National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for additional charts additional

  1. Phosphazene additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  2. Wilson Addition Map 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    2011-08-29

    Most of the noise models in signal processing are either additive or multiplicative. However, the widely held wavelet shrinkage estimators for signal denoising deal only with additive noise. In this thesis, a new Bayesian wavelet shrinkage model...

  3. Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, is receiving attention from media, investment communities and governments around the world transforming it from obscurity to something to be talked about.

  4. ADDITIONAL MONIES SALARY SACRIFICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    ADDITIONAL MONIES SALARY SACRIFICE AGREEMENT INFORMATION PACKAGE 1) Overview 2) Agreement 3. Whether this is through working additional hours, performance bonus, salary supplementation or any of the other reasons as shown on the Salary Sacrifice Agreement. The University allows staff to elect to have

  5. Zinc electrode with cement additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

    1982-06-01

    A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

  6. Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

  7. Additive manufacturing method of producing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

  8. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  9. A Primer on Food Additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01

    stream_source_info Bull1208a.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 25137 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Bull1208a.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 45.7 8-1208 :08 A Primer... on Food Additives Extension Foods and Nutrition Specialists The Texas A&M University System Consumers today are very concerned about what goes into their food. This primer on food additives describes what food additives do and why modern food...

  10. Additive assembly of digital materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

    2010-01-01

    This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

  11. Fight over fuel additive rekindled

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringer, J.

    1996-03-20

    Ethyl and EPA are trading punches over EPA`s doubts about the safety of Ethyl`s gasoline additive methylcyclopentadienyl manganese (MMT). Late last week, EPA released a statement reaffirming its position that there has not been enough research on health effects of MMT and asking gas stations to label pumps that contain the additive so consumers will be aware they are using it. Responding to that statement, Ethyl has written Administrator Carol Browner asking why she appears to be supporting the Environmental Defense Fund`s (EDF; Washington) campaign against MMT and advocating the delay of the additive use in light of its known emission-reducing characteristics. The tension began in the early `90s, when the EPA refused to allow Ethyl to market MMT and required it to perform more long-term health studies. Last October a court ordered the agency to grant Ethyl approval to use MMT in nonreformulated gasoline.

  12. Tulsa Programs For additional information,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Tulsa Programs For additional information, please contact: Vickie E. Lake, Ph.D. (918) 660 entirety on the Tulsa campus. Course delivery is typically in the evenings. If enrolled full- time: http://gradweb.ou.edu PROGRAM COORDINATOR Vickie E. Lake, Assistant Professor University of Oklahoma-Tulsa

  13. Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holshouser, Chris [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Newell, Clint [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Palas, Sid [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Rowe, John C [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing (AM) system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  14. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; et al

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  15. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker; Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM), Comstock; Robert H. (Gardendale, AL)

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  16. Additive Gaussian Processes David Duvenaud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -4 -2 0 2 4 -1 0 1 2 3 4 -4 -2 0 2 4 -4 -2 0 2 4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 f1(x1) f2(x2) f1(x1) + f2(x2) f(x1, xAdditive Gaussian Processes David Duvenaud Department of Engineering Cambridge University dkd23@cam Department of Engineering Cambridge University cer54@cam.ac.uk Abstract We introduce a Gaussian process model

  17. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Electrolyte Additives Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  18. Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Additives that Enhance Thermal and Overcharge Abuse Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  19. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuring theCommittee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies," TheASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

  20. Additive manufacturing capabilities expanding | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive manufacturing capabilities expanding January 01, 2013 Large-scale polymer additive manufacturing equipment located at the Manufacturing Demonstration Facility. Additive...

  1. Additive Manufacturing: Technology and Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FAL 99-01 More5,AchievingSeptemberAdditive Manufacturing:

  2. Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity ORSSAB's recommendations encourage DOE to...

  3. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing University of Kansas of additive manufacturing. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of

  4. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01

    65688 PRECISION AND ENERGY USAGE FOR ADDITIVE MANUFACTURINGpart quality and energy usage for additive manufacturingfound in this study. Energy usage is quantified by measuring

  5. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  6. Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Component R&D within the ABR Program, 2009 thru 2013 Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  7. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Workshop Poster Abstract Submission - deadline July 10, 2015 Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials using in situ sensors, diagnostics...

  8. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops Additive Manufacturing Workshop Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop Our goal is to define opportunities and research gaps within...

  9. Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

  10. Chart 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    configurations, yet be completely powered from the solar radiation that falls on the footprint of the structure. To accomplish this, the Texas A&M team designed and simulated varying designs using building energy simulation (DOE-2), solar thermal analysis (F-CHART...

  11. Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    #12;Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher Holshouser, Clint Newell, and Sid Palas, Tenn. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing system has the potential to manufacture parts completely) are working on an additive manufacturing (AM) system (Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM) capable

  12. ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

  13. Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

  14. Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells," originally presented on February 11, 2014.

  15. Towards Mobile Microrobot Swarms for Additive Micromanufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavlanos, Michael

    of independently controlled microrobots in advanced, additive manufacturing applications. Keywords Mobile Microrobotics, Multi-robot Control, Additive Manufacturing 1. Introduction Flexible manufacturing capabilities, and additive manufacturing has proven to be a disruptive technology at the small- to medium-scale. Many

  16. EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

  17. ,"Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  18. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  19. ,"Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  20. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  1. ,"Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  2. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  3. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  4. ,"Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  5. ,"Alaska Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska...

  6. ,"California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  7. ,"Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  8. ,"Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  9. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  10. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  11. ,"Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  12. ,"Texas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  13. ,"Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  14. ,"Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  15. ,"Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  16. ,"Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  17. ,"Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  18. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  19. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  20. ,"Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015"...

  1. Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures for Testing Energy Consumption of Clothes Washers with Warm Rinse Cycles, Issued: June 30, 2010. Draft of DOE...

  2. DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers January 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis...

  3. Biomass 2014: Additional Speaker Biographies | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    document outlines the biographies of the additional speakers for Biomass 2014, held July 29-July 30 in Washington, D.C. additionalspeakerbiographiesbiomass2014 More Documents &...

  4. Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on green ceramic/dielectrics Problem this technology (note: may require additional tooling/ set up time) · Rapid Prototyping & small scale manufacture microelectronics such as manufacture of LTCC ceramic/ Dielectric antenna and rapid PCB prototyping or repair

  5. Differential Addition in generalized Edwards Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    and Corollary 1, as explained at the end of section 3. Table 1. Some coordinate choices with fast arithmeticDifferential Addition in generalized Edwards Coordinates Benjamin Justus and Daniel Loebenberger (1 + dx2 y2 ) that omit the x- coordinate. The first parametrization leads to a differential addition

  6. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  7. Nucleophilic Additions to 3-Azido-hexanal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Chad E.

    2009-04-29

    Sakurai and Mukaiyama aldol additions were carried out with 3-Azido-hexanal under chelation and non-chelation conditions. The reactions were generally found to be diastereofacially selective in favor of the anti stereoisomer and showed simple...

  8. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY LETTERS Chronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    BIOGEOCHEMISTRY LETTERS Chronic nitrogen additions suppress decomposition and sequester soil carbon dioxide emis- sions, offsetting a substantial portion of greenhouse gas forcing of the climate system. Although a number of factors are responsible for this terrestrial carbon sink, atmospheric nitrogen

  9. Packaging and Transportation of Additional Neptunium Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2010-05-05

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a second neptunium oxide production campaign in which nine (9) additional cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. These additional cans were from a different feed solution than the first fifty (50) cans of neptunium oxide that were previously produced and shipped via a Letter of Amendment to the 9975 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) content table. This paper will address the challenges associated with demonstrating the neptunium oxide produced from the additional feed solution was equivalent to the original neptunium oxide and within the content description of the Letter of Amendment.

  10. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

  11. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1996-12-10

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

  12. Breaking Barriers in Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J; Duty, Chad E; Post, Brian K; Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Kunc, Vlastimil; Peter, William H; Blue, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) enables the creation of complex structures directly from a computer-aided design (CAD). There are limitations that prevent the technology from realizing its full potential. AM has been criticized for being slow and expensive with limited build size. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a large scale AM system that improves upon each of these areas by more than an order of magnitude. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system directly converts low cost pellets into a large, three-dimensional part at a rate exceeding 25 kg/h. By breaking these traditional barriers, it is possible for polymer AM to penetrate new manufacturing markets.

  13. CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons: November 28 to December 1, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: No accessible routes will be affected. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction project

  14. Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received 3-12 mo. Respond to Office Action Patent attorney The patent examiner provides notification of which claims in the application have been rejected or accepted determines there are multiple inventions in 1 application. Patent Application Published 6 mo. Non

  15. Colorimetric microanalysis of several organic feed additives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckman, Herman F.

    1959-01-01

    The energy use and peak load requirements of the addition to Records Storage Building in Austin, Texas were analyzed using the DOE 2.1B building energy simulation program. An analysis was made for the building as specified in schematic designs...

  16. The addition of disilanes to cumulenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.

    1997-10-08

    The syntheses of silicon-containing compounds and the studies of their rearrangements have been active research areas in the Barton research group. Previously, the addition of disilanes to acetylenes was studied in the group and an intramolecular 2S + 2A mechanism has been proposed. In this thesis, the work is focused on the addition of disilanes to cumulenes. The syntheses of the precursors are discussed and the possible mechanisms for their thermal, photochemical and catalytic rearrangements are proposed. Conjugated organic polymers have been studied in the group since 1985 because of their potential for exhibiting high electroconductivity, photoconductivity, strong non-linear optical response and intense fluorescence. In the second section of this dissertation, the synthesis and property studies of poly(phenylene vinylene) analogues are discussed.

  17. Vehicular fuels and additives for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Interest in automotive fuel is resurging. Automobile fuels must increasingly deal with clean air regulations and ozone problems. Furthermore, feedstocks become heavier,as refinery production changes, as more unleaded is produced, and as an increasing number of pollution regulations must be satisfied greater attention will be paid to better mixtures, solvents, additives, and neat methanol. BCC report analyzes developments technologies, markets, players and the political/regulations aspects of this important market. Study also assesses the advantages and drawbacks of methanol, ethanol, MTBE and other additives which have their place as octane enhancers and fuel substitutes-all now deeply involved in the gasoline modification battle. Other issues addressed are subsidies, farm lobbying, imports, pricing, economics, Detroit's response, neat fuel testing projects, volatility problems vs. fewer ozone-forming hydrocarbon species, and emission ratings.

  18. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harwell, Lane D. (Albuquerque, NM); Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Donald L. (Corrales, NM); Pressly, Gary A. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2000-11-07

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  19. Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jason 1981-

    2011-05-09

    critical detail of weak acid chemistry. One concern when using any acid in oilfield operations is the corrosion of well tubulars. Thus operators often choose to pump corrosion inhibitor, a chemical additive electrostatically attracted... to the negative charge of the well casing or production tubing, to decrease the rate at which the acid accesses well tubular surfaces (Crowe and Minor 1985). A typical working concentration of corrosion inhibitor is 1-2 wt% of injected acid (Smith et al. 1978...

  20. Anti-friction additives for lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karol, T.J.; Magaha, H.S.; Schlicht, R.C.

    1987-03-03

    A lubricating oil composition is described comprising (i) a major portion of lubricant oil; and (ii) from about 0.05 to about 10.0 wt.% of, as an additive, a product prepared by reacting a natural oil selected from the group consisting of coconut, babassu, palm, palm kernel, olive, castor, peanut, beef tallow and lard, with a (C/sub 2/-C/sub 10/) hydroxy acid and a polyamine.

  1. Managing water addition to a degraded core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Odar, F. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present information that can be used in severe accident management by providing an improved understanding of the effects of water addition to a degraded core. This improved understanding is developed using a diagram showing a sequence of core damage states. Whenever possible, a temperature and a time after accident initiation are estimated for each damage state in the sequence diagram. This diagram can be used to anticipate the evolution of events during an accident. Possible responses of plant instruments are described to identify these damage states and the effects of water addition. The rate and amount of water addition needed (1) to remove energy from the core, (2) to stabilize the core or (3) to not adversely affect the damage progression, are estimated. Analysis of the capability to remove energy from large cohesive and particulate debris beds indicates that these beds may not be stabilized in the core region and they may partially relocate to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel.

  2. Managing water addition to a degraded core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Odar, F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In this paper we present information that can be used in severe accident management by providing an improved understanding of the effects of water addition to a degraded core. This improved understanding is developed using a diagram showing a sequence of core damage states. Whenever possible, a temperature and a time after accident initiation are estimated for each damage state in the sequence diagram. This diagram can be used to anticipate the evolution of events during an accident. Possible responses of plant instruments are described to identify these damage states and the effects of water addition. The rate and amount of water addition needed (1) to remove energy from the core, (2) to stabilize the core or (3) to not adversely affect the damage progression, are estimated. Analysis of the capability to remove energy from large cohesive and particulate debris beds indicates that these beds may not be stabilized in the core region and they may partially relocate to the lower plenum of the reactor vessel.

  3. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationan overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

  4. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01

    application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,of China’s additive manufacturing industry is presented,

  5. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegisterLithium-based TechnologiesAdvancedAdditive

  6. Lubricant Additives | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervarLeeds,Asia-Pacific DevelopingLower Valley Energy IncAdditives

  7. Property:AdditionalRef | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,Information Promoting CleanAdditionalRef Jump to:

  8. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

  9. Atom addition reactions in interstellar ice analogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linnartz, Harold; Fedoseev, Gleb

    2015-01-01

    This review paper summarizes the state-of-the-art in laboratory based interstellar ice chemistry. The focus is on atom addition reactions, illustrating how water, carbon dioxide and methanol can form in the solid state at astronomically relevant temperatures, and also the formation of more complex species such as hydroxylamine, an important prebiotic molecule, and glycolaldehyde, the smallest sugar, is discussed. These reactions are particularly relevant during the dark ages of star and planet formation, i.e., when the role of UV light is restricted. A quantitative characterization of such processes is only possible through dedicated laboratory studies, i.e., under full control of a large set of parameters such as temperature, atom-flux, and ice morphology. The resulting numbers, physical and chemical constants, e.g., barrier heights, reaction rates and branching ratios, provide information on the molecular processes at work and are needed as input for astrochemical models, in order to bridge the timescales t...

  10. Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W; Gotham, Douglas J.; Luciani, Ralph L.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  11. CREATION OF THE MODEL ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houck, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Wulf, N.

    2010-05-25

    In 1991, the international nuclear nonproliferation community was dismayed to discover that the implementation of safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its NPT INFCIRC/153 safeguards agreement with Iraq had failed to detect Iraq's nuclear weapon program. It was now clear that ensuring that states were fulfilling their obligations under the NPT would require not just detecting diversion but also the ability to detect undeclared materials and activities. To achieve this, the IAEA initiated what would turn out to be a five-year effort to reappraise the NPT safeguards system. The effort engaged the IAEA and its Member States and led to agreement in 1997 on a new safeguards agreement, the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between States and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards. The Model Protocol makes explicit that one IAEA goal is to provide assurance of the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities. The Model Protocol requires an expanded declaration that identifies a State's nuclear potential, empowers the IAEA to raise questions about the correctness and completeness of the State's declaration, and, if needed, allows IAEA access to locations. The information required and the locations available for access are much broader than those provided for under INFCIRC/153. The negotiation was completed in quite a short time because it started with a relatively complete draft of an agreement prepared by the IAEA Secretariat. This paper describes how the Model Protocol was constructed and reviews key decisions that were made both during the five-year period and in the actual negotiation.

  12. MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION In this course you product development and innovation. You will develop a rich knowledge of additive manufacturing processes enabling advanced/additive manufacturing and personal fabrication. You will have the opportunity

  13. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01

    application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

  14. Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Bench test results showed that compared with fully-formulated engine oils,...

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction...

  16. Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period on National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment...

  17. Ionic Liquids as Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Functional Lubricant Additives to Enhance Engine Efficiency Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives work together?...

  18. Army Awards 20 Additional Contracts for Renewable Energy Technologies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Army Awards 20 Additional Contracts for Renewable Energy Technologies Army Awards 20 Additional Contracts for Renewable Energy Technologies February 26, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The...

  19. Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Download presentation...

  20. Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Two Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve September 2, 2005 -...

  1. The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects...

  2. An Overview of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies Peterson...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies Peterson, Dominic S. Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science(36) Additive Manufacturing...

  3. Title: Investigation of extraterrestrial construction processes using Additive Manufacturing techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anand, Mahesh

    Title: Investigation of extraterrestrial construction processes using Additive Manufacturing: · To investigate the strengths and weaknesses of existing Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes relevant to lunar

  4. Obama Administration Announces Additional $13,969,700 for Local...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Additional 13,969,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Alaska Obama Administration Announces Additional 13,969,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Alaska...

  5. Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  6. The Role of Additive in Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based Small Molecular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Role of Additive in Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based Small Molecular Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Role of Additive in...

  7. Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export...

  8. Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies ORSSAB recommends...

  9. Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experiments on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation Controlled Experiments on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash,...

  10. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationof China’s additive manufacturing industry was presented. Inroles in addi- tive manufacturing (AM) development and

  11. The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Importance of Carbon Fiber to Polymer Additive Manufacturing...

  12. DOE Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane Effects on Gulf Coast DOE Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane Effects on Gulf Coast...

  13. Highly Selective Acetate Aldol Additions Using Mesityl-Substituted Chiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been reported for acetate-type aldol additions involving the use of tin,7 lithium,8 boron,9Highly Selective Acetate Aldol Additions Using Mesityl-Substituted Chiral Auxiliaries Michael T Highly diastereoselective acetate aldol additions using chlorotitanium enolates of mesityl-substituted N

  14. MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES Authors: Olivier Kerbrat of the tool may advantageously be machined or manufactured by an additive process. Originality/value: Nowadays is proposed to combine additive and subtractive processes, for tooling design and manufacturing

  15. DOE Announces Additional Steps in Developing Sustainable Biofuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Developing Sustainable Biofuels Industry DOE Announces Additional Steps in Developing Sustainable Biofuels Industry October 7, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis Releases Results from...

  16. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-Based Lubrication Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to design, develop, manufacture, and scale up boron-based nanoparticulate lubrication additives.

  17. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  18. ,"New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Jersey Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  19. ,"New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  20. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  1. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  2. ,"South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","9302015" ,"Next Release...

  3. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota...

  4. Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing for High Structural Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing as a potential route to achieve high performing structures James Withers MER Corporation Rajiv S. Mishra Center for Friction Stir Processing,...

  5. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Develop & Evaluate...

  6. NNSA Awards Additional Support to Accelerate the Development...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Additional Support to Accelerate the Development of Domestic Mo-99 in the U.S. without the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook...

  7. Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    announced today that the Department of Energy has approved two additional loans of crude oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). "We are committed to doing everything in...

  8. Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing for High Structural Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of other potential applications for aerospace & energy industries Laser-FSAM hybrid & mini-sample testing capabilites 2 3 Chronological evolution of metal based additive...

  9. NMAC 17.5.440 Extensions, Improvements, Additions, and Cooperative...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Extensions, Improvements, Additions, and Cooperative Agreements between or among Utilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  10. Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tuesday, February 11, the Energy Department will present a live webinar on additive manufacturing to stimulate discussion in the hydrogen and fuel cell community on the application...

  11. Meso-Scale during Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing Chen,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermal Properties and Beam-Particle Interaction at Meso-Scale during Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing Chen, Jian ORNL ORNL; Zheng, Lili ORNL ORNL; Feng, Zhili...

  12. Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics Peterson, Dominic S. [Los...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics Peterson, Dominic S. Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science(36) 3d printing 3d printing Abstract...

  13. Silica 'spiky screws' could enhance industrial coatings, additive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hill Communications 865.241.0709 Silica 'spiky screws' could enhance industrial coatings, additive manufacturing The screw-like spikes grown from a spherical silica particle...

  14. Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant...

  15. Obama Administration Announces Additional $11,072,300 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1,072,300 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Delaware Obama Administration Announces Additional 11,072,300 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Delaware March 26,...

  16. Measurement of $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ production with additional...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mathrm t bart production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at sqrts 8 TeV Citation Details...

  17. OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and Permitting Requirements for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit with form History OAR 340-120 - Additional Siting and Permitting Requirements for Hazardous Waste and PCB Treatment and Disposal Facilities Jump to: navigation, search...

  18. Integer Arithmetic without Arithmetic Addition Applications: Discriminant Analysis, Cryptographic Primitives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    the quintessential operation of addition. We propose an arithmetic constructed over a fundamental mapping of one set integer, and further limit our investigation to a mapping procedure that views the input integers as a set The arithmetic addition belies the subsequent range of mathematical operations: subtraction, multiplication

  19. Supersonic Energy Addition for Improving Electrothermal Thruster Performance :Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In addition to an electric arc other approaches for creating a plasma in the plenum that use a source temperature and complex chemistry of a fully ionized plasma. Supersonic energy addition can be achieved using propulsion has been to heat the flow by creating a plasma in the plenum, which is sustained in one of several

  20. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982000 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2000 tropical ozone climatology 1. Comparison with Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and ground-based measurements Anne M. Thompson,1 Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project and established from operational sites, provided over 1000 ozone

  1. Vacuum pyrolysis of waste tires with basic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Xinghua; Wang Tiejun Ma Longlong; Chang Jie

    2008-11-15

    Granules of waste tires were pyrolyzed under vacuum (3.5-10 kPa) conditions, and the effects of temperature and basic additives (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH) on the properties of pyrolysis were thoroughly investigated. It was obvious that with or without basic additives, pyrolysis oil yield increased gradually to a maximum and subsequently decreased with a temperature increase from 450 deg. C to 600 deg. C, irrespective of the addition of basic additives to the reactor. The addition of NaOH facilitated pyrolysis dramatically, as a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 48 wt% was achieved at 550 deg. C without the addition of basic additives, while a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 50 wt% was achieved at 480 deg. C by adding 3 wt% (w/w, powder/waste tire granules) of NaOH powder. The composition analysis of pyrolytic naphtha (i.b.p. (initial boiling point) {approx}205 deg. C) distilled from pyrolysis oil showed that more dl-limonene was obtained with basic additives and the maximal content of dl-limonene in pyrolysis oil was 12.39 wt%, which is a valuable and widely-used fine chemical. However, no improvement in pyrolysis was observed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition. Pyrolysis gas was mainly composed of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Pyrolytic char had a surface area comparable to commercial carbon black, but its proportion of ash (above 11.5 wt%) was much higher.

  2. The effect of additives on lime dissolution rates. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khang, S.J.

    1996-07-31

    Based on the previous years` studies concerning the efficiency of SO{sub 2} removal by spray dryers with high sulfur coal flue gas, the work for year five included investigations of lime dissolution rates at different slaking conditions and with the effect of additives. The prominent additives that have significant effects on lime dissolution rates were tested with the mini pilot spray drying absorber to see their effects on spray drying desulfurization applications. The mechanisms of these additive effects along with the properties of hygroscopic additives have been discussed and incorporated into the spray drying desulfurization model ``SPRAYMOD-M.`` Slaking conditions are very important factors in producing high quality lime slurry in spray drying desulfurization processes. At optimal slaking conditions, the slaked lime particles are very fine (3-5{mu}m) and the slaked lime has high BET surface areas which are beneficial to the desulfurization. The slaked lime dissolution rate experiments in our study are designed to determine how much lime can dissolve in a unit time if the initial lime surface area is kept constant. The purpose of the dissolution rate study for different additives is to find those effective additives that can enhance lime dissolution rates and to investigate the mechanisms of the dissolution rate enhancement properties for these additives. The applications of these additives on spray drying desulfurization are to further verify the theory that dissolution rate is a rate limiting step in the whole spray drying desulfurization process as well as to test the feasibility of these additives on enhancing SO{sub 2} removal in spray dryers.

  3. Zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition with lead additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henriksen, Gary L. (Troy, MI)

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition containing an additive providing improved zinc-on-zinc recyclability. The improved electrolyte composition involves the use of a lead additive to inhibit undesirable irregular plating and reduce nodular or dendritic growth on the electrode surface. The lead-containing electrolyte composition of the present invention appears to influence not only the morphology of the base plate zinc, but also the morphology of the zinc-on-zinc replate. In addition, such lead-containing electrolyte compositions appear to reduce hydrogen formation.

  4. Zeroth Law compatibility of non-additive thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Biró; P. Ván

    2011-06-02

    Non-extensive thermodynamics was criticized among others by stating that the Zeroth Law cannot be satisfied with non-additive composition rules. In this paper we determine the general functional form of those non-additive composition rules which are compatible with the Zeroth Law of thermodynamics. We find that this general form is additive for the formal logarithms of the original quantities and the familiar relations of thermodynamics apply to these. Our result offers a possible solution to the longstanding problem about equilibrium between extensive and non-extensive systems or systems with different non-extensivity parameters.

  5. Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

    2010-12-21

    The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

  6. Beyond 3D Printing: The New Dimensions of Additive Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Steven John

    Additive fabrication, often referred to as 3D printing, is the construction of objects by adding material. This stands in contrast to subtractive methods, which involve removing material by means of milling or cutting. ...

  7. All Eyes on Additive Manufacturing Methods | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    All Eyes on Additive Manufacturing Methods Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click...

  8. South High Rises Renovation and Addition Program of Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,714,286 Total Construction Cost Teams 24 - 27 SECTION VI Master Policy Index 28 - 29 SECTION VII Site Map & Floor Plans 30 - 37 #12 Siebert, Stradley, Park, Smith, and Steeb Halls. There will also be constructed two additions

  9. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  10. Ionic Liquids as Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine Lubrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A group of oil-miscible ionic liquids has been developed by an ORNL-GM team as candidate lubricant additives with promising physical/chemical properties and potential multiple functionalities.

  11. The Selection and Use of Fireside Additives on Industrial Boilers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radway, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    As energy prices have escalated and fuel quality deteriorated, fuel chemicals have found increasing acceptance as tools for improving efficiency and reliability of combustion systems. Though application of fuel additives is not new, their use has...

  12. Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Defense with additional ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve in response to a request from the State of Connecticut. The Energy Department...

  13. Obama Administration Announces Additional $9,593,500 for Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guam Obama Administration Announces Additional 9,593,500 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Guam March 26, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Vice President Joe Biden...

  14. Approaches to Maintaining Provenance throughout the Additive Manufacturing Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prototyping and 3D printing by users both in engineering and the humanities. The proposed digital signing--Digital Signing; 3D printing; 3D objects; provenance. I.INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing as a process has been

  15. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL NEURODYNAMICS: EFFECTS OF ADDITIVE AND PARAMETRIC NOISE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milton, John G.

    Department of Neurology Committees on Neurobiology & Computational Neuroscience The University of ChicagoINTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL NEURODYNAMICS: EFFECTS OF ADDITIVE AND PARAMETRIC NOISE John Milton current first attracted the attention of neurobiologists to the presence of ion channels, or pores

  16. Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

    2002-06-26

    Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

  17. Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

  18. Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Bruce K. (Englewood, CO); Junkin, James E. (Englewood, CO)

    1982-12-21

    Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

  19. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, J.; Viola, M. B.

    2013-10-31

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  20. Design of Extended Warranties in Supply Chains under Additive Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Kumpeg; Mallik, Suman; Chhajed, Dilip

    2012-01-01

    Li, Kumpeg, Suman Mallik, and Dilip Chhajed. "Design of Extended Warranties in Supply Chains under Additive Demand." Production and Operations Management 21.4 (2012): 730-46. Publisher’s official version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1937- 5956... of this document.] Paper citation: Li, Kumpeg, Suman Mallik, and Dilip Chhajed. "Design of Extended Warranties in Supply Chains under Additive Demand." Production and Operations Management 21.4 (2012): 730-46. Keywords: extended warranty, supply chain...

  1. Blast furnace coke quality in relation to petroleum coke addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, R.; Diez, M.A.; Menendez, J.A.; Barriocanal, C.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Nacional del Carbon; Sirgado, M. [ENSIDESA, Aviles (Spain)

    1995-12-01

    The incorporation of petroleum coke as an additive in industrial coking coal blends is a practice often used by steel companies. A suitable blast furnace coke produced by replacing part of the coking coal blend with a suitable petroleum coke (addition of 5 to 15%), was made by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation and successfully tested at several blast furnaces. This coke had lower reactivity, less ash and slightly higher sulfur content than coke made without the addition of petroleum coke. In contrast with these results, it has been reported in a BCRA study that additions of petroleum coke to a strong coking coal, above 5 wt%, increased coke reactivity. These differences may be explained on the basis of the coal or blend characteristics to which petroleum coke is added. Petroleum coke addition seems to give better results if the coal/blend has high fluidity. The present situation in Spain is favorable for the use of petroleum coke. So, a study of laboratory and semi-industrial scale was made to assess the possibility of using petroleum coke as an additive to the typical industrial coal blend coked by the Spanish Steel Company, ENSIDESA. The influence of the petroleum coke particle size was also studied to semi-industrial scale.

  2. Organogermanium Chemistry: Germacyclobutanes and digermane Additions to Acetylenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Michael Chubb

    2003-12-12

    This dissertation comprises two main research projects. The first project, presented in Chapter 1, involves the synthesis and thermochemistry of germacyclobutanes (germetanes). Four new germetanes (spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane, dichlorogermetane, and germacyclobutane) have been synthesized using a modified di-Grignard synthesis. Diallylgermetane is shown to be a useful starting material for obtaining other germetanes, particularly the parent germetane, germacyclobutane. The gas-phase thermochemistries of spirodigermetane, diallylgermetane and germacyclobutane have been explored via pulsed stirred-flow reactor (SFR) studies, showing remarkable differences in decomposition, depending on the substitution at the germanium atom. The second project investigates the thermochemical, photochemical, and catalytic additions of several digermanes to acetylenes. The first examples of thermo- and photochemical additions of Ge-Ge bonds to C{triple_bond}C are demonstrated. Mechanistic investigations are described and comparisons are made to analogous disilane addition reactions, previously studied in their group.

  3. Characteristics of yttrium oxide laser ceramics with additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osipov, V V; Solomonov, V I; Orlov, A N; Shitov, V A; Maksimov, R N; Spirina, A V

    2013-03-31

    Neodymium- or ytterbium-doped laser ceramics with a disordered crystal-field structure formed by introduction of iso- and heterovalent elements into yttrium oxide are studied. It is shown that these additives broaden the spectral band of laser transitions, which makes it possible to use ceramics as active laser media emitting ultrashort pulses. Lasing was obtained in several samples of this ceramics. At the same time, it is shown that addition of zirconium and hafnium stimulates the Foerster quenching of upper laser levels and pump levels. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  4. On the Context-Freeness Problem for Vector Addition Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or equivalently vector addition systems (VAS), are widely recognized as a central model for concurrent systems one of the most studied formalisms for the modeling and analysis of concurrent systems. Despite their fairly large expressive power, many verification problems are decidable for VAS: boundedness

  5. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors on the roof to June 30, 2011. DURATION OF PROJECT: May 21, 2011 to June 30, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday persons in the vicinity of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades

  6. CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors. DURATION OF PROJECT: May 31, 2011 to June 21, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4. The loading area will be closed on May 31, 2011. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction

  7. HIGH-PERFORMANCE PARALLEL ADDITION USING HYBRID WAVE-PIPELINING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyathi, Jabulani

    HIGH-PERFORMANCE PARALLEL ADDITION USING HYBRID WAVE-PIPELINING James Levy, Jabulani Nyathi, jabu, jdelgado)@eecs.wsu.edu Abstract-- Pipelining digital systems has been shown to provide significant performance gains over non-pipelined systems and remains a standard in microprocessor design

  8. *Additional SOPs available, see: Labeling Experiments or Bottles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    Materials: -- Acceptable Locations For Use: Refer to chemical specific SOPs. Additional Process Notes email) and when you will return. If the chemical is particularly hazardous, make sure to represent Acids (Very hazardous! Do not approach.) Dirk Pitt Tue (May 5?) 530-752-2241 Overnight bath will clean

  9. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, E.D. Jr.; Christiansen, R.L.; Lederhos, J.P.; Long, J.P.; Panchalingam, V.; Du, Y.; Sum, A.K.W.

    1997-06-17

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hindrance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  10. Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sloan, Jr., Earle Dendy (Golden, CO); Christiansen, Richard Lee (Littleton, CO); Lederhos, Joseph P. (Wheatridge, CO); Long, Jin Ping (Dallas, TX); Panchalingam, Vaithilingam (Lakewood, CO); Du, Yahe (Golden, CO); Sum, Amadeu Kun Wan (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01

    Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hinderance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

  11. For additional information, contact: Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    For additional information, contact: Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Montana State University 103 Chemistry & Biochemistry Building P.O. Box 173400 Bozeman, MT 59717-3400 Tel: 406-994-4801 Fax of the American Association for the Advancement of Science CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY 1 2 KELLY GORHAM 3 MSSE

  12. Request for Addition or Change to SPP Submitted By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Recycled Content % Pre-Consumer % Post-Consumer Locally Harvested/ Extracted Materials Within 500 Mi assembly of components)? Where is the product extracted, harvested or recovered from? Additional Comments? Product Disposal Recyclable? Hazardous Disposal? Energy Efficiency R-value: COP: Reduced Water Consumption

  13. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982000 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2000 tropical ozone climatology 2; published 31 January 2003. [1] The first view of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone variability in the Southern Hemisphere tropics is provided by a 3-year record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere

  14. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982004 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2004 tropical ozone climatology: 3 more than 3000 ozone profiles from 14 tropical and subtropical sites using balloon- borne technique might cause small station-to-station biases in the total ozone measurement. We present further

  15. Faculty Summer Research Salary Additional Compensation Pay Request

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Faculty Summer Research Salary Additional Compensation Pay Request Faculty are eligible to receive up to 1/3 of their 9-month academic salary as compensation for time spent working on research projects during the summer term. Salary is paid directly from funds awarded for the sponsored project

  16. For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barge, Marcy

    For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics Montana State.montana.edu/econ agecon@montana.edu 1 2 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS & ECONOMICS KELLY GORHAM 1 Austin Owens traveled to Greece as mentors for students in Economics 101 4 Chris Stoddard was the recipient of a MSU Cox Family Faculty

  17. Managing Milk Composition: Feed Additives and Production Enhancers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Sandra R.; Jordan, Ellen R.; Looper, Mike; Waldner, Dan

    2000-12-14

    Additivies and Production Enhancers Sandra R. Stokes, Dan N. Waldner, Ellen R. Jordan, and Michael L. Looper* L-5390 12/00 Feed additives and management tools such as bST (bovine somatotropin) play an essential role in enhanc- ing production and yield of milk...

  18. SHORT COMMUNICATION Oxidation processes on conducting carbon additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    window Á Solid electrolyte interphase 1 Introduction Lithium-ion batteries are now used in a wide range of a more stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) [13, 14], becomes a challenge. Although the typical different types of typical carbon additives for lithium-ion batteries and carbonates electrolyte above 5 V

  19. Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains Sustainable Catholyte p losses and, therefore, power losses. Here, we report that adding carbon dioxide (CO2) gas to the cathode and sustainable energy from wastewaters, replace energy intensive wastewater treatment processes, and produce

  20. Transliteration chart for Slavonic-Serbian and Russo-Serbian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husic, Geoff

    2008-06-15

    Transliteration chart for Slavonic-Serbian and Russo-Serbian Geoff Husi? University of Kansas Libraries 2008 This transliteration chart is not an official ALA-LC romanization chart. I offer it merely as a guide to assist in cataloging Slavonic...-Serbian. For any additional letters please consult the ALA-LC Romanization chart for Church Slavic: http://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/roman.html ? ? ?...

  1. A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerbrat, Olivier; Hascoët, Jean-Yves; 10.1016/j.compind.2011.04.003

    2011-01-01

    Design For Manufacturing (DFM) approaches aim to integrate manufacturability aspects during the design stage. Most of DFM approaches usually consider only one manufacturing process, but products competitiveness may be improved by designing hybrid modular products, in which products are seen as 3-D puzzles with modules realized aside by the best manufacturing process and further gathered. A new DFM system is created in order to give quantitative information during the product design stage of which modules will benefit in being machined and which ones will advantageously be realized by an additive process (such as Selective Laser Sintering or laser deposition). A methodology for a manufacturability evaluation in case of a subtractive or an additive manufacturing process is developed and implemented in a CAD software. Tests are carried out on industrial products from automotive industry.

  2. Additive for iron disulfide cathodes used in thermal batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-03-23

    The invention comprises thermal batteries employing an FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer itself. A minor amount of CaSi/sub 2/ preferably 1-3% by weight is provided as an additive in the FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer to eliminate the voltage transient (spike) which normally occurs upon activation of batteries of this type. The amount of FeS/sub 2/ by weight generally comprises 64 to 90%.

  3. Additive for iron disulfide cathodes used in thermal batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armijo, James R. (Albuquerque, NM); Searcy, Jimmie Q. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1983-01-01

    The invention comprises thermal batteries employing an FeS.sub.2 depolarizer, i.e. cathode material, and the depolarizer itself. A minor amount of CaSi.sub.2 preferably, 1-3% by weight is provided as an additive in the FeS.sub.2 depolarizer to eliminate the voltage transient (spike) which normally occurs upon activation of batteries of this type. The amount of FeS.sub.2 by weight generally comprises 64-90%.

  4. Economic Implications of Additive Manufacturing and the Contribution of MIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiesse, Frédéric; Wirth, Marco; Kemper, Hans-Georg; Moisa, Michelle; Morar, Dominik; Lasi, Heiner; Piller, Frank; Buxmann, Peter; Mortara, Letizia; Ford, Simon; Minshall, Tim

    2015-03-03

    and automotive industries. In addition, logistics processes can be digitalized through location-independent manufacturing. Thus, the physical flow of material can be reduced significantly. This would initiate massive changes in the logistics industry which... – and particular platforms like Thingiverse – allows sharing ideas with other individuals worldwide. Active participants of the movement related to Digital Fabrication often call themselves “makers” (Anderson 2012). This “makers movement” consists of user...

  5. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Composite Part Molds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, Chad E.; Springfield, Robert M.

    2015-02-01

    The ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) collaborated with Tru-Design to test the quality and durability of molds used for making fiber reinforced composites using additive manufacturing. The partners developed surface treatment techniques including epoxy coatings and machining to improve the quality of the surface finish. Test samples made using the printed and surface finished molds demonstrated life spans suitable for one-of-a-kind and low-volume applications, meeting the project objective.

  6. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Fan [Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  7. Comparing Environmental Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machining via Life-Cycle Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faludi, Jeremy; Bayley, Cindy; Bhogal, Suraj; Iribarne, Myles

    2014-01-01

    Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machiningcutting! Impacts of Additive Manufacturing in LiteratureSocial Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs CNC Machining

  8. Additional nuclear criticality safety calculations for small-diameter containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hone, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents additional criticality safety analysis calculations for small diameter containers, which were originally documented in Reference 1. The results in Reference 1 indicated that some of the small diameter containers did not meet the criteria established for criticality safety at the Portsmouth facility (K{sub eff} +2{sigma}<.95) when modeled under various contingency assumptions of reflection and moderation. The calculations performed in this report reexamine those cases which did not meet the criticality safety criteria. In some cases, unnecessary conservatism is removed, and in other cases mass or assay limits are established for use with the respective containers.

  9. Alabama Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0Cubic(MillionDecade Year-0 Year-1Additions

  10. Arkansas Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724 2,570MonthThousand8 2 2 2Additions (Million

  11. California Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724perSales (BillionFeet)Feet)Additions

  12. Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions (Million Cubic Feet)

  13. Delaware Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1 0 0 02009 2010 20113 -2 -31

  14. Delaware Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugAdditions1 0 0 02009Decade

  15. Louisiana Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013(MillionYear Jan Feb Mar AprAdditions

  16. Minnesota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 15 15May-15DecadeAdditions (Million

  17. Additional Storage Contracts Awarded for Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FAL 99-01 More5,AchievingSeptember 9,ActivitiesAdditional|

  18. Additional Verification Bodies Now Available for SEP | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FAL 99-01 More5,AchievingSeptember 9,ActivitiesAdditional|

  19. North Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr721,507 836,698 867,922247,047Additions

  20. Ionic Liquids with Ammonium Cations as Lubricants or Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Truhan, Jr., John J

    2006-01-01

    Friction and wear are estimated to cost 6% of the US gross national product, or around $700 billion annually. A new class of more effective lubricants could lead to huge energy savings. Limited recent literature has suggested potential for using room-temperature ionic liquids as lubricants, however only a few out of millions (or more) of species have been evaluated. Recent ORNL work discovered a new category of ionic liquids with ammonium cations that have demonstrated promising lubricating properties as net lubricants or lubricant additives, particularly in lubricating difficult-to-lubricate metals like aluminum. More than 30% friction reduction has been observed on ammonium-based ionic liquids compared to conventional hydrocarbon oils. The inherent polarity of ionic liquids is believed to provide strong adhesion to contact surfaces and form a boundary lubricating film leading to friction and wear reductions. Other advantages of ionic liquids include (1) negligible volatility, (2) high thermal stability, (3) non-flammability, and (4) better intrinsic properties that eliminate the necessity of many expensive lubricant additives. With very flexible molecular structures, this new class of lubricants, particularly ammonium-based ionic liquids, can be tailored to fit a big variety of applications including but not limited to bearings, combustion engines, MEMS, and metal forming.

  1. Fuel, lubricant and additive effects in combustion chamber deposit formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelemen, S.R.; Homan, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    CCD causes octane requirement increase (ORI) and can potentially contributes to exhaust emissions and combustion chamber deposit interference (CCDI). Experiments were conducted to identify the separate fuel, lubricant and additive contributions to the amount and composition of CCD. CCD originates from multiple sources. Gasoline hydrocarbon components, gasoline additives, engine lubricant, and atmospheric nitrogen contribute to CCD in different ways. With some fuels the engine lubricant is the main contributor to CCD and this is shown by the high ash level in the CCD. For other fuels CCD is predominantly organic. Significant amounts of nitrogen were found in the CCD even when the fuel and lubricant were nitrogen free. The pyrolysis reactivity of different CCDs was studied to gain an understanding about the transformations that potentially happen over longer times and lower temperatures on the combustion chamber walls. In all cases during mild pyrolysis (375{degrees}C) there was a substantial increase in the level of aromatic carbon and a decrease in the level of organic oxygen. The largest increases in the amount of aromatic carbon occurred for CCDs that were the least aromatic.

  2. Strong Integer Additive Set-valued Graphs: A Creative Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. K. Sudev; K. A. Germina; K. P. Chithra

    2015-04-23

    For a non-empty ground set $X$, finite or infinite, the {\\em set-valuation} or {\\em set-labeling} of a given graph $G$ is an injective function $f:V(G) \\to \\mathcal{P}(X)$, where $\\mathcal{P}(X)$ is the power set of the set $X$. A set-indexer of a graph $G$ is an injective set-valued function $f:V(G) \\to \\mathcal{P}(X)$ such that the function $f^{\\ast}:E(G)\\to \\mathcal{P}(X)-\\{\\emptyset\\}$ defined by $f^{\\ast}(uv) = f(u){\\ast} f(v)$ for every $uv{\\in} E(G)$ is also injective., where $\\ast$ is a binary operation on sets. An integer additive set-indexer is defined as an injective function $f:V(G)\\to \\mathcal{P}({\\mathbb{N}_0})$ such that the induced function $g_f:E(G) \\to \\mathcal{P}(\\mathbb{N}_0)$ defined by $g_f (uv) = f(u)+ f(v)$ is also injective, where $\\mathbb{N}_0$ is the set of all non-negative integers and $\\mathcal{P}(\\mathbb{N}_0)$ is its power set. An IASI $f$ is said to be a strong IASI if $|f^+(uv)|=|f(u)|\\,|f(v)|$ for every pair of adjacent vertices $u,v$ in $G$. In this paper, we critically and creatively review the concepts and properties of strong integer additive set-valued graphs.

  3. International Workshops to Foster Implementation of the IAEA Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Coates, Cameron W.; Bedke, Michael L.

    2003-07-14

    A country’s adherence to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) Additional Protocol is an important statement to the world of that country’s commitment to nuclear nonproliferation. Without the Additional Protocol (AP) it is possible, as demonstrated in Iraq, for a country party to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to clandestinely work toward nuclear weapons and be undetected by the IAEA. This is because classical safeguards under the NPT are directed at diversion of nuclear material from declared activities. But a country may instead build undeclared activities to produce weapons-grade nuclear material. The AP is directed at detecting those undeclared activities. As of May 2003, 73 countries had signed the AP, but only 35 have entered into force. To further adherence to the AP, the IAEA has held regional, high-level seminars in Japan, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Romania, and Malaysia to explain AP provisions. To supplement these policy-level seminars, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken to develop a set of modules of technical competencies required to implement the AP. The intent is to work closely with the IAEA by providing these technical competencies to countries as well as to complement the IAEA’s regional seminars and other outreach efforts. This paper briefly describes the technical competency modules.

  4. Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEV/EV Lithium-ion Battery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives Electrolytes -...

  5. Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Irvine, Kevin (Huntsville, AL); Berger, Paul (Rome, NY); Comstock, Robert (Bel Air, MD)

    2010-02-16

    Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

  6. Improving properties of Mg with Al–Cu additions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashad, Muhammad; Pan, Fusheng; Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Shahid; Saleem, Muhammad

    2014-09-15

    The present work reports improvement in tensile properties of the Mg matrix reinforced with micron-sized copper–aluminum particulate hybrids. The Al–Cu particulate hybrids were incorporated into the Mg matrix through powder metallurgy method. The synthesized alloys exhibited homogeneously dispersed Mg{sub 2}Cu particles in the matrix, therefore leading to a 110% increase in yield strength (221 MPa) and a 72% enhancement in ultimate tensile strength (284 MPa) by addition of 1.0 wt.%Al–0.6 wt.%Cu particle hybrids. Optical microscopy, scanning election microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the microstructure and intermetallic phases of the synthesized alloys. - Highlights: • Mg matrix is reinforced with Al–Cu particulate hybrids. • Powder metallurgic method is used to fabricate the alloys. • Tensile strength and ductility were increased simultaneously.

  7. Motor stator using corner scraps for additional electrical components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S.; Su, Gui-Jia; Adams, Donald J.; Nagashima, James M.; Stancu, Constantin; Carlson, Douglas S.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2004-03-16

    A method for making a motor and auxiliary devices with a unified stator body comprises providing a piece of material (10) having an area larger than a cross section of the stator (11), removing material from the piece of material (10) to form a pattern for a cross section of a core (11) for the stator, and removing material from the piece of material (10) outside the cross section of the core of the stator (11) to allow positioning of cores (22, 23, 24) for supporting windings (25, 26, 27) of least one additional electromagnetic device, such as a transformer (62) in a dc-to-dc converter (61, 62) that provides a low. voltage dc output. An article of manufacture made according to the invention is also disclosed and apparatus made with the method and article of manufacture are also disclosed.

  8. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore »plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N addition rates indicate that arid ecosystems are sensitive to modest increments in anthropogenic N deposition.« less

  9. Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

    2005-06-30

    Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. The testing was performed at Southern Research's Catalyst Test Facility, a bench-scale reactor capable of simulating gas-phase reactions occurring in coal-fired utility pollution-control equipment. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project--honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Methods and procedures for experimental testing continue to be developed to produce the highest quality mercury-oxidation data. During this past quarter, it was discovered that long periods (12 - 24 hours) are required to equilibrate the catalysts in the system. In addition, after the system has been equilibrated, operational changes to temperature, gas concentration, or flow rate shifts the equilibrium, and steady-state must be reestablished, which can require as much as twelve additional hours per condition change. In the last quarter of testing, it was shown that the inclusion of ammonia had a strong effect on the oxidation of mercury by SCR catalysts, both in the short-term (a transitional period of elemental and oxidized mercury off gassing) and the long-term (less steady-state mercury oxidation). All experiments so far have focused on testing the catalysts in a simulated Powder River Basin (PRB) flue-gas environment, which contains lower sulfur and chlorine than produced by other coals. In the next quarter, parametric testing will be expanded to include flue gases simulating power plants burning Midwestern and Eastern coals, which are higher in sulfur and chlorine. Also, the isolation of such gases as hydrogen chloride (HCl), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) will be investigated. All of these efforts will be used to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to flue gas composition, temperature, and flow rate.

  10. Bubble formation in water with addition of a hydrophobic solute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryuichi Okamoto; Akira Onuki

    2015-05-29

    We show that phase separation can occur in a one-component liquid outside its coexistence curve (CX) with addition of a small amount of a solute. The solute concentration at the transition decreases with increasing the difference of the solvation chemical potential between liquid and gas. As a typical bubble-forming solute, we consider ${\\rm O}_2$ in ambient liquid water, which exhibits mild hydrophobicity and its critical temperature is lower than that of water. Such a solute can be expelled from the liquid to form gaseous domains while the surrounding liquid pressure is higher than the saturated vapor pressure $p_{cx}$. This solute-induced bubble formation is a first-order transition in bulk and on a partially dried wall, while a gas film grows continuously on a completely dried wall. We set up a bubble free energy $\\Delta G$ for bulk and surface bubbles with a small volume fraction $\\phi$. It becomes a function of the bubble radius $R$ under the Laplace pressure balance. Then, for sufficiently large solute densities above a threshold, $\\Delta G$ exhibits a local maximum at a critical radius and a minimum at an equilibrium radius. We also examine solute-induced nucleation taking place outside CX, where bubbles larger than the critical radius grow until attainment of equilibrium.

  11. Viscosity index improver-dispersant additive useful in oil compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, J.B.; Dick, M.N.

    1988-10-25

    A process comprising grafting in the substantial absence of solvent a hydrocarbon polymer of C/sub 2/ to C/sub 28/ olefin, the polymer having a number average molecular weight in the range of about 5,000 to 500,000 with an unsaturated material selected from the group consisting of: (A) ethylenically unsaturated C/sub 3/ to C/sub 10/ carboxylic acid having 1 to 2 carboxylic acid groups or an anhydride group, and (B) nitrogen-containing ethylenically unsaturated monomers containing 6 to 30 carbon atoms and 1 to 4 nitrogen atoms, in the presence of a free radical initiator and a chain stopping agent comprising at least one member selected from the group consisting of alphatic mercaptans having 4 to 24 carbon atoms, deithyl hydroxyl amine cumene and phenols, the grafting being conducted in a manner and under conditions sufficient to form a substantially oil soluble graft copolymer useful as a viscosity index improver-dispersant additive for lubricating oil compositions.

  12. ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

    2011-09-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

  13. Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

    2004-12-31

    Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. Three different SCR catalysts are being studied. These are honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts are manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Test methods and experimental procedures were developed for current and future testing. The methods and procedures equalize factors influencing mercury adsorption and oxidation (surface area, catalyst activity, and pore structure) that normally differ for each catalyst type. Initial testing was performed to determine the time necessary for each catalyst to reach surface-adsorption equilibrium. In addition, the fraction of Hg oxidized by each of the SCR catalyst types is being investigated, for a given amount of catalyst and flow rate of mercury and flue gas. The next major effort will be to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to changes in mercury concentration and with respect to HCl concentration. Hg-sorption equilibrium times will also be investigated with respect to ammonia concentration in the simulated flue gas.

  14. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  15. Developments in Assisting Countries in Implementing the IAEA Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Hansen, Linda H.; Cain, Ronald A.; Kovacic, Don N.; Apt, Kenneth E.; VanSickle, Matthew

    2010-08-11

    In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began assisting selected non-nuclear weapon states in planning and preparing for implementation of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Additional Protocol (AP). Since then, the AP international implementation program has contributed to the substantial progress made by Vietnam, Thailand, Iraq, and Malaysia in preparing for entry-into-force of the AP. An overall engagement plan has been developed with components designed to train government AP implementing agencies, inform policy makers, conduct outreach to industry and universities, make AP reporting software available and useful, and plan a detailed approach for implementing the declaration and complementary access provisions of the AP. DOE recently began collaborating with Indonesia, which has already entered the AP into force, requiring a second method of engagement somewhat different from that taken with countries that have not entered the AP into force. The AP international implementation program, administered by the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program, is working more closely with DOE’s International Nonproliferation Export Control Program to ensure countries are aware of and prepared to implement the export/import provisions of the AP. As the AP implementation program matures and helps move countries closer to entry-into-force or improved AP implementation, it is identifying characteristics of a country’s “end-state” that indicate that DOE assistance is no longer required. The U.S. AP Implementation Act and Senate Resolution of Ratification require the Administration to report annually to Congress on measures taken to achieve the adoption of the AP in non-nuclear weapon states. DOE’s AP international implementation program is a significant part of these measures. This paper describes recent developments to increase the scope and effectiveness of the program.

  16. Minimal Digit Sets for Parallel Addition in Non-standard Numeration Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liège, Université de

    for Bases being Algebraic Numbers 4 Addition versus Conversion & Subtraction Addition versus Conversion Pisot Unit Bases Rational Bases Complex Base 6 Summary of Minimal Alphabets for Parallel Addition Lower Bounds for Bases being Algebraic Numbers 4 Addition versus Conversion & Subtraction Addition

  17. Additive group invariants in pos. char. Summer meeting of the Canadian Mathematical Society, June 4-6, 2010 1 Additive group invariants in positive characteristic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehlau, David

    Additive group invariants in pos. char. Summer meeting of the Canadian Mathematical Society, June 4 Additive group invariants in pos. char. Summer meeting of the Canadian Mathematical Society, June 4-6, 2010 The main result For more details Additive group invariants in pos. char. Summer meeting of the Canadian

  18. Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Additive manufacturing technologies Functionally Integrated Composite Structures, Augsburg, Germany ME Faculty Candidate Abstract: Additive

  19. The Use of Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Multi-Function...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Use of Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Multi-Function Small Satellite Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Use of Additive Manufacturing for...

  20. Additive Manufacturing Symposium This event is supported by the Department of Energy's Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    Additive Manufacturing Symposium This event is supported by the Department of Energy's Science of Additive Manufacturing (AM) to: n Engage policy and research leaders in a dialogue on what potential AM has an Additive Manufacturing Summit in 2013. 9:00 am Welcome and Opening Comments 9:35 Additive Manufacturing

  1. Consideration of changes required to support additional entry points in the Academic Year 1. Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    Consideration of changes required to support additional entry points in the Academic Year 1 for additional intakes (for example, whether more additional entry points ­ such as April - might also to the increasing number of ad hoc requests coming forward for additional entry points in the academic year

  2. Additional Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following resources are focused on Federal new construction and major renovation projects, sustainable construction, and the role of renewable energy technologies in such facilities. These...

  3. Additional exercise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-12-13

    EXERCISE. A corporation hires peoples according to the following rule. The duration of a contract is a random variable C. The number of applicant in a time ...

  4. Additive Manufacturing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegister / Vol. 72, No.Resources | NationalMST »

  5. additive manufacturuing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largestnamedGroup!management | Nationaladaoud

  6. Catalytic Nanoparticle Additives in the Combustion of AP/HTPB Composite Solid Propellant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitz, Kevin R.

    2012-02-14

    are applicable to any metal oxide produced by a similar method. The process required for efficiently producing larger batches of nanoparticle additives was seen to have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the additive to modify the burning rate...

  7. Effects of chemical additives on hydrocarbon disappearance and biodegradation in freshwater marsh microcosms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, John

    determined the concentration of four total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measures and 43 target hydro- carbonsEffects of chemical additives on hydrocarbon disappearance and biodegradation in freshwater marsh 2006 Hydrocarbon disappearance and biodegradation were insensitive to common commercial additives

  8. Effects of Acid Additives on Spent Acid Flowback through Carbonate Cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasir, Ehsaan Ahmad

    2012-07-16

    these challenges, different chemicals, or additives, are added to the acid solution such as corrosion inhibitors and iron control agents. These additives may change the relative permeability of the spent acid, and formation wettability, and may either hinder...

  9. Group Sparse Additive Models Junming Yin junmingy@cs.cmu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Eric P.

    to be selected jointly. Previous works either study the group spar- sity in the parametric setting (e.g., group additive models (GroupSpAM), which can handle group spar- sity in additive models. We generalize the 1/ 2

  10. Addition of Spin Angular Momentum: A Tensor Algebra Analysis Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    Addition of Spin Angular Momentum: A Tensor Algebra Analysis Frank Rioux In this entry I work the addition of angular momentum for two identical spin1/2 particles. The tensor algebra approach the eigenvalues in the top row,

  11. Mechanistic analysis of an asymmetric palladium-catalyzed conjugate addition of arylboronic acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Mechanistic analysis of an asymmetric palladium- catalyzed conjugate addition of arylboronic acids,c Brian M. Stoltzb and Richard N. Zare*a An asymmetric palladium-catalyzed conjugate addition reaction conditions. Palladium-catalyzed conjugate addition reactions are an ongoing eld of research.6­8 The Stoltz

  12. The Capacity-Cost Function of Discrete Additive Noise Channels with and without Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehlau, David

    of discrete channels with memory. Index Terms { Channels with memory, additive noise, capacity-cost functionThe Capacity-Cost Function of Discrete Additive Noise Channels with and without Feedback #3; Fady by investigating the capacity- cost function (C (#12;)) of such additive noise channels without feedback. We

  13. Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavestri, R.C.

    1997-07-01

    Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

  14. Supersonic Energy Addition for Improving the Performance of Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supersonic Energy Addition for Improving the Performance of Nuclear Thermal Rockets V.P. Chiravalle impulse decreases. Another approach to achieving increased nuclear rocket performance is to add energy additional components to a nuclear rocket which is augmented by laser energy addition using an LSP

  15. Title of the paper: A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Title of the paper: A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing Authors approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing 1. Introduction In order to stay competitive, technical improvements in additive manufacturing processes provide the opportunity to manufacture real

  16. A new global approach to design for additive manufacturing R. PONCHE 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A new global approach to design for additive manufacturing R. PONCHE 1 J.Y. HASCOET, O. KERBRAT, P directly through additive manufacturing. It is now accepted that these new processes can increase of these processes, with the Design For Additive Manufacturing (DFAM) concept. In this context, a methodology

  17. Proceedings of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 39, 2011 Additive Manufacturing based on Optimized Mask Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong

    Proceedings of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 39, 2011 Additive Manufacturing based on Optimized Mask Video@usc.edu, (213) 740-7829 ABSTRACT Additive manufacturing (AM) processes based on mask image projection and resolution of built components. KEYWORDS Additive manufacturing, Solid freeform fabrication, Mask image

  18. Fuel additives and heat treatment effects on nanocrystalline zinc ferrite phase composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Fuel additives and heat treatment effects on nanocrystalline zinc ferrite phase composition Ping Hu October 2010 Keywords: Zinc ferrite Fuel additive Heat treatment Phase composition a b s t r a c considered the influence of fuel additives and heat treatment conditions on the phase composition

  19. Epistasis Is a Major Determinant of the Additive Genetic Variance in Mimulus guttatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-05-11

    to describe both the effects of individual genes as well as the genetic variance com- ponents of populations (additive, dominance, and epistatic). It has long been known that high additive genetic variance does not imply additive gene action [11], a conclusion... questions unanswered. For instance, do interac- tions among genes tend to increase or decrease VA of traits, on average? As allele frequencies change in response to selection, does epistasis accelerate or dampen the corresponding change in VA? For a...

  20. Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating Configurations More Documents & Publications Mirant Potomac, Alexandria,...

  1. The Use of Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Multi-Function...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Use of Additive Manufacturing for Fabrication of Multi-Function Small Satellite Structures Horais, Brian J ORNL ORNL; Love, Lonnie J ORNL ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R ORNL ORNL...

  2. New enantioselective metal-catalysed conjugate addition-initiated reactions of alkenyl(aza)arenes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, Aakarsh

    2013-06-29

    I. Enantioselective Rhodium-Catalysed Arylation of Electron-Deficient Alkenylarenes ?-substituted alkenyl-para-nitroarenes, an unexplored substrate class for catalytic asymmetric addition reactions, undergo highly ...

  3. Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Development of active nanoparticle additive for lubricatns that will minimize sulfur and phosporous content in engine oil, and lower ash forming elements

  4. Bench-Top Engine System for Fast Screening of Alternative Fuels and Fuel Additives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A bench-top engine testing system was used to fast screen the efficiency of fuel additives or fuel blends on NOx reduction

  5. EIS-0403: BLM Notice of Availability of Maps and Additional Public...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BLM Notice of Availability of Maps and Additional Public Scoping from the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Second Scoping Period) EIS-0403: BLM Notice of Availability...

  6. SECTION SEVEN DEFINITION OF TERMS Additional Subject Group of related modules within an academic discipline which is taken in addition to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    SECTION SEVEN DEFINITION OF TERMS Additional Subject Group of related modules within an academic(s). Single / Double / Triple module Unit of study with a value of 10/20/30 credits. Subject Group of related modules within one academic discipline. Timetable Group Groups within which a module's teaching and other

  7. A Logistic Additive Approach for Relation Prediction in Multi-relational Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tresp, Volker

    A Logistic Additive Approach for Relation Prediction in Multi-relational Data Xueyan Jiang2 of initializing the components of a logistic ad- ditive model by matrix factorization and a phase of further-relational datasets are conducted to validate the logistic additive approach. 1 Introduction Considering the problem

  8. Purdue AgronomyPurdue AgronomyCROP, SOIL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Septic System Additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    gallons of wastewater are produced per person per day, depending on water use habits and water use of these additives. This publication also describes the treatment functions of septic systems and the available scientific data regarding the effectiveness of septic system additives. Treatment Functions of Septic Systems

  9. he increasing frequency of detection of the widely used gasoline additive methyl tert-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T he increasing frequency of detection of the widely used gasoline additive methyl tert- butyl, the September 15, 1999, Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline (1) states that between 5 with large releases (e.g., LUFTs). Unprecedented growth in use Use of MTBE as a gasoline additive began

  10. Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases Emissions--Carbon Dioxide Emissions--Sequestration and Storage--Biochar--Basalt--Organic Fertilizers, this investigation focuses on the range of potential of different soil additives to enhance sequestration and storage

  11. LONG TERM RESIDUAL EFFECTS OF A NUTRIENT ADDITION ON A BARRIER ISLAND DUNE ECOSYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    LONG TERM RESIDUAL EFFECTS OF A NUTRIENT ADDITION ON A BARRIER ISLAND DUNE ECOSYSTEM by Susan M EFFECTS OF A NUTRIENT ADDITION ON A BARRIER ISLAND DUNE ECOSYSTEM Susan M. Heyel Old Dominion University, 2000 Director: Dr. Frank P. Day In 1991, 150 m2 were fertilized with nitrogen on three dunes on Hog

  12. Request for Base Salary Change -For Filled Positions Only Additional Duties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Request for Base Salary Change - For Filled Positions Only Additional Duties Reclassification Administrative/Temporary Salary Adjustment Amendment to FTE of Filled Position Increase to Level Please check here if salary includes any PSA funding: (Additional approval may be required) Employee Name: Empl

  13. MAE SEMINAR Recent advances in Additive Manufacturing/3D Printing Technologies, Material Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    MAE SEMINAR Recent advances in Additive Manufacturing/3D Printing Technologies, Material Science Samueli School of Engineering University of California Irvine 3D printing or Additive Manufacturing in different shapes. 3D printing is also considered distinct from traditional machining techniques, which

  14. Mechanism of the Heck reaction: nature of oxidative addition and alkene insertion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Anthony Steven

    2004-11-15

    stages of the Heck reaction suggest it should be. This study seeks to elucidate the nature of the oxidative addition of aryl halide to a palladium catalyst using a ligand that has been shown to have high activity in facilitating oxidative addition...

  15. Additive development for ultra-clean coal slurry fuel: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, M.H.; Swanson, W.W.

    1988-05-24

    AMAX performed research to develop improved quality, cost-effective dispersing additives for coal-water slurry fuels intended for high-intensity combustion systems. Dispersants were identified on the basis of coal surface characteristics and coal-dispersant interactions. Micronized samples of physically and chemically cleaned coal feedstocks from the Eastern and Midwestern regions of the United States were examined using bulk and surface analysis techniques. Utilization of coal surface and dispersant functionality was optimized through multicomponent application of additives, pH control, and control of surface oxidation. A low-cost, low-alkali, sulfur-free dextrin compound was found to be effective in enhancing dispersion when applied to the coal surfaces as a pretreatment or with conventional dispersants as a co-additive. The cleaning method and ash content had minimal direct impact on coal surface functionality. Parameters such as internal moisture, particle size, surface area, surface oxidation, and soluble ions were the primary considerations which influenced slurry loading and additive consumption. The dispersing additive packages functioned over the range of coal types and cleaning levels investigated. The preferred additives were compatible with each other, allowing for blending to optimize performance, cost, and alkali contamination. Each additive was found to be suitable for use in applications which utilize elevated-temperature fuel delivery systems. 17 refs., 8 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Styron 663 W/O Additives DatapointLabs Report # 7903: Styron 663 W/O Additives PAGE 1 OF 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Certificate # 1242.01), and maintains a quality system in accordance with ISO/IEC 17025. Any opinions 1714.60 100 1139.50 30000 14.34 1000 558.33 1000 220.85 50001 10.67 8000 57.70 80000 7.46 30000 22.44 50001 19.53 PAGE 3 OF 17 #12;DatapointLabs Report # 7903: Styron 663 W/O Additives PAGE 4 OF Viscosity

  17. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Combining data from motored engine friction, a theoretical engine model, a line friction contact rig, and a fired engine can provide better insight to lube oil and additive performance.

  19. Experimental Techniques to Study the Effects of Nanoparticle Additives on Heterogeneous Monopropellant Combustion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCown, Kenneth Woodrow

    2014-04-01

    This thesis presents the development of techniques used to investigate the combustion behavior of liquid monopropellants with or without additives, with a focus on nano-scale particles as burning rate modifiers in nitromethane. The linear burning...

  20. MAGE: ADDITIONS TO THE AGE ALGORITHM FOR LEARNING IN MULTIAGENT SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Larry M.

    MAGE: ADDITIONS TO THE AGE ALGORITHM FOR LEARNING IN MULTI­AGENT SYSTEMS Michael L. Dowell and Dr, South Carolina 29208, USA e­mail: Dowell@ece.scarolina.edu Stephens@ece.scarolina.edu ABSTRACT

  1. MSE Laboratory Access Requirements in addition to EHS Safety Seminar A) Graduate Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    MSE Laboratory Access Requirements in addition to EHS Safety Seminar A Data Sheets [MSDS] in all labs you work in. d. Laboratory Specific Documentation will vary between your advisor's research laboratories & the MSE teaching labs

  2. Additional Phase and Assessment Descriptive Quality Indicators for Single-case Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boles, Margot

    2015-04-08

    This table presents a rating scale for additional phase and assessment descriptive quality indicators in single-case research. This table is adapted from CEC (2014), Horner et al. (2005), Reichow (2008), and Wolery (2013).

  3. Boron-based Additives in Oil and Grease for Wind Turbine Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jun-Hyeok

    2013-06-25

    This research investigates the tribological performance of crystalline and amorphous powders of boron as additives in lubricants: grease and mineral oil for potential applications of wind turbine. This research is focused on the wear resistance...

  4. Additional Steam Traps Increase Production of a Drum Oven at a Petroleum Jelly Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-03-01

    Additional steam traps were installed on the drum oven at a petroleum jelly production facility at an ExxonMobil plant in Nigeria. The installation improved heat transfer and saved energy.

  5. Additive Manufacturing of Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting: Processing, Post-Processing, & Mechanical Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sames, William

    2015-05-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters were studied for production of the high temperature alloy Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and mechanical...

  6. Effects of Y_(2)O_(3) and ?-ZrP Additives on Lubrication of Grease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chung Jwa

    2014-07-28

    lubricants is 40% ~50%. The objective of this research is to 1) develop novel nanomaterials as grease additives, and 2) obtain understanding in tribological performances of the same. The research focuses on zirconium phosphate and yttrium oxide nanoparticles...

  7. Synthesis of Densely Functionalized Cyclopropanes via Diastereoselective Nucleophilic Additions to in Situ Generated Cyclopropenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryabchuk, Pavel

    2013-12-31

    This thesis is concerned with the development and application of methods for the diastereoselective synthesis of substituted cyclopropanes. The methodology described in this dissertation is based on the addition of ...

  8. Nonparametric estimation of additive nonlinear ARX time series: Local Linear Fitting and Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Zongwu; Masry, Elias

    2000-08-01

    We consider the estimation and identification of the components (endogenous and exogenous) of additive nonlinear ARX time series models. We employ a local polynomial fitting scheme coupled with projections. We establish ...

  9. The Use of Additional Analyses to Clarify the Functions of Problem Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Steven Wade

    2010-05-10

    and decrease problem behavior; however, treatment did not result in clinically-significant reductions in problem behavior in all cases. Additional within-session analyses and experimental analyses were used to clarify the functions of problem behavior...

  10. Increased plant growth from nitrogen addition should conserve phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Increased plant growth from nitrogen addition should conserve phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems, or reversed, depending on the kinet- ics and size of a buffering reactive P pool. These properties determine

  11. Production of High Quality Dust Control Foam to Minimize Moisture Addition to Coal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Termine, F.; Jordan, S. T.

    1985-01-01

    Foam is displacing wet suppression as the method of choice for controlling fugitive emissions from coal. Coal treated by wet suppression consumes through moisture addition, a heat energy equivalent of 1 ton out of every ...

  12. Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-12-15

    The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Cancels DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13.

  13. Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-12-15

    The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Supersedes DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, Supersedes DOE O 142.1A. Certified 12-3-14.

  14. Uv-Light Stabilization Additive Package For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanoka, Jack I. (Brookline, MA); Klemchuk, Peter P. (Watertown, CT)

    2002-03-05

    An ultraviolet light stabilization additive package is used in an encapsulant material that may be used in solar cell modules, laminated glass and a variety of other applications. The ultraviolet light stabilization additive package comprises a first hindered amine light stabilizer and a second hindered amine light stabilizer. The first hindered amine light stabilizer provides thermal oxidative stabilization, and the second hindered amine light stabilizer providing photo-oxidative stabilization.

  15. Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

    2003-06-24

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

  16. An Additive Bivariate Hierarchical Model for Functional Data and Related Computations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redd, Andrew Middleton

    2011-10-21

    the penalties 11 are given is computationally intensive. In addition the space for nding the penalty parameters is four dimensional, two for each predictor variable, one each for the mean and principal component functions. Optimizing over a four dimensional... ed by the structure of the formula used. I implement two new formula operators that only work with the pfda package; %&% bind together variables, on the left side of the formula indicates the paired model, on the right an additive variable...

  17. Event Marks Addition of Historical Girl Scout Collection to KU Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-04-09

    12/5/13 KU Libraries: Event Marks Addition of Historical Girl Scout Collection to KU Libraries www.lib.ku.edu/news/girlscouts.shtml 1/1 Contact Us KU Libraries Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (785) 864-8983 RESEARCH TOOLS AND EXPERTISE FOR TWENTY... Request Articles, Books,… Friends & Benefactors Suggestions Event Marks Addition of Historical Girl Scout Collection to KU Libraries KU Libraries hosted an event on Saturday, March 31 to commemorate the gift of a significant collection of papers...

  18. An atomic view of additive mutational effects in a protein structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, M.M.; Terwilliger, T.C.

    1996-04-01

    Substitution of a single amino acid in a protein will often lead to substantial changes in properties. If these properties could be altered in a rational way then proteins could be readily generated with functions tailored to specific uses. When amino acid substitutions are made at well-separated locations in a single protein, their effects are generally additive. Additivity of effects of amino acid substitutions is very useful because the properties of proteins with any combination of substitutions can be inferred directly from those of the proteins with single changes. It would therefore be of considerable interest to have a means of knowing whether substitutions at a particular pair of sites in a protein are likely to lead to additive effects. The structural basis for additivity of effects of mutations on protein function was examined by determining crystal structures of single and double mutants in the hydrophobic core of gene V protein. Structural effects of mutations were found to be cumulative when two mutations were made in a single protein. Additivity occurs in this case because the regions structurally affected by mutations at the two sites do not overlap even though the sites are separated by only 9 {angstrom}. Structural distortions induced by mutations in gene V protein decrease rapidly, but not isotropically, with distance from the site of mutation. It is anticipated that cases where structural and functional effects of mutations will be additive could be identified simply by examining whether the regions structurally affected by each component mutation overlap.

  19. Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganization Chart Organization Charts

  20. Impact of Elevated Nitrate on Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: Implications of inhibitory mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress Qiang He 1,2 ,mechanisms in addition to osmotic stress. While thethe potential involvement of osmotic and nitrite stress

  1. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

  2. Organizational Chart | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Chart Office presentation icon Organizational Chart More Documents & Publications IEA Organizational Chart Office of International Affairs Org Chart Chart of breakout of...

  3. Polydimethylsiloxane as a Macromolecular Additive for Enhanced Performance of Molecular Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Kenneth R.; Mei, Jianguo; Stalder, Romain; Shim, Jae Won; Cheun, Hyeunseok; Steffy, Fred; So, Franky; Kippelen, Bernard; Reynolds, John R.

    2011-03-15

    The effect of the macromolecular additive, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), on the performance of solution processed molecular bulk heterojunction solar cells is investigated, and the addition of PDMS is shown to improve device power conversion efficiency by ~70% and significantly reduce cell-to-cell variation, from a power conversion efficiency of 1.25 ± 0.37% with no PDMS to 2.16 ± 0.09% upon the addition of 0.1 mg/mL PDMS to the casting solution. The cells are based on a thiophene and isoindigo containing oligomer as the electron donor and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) as the electron acceptor. PDMS is shown to have a strong influence on film morphology, with a significant decrease in film roughness and feature size observed. The morphology change leads to improved performance parameters, most notably an increase in the short circuit current density from 4.3 to 6.8 mA/cm2 upon addition of 0.1 mg/mL PDMS. The use of PDMS is of particular interest, as this additive appears frequently as a lubricant in plastic syringes commonly used in device fabrication; therefore, PDMS may unintentionally be incorporated into device active layers.

  4. PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT OF COMPRESSION MOLDED KENAF FIBER REINFORCED VINYL ESTER COMPOSITES THROUGH RESIN ADDITIVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-05-17

    Plant-based bio-fiber has the potential to achieve weight and cost savings over glass fiber in automotive polymer composites if moisture stability and fiber-resin compatibility issues can be solved. This paper describes the compression molding of 50vol% 2 inch random nonwoven mat kenaf fiber vinyl ester composites with and without chemical resin additives intended to improve moisture stability and resin compatibility. The 2wt% addition of n-undecanoyl chloride or 10-undecenoyl chloride to the styrene-based resin prior to molding of the kenaf composites was observed to decrease the 24hr, 25oC moisture uptake of the molded panels by more than 50%. The tensile stiffness and flexural stiffness of the soaked panels containing these additives were seen to increase by more than 30% and 70%, respectively, relative to panels made with no additives. While ‘dry’ panel (50% relative humidity at 25oC) strengths did not significantly change in the presence of the additives, tensile strength was observed to increase by more than 40% and flexural strength more than doubled for the soaked panels.

  5. Lubricant additives, friend or foe: What the equipment design engineer needs to know

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixon, H.P.; Zantopulos, H.

    1995-10-01

    Lubricant formulations and lubricant additives have been slanted heavily toward protecting gear concentrated contacts from galling and wear. Much of the performance differentiation of these lubricants has been dependent on highly accelerated standardized laboratory testing. The area of contact fatigue has played a less important role in shaping lubricant formulations, but new test results for several commercially available gear lubricants suggest this area warrants a closer examination. The performance effects of fully and partially additized lubricants were studied using standard bearing industry rolling contact fatigue and wear testing procedures for tapered roller bearings. These test results indicate significant detrimental effects to wear, and fatigue life performance can occur with some additized lubricant formulations. Observations of functional surfaces, before and after testing, are made and examined for several lubricant formulations. The implications of these findings for equipment applications are discussed, and suggestions are made for ways to minimize or avoid potential detrimental performance effects. 10 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Solving the additive eigenvalue problem associated to a dynamics of a 2D-traffic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadir Farhi

    2009-08-25

    This is a technical note where we solve the additive eigenvalue problem associated to a dynamics of a 2D-traffic system. The traffic modeling is not explained here. It is available in \\cite{Far08}. It consists of a microscopic road traffic model of two circular roads crossing on one junction managed with the priority-to-the-right rule. It is based on Petri nets and minplus algebra. One of our objectives in \\cite{Far08} was to derive the fundamental diagram of 2D-traffic, which is the relation between the density and the flow of vehicles. The dynamics of this system, derived from a Petri net design, is non monotone and additively homogeneous of degree 1. In this note, we solve the additive eigenvalue problem associated to this dynamics.

  7. Reactive nanophase oxide additions to melt-processed high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goretta, K.C.; Brandel, B.P.; Lanagan, M.T.; Hu, J.; Miller, D.J.; Sengupta, S.; Parker, J.C.; Ali, M.N.; Chen, Nan

    1994-10-01

    Nanophase TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were synthesized by a vapor-phase process and mechanically mixed with stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} powders in 20 mole % concentrations. Pellets produced from powders with and without nanophase oxides were heated in air or O{sub 2} above the peritectic melt temperature and slow-cooled. At 4.2 K, the intragranular critical current density (J{sub c}) increased dramatically with the oxide additions. At 35--50 K, effects of the oxide additions were positive, but less pronounced. At 77 K, the additions decreased J{sub c}, probably because of inducing a depresion of the transition temperature.

  8. Determination of the boiling enhancement mechanism caused by surfactant addition to water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31

    In the present investigation, boiling heat transfer coefficients are measured for an electrically heated 390-{micro}m, platinum wire immersed in saturated water, and in water mixed with three different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (an anionic surfactant). The addition of a surfactant to water is known to enhance boiling heat transfer. A recently developed photographic/laser Doppler anemometry measurement technique is used to quantify the vapor volumetric flowrate departing from the wire during the boiling process. The volumetric flowrate data are combined with results from additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from three nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms. Comparisons are made to determine which heat transfer mechanisms are affected by the surfactant addition, and thus, which mechanisms promote boiling enhancement.

  9. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  10. Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Ryan D.; Nixon, H. P.; Darragh, Craig V.; Howe, Jane Y; Coffey, Dorothy W

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

  11. Phosphazene Based Additives for Improvement of Safety and Battery Lifetimes in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason K Harrup; Kevin L Gering; Harry W Rollins; Sergiy V Sazhin; Michael T Benson; David K Jamison; Christopher J Michelbacher

    2011-10-01

    There need to be significant improvements made in lithium-ion battery technology, principally in the areas of safety and useful lifetimes to truly enable widespread adoption of large format batteries for the electrification of the light transportation fleet. In order to effect the transition to lithium ion technology in a timely fashion, one promising next step is through improvements to the electrolyte in the form of novel additives that simultaneously improve safety and useful lifetimes without impairing performance characteristics over wide temperature and cycle duty ranges. Recent efforts in our laboratory have been focused on the development of such additives with all the requisite properties enumerated above. We present the results of the study of novel phosphazene based electrolytes additives.

  12. Effects of polymer additives in the bulk of turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yi-Chao; Funfschilling, Denis; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ni, Rui; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence that a minute amount of polymer additives can significantly enhance heat transport in the bulk region of turbulent thermal convection. The effects of polymer additives are found to be the \\textit{suppression} of turbulent background fluctuations that give rise to incoherent heat fluxes that make no net contribution to heat transport, and at the same time to \\textit{increase} the coherency of temperature and velocity fields. The suppression of small-scale turbulent fluctuations leads to more coherent thermal plumes that result in the heat transport enhancement. The fact that polymer additives can increase the coherency of thermal plumes is supported by the measurements of a number of local quantities, such as the extracted plume amplitude and width, the velocity autocorrelation functions and the velocity-temperature cross-correlation coefficient. The results from local measurements also suggest the existence of a threshold value for the polymer concentration, only above which c...

  13. Methods and energy storage devices utilizing electrolytes having surface-smoothing additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang; Graff, Gordon L; Chen, Xilin; Ding, Fei

    2015-11-12

    Electrodeposition and energy storage devices utilizing an electrolyte having a surface-smoothing additive can result in self-healing, instead of self-amplification, of initial protuberant tips that give rise to roughness and/or dendrite formation on the substrate and anode surface. For electrodeposition of a first metal (M1) on a substrate or anode from one or more cations of M1 in an electrolyte solution, the electrolyte solution is characterized by a surface-smoothing additive containing cations of a second metal (M2), wherein cations of M2 have an effective electrochemical reduction potential in the solution lower than that of the cations of M1.

  14. A stochastic multi-symplectic scheme for stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Jialin; Zhang, Liying

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we investigate a stochastic multi-symplectic method for stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise. Based on the stochastic version of variational principle, we find a way to obtain the stochastic multi-symplectic structure of three-dimensional (3-D) stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise. We propose a stochastic multi-symplectic scheme and show that it preserves the stochastic multi-symplectic conservation law and the local and global stochastic energy dissipative properties, which the equations themselves possess. Numerical experiments are performed to verify the numerical behaviors of the stochastic multi-symplectic scheme.

  15. Mechanical characterization of filler sandcretes with rice husk ash additions. Study applied to Senegal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cisse, I.K.; Laquerbe, M.

    2000-01-01

    To capitalize on the local materials of Senegal (agricultural and industrial wastes, residual fines from crushing process, sands from dunes, etc.), rise husk ash and residues of industrial and agricultural wastes have been used as additions in sandcretes. The mechanical resistance of sandcrete blocks obtained when unground ash (and notably the ground ash) is added reveals that there is an increase in performance over the classic mortar blocks. In addition, the use of unground rice husk ash enables production of a lightweight sandcrete with insulating properties, at a reduced cost. The ash pozzolanic reactivity explains the high strengths obtained.

  16. LONG-TERM DEMONSTRATION OF SORBENT ENHANCEMENT ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason D. Laumb; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John P. Kay; Christopher L. Martin; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Nicholas B. Lentz; Alexander Azenkeng; Kevin C. Galbreath; Lucinda L. Hamre

    2011-05-27

    Long-term demonstration tests of advanced sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) technologies have been completed at five coal-fired power plants. The targeted removal rate was 90% from baseline conditions at all five stations. The plants included Hawthorn Unit 5, Mill Creek Unit 4, San Miguel Unit 1, Centralia Unit 2, and Hoot Lake Unit 2. The materials tested included powdered activated carbon, treated carbon, scrubber additives, and SEAs. In only one case (San Miguel) was >90% removal not attainable. The reemission of mercury from the scrubber at this facility prevented >90% capture.

  17. Passive solar addition to therapeutic pre-school. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This project consisted of designing and constructing a passive solar system on a new classroom addition to the Peanut Butter and Jelly Therapeutic Pre-School in Albuquerque, NM. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the applicability of solar space heating systems to large institutional buildings, and to demonstrate the energy and cost savings available through the use of such systems. Preliminary estimates indicated that the passive solar systems will provide about 90 percent of the heating and cooling needs for the new classroom addition to the school.

  18. Effect of surface roughness and polymeric additive on nucleate pool boiling at subatmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.K.; Verma, R.K.; Ramani, M.P.S.; Mahajan, S.P.

    1986-09-01

    This investigation pertains to boiling heat transfer from a submerged flat surface at subatmospheric and atmospheric pressures in the presence of hydroxy ethyl cellulose (HEC) as a polymeric additive in small doses. Boiling was carried out in presence of the additive on smooth and rough aluminium surfaces having effective cavity size within the range as predicted by Hsu model and the pressure was kept in the range of 8 - 100 KN/sq.m (abs). Effects of surface roughness, saturation pressure and polymer concentration on boiling heat transfer were studied and the results were compared with Rohsenow's correlation.

  19. The Effect of Additions on the Availability of Soil Potash and the Preparation of Sugar Humus. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1916-01-01

    , the following additions were made: carbonate of lime (Ca) (precipitated chalk), 5.0 grams = 0.1% of the soil or 1000 parts per million; carbonate of lime (XCa), 50 gramsf 1% of the soil, or 10,000 parts per million; sulphate of lime (S), 5 grams ; sulphate...-5900 grams. 4649-8000 grams. The pots were filled to the same depth. The difference in the weight is due to the difference in the density of the soils. Additions were made as follows: Carbonate .of lime as precipitated chalk (Ca) 8 grams, or a little...

  20. Exploiting Collisions in Addition Chain-based Exponentiation Algorithms Using a Single Trace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Exploiting Collisions in Addition Chain-based Exponentiation Algorithms Using a Single Trace Neil. Public key cryptographic algorithms are typically based on group exponentiation algorithms where of the input to the exponentiation algorithm. These attacks would therefore be applicable to algorithms

  1. Fourier Analysis In addition to their inestimable importance in mathematics and its applications,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olver, Peter

    Chapter 13 Fourier Analysis In addition to their inestimable importance in mathematics and its applications, Fourier series also serve as the entry point into the wonderful world of Fourier analy- sis the theory and enlarging the scope of applications of Fourier­inspired methods. New directions in Fourier

  2. Evaluation of per-record identification risk by additive modeling of interaction for contingency table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takemura, Akimichi

    Evaluation of per-record identification risk by additive modeling of interaction for contingency. Introduction In evaluating the disclosure risk of a given microdata set, the number (or the pro- portion, it is likely to be a population unique. One way of evaluating the per-record identification risk is modeling

  3. Impacts of a Nanosized Ceria Additive on Diesel Engine Emissions of Particulate and Gaseous Pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    Impacts of a Nanosized Ceria Additive on Diesel Engine Emissions of Particulate and Gaseous incorporating nanosized ceria have been increasingly used in diesel engines as combustion promoters. However- cylinder, four-cycle diesel engine using fuel mixes containing nanoceria of varying concentrations

  4. ADDITION FOR CHAPTER 10 OF THE EA/RIR/IRFA RE NEPA AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADDITION FOR CHAPTER 10 OF THE EA/RIR/IRFA RE NEPA AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS. During the Council.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Environmental Protection Agency 1995). Further, the amount of waste disposed) and the impacts of those disposals are unrelated to the percentages of the walleye pollock and Pacific cod

  5. Chemical structure of a methane counterflow diffusion flame perturbed with the addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Alessandro

    Chemical structure of a methane counterflow diffusion flame perturbed with the addition of either, P.O. Box 208286, New Haven, CT 06520-8286, USA Abstract The chemical structure of a methane is consistent with the anticipated chemical kinetic behavior, based on thermal decomposition of large alkanes

  6. Ether sulfones with additives for electrolytes in rechargeable lithium ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angell, C. Austen

    Ether sulfones with additives for electrolytes in rechargeable lithium ion batteries Xiao-Guang Sun in rechargeable lithium ion battery [1-5]. In a previous publication [6] we described a series of ether sulfones electrolytes, can yield lithium button cells ?batteries with very favorable characteristics. (Refs to VC

  7. Regioselectivity in the Palladium-Catalyzed Addition of Carbon Nucleophiles to Carbocyclic Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Articles Regioselectivity in the Palladium-Catalyzed Addition of Carbon Nucleophiles to Carbocyclic reagents were compared. Introduction Palladium-catalyzed allylic substitution is an efficient and highly. Palladium Reagents and Catalysts. Innovations in Organic Synthesis; John Wiley & Sons: New York, 1995; pp

  8. PSO-2005 FU-5206 final report Emission control by sulphur addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Biomass Gasification Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Januar below. The project is a collaboration between Department of Mechanical Engineering (The Biomass Gasification Group) and Department of Chemical Engineering (CHEC) at DTU. Task 1: Addition of SO2 to swirl

  9. omit an important additional dimension. In birds, sexual dimorphism in singing and song learning varies greatly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    omit an important additional dimension. In birds, sexual dimorphism in singing and song learning] and the prevalence of female song in Australian birds [10], song in both sexes could be the ancestral condition of the size of neural song control regions and song complexity in duetting birds: evolutionary implications. J

  10. SHORT REPORT Open Access No additional copies of HERV-Fc1 in the germ line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    SHORT REPORT Open Access No additional copies of HERV-Fc1 in the germ line of multiple sclerosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). This suspicion has in part been based on increased expression of viral RNA this provirus and multiples sclerosis. Keywords: HERV-Fc1, Multiple sclerosis, Provirus copy-number Findings

  11. Introduction The use of ethanol as a gasoline additive is likely to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Introduction The use of ethanol as a gasoline additive is likely to increase in the near future investigators have developed mathematical models for predicting the effect of ethanol (added to gasoline at 10 these models provide valuable insight into the potential ground water impacts of ethanol in gasoline

  12. Supplementary Figure S1 Additional characterization of salt responses of [Low] and [High] responsive salt cells.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraon, Andrei

    Supplementary Figure S1 Additional characterization of salt responses of [Low] and [High] responsive salt cells. (a) Diagram illustrating the imaging preparation (see Methods for details). Taste buds.e.m. dF/F responses for the [Low] and [High] salt-responding cells (n3). (c) TRCs activated by low

  13. Public Opinions of Building Additional High-Voltage Electric Power Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Public Opinions of Building Additional High-Voltage Electric Power Lines A Report to the National-Voltage Electric Power Lines: A Report to the National Science Foundation and the Electric Power Research Center to build new power lines. Residents living in counties with planned routes for new transmission lines

  14. Metal-air cell comprising an electrolyte with a room temperature ionic liquid and hygroscopic additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friesen, Cody A.; Krishnan, Ramkumar; Tang, Toni; Wolfe, Derek

    2014-08-19

    An electrochemical cell comprising an electrolyte comprising water and a hydrophobic ionic liquid comprising positive ions and negative ions. The electrochemical cell also includes an air electrode configured to absorb and reduce oxygen. A hydrophilic or hygroscopic additive modulates the hydrophobicity of the ionic liquid to maintain a concentration of the water in the electrolyte is between 0.001 mol % and 25 mol %.

  15. Nitrogen Addition Increases Carbon Storage in Soils, But Not in Trees, in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    Nitrogen Addition Increases Carbon Storage in Soils, But Not in Trees, in an Eastern U.S. Deciduous, increasing carbon (C) capture from the atmosphere and possibly C sequestration in the woody biomass (Driscoll the effects of excess N deposition on carbon (C) and N cycling, we experimentally added N (as NH4NO3

  16. Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Additive functions and number systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Additive functions and number systems systems April 7, 2010 1 / 35 #12;Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Outline Number and Computational Number Theory Number systems Let R be an integral domain, b R, and N = {n1, . . . , nm} R

  17. Tailoring the plateau burning rates of composite propellants by the use of nanoscale additives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Matthew Aaron

    2009-05-15

    to propellants in order to enhance burning rate or other properties. However, the effect of nano-size solid additives in these propellants is not fully understood or agreed upon within the research community. The current project set out to explore what possible...

  18. TAILORING THE PLATEAU BURNING RATES OF COMPOSITE PROPELLANTS BY THE USE OF NANOSCALE ADDITIVES 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Matthew

    2010-07-14

    to propellants in order to enhance burning rate or other properties. However, the effect of nano-size solid additives in these propellants is not fully understood or agreed upon within the research community. The current project set out to explore what possible...

  19. Some Additional Constructs in the Hitachi-UCI SDO PIM/PSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Jun

    Some Additional Constructs in the Hitachi-UCI SDO PIM/PSM Jun Suzuki, Ph.D. jsuzuki@ics.uci.edu www PIM/PSM Submission · UCI is a supporter for the Hitachi's submission to the SDO PIM/PSM RFP. #12

  20. WPN 09-6: Lead Safe Weatherization (LSW) Additional Materials and Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To provide clarification and additional information to grantees as they implement WPN 08-6, Interim Lead-Safe Weatherization Guidance. This guidance augments, but does not replace, WPN 08-6 and builds on the foundation provided in WPN 02-6, Weatherization Activities and Federal Lead Based Paint Regulations.

  1. Securing Texas water: Experts call for additional planning, policies, expanding "new" water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    and policy for the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority, said the state no longer has the surplus water it had from SECURING TEXAS WATER Experts call for additional planning, policies, expanding ?new? water Summer 2012 tx H2O 3 ] the reservoirs built a...

  2. Intracavity coherent addition of Gaussian beam distributions using a planar interferometric coupler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friesem, Asher A.

    of Physics. [DOI: 10.1063/1.1791330] The beam quality, stability, and heat dissipation of high- power lasers are typically inferior to those of low power lasers. This suggests that a combination of several low- power lasers may be advantageous over a single high-power one. Such a combination, namely addition, could

  3. STFC TRAINING GRANTS (TGs) ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STFC TRAINING GRANTS (TGs) ­ ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs) STFC Grants (TGs). TGs will be announced in the form of a single grant to each department and will cover all will the value of the TG be calculated? TGs will be calculated on the basis of a student unit cost

  4. Using the Context-enhanced Additive Heuristic for Temporal and Numeric Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetter, Thomas

    , the main dif- ference lies in the heuristic: Sapa utilizes a temporal version of planning graphs firstUsing the Context-enhanced Additive Heuristic for Temporal and Numeric Planning Patrick Eyerich,mattmuel,roeger}@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Abstract Planning systems for real-world applications need the abil- ity to handle concurrency and numeric

  5. Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional amendments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional, University Park, PA 16802, USA c State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Department of Energy Available online 30 April 2011 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Domestic wastewater Startup time Substrate a b

  6. Multiagent Resource Allocation in k-additive Domains: Preference Representation and Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amsterdam, University of

    a utility function mapping "states of affairs" (outcomes of an election, allocations of resourcesMultiagent Resource Allocation in k-additive Domains: Preference Representation and Complexity Yann for multiagent resource allocation where autonomous software agents negotiate over the allocation of bundles

  7. Annals of Operations Research Multiagent Resource Allocation in k-additive Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endriss, Ulle

    a utility function mapping "states of affairs" (outcomes of an election, allocations of resourcesAnnals of Operations Research To appear Multiagent Resource Allocation in k-additive Domains allocation where autonomous software agents negotiate over the allocation of bundles of indivisible resources

  8. Remarks on the equivalence of full additivity and monotonicity for the entanglement cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando G. S. L. Brandao; Michal Horodecki; Martin B. Plenio; Shashank Virmani

    2013-08-27

    We analyse the relationship between the full additivity of the entanglement cost and its full monotonicity under local operations and classical communication. We show that the two properties are equivalent for the entanglement cost. The proof works for the regularization of any convex, subadditive, and asymptotically continuous entanglement monotone, and hence also applies to the asymptotic relative entropy of entanglement.

  9. The effect of hydrogen addition on flammability limit and NOx emission in ultra-lean counterflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    The effect of hydrogen addition on flammability limit and NOx emission in ultra-lean counterflow CH CH4/air premixed flames on the extinction limits and the characteristics of NOx emission and NOx emission characteristics in ultra-lean pre- mixed flames. The extinction characteristics

  10. Safety basis for the 241-AN-107 mixer pump installation and caustic addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Vleet, R.J.

    1994-10-05

    This safety Basis was prepared to determine whether or not the proposed activities of installing a 76 HP jet mixer pump and the addition of approximately 50,000 gallons of 19 M (50:50 wt %) aqueous caustic are within the safety envelope as described by Tank Farms (chapter six of WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001, Rev. 0). The safety basis covers the components, structures and systems for the caustic addition and mixer pump installation. These include: installation of the mixer pump and monitoring equipment; operation of the mixer pump, process monitoring equipment and caustic addition; the pump stand, caustic addition skid, the electrical skid, the video camera system and the two densitometers. Also covered is the removal and decontamination of the mixer pump and process monitoring system. Authority for this safety basis is WHC-IP-0842 (Waste Tank Administration). Section 15.9, Rev. 2 (Unreviewed Safety Questions) of WHC-IP-0842 requires that an evaluation be performed for all physical modifications.

  11. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES To learn more about the field and career options in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Timothy J.

    Association for Clinical Chemistry aacc.org Government Jobs usajobs.gov #12;ADDITIONAL RESOURCES To learn more about the field and career options in Chemistry, please visit: Science Careers jobs.sciencecareers.org Biospace biospace.com American Chemical Society acs

  12. Comparisons of short carbon nanotubes containing conductive additives of cathode for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Qingtang, E-mail: zhqt137@163.com [School of Petrochemical Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Science, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Xiaomei; Lu, Wenjiang; Tang, Fuling [School of Material Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Guo, Junhong [School of Petrochemical Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Yu, Weiyuan [School of Material Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Qu, Meizhen; Yu, Zuolong [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Science, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Short carbon nanotubes (SCNT) containing conductive additives were used. • SCNT/graphite powder (GP) mixture is better than SCNT/mesoporous carbon mixture. • SCNT connect many isolated GP particles to form a more valid conductive network. • SCNT absorb some electrolyte solution allowing quick electrochemical reactions. - Abstract: Short carbon nanotubes (SCNT) containing conductive additives, i.e. SCNT/graphite powder (GP) mixture (SCNTGP) and SCNT/mesoporous carbon (MC) mixture (SCNTMC) were employed as conductive additives for LiCoO{sub 2} cathode. GP and MC have similar particle size, but GP has lower specific surface area and higher electronic conductivity. Electrochemical measurements indicate that SCNTGP is more effective in improving the electrochemical performance of LiCoO{sub 2} composite cathode under the same conditions. The reason is described as follows. SCNT connect the isolated GP particles to form a more valid conductive network. In addition, SCNT has a certain specific mesoporous surface area, which can absorb some electrolyte solution and then provide buffer lithium ions for quick electrochemical reactions. Consequently, the combination of these two factors would be responsible to the improvement in the electrochemical performance of the SCNTGP loaded cathode.

  13. October 1999, 2007 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 Some additional topics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    1 October 1999, 2007 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 Some additional topics in numerical integration This set integration -- Matlab's integration software October 1999, 2007 Dianne P. O'Leary 2 Adaptive integration". easy easy hard easy very hard f(t) October 1999, 2007 Dianne P. O'Leary 3 Non-Adaptive integration

  14. Assessment of the Psoriatic Transcriptome in a Large Sample: Additional Regulated Genes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abecasis, Goncalo

    ,3 To further elucidate molecular alterations in psoriasis, we performed a gene expression study of 58 paired regulated transcripts in psoriasis provides additional insight into the pathogenic mechanisms involved and emphasizes the need for more complex yet tractable experimental models of psoriasis. Journal of Investigative

  15. Enhancement of heat and mass transfer in metal hydride beds with the addition of Al plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    in the hydriding process with the addition of internal aluminum plates. The two-dimensional equations governing during the absorption/desorption process in the metal hydride beds. The main factors governing the metal hydride matrix and kinetics of the hydrogen sorption processes, etc. By ne- glecting the hydrogen

  16. Improved Irradiation Performance of Uranium-Molybdenum/Aluminum Dispersion Fuel by Silicon Addition in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeon Soo Kim; G. L. Hofman; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2013-10-01

    Uranium-molybdenum fuel particle dispersion in aluminum is a form of fuel under development for conversion of high-power research and test reactors from highly enriched to low-enriched uranium in the U.S. Global Threat Reduction Initiative program (also known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program). Extensive irradiation tests have been conducted to find a solution for problems caused by interaction layer growth and pore formation between U-Mo and Al. Adding a small amount of Si (up to [approximately]5 wt%) in the Al matrix was one of the proposed remedies. The effect of silicon addition in the Al matrix was examined using irradiation test results by comparing side-by-side samples with different Si additions. Interaction layer growth was progressively reduced with increasing Si addition to the matrix Al, up to 4.8 wt%. The Si addition also appeared to delay pore formation and growth between the U-Mo and Al.

  17. New Catalyst Might Expand Bio-Ethanol's Possible uses: fuel additives, rubber and solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and solvents RESULTS To turn bio-ethanol into chemicals that are typically made from petroleum, re- searchers-boosting gas and fuel ad- ditives, bio-based rubber for tires and a safer solvent for the chemicals industry Univer- sity have potentially found a renewable path to fuel additives, rubber and solvents. Scientists

  18. Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Li

    Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum form 27 July 2010 Accepted 3 September 2010 Keywords: High-energy-density fuels Droplet combustion n-decane-based fuels. Five distinctive stages (preheating and ignition, classical combustion

  19. Trends in Hydraulic Fracturing Distributions and Treatment Fluids, Additives, Proppants, and Water Volumes Applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trends in Hydraulic Fracturing Distributions and Treatment Fluids, Additives, Proppants, and Water.S. Geological Survey #12;Cover photos. U.S. hydraulic fracturing operation (front and back covers). Photos courtesy of Mark Engle, U.S. Geological Survey. #12;Trends in Hydraulic Fracturing Distributions

  20. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES To learn more about the field and career options in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Timothy J.

    : American Physical Society aps.org Physics World physicsworld.com American Institute of Physics aipADDITIONAL RESOURCES To learn more about the field and career options in Physics, please visit.org Focus on Careers: PHYSICS Physics graduate study at Brandeis University features a challenging

  1. An Additive Branch-and-Bound Algorithm for the Pickup and Delivery Traveling Salesman Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrabs, Francesco

    in the management of automatic guided vehicles that load items on one end and unload them at the other end [Erdogan with LIFO or FIFO Loading Francesco Carrabs and Raffaele Cerulli Dipartimento di Matematica ed Informatica This paper introduces an additive branch-and-bound algorithm for two variants of the pickup and delivery

  2. REGISTRATION IN iSIS Additional information about fall 2013 course registration, per the ASE Registrar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufts University

    #04022013 REGISTRATION IN iSIS Additional information about fall 2013 course registration, per the ASE Registrar This year, fall 2013 registration will happen in iSIS, Tufts' new Integrated Student Information System, located at http://go.tufts.edu/isis. Accessing iSIS Log into iSIS with your Tufts Username

  3. Fine limestone additions to regulate setting in high volume fly ash mixtures Dale P. Bentz a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Fine limestone additions to regulate setting in high volume fly ash mixtures Dale P. Bentz a September 2011 Keywords: Blended cement High volume fly ash Isothermal calorimetry Limestone Particle size Setting Strength Ternary blend a b s t r a c t High volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete mixtures are being

  4. Perfect Strong Scaling Using No Additional Energy James Demmel, Andrew Gearhart, Benjamin Lipshitz, and Oded Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Perfect Strong Scaling Using No Additional Energy James Demmel, Andrew Gearhart, Benjamin Lipshitz, and Oded Schwartz Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, USA {demmel,agearh,lipshitz,odedsc}@cs.berkeley.edu Abstract--Energy efficiency of computing devices

  5. Growth and yield comparisons of Pix® Plus and additional Bacillus cereus treated cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuti, Russell Carlo

    2001-01-01

    to assess the benefits of additional BC applications to Pix® Plus treated cotton. Experimental design was a six treatment Latin square with five experimental treatments and an untreated check (UTC). All five treatments received 0.58 L ha?ą Pix® Plus...

  6. Complementarity in direct searches for additional Higgs bosons at the LHC and the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Kanemura; Hiroshi Yokoya; Ya-Juan Zheng

    2014-07-28

    We discuss complementarity of discovery reaches of heavier neutral Higgs bosons and charged Higgs bosons at the LHC and the International Linear Collider (ILC) in two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs). We perform a comprehensive analysis on their production and decay processes for all types of Yukawa interaction under the softly-broken discrete symmetry which is introduced to avoid flavour changing neutral currents, and we investigate parameter spaces of discovering additional Higgs bosons at the ILC beyond the LHC reach. We find that the 500 GeV run of the ILC with the integrated luminosity of 500 fb^{-1} shows an advantage for discovering the additional Higgs bosons in the region where the LHC cannot discover them with the integrated luminosity of 300 fb^{-1}. For the 1 TeV run of the ILC with the integrated luminosity of 1 ab^{-1}, production processes of an additional Higgs boson associated with the top quark can be useful as discovery channels in some parameter spaces where the LHC with the integrated luminosity of 3000 fb^{-1} cannot reach. It is emphasized that the complementary study at the LHC and the ILC is useful not only to survey additional Higgs bosons at the TeV scale, but also to discriminate types of Yukawa interaction in the 2HDM.

  7. NMR Spectroscopic Investigations of Mixed Aggregates Underlying Highly Enantioselective 1,2-Additions of Lithium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collum, David B.

    ,2-Additions of Lithium Cyclopropylacetylide to Quinazolinones Rodney L. Parsons, Jr.,*, Joseph M. Fortunak Abstract: The solution structures of mixed aggregates derived from lithium alkoxides and lithium acetylides that mixtures of lithium cyclopropylacetylide (RCCLi), a (+)-carene-derived amino alkoxide (R*OLi), and lithium

  8. Long range ordered alloys modified by addition of niobium and cerium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.

    1984-08-22

    Long range ordered alloys are described having the nominal composition (Fe,Ni,Co)/sub 3/ (V,M) where M is a ductility enhancing metal selected from the group Ti, Zr, Hf with additions of small amounts of cerium and niobium to dramatically enhance the creep properties of the resulting alloys.

  9. The correlation of microchemical properties to antiwear (AW) performance in ashless thiophosphate oil additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

    May 2004 X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at macro-scale (mm2 ) and X oil additives M.N. Najmana, , M. Kasraia, *, G. M. Bancrofta , B.H. Frazerb and G. De Stasiob and spatial distributions of chemical species in tribochemical films generated from ashless thiophosphate oil

  10. Microwave photochemistry. Photoinitiated radical addition of tetrahydrofuran to peruorohexylethene under microwave irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    Żuorohexylethene under microwave irradiation VladimőÂr CőÂrkva, Milan HaÂjek* Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals combined irradiation using a new simple photochemical reactor developed for organic synthetic reactions reserved. Keywords: Radical addition; Microwave irradiation; Photoinitiation; Electrodeless UV lamp

  11. Kyotoforcommuters Offset schemes are a small but potentially useful addition to the carbon balance sheet.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Kyotoforcommuters Offset schemes are a small but potentially useful addition to the carbon balance emissions in regions of the world where it is inexpensive to do so: for example, households in India or Peru address the issue. Consumers of goods and services that depend on the burning of fossil fuels also have

  12. TYPES OF PAINT DIY CHECKLIST Consists of pigments, additives and binders in an oil or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    TYPES OF PAINT DIY CHECKLIST PAINT · Consists of pigments, additives and binders in an oil or water of application and durability. · Cheaper paint generally contains more solvents than more expensive paint-based). · Oil-based (solvent-/polyurethane-based, also known as alkyd paint). · Natural (eg. mineral paint

  13. Effects of silica nanoparticle addition to the secondary coating of dual-coated optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Effects of silica nanoparticle addition to the secondary coating of dual-coated optical fibers J Available online 30 March 2006 Abstract The mechanical and optical properties of dual-coated optical fibers with silica nanoparticles added to the secondary (outer) coating have been investigated. Incorporation

  14. Strain-Release Activation of ?,?-Unsaturated Amides Towards Conjugate Addition of N, O and S - Nucleophiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banning, Joseph Erik

    2013-05-31

    -aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid derivatives. v Table of Contents Chapter 1. Activation methods for conjugate addition to ?,?-unsaturated amides. ................................... 1 1.1. Introduction... ...................................................................................... 5 1.4. Nitrogen-centered nucleophiles and unactivated systems ............................................................. 10 1.5. Nitrogen-centered nucleophiles and activated systems...

  15. The impact of additives found in industrial formulations of TCE on the wettability of sandstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    The impact of additives found in industrial formulations of TCE on the wettability of sandstone) that are often encountered in industrial solvent formulations. Wettability assessments were made on sandstone wetting preference of sandstone which frequently resulted in neutral wetting conditions. The large volume

  16. Kinetic effect of Pd additions on the hydrogen uptake of chemically activated, ultramicroporous carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C

    2010-01-01

    The effect of mixing chemically-activated ultramicroporous carbon (UMC) with Pd nanopowder is investigated. Results show that Pd addition doubles the rate of hydrogen uptake, but does not enhance the hydrogen capacity or improve desorption kinetics. The effect of Pd on the rate of hydrogen adsorption supports the occurrence of the hydrogen spillover mechanism in the Pd - UMC system.

  17. FOOD COMPOSITION AND ADDITIVES GMOtrack: Generator of Cost-Effective GMO Testing Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novak, Petra Kralj

    FOOD COMPOSITION AND ADDITIVES GMOtrack: Generator of Cost-Effective GMO Testing Strategies PETRA are in the approval process. Many countries have adopted legislation to deal with GMO-related issues such as food safety, environmental concerns, and consumers' right of choice, making GMO traceability a necessity

  18. Effect of additives on the reduction of nitrogen oxides using cyanuric acid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standridge, Brad Lee

    1994-01-01

    The addition of cyanuric acid to hot exhaust flows has been shown in the past to selectively remove much of the nitric oxide (NO) emitted from combustion sources. Known as the RapreNOx process, this approach to pollution control does not require a...

  19. Introduction to CHART: a graphic analysis and display system. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbig, J.; Sventek, V.

    1984-08-01

    Chart is an interactive graphics program that can be used to create tables of data and to display this data as a table or as a graph. Several different graphic forms are available, including bar charts, line graphs, and pie charts. Chart is interactive; this means that commands are typed by the user at a terminal and their effects are seen in a few seconds. It is easy to experiment with different display formats and then choose the one that displays your data most effectively. Chart also makes it easy to start with a simple table and then gradually add additional features such as titles, footnotes, and complex column headings in gradual steps. Each step gives the user a clearer idea of what the final published table or graph should look like in order to best communicate the meaning of the data. This manual provides an introduction to using Chart and at the end of the course you will be able to produce tables and graphic displays like those shown in Figures 1 through 4. The Introduction to Chart course assumes that the user has taken the Introduction to the Distributed Computer Network course or can demonstrate knowledge of the topics covered in that course.

  20. Organizational Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Careers/ Human ResourcesOrg Chart

  1. Titanium addition practice, and maintenance for the hearths in AHMSA`s blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, A.G.; Jimenez, G.; Castillo, J. [Altos Hornos de Mexico, Monclova (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    Altos Hornos de Mexico (AHMSA) is a steel company located in Northern Mexico, in the state of Coahuila. Currently there are three blast furnaces in operation and one more about to finish its general repair. This last one is to remain as a back-up unit. Because of blast furnace hearth wear outs AHMSA has developed some maintenance procedures. These procedures are based on titanium ore additions and hearth thermic control monitoring. There are also some other maintenance practices adopted to the working operations to assure that such operations detect and avoid in time hearth wear outs that place personnel and/or the unit in danger (due to hearth leaks). This paper describes titanium ore addition to No. 2 blast furnace during the final campaign and it also illustrates maintenance practices and continuous monitoring of temperature trends both of which were implemented at AHMSA`s No. 5 blast furnace.

  2. Improvement of mechanical properties by additive assisted laser sintering of PEEK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroh, M., E-mail: michael.kroh@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de; Bonten, C., E-mail: michael.kroh@ikt.uni-stuttgart.de [Institut für Kunststofftechnik, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Eyerer, P., E-mail: peter.eyerer@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology (ICT) (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The additive assisted laser sintering was recently developed at IKT: A carbon black (CB) additive is used to adjust the polymer's laser absorption behavior with the aim to improve the interconnection of sintered powder layers. In this paper a parameter study, Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) samples were prepared with different contents of carbon black and were laser sintered with varying thermal treatment. The samples were mechanically tested and investigated by optical light and transmission electron microscopy. An influence on the morphology at the border areas of particles and intersections of laser sintered layers was found. Depending on the viscosity of the raw material and CB content, different shapes of lamellae were observed. These (trans-) crystalline or polymorph structures, respectively, influence the thermal and mechanical behavior of the virgin PEEK. Moreover, the thermal treatment during the sintering process caused an improvement of mechanical properties like tensile strength and elongation at break.

  3. The Dynamics of Bistable Switching Behavior in Limit Cycle Systems with Additive Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Schwemmer; Jay M. Newby

    2015-01-23

    Additive noise is known to produce counter-intuitive behaviors in nonlinear dynamical systems. Previously, it was shown that systems with a deterministic limit cycle can display bistable switching between metastable states in the presence of asymmetric additive white noise. Here, we systematically analyze the dynamics of this bistable behavior and show how the vector field away from the limit cycle influences the rate and directionality of the bistable switching. Using stochastic phase reduction methods, we identify mechanisms underlying different rates of switching and predict when the system will rotate in the opposite direction of the deterministic limit cycle. Thus, this work presents an alternative mechanism for generating a range of bistable switch-like behaviors that have been observed in a number of physical systems.

  4. Temperature Dependent Interaction Non-Additivity in the Inorganic Ionic Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban, Vitaly V

    2015-01-01

    Interaction non-additivity in the chemical context means that binding of certain atom to a reference atom cannot be fully predicted from the interactions of these two atoms with other atoms. This constitutes one of key phenomena determining an identity of our world, which would have been much poorer otherwise. Ionic systems provide a good example of the interaction non-additivity in most cases due to electron transfer and delocalization effects. We report Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations of LiCl, NaCl, and KCl at 300, 1500, and 2000 K. We show that our observations originate from interplay of thermal motion during BOMD and cation nature. In the case of alkali cations, ionic nature plays a more significant role than temperature. Our results bring fundamental understanding of electronic effects in the condensed phase of ionic systems and foster progress in physical chemistry and engineering.

  5. Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jianlu; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Vijayakumar, M.; Kim, Soowhan; Wang, Wei; Schwenzer, Birgit; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-01

    The stability of the electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow battery was investigated with ex-situ heating/cooling treatment and in-situ flow-battery testing methods. The effects of inorganic and organic additives have been studied. The additives containing the ions of potassium, phosphate, and polyphosphate are not suitable stabilizing agents because of their reactions with V(V) ions, forming precipitates of KVSO6 or VOPO4. Of the chemicals studied, polyacrylic acid and its mixture with CH3SO3H are the most promising stabilizing candidates which can stabilize all the four vanadium ions (V2+, V3+, VO2+, and VO2+) in electrolyte solutions up to 1.8 M. However, further effort is needed to obtain a stable electrolyte solution with >1.8 M V5+ at temperatures higher than 40 °C.

  6. Methods of cracking a crude product to produce additional crude products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX)

    2009-09-08

    A method for producing a crude product is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce one or more crude products. At least one of the crude products has a boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. as determined by ASTM Method D5307. The crude product having the boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. is catalytically cracked to produce one or more additional crude products. At least one of the additional crude products is a second gas stream. The second gas stream has a boiling point of at most 38.degree. C. at 0.101 MPa.

  7. Lithium difluoro(oxalato)borate as additive to Improve the thermal stability of llithiated graphite.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Z.; Qin, Y.; Liu, J.; Amine, K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-01-21

    The reaction of lithiated graphite with a nonaqueous electrolyte of 1.2 M LiPF{sub 6} in ethylene carbonate/ethyl methyl carbonate (3:7 by weight) was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. The decomposition of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) took place at about 100 C and was followed by a continuous formation/decomposition of the SEI up to 250 C. Another two peaks were observed at temperatures above 250 C. These peaks were attributed to the major reaction of lithiated graphite with the nonaqueous electrolyte. With the addition of lithium difluoro(oxalato)borate as an electrolyte additive, the onset temperatures of the three peaks were pushed higher, as confirmed by the activation energies obtained.

  8. The effect of additives on effective diffusivities in solidified/stabilized wastes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyi, Aye Aye

    1992-01-01

    Cement ? Fly Ash (PCFA) Portland Cement-Bentonite (PCB) Portland Cement-Silica Fume (PCSF) Portland Cement-Sodium Silicate (PCSS) COMPARISON BETWEEN SCC AND SSCC TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON (TOC) ANALYSIS COST ANALYSIS SUMMARY OF RESULTS CONCLUSIONS... Solutions PORTLAND CEMENT BASED SOLIDIFICATION Soft Water 18 18 19 20 vii SIMPLE LEACH MODEL THE ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY METHOD CORRELATIONS BETWEEN POROSITY AND EFFECTIVE DIFFUSIVITY ADDITIVES Pozzolans Fly Ash . Microsilica Sodium Silicate...

  9. Analysis of Tank 43H Samples at the Conclusion of Uranyl Carbonate Addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.N.

    2002-10-15

    Tank 43H serves as the feed Tank to the 2H evaporator. In the months of July and August 2001, about 21,000 gallons of a depleted uranyl carbonate solution were added to Tank 43H and agitated with two Flygt mixers. The depleted uranium addition served to decrease the U-235 enrichment in the Tank 43H supernate so that the supernate could be evaporated with no risk of accumulating enriched uranium.

  10. Synergistic Effects Between Phosphonium-Alkylphosphate Ionic Liquids and Zinc Dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) as Lubricant Additives

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qu, Jun; Barnhill, William C.; Luo, Huimin; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Leonard, Donovan N.; Landauer, Alexander K.; Kheireddin, Bassem; Gao, Hong; Papke, Brian L; Dai, Sheng

    2015-07-14

    Unique synergistic effects between phosphonium-alkylphosphate ionic liquids and zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) are discovered when used together as lubricant additives, resulting in significant friction and wear reduction along with distinct tribofilm composition and mechanical properties. The synergism is attributed to the 30-70× higher-than-nominal concentrations of hypothetical new compounds (via anion exchange between IL and ZDDP) on the fluid surface/interface.

  11. Relativistic velocity addition law derived from a machine gun analogy and time dilation only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

    2007-03-15

    We consider a scenario that involves a machine gun, the bullets it fires and a moving target, considered from the rest frame of the machine gun and from the rest frame of the target respectively. Involving the special relativity via its two postulates and the time dilation formula we derive the relativistic velocity addition law showing that it leads to the Lorentz transformations for the space-time coordinates of the same event.

  12. Electrodeposition of nickel-chromium-phosphorous alloys in the presence of additives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindlish, Rahul

    1991-01-01

    practical applications because of their unique properties. They are chemically and structurally homoge- neous (1, 2). They are mechanically hard and have an extremely high tensile strength. They are single-phase alloys without long range crystalline order... was utilized in order to determine the effect of these additives on the surface morphology of the electrodeposited alloy. The crystallinity of the deposited material was determined by X-ray diffraction. Corrosion testing of the deposited alloy was carried...

  13. Solar neutrino spectrum, sterile neutrinos and additional radiation in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. de Holanda; A. Yu. Smirnov

    2011-02-01

    Recent results from the SNO, Super-Kamiokande and Borexino experiments do not show the expected upturn of the energy spectrum of events (the ratio $R \\equiv N_{obs}/N_{SSM}$) at low energies. At the same time, cosmological observations testify for possible existence of additional relativistic degrees of freedom in the early Universe: $\\Delta N_{eff} = 1 - 2$. These facts strengthen the case of very light sterile neutrino, $\

  14. Redox Shuttle Additive, Wins 2014 R&D 100 Award | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnowRedox Shuttle Additive, Wins 2014

  15. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO?) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO?) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO? the film exhibits thermalmore »instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO? increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO?. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO? concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO? promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO? adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.« less

  16. Effect of pretreatment and additives on boron release during pyrolysis and gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuuki Mochizuki; Katsuyasu Sugawara; Yukio Enda [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Resources Science

    2009-09-15

    Boron is one of the most toxic and highly volatile elements present in coal. As part of a series of studies carried out on coal cleaning to prevent environmental problems and to promote efficient coal utilization processes, the removal of boron by leaching with water and acetic acid has been investigated. The effects of the addition of ash components, that is, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and CaO on the control of boron release during pyrolysis and gasification were investigated. Here, 20-70% of boron in coal was removed by leaching the coal with water and acetic acid. Boron leached by water and acetic acid was related to the volatiles released from coal in pyrolysis below 1173 K. The addition of ash components such as SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was found to be effective in suppressing the release of boron during pyrolysis at temperatures below and above 1173 K, respectively. The addition of CaO to coal was effective in suppressing the release of boron during gasification at 1173 K. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Reducing the ordering temperature of CoPt nanoparticles by B additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khemjeen, Yutthaya; Pinitsoontorn, Supree Chompoosor, Apiwat; Maensiri, Santi

    2014-08-07

    We reported the effect of boron addition on magnetic properties and structure of CoPt nanoparticles prepared by a polyol method. The magnetic property measurement showed that the CoPt-B sample exhibited a much larger coercivity compared to the sample without B additive at the same annealing temperature. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the average particle size was about 2?nm for the as-synthesized sample with the ratio of Co and Pt close to 1:1. After annealing, the particle sizes increased but the composition was maintained. The phase transformation of the nanoparticles versus temperature was investigated using a combination of X-ray diffraction and in-situ X-ray absorption analysis. It was shown that the phase transition temperature at which the nanoparticles change from the disordered A1 phase to the ordered L1{sub 0} phase occurs at temperature of 600?°C. We concluded that boron additives could reduce the ordering temperature of CoPt of about 100?°C.

  18. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11 -Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Lanping; Jin, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenyong; Sellmyer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. The effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox(x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. The coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x?1.5). The maximum energy product(BH)maxincreases with increasingxfrom 0.5?MGOe forx=0to a maximum value of 4.2?MGOe forx=1.5. The smallest domain size with a relativelymore »short magnetic correlation length of 128?nm and largest root-mean-square phase shift?rmsvalue of 0.66° are observed for thex=1.5. The optimal Mo addition promotes magnetic domain structure refinement and thus leads to a significant increase in coercivity and energy product in this sample.« less

  19. Sufficient conditions for the additivity of stall forces generated by multiple filaments or motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripti Bameta; Dipjyoti Das; Dibyendu Das; Ranjith Padinhateeri; Mandar M. Inamdar

    2015-03-23

    Molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments mostly work collectively under opposing forces. This opposing force may be due to cargo carried by motors, or resistance coming from cell membrane pressing against the cytoskeletal filaments. Certain recent studies have shown that the collective maximum force (stall force) generated by multiple cytoskeletal filaments or molecular motors may not always be just a simple sum of stall force for individual filaments or motors. To understand this phenomena of excess or deficit collective force generation, we study a broad class of models of both cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. We argue that the stall force generated by a group of filaments or motors is additive, i.e., the stall force of N filaments(motors) is N times the stall force of one filament (motor), when the system is in equilibrium at stall. Consequently, we show that this additivity typically does not hold when the system departs from equilibrium at stall. We thus present a novel and unified understanding of existing models exhibiting such non- addivity, and generalize our arguments by developing new models that demonstrate this phenomena. We also propose a quantity similar to thermodynamic efficiency to provide a simple understanding of deviation from stall-force additivity for filament and motor collectives.

  20. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO?) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO?) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO? the film exhibits thermal instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO? increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO?. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO? concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO? promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO? adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.

  1. Complementarity in direct searches for additional Higgs bosons at the LHC and the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanemura, Shinya; Zheng, Ya-Juan

    2014-01-01

    We discuss complementarity of discovery reaches of heavier neutral Higgs bosons and charged Higgs bosons at the LHC and the International Linear Collider (ILC) in two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs). We perform a comprehensive analysis on their production and decay processes for all types of Yukawa interaction under the softly-broken discrete symmetry which is introduced to avoid flavour changing neutral currents, and we investigate parameter spaces of discovering additional Higgs bosons at the ILC beyond the LHC reach. We find that the 500 GeV run of the ILC with the integrated luminosity of 500 fb^{-1} shows an advantage for discovering the additional Higgs bosons in the region where the LHC cannot discover them with the integrated luminosity of 300 fb^{-1}. For the 1 TeV run of the ILC with the integrated luminosity of 1 ab^{-1}, production processes of an additional Higgs boson associated with the top quark can be useful as discovery channels in some parameter spaces where the LHC with the integrated luminos...

  2. ANALYSIS OF DISTRIBUTION FEEDER LOSSES DUE TO ADDITION OF DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Singh, Ruchi

    2011-08-09

    Distributed generators (DG) are small scale power supplying sources owned by customers or utilities and scattered throughout the power system distribution network. Distributed generation can be both renewable and non-renewable. Addition of distributed generation is primarily to increase feeder capacity and to provide peak load reduction. However, this addition comes with several impacts on the distribution feeder. Several studies have shown that addition of DG leads to reduction of feeder loss. However, most of these studies have considered lumped load and distributed load models to analyze the effects on system losses, where the dynamic variation of load due to seasonal changes is ignored. It is very important for utilities to minimize the losses under all scenarios to decrease revenue losses, promote efficient asset utilization, and therefore, increase feeder capacity. This paper will investigate an IEEE 13-node feeder populated with photovoltaic generators on detailed residential houses with water heater, Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning (HVAC) units, lights, and other plug and convenience loads. An analysis of losses for different power system components, such as transformers, underground and overhead lines, and triplex lines, will be performed. The analysis will utilize different seasons and different solar penetration levels (15%, 30%).

  3. Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

    2014-02-10

    We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

  4. Effects of Additive Elements on the Phase Formation and Morphological Stability of Nickel Monosilicide Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavoie,C.; Detavernier, C.; Cabral, Jr. , C.; d'Heurle, F.; Kellock, A.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Harper, J.

    2006-01-01

    Alloying elements can substantially affect the formation and morphological stability of nickel monosilicide. A comprehensive study of phase formation was performed on 24 Ni alloys with varying concentrations of alloying elements. Silicide films have been used for more than 15 years to contact the source, drain and gate of state-of-the-art complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. In the past, the addition of alloying elements was shown to improve the transformation from the high resistivity C49 to the low resistivity C54-TiSi{sub 2} phase and to allow for the control of surface and interface roughness of CoSi{sub 2} films as well as produce significant improvements with respect to agglomeration of the films. Using simultaneous time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD), resistance and light scattering measurements, we follow the formation of the silicide phases in real time during rapid thermal annealing. Additions to the Ni-Si system lead to modifications in the phase formation sequence at low temperatures (metal-rich phases), to variations in the formation temperatures of NiSi and NiSi{sub 2}, and to changes in the agglomeration behavior of the films formed. Of the 24 elements studied, additions of Mo, Re, Ta and W are amongst the most efficient to retard agglomeration while elements such as Pd, Pt and Rh are most efficient to retard the formation of NiSi{sub 2}.

  5. Nucleophilic additions to a para-benzyne derived from an enediyne : : Exploring the non-radical reactivity of a diradical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes-Rodríguez, Gabriel J.

    2013-01-01

    addition to a para-benzyne derived from an enediyne. The wasaddition to a p-benzyne derived from an enediyne”. Perrin,additions to a para-benzyne derived from an enediyne”.

  6. ELECTRONIC CHARTS INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    199 CHAPTER 14 ELECTRONIC CHARTS INTRODUCTION 1400. The Importance of Electronic Charts Since. Electronic charts automate the process of integrating real-time positions with the chart display and allow is expected to take and plot a fix every three minutes. An electronic chart system can do it once per second

  7. The Effects of Various Conductive Additive and Polymeric Binder Contents on the Performance of a Lithium-ion Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, G.

    2008-01-01

    conductive additive, and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF), a polymer binder) on the power performance of lithium-ion composite

  8. Toward Integration of Computer Aided Process Planning and Design for Additive Manufacturing in the Early Design Stages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Toward Integration of Computer Aided Process Planning and Design for Additive Manufacturing in the Early Design Stages Sarah Keenan Additive manufacturing (AM) is a developing field of manufacturing into account the advantages and constraints of AM processes, rules for Design for Additive Manufacturing (DFAM

  9. Abstract--Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    Abstract-- Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses. I. INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing, or 3D

  10. A study of the regeneration process in diesel particulate traps using a copper fuel additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, J.C.; Opris, C.N.; Baumgard, K.J.; Johnson, J.H. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The goals of this research are to understand the regeneration process in ceramic (Cordierite) monolith traps using a copper fuel additive and to investigate the various conditions that lead to trap regeneration failure. The copper additive lowers the trap regeneration temperature from approximately 500 C to 375 C and decreases the time necessary for regeneration. Because of these characteristics, it is important to understand the effect of the additive on regeneration when excessive particulate matter accumulation occurs in the trap. The effects of particulate mass loading on regeneration temperatures and regeneration time were studied for both the controlled (engine operated at full load rated speed) and uncontrolled conditions. The trap peak temperatures were higher for the uncontrolled than the controlled regeneration. The higher peak trap temperatures were predominantly controlled by the effect of the exhaust flow rates on the energy transfer processes. The total regeneration time was faster for the controlled regeneration compared to the uncontrolled regeneration. All traps passed the controlled regeneration tests having maximum temperatures less than 900 C. During the uncontrolled regeneration tests, trap failure occurred at 135 and 139 g particulate matter loadings. The maximum temperatures were in excess of 1,150 C. The pressure drop across the trap was modeled using the one dimensional Darcy`s law which accounted for the pressure drop due to the ceramic wall and the particulate layer. The experimental results for the substrate correlate well with the empirical substrate pressure drop models available in the literature. The models also enable an estimate to be made regarding trap mass loading. These data along with the laboratory data have indicated that mass loadings greater than 110 g followed by high temperature operation and subsequent engine idling can result in trap failures during regeneration.

  11. Cytotoxic Effects of Temozolomide and Radiation are Additive- and Schedule-Dependent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chalmers, Anthony J., E-mail: a.j.chalmers@sussex.ac.u [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, University of Sussex, Falmer (United Kingdom); Genome Damage and Stability Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer (United Kingdom); Ruff, Elliot M. [Royal Sussex County Hospital, Eastern Road, Brighton (United Kingdom); Martindale, Christine [UCL Cancer Institute, Paul O'Gorman Building, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Lovegrove, Nadia [Genome Damage and Stability Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer (United Kingdom); Short, Susan C. [UCL Cancer Institute, Paul O'Gorman Building, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Despite aggressive therapy comprising radical radiation and temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy, the prognosis for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains poor, particularly if tumors express O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT). The interactions between radiation and TMZ remain unclear and have important implications for scheduling and for developing strategies to improve outcomes. Methods and Materials: Factors determining the effects of combination therapy on clonogenic survival, cell-cycle checkpoint signaling and DNA repair were investigated in four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, U87-MG). Results: Combining TMZ and radiation yielded additive cytotoxicity, but only when TMZ was delivered 72 h before radiation. Radiosensitization was not observed. TMZ induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest at 48-72 h, coincident with phosphorylation of Chk1 and Chk2. Additive G2/M arrest and Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation was only observed when TMZ preceded radiation by 72 h. The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) inhibitor KU-55933 increased radiation sensitivity and delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks, but did not influence TMZ effects. The multiple kinase inhibitor caffeine enhanced the cytotoxicity of chemoradiation and exacerbated DNA damage. Conclusions: TMZ is not a radiosensitizing agent but yields additive cytotoxicity in combination with radiation. Our data indicate that TMZ treatment should commence at least 3 days before radiation to achieve maximum benefit. Activation of G2/M checkpoint signaling by TMZ and radiation has a cytoprotective effect that can be overcome by dual inhibition of ATM and ATR. More specific inhibition of checkpoint signaling will be required to increase treatment efficacy without exacerbating toxicity.

  12. Effect of oxygen compounds addition on the hydrocracking of coal derived liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Yoshiki; Kodera, Yoichi; Kamo, Tohru; Kushiyama, Satoshi [National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Hydrocarbon Research Lab.

    1998-12-31

    Coal derived liquid from liquefaction, coking and low temperature pyrolysis contains considerable amounts of alkylphenols with alkylbenzenes and alkylnaphthalenes. To produce and purify useful chemicals from coal-derived liquid, hydrocracking and hydrotreating of alkylphenol mixture is a very important process. In this study the effects of oxygen compounds such as dimethylcarbonate (DMC) addition on the hydrocracking of alkylphenols and coal-derived liquid were investigated to decrease hydrogen consumption due to the production of water from the removal of OH group. From the hydrocracking of 3,5-dimethylphenol (3,5-DMP) without DMC at 700 C, residence time of 3--10 sec under hydrogen-to-reactant molar ratio of more than 10 using atmospheric flow apparatus with quartz reactor, m-xylene and m-cresol were produced with the production ratio of 1:1.8. However the dehydroxylation to produce m-xylene was decreased by the addition of 10% DMC with the 50% increased production ratio of 1:2.7. These are considered due to the strong interaction between OH group and DMC. Similar reaction behavior was observed in the hydrocracking of 2,5-DMP and the production ratio of (o-cresol + m-cresol)/p-xylene slightly increased from 3.0 to 3.5 by the addition of DMC. On the other hand, the products distribution did not change with and without DMC in the case of 2,6-DMP. This indicates the interaction is hindered by steric effect by the neighboring CH{sub 3} group. The effect of other oxygen compounds on the hydrocracking and the products distribution from the hydrocracking of coal-derived liquids is also discussed.

  13. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S.

    1994-11-01

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  14. Emerging Technologies in the Built Environment: Geographic Information Science (GIS), 3D Printing, and Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract 1: Geographic information systems emerged as a computer application in the late 1960s, led in part by projects at ORNL. The concept of a GIS has shifted through time in response to new applications and new technologies, and is now part of a much larger world of geospatial technology. This presentation discusses the relationship of GIS and estimating hourly and seasonal energy consumption profiles in the building sector at spatial scales down to the individual parcel. The method combines annual building energy simulations for city-specific prototypical buildings and commonly available geospatial data in a GIS framework. Abstract 2: This presentation focuses on 3D printing technologies and how they have rapidly evolved over the past couple of years. At a basic level, 3D printing produces physical models quickly and easily from 3D CAD, BIM (Building Information Models), and other digital data. Many AEC firms have adopted 3D printing as part of commercial building design development and project delivery. This presentation includes an overview of 3D printing, discusses its current use in building design, and talks about its future in relation to the HVAC industry. Abstract 3: This presentation discusses additive manufacturing and how it is revolutionizing the design of commercial and residential facilities. Additive manufacturing utilizes a broad range of direct manufacturing technologies, including electron beam melting, ultrasonic, extrusion, and laser metal deposition for rapid prototyping. While there is some overlap with the 3D printing talk, this presentation focuses on the materials aspect of additive manufacturing and also some of the more advanced technologies involved with rapid prototyping. These technologies include design of carbon fiber composites, lightweight metals processing, transient field processing, and more.

  15. Field-enhanced electrodes for additive-injection non-thermal plasma (NTP) processor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ferreri, Vincent (Westminster, CO); Kim, Yongho (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-04-21

    The present invention comprises a field enhanced electrode package for use in a non-thermal plasma processor. The field enhanced electrode package includes a high voltage electrode and a field-enhancing electrode with a dielectric material layer disposed in-between the high voltage electrode and the field-enhancing electrode. The field-enhancing electrode features at least one raised section that includes at least one injection hole that allows plasma discharge streamers to occur primarily within an injected additive gas.

  16. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Ronald Lee (Lakewood, CO); Elliott, Brian John (Superior, CO); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Golden, CO); Myers, Andrew William (Arvada, CO); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Boulder, CO)

    2006-01-17

    The present invention relates to a new class of surface modified particles and to a multi-step surface modification process for the preparation of the same. The multi-step surface functionalization process involves two or more reactions to produce particles that are compatible with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through organic linking groups.

  17. V-shaped resonators for addition of broad-area laser diode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda Y.

    2012-12-25

    A system and method for addition of broad-area semiconductor laser diode arrays are described. The system can include an array of laser diodes, a V-shaped external cavity, and grating systems to provide feedback for phase-locking of the laser diode array. A V-shaped mirror used to couple the laser diode emissions along two optical paths can be a V-shaped prism mirror, a V-shaped stepped mirror or include multiple V-shaped micro-mirrors. The V-shaped external cavity can be a ring cavity. The system can include an external injection laser to further improve coherence and phase-locking.

  18. Mineral resources of the Buffalo Hump and Sand Dunes Addition Wilderness Study Areas, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, A.B.; Barbon, H.N.; Kulik, D.M. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); McDonnell, J.R. Jr. (US Bureau of Mines (US))

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a study to assess the potential for undiscovered mineral resources and appraise the identified resources of the Buffalo Hump and Sand Dunes Addition Wilderness Study Areas, southwestern Wyoming, There are no mines, prospects, or mineralized areas nor any producing oil or gas wells; however, there are occurrences of coal, claystone and shale, and sand. There is a moderate resource potential for oil shale and natural gas and a low resource potential for oil, for metals, including uranium, and for geothermal sources.

  19. Enhanced performance of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells upon graphene addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robaeys, Pieter, E-mail: pieter.robaeys@uhasselt.be; Dierckx, Wouter; Dexters, Wim; Spoltore, Donato; Drijkoningen, Jeroen [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University (Belgium); Bonaccorso, Francesco [Cambridge Graphene Centre, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Graphene Labs, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Bourgeois, Emilie; D'Haen, Jan; Haenen, Ken; Manca, Jean V.; Nesladek, Milos [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC vzw (Belgium); Liesenborgs, Jori; Van Reeth, Frank [Expertise centre for Digital Media (EDM), Hasselt University (Belgium); Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C. [Cambridge Graphene Centre, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-25

    Graphene has potential for applications in solar cells. We show that the short circuit current density of P3HT (Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):PCBM((6,6)-Phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester) solar cells is enhanced by 10% upon the addition of graphene, with a 15% increase in the photon to electric conversion efficiency. We discuss the performance enhancement by studying the crystallization of P3HT, as well as the electrical transport properties. We show that graphene improves the balance between electron and hole mobilities with respect to a standard P3HT:PCBM solar cell.

  20. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, E. N. Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-15

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  1. Evaluation of biological treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater with pac addition. Project summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.A.; Osantowski, R.A.

    1988-07-01

    The purposes of the study were to: (1) attempt to find the cause of the formation of the viscous floating mass of mixed liquor solids (VFMLS), (2) generate additional research data for total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal from pharmaceutical wastewater using the PACT process, (3) evaluate the efficiency of PACT in removing specific organics, (4) evaluate the effectiveness of PACT in reducing effluent aquatic toxicity, and (5) evaluate the use of a selector to improve the settling characteristics of the mixed liquor. One control unit, two PACT units, and a unit equipped with a series of selector basins were operated.

  2. ,"U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015" ,"Release Date:","12/31/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"ReleaseAdditions

  3. Org Charts | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    orgANIZATION Charts Jefferson Lab Organizational Chart 12 GeV Project Organization Accelerator Operations, Research & Development Division Chief Operating Officer Chief Financial...

  4. Integrated reservoir characterization: Improvement in heterogeneities stochastic modelling by integration of additional external constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doligez, B.; Eschard, R.; Geffroy, F.

    1997-08-01

    The classical approach to construct reservoir models is to start with a fine scale geological model which is informed with petrophysical properties. Then scaling-up techniques allow to obtain a reservoir model which is compatible with the fluid flow simulators. Geostatistical modelling techniques are widely used to build the geological models before scaling-up. These methods provide equiprobable images of the area under investigation, which honor the well data, and which variability is the same than the variability computed from the data. At an appraisal phase, when few data are available, or when the wells are insufficient to describe all the heterogeneities and the behavior of the field, additional constraints are needed to obtain a more realistic geological model. For example, seismic data or stratigraphic models can provide average reservoir information with an excellent areal coverage, but with a poor vertical resolution. New advances in modelisation techniques allow now to integrate this type of additional external information in order to constrain the simulations. In particular, 2D or 3D seismic derived information grids, or sand-shale ratios maps coming from stratigraphic models can be used as external drifts to compute the geological image of the reservoir at the fine scale. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these new tools, their impact on the final reservoir model, and their sensitivity to some key parameters.

  5. Highly Aligned Carbon Fiber in Polymer Composite Structures via Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tekinalp, Halil L [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio M [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, diverging from traditional manufacturing techniques, such as casting and machining materials, can handle complex shapes with great design flexibility without the typical waste. Although this technique has been mainly used for rapid prototyping, interest is growing in using this method to directly manufacture actual parts of complex shape. To use 3D-printing additive manufacturing in wide spread applications, the technique and the feedstock materials require improvements to meet the mechanical requirements of load-bearing components. Thus, we investigated the short fiber (0.2 mm to 0.4 mm) reinforced acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene composites as a feedstock for 3D-printing in terms of their processibility, microstructure and mechanical performance; and also provided comparison with traditional compression molded composites. The tensile strength and modulus of 3D-printed samples increased ~115% and ~700%, respectively. 3D-printer yielded samples with very high fiber orientation in printing direction (up to 91.5 %), whereas, compression molding process yielded samples with significantly less fiber orientation. Microstructure-mechanical property relationships revealed that although the relatively high porosity is observed in the 3D-printed composites as compared to those produced by the conventional compression molding technique, they both exhibited comparable tensile strength and modulus. This phenomena is explained based on the changes in fiber orientation, dispersion and void formation.

  6. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and Additives for Diesel Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    The lubricating properties of two ionic liquids with the same anion but different cations, one ammonium IL [C8H17]3NH.Tf2N and one imidazolium IL C10mim.Tf2N, were evaluated both in neat form and as oil additives. Experiments were conducted using a standardized reciprocating sliding test using a segment of a Cr-plated diesel engine piston ring against a grey cast iron flat specimen with simulated honing marks as on the engine cylinder liner. The selected ionic liquids were benchmarked against conventional hydrocarbon oils. Substantial friction and wear reductions, up to 55% and 34%, respectively, were achieved for the neat ionic liquids compared to a fully-formulated 15W40 engine oil. Adding 5 vol% ILs into mineral oil has demonstrated significant improvement in the lubricity. One blend even outperformed the 15W40 engine oil with 9% lower friction and 34% less wear. Lubrication regime modeling, worn surface morphology examination, and surface chemical analysis were conducted to help understand the lubricating mechanisms for ionic liquids. Results suggest great potential for using ionic liquids as base lubricants or lubricant additives for diesel engine applications.

  7. Oil-Miscible and Non-Corrosive Phosphonium Ionic Liquids as Candidate Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Bo; Bansal, Dinesh G; Qu, Jun; Sun, Xiaoqi; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Blau, Peter Julian; Bunting, Bruce G; Mordukhovich, Gregory; Smolenski, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been receiving considerable attention from the lubricants industry as potential friction and wear-reducing additives, but their solubility in oils is an issue. Unlike most ionic liquids that are insoluble in non-polar hydrocarbon oils, this study reports phosphonium-based ILs (PP-ILs) that are fully miscible with both mineral oil-based and synthetic lubricants. Both the cation and anion in quaternary structures, long alkyl chains, and capability of pairing the cation and the anion via a H-O bond are hypothesized to improve the compatibility between ions and neutral oil molecules. The measured viscosities of the oil-IL blends agree well with the Refutas equation that is for solutions containing multiple components. High thermal stability and non-corrosiveness were observed for the PP-ILs. Effective friction reduction and anti-wear functionality have been demonstrated in tribological tests when adding 5 wt% of a PP-IL into a base oil, suggesting potential applications for using the oil-miscible PP-ILs as lubricant additives.

  8. Sufficient conditions for the additivity of stall forces generated by multiple filaments or motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bameta, Tripti; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments mostly work collectively under opposing forces. This opposing force may be due to cargo carried by motors, or resistance coming from cell membrane pressing against the cytoskeletal filaments. Certain recent studies have shown that the collective maximum force (stall force) generated by multiple cytoskeletal filaments or molecular motors may not always be just a simple sum of stall force for individual filaments or motors. To understand this phenomena of excess or deficit collective force generation, we study a broad class of models of both cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. We argue that the stall force generated by a group of filaments or motors is additive, i.e., the stall force of N filaments(motors) is N times the stall force of one filament (motor), when the system is in equilibrium at stall. Consequently, we show that this additivity typically does not hold when the system departs from equilibrium at stall. We thus present a novel and unified underst...

  9. Early Career: Templating of Liquid Crystal Microstructures by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinen, Jennifer M

    2014-12-31

    This research has shown that the microstructure of self-assembled copolymers can be decoupled from the polymer chemistry. The simplest polymer architecture, linear block copolymers, is valuable for a broad range of applications, including adhesives and coatings, medical devices, electronics and energy storage, because these block copolymers reproducibly self-assemble into microphase separated nanoscale domains. Unfortunately, the self-assembled microstructure is tuned by polymer composition, thus limiting the potential to simultaneously optimize chemical, mechanical, and transport properties for desired applications. To this end, much work was been put into manipulating block copolymer self-assembly independently of polymer composition. These efforts have included the use of additives or solvents to alter polymer chain conformation, the addition of a third monomer to produce ABC triblock terpolymers, architectures with mixed blocks, such as tapered/gradient polymers, and the synthesis of other nonlinear molecular architectures. This work has shown that the microstructures formed by linear ABC terpolymers can be altered by controlling the architecture of the polymer molecules at a constant monomer composition, so that the microstructure is tuned independently from the chemical properties.

  10. Third-body effects in termolecular reactions: halide ion addition to boron trifluoride and boron trichloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babcock, L.M.; Streit, G.E.

    1984-10-11

    The additions of F/sup -/ to BF/sub 3/ and Cl/sup -/ to BCl/sub 3/ have been examined in the presence of a variety of third bodies, M, by using the flowing afterglow technique. The rates of all of these addition reactions show both a pressure-dependent and a pressure-independent term; and an expression is included for the observed rate coefficient, which is a composite coefficient characteristic of both pressure-related processes. For the third bodies studied (He, CH/sub 4/ N/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, and CF/sub 4/) the predominant factor in determining the efficiency of M in the collisional stabilization of (BX/sub 3/X/sup 1 -/)* is its mass. The presence of internal degrees of freedom in the third body has little effect upon its efficiency even in the case where M is isostructural and isoelectronic with the adduct. These results strongly support a termolecular process in which V-T energy transfer predominates in the collisional deactivation of the excited nascent product. The pressure-independent deactivation channel is postulated to be a radiative process.

  11. Low fluid leakoff cementing compositions and filtration control additive for cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrest, G.T.

    1993-07-20

    A cementing composition is described, for cementing oil or gas wells penetrating subterranean formations, capable of forming a fluid slurry when mixed with water comprising: dry hydraulic cement; and a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh. In a process for cementing a casing in an oil or gas well penetrating a subterranean formation wherein a cement slurry, formed by mixing water and hydraulic cement, is pumped down the well to flow upwardly between the casing and the subterranean formation, the improvement is described comprising: utilizing as a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, and utilizing finely ground peanut hulls wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh.

  12. Sorbent preparation/modification/additives. Final report, September 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudich, M.E.; Venkataramakrishnan, R. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Sorbent preparation techniques used today have generally been adapted from techniques traditionally used by the lime industry. Traditional dry hydration and slaking processes have been optimized to produce materials intended for use in the building industry. These preparation techniques should be examined with an eye to optimization of properties important to the SO{sub 2} capture process. The study of calcium-based sorbents for sulfur dioxide capture is complicated by two factors: (1) little is known about the chemical mechanisms by which the standard sorbent preparation and enhancement techniques work, and (2) a sorbent preparation technique that produces a calcium-based sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in one regime of operation [flame zone (>2400 F), in-furnace (1600--2400 F), economizer (800--1100 F), after air preheater (<350 F)] may not produce a sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in the other reaction zones. Again, an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of sorbent enhancement is necessary if a systematic approach to sorbent development is to be used. As a long-term goal, an experimental program is being carried out for the purpose of (1) defining the effects of slaking conditions on the properties of calcium-based sorbents, (2) determining how the parent limestone properties of calcium-based sorbents, and (3) elucidating the mechanism(s) relating to the activity of various dry sorbent additives. An appendix contains a one-dimensional duct injection model with modifications to handle the sodium additives.

  13. Ground-level ozone following astrophysical ionizing radiation events: an additional biological hazard?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian C

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to-date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling we have examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and find that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supe...

  14. Scaling plant nitrogen use and uptake efficiencies in response to nutrient addition in peatlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Bridgham, Scott [University of Oregon; Kellogg, Laurie E. [University of Minnesota, St Paul

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the primary growth-limiting nutrient in many terrestrial ecosystems, and therefore plant production per unit N taken up (i.e., N use efficiency, NUE) is a fundamentally important component of ecosystem function. Nitrogen use efficiency comprises two components: N productivity (AN, plant production per peak biomass N content) and the mean residence time of N in plant biomass (MRTN). We utilized a five-year fertilization experiment to examine the manner in which increases in N and phosphorus (P) availability affected plant NUE at multiple biological scales (i.e., from leaf to community level). We fertilized a natural gradient of nutrient-limited peatland ecosystems in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, USA, with 6 g Nm2yr1, 2 g Pm2yr1, or a combination of N and P. Our objectives were to determine how changes in carbon and N allocation within a plant to leaf and woody tissue and changes in species composition within a community, both above- and belowground, would affect (1) NUE; (2) the adaptive trade-off between the components of NUE; (3) the efficiency with which plants acquired N from the soil (N uptake efficiency); and (4) plant community production per unit soil N availability (N response efficiency, NRE). As expected, N and P addition generally increased aboveground production and N uptake. In particular, P availability strongly affected the way in which plants took up and used N. Nitrogen use efficiency response to nutrient addition was not straightforward. Nitrogen use efficiency differed between leaf and woody tissue, among species, and across the ombrotrophic minerotrophic gradient because plants and communities were adapted to maximize either AN or MRTN, but not both concurrently. Increased N availability strongly decreased plant and community N uptake efficiency, while increased P availability increased N uptake efficiency, particularly in a nitrogen-fixing shrub. Nitrogen uptake efficiency was more important in controlling overall plant community response to soil N availability than was NUE, and above- and belowground community N uptake efficiencies responded to nutrient addition in a similar manner. Our results demonstrate that plants respond to nutrient availability at multiple biological scales, and we suggest that N uptake efficiency may be a more representative measurement of plant responses to nutrient availability gradients than plant NUE.

  15. Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Lowe, Larry E [ORNL; Sames, William J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

  16. Regeneration of DPF at low temperatures with the use of a cerium based fuel additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pattas, K.; Samaras, Z.; Roumbos, A. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece); Lemaire, J.; Mustel, W.; Rouveirolles, P.

    1996-09-01

    A light duty truck with a naturally aspirated engine was equipped with a DPF (changing the exhaust pipe and eliminating the muffler) and operated on fuel doped with a cerium based additive in various concentrations. Tests were carried out on chassis dynamometer using the European urban cycle, but also under city driving conditions with maximum speeds up to 50 km/h and exhaust gas temperature up to 300 C. Under these conditions, it was observed that filter regeneration was always possible at relatively high particulate accumulation in the filter, while the effect on fuel consumption (as measured over the emission test cycles) was not detectable, compared to baseline data of the vehicle. Change in driving conditions from slow urban to highway with highly loaded trap led to spontaneous trap regeneration at higher temperatures, without effect on fuel consumption. This paper documents the operation of a fully passive DPF system for diesel light duty vehicles.

  17. Is the Time a Dimension of an Alien Universe? (this hypothesis gives an additional redshift)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Ya. Kobelev

    2000-05-25

    On the base of the hypothesis about a nature of the time as a dimension of alien Universe relation between alteration of time with coordinates $\\frac{\\partial t}{\\partial x}$ and time {t} offered: $ \\frac{\\partial t} {\\partial x} = H_{t} t$ . This relation is an analogy of the Habble law in the time space. The consequence of it is additional redshift $Z_{DT}$ depending on differences $\\tau$ of times existence of the objects with redshift that are compared ($t_{0}$ is the time existence of more old object): $Z_{DT}=\\frac{1+\\frac{\\tau}{t_{0}}}{\\sqrt{1-(\\frac{\\tau}{t_{0}}})^{2}}-1$. The redshift of Arp galaxies may be explained if this relation is used and this explanation doe's not contradict Arp hypothesis about supernova explosions. Discussion a possibilities of experimental verification of the hypothesis is considered.

  18. Is the Time a Dimension of an Alien Universe? (this hypothesis gives an additional redshift)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobelev, L Yu

    2000-01-01

    On the base of the hypothesis about a nature of the time as a dimension of alien Universe relation between alteration of time with coordinates $\\frac{\\partial t}{\\partial x}$ and time {t} offered: $ \\frac{\\partial t} {\\partial x} = H_{t} t$ . This relation is an analogy of the Hubble law in the time space. The consequence of it is additional redshift $Z_{DT}$ depending on differences $\\tau$ of times existence of the objects with redshift that are compared ($t_{0}$ is the time existence of more old object): $Z_{DT}=\\frac{1+\\frac{\\tau}{t_{0}}}{\\sqrt{1-(\\frac{\\tau}{t_{0}}})^{2}}-1$. The redshift of Arp galaxies may be explained if this relation is used and this explanation doe's not contradict Arp hypothesis about supernova explosions. Discussion a possibilities of experimental verification of the hypothesis is considered.

  19. Additions to the ICSBEP and IRPhEP Handbooks since NCSD 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2013-10-01

    High-quality integral benchmark experiments have always been a priority for criticality safety. However, interest in integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of future criticality safety needs to support next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The importance of drawing upon existing benchmark data is becoming more apparent because of dwindling availability of critical facilities worldwide and the high cost of performing new experiments. Integral benchmark data from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and the International Handbook of Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments are widely used. Significant Benchmark data have been added to those two handbooks since the last Nuclear Criticality Safety Division Topical Meeting in Richland, Washington (September 2009). This paper highlights those additions.

  20. A Framework for Teaching the Fundamentals of Additive Manufacturing and Enabling Rapid Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Go, Jamison

    2015-01-01

    The importance of additive manufacturing (AM) to the future of product design and manufacturing systems demands educational programs tailored to embrace its fundamental principles and its innovative potential. Moreover, the breadth and depth of AM spans several traditional disciplines, presenting a challenge to instructors yet giving the opportunity to integrate knowledge via creative and challenging projects. This paper presents our approach to teaching AM at the graduate and advanced undergraduate level, in the form of a 15-week course developed and taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The lectures begin with in-depth technical analysis of the major AM processes. In lab sessions, students operate and characterize desktop AM machines, and work in teams to design and fabricate a bridge having maximum strength per unit weight while conforming to geometric constraints. To conclude the semester, teams created prototype machines for printing molten glass, soft serve ice cream, biodegradable materi...

  1. Statistical physics of neural systems with non-additive dendritic coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breuer, David; Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin

    2015-01-01

    How neurons process their inputs crucially determines the dynamics of biological and artificial neural networks. In such neural and neural-like systems, synaptic input is typically considered to be merely transmitted linearly or sublinearly by the dendritic compartments. Yet, single-neuron experiments report pronounced supralinear dendritic summation of sufficiently synchronous and spatially close-by inputs. Here, we provide a statistical physics approach to study the impact of such non-additive dendritic processing on single neuron responses and the performance of associative memory tasks in artificial neural networks. First, we compute the effect of random input to a neuron incorporating nonlinear dendrites. This approach is independent of the details of the neuronal dynamics. Second, we use those results to study the impact of dendritic nonlinearities on the network dynamics in a paradigmatic model for associative memory, both numerically and analytically. We find that dendritic nonlinearities maintain net...

  2. Exhaust after-treatment system with in-cylinder addition of unburnt hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Gerald N. (Corby, GB); Kesse, Mary L. (Peoria, IL)

    2007-10-30

    Certain exhaust after-treatment devices, at least periodically, require the addition of unburnt hydrocarbons in order to create reductant-rich exhaust conditions. The present disclosure adds unburnt hydrocarbons to exhaust from at least one combustion chamber by positioning, at least partially within a combustion chamber, a mixed-mode fuel injector operable to inject fuel into the combustion chamber in a first spray pattern with a small average angle relative to a centerline of the combustion chamber and a second spray pattern with a large average angle relative to the centerline of the combustion chamber. An amount of fuel is injected in the first spray pattern into a non-combustible environment within the at least one combustion chamber during at least one of an expansion stroke and exhaust stroke. The exhaust with the unburnt amount of fuel is moved into an exhaust passage via an exhaust valve.

  3. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

  4. Method for simultaneous use of a single additive for coal flotation, dewatering, and reconstitution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wen, Wu-Wey (Murrysville, PA); Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Finleyville, PA)

    1995-01-01

    A single dose of additive contributes to three consecutive fine coal unit operations, i.e., flotation, dewatering and reconstitution, whereby the fine coal is first combined with water in a predetermined proportion so as to formulate a slurry. The slurry is then mixed with a heavy hydrocarbon-based emulsion in a second predetermined proportion and at a first predetermined mixing speed and for a predetermined period of time. The conditioned slurry is then cleaned by a froth flotation method to form a clean coal froth and then the froth is dewatered by vacuum filtration or a centrifugation process to form reconstituted products that are dried to dust-less clumps prior to combustion.

  5. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-08-04

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials. 8 figs.

  6. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitensky, Mark W. (Boston, MA); Yoshida, Tatsuro (Newton, MA)

    1998-01-01

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials.

  7. Lubricants or lubricant additives composed of ionic liquids containing ammonium cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Jun (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Truhan, Jr.,; John J. (Cookeville, TN) [Cookeville, TN; Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Blau, Peter J. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    A lubricant or lubricant additive is an ionic liquid alkylammonium salt. The alkylammonium salt has the structure R.sub.xNH.sub.(4-x).sup.+,[F.sub.3C(CF.sub.2).sub.yS(O).sub.2].sub.2N.sup- .- where x is 1 to 3, R is independently C.sub.1 to C.sub.12 straight chain alkyl, branched chain alkyl, cycloalkyl, alkyl substituted cycloalkyl, cycloalkyl substituted alkyl, or, optionally, when x is greater than 1, two R groups comprise a cyclic structure including the nitrogen atom and 4 to 12 carbon atoms, and y is independently 0 to 11. The lubricant is effective for the lubrication of many surfaces including aluminum and ceramics surfaces.

  8. New proofs for the two Barnes lemmas and an additional lemma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, Bernd [Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany)] [Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Mellin-Barnes (MB) representations have become a widely used tool for the evaluation of Feynman loop integrals appearing in perturbative calculations of quantum field theory. Some of the MB integrals may be solved analytically in closed form with the help of the two Barnes lemmas which have been known in mathematics already for one century. The original proofs of these lemmas solve the integrals by taking infinite series of residues and summing these up via hypergeometric functions. This paper presents new, elegant proofs for the Barnes lemmas which only rely on the well-known basic identity of MB representations, avoiding any series summations. They are particularly useful for presenting and proving the Barnes lemmas to students of quantum field theory without requiring knowledge on hypergeometric functions. The paper also introduces and proves an additional lemma for a MB integral {integral}dz involving a phase factor exp ({+-}i{pi}z).

  9. Effect of metal Additions on the Hydrogen Uptake of Microporous Carbon at Near-Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Bhat, Vinay V

    2010-01-01

    Enhancing the hydrogen sorption capacity of microporous carbon materials at near-ambient temperature continue to be a challenge and the subject of intense research. Physisorption alone on microporous carbons is not strong enough to provide the desired levels of hydrogen uptake. Modifying carbons with small amounts of metals has been proven effective to increase the amounts adsorbed. However, very different mechanisms may be involved when the promoters are transition metals or alkali metals. In this presentation we compare the effect of additions of palladium and/or alkali metals on the hydrogen uptake of microporous carbons, in an attempt to differentiate between the possible mechanisms leading to enhanced hydrogen capacity and fast kinetics.

  10. RECENT ADDITIONS OF CRITICALITY SAFETY RELATED INTEGRAL BENCHMARK DATA TO THE ICSBEP AND IRPHEP HANDBOOKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Sartori

    2009-09-01

    High-quality integral benchmark experiments have always been a priority for criticality safety. However, interest in integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of future criticality safety needs to support next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The importance of drawing upon existing benchmark data is becoming more apparent because of dwindling availability of critical facilities worldwide and the high cost of performing new experiments. Integral benchmark data from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and the International Handbook of Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments are widely used. Benchmark data have been added to these two handbooks since the last Nuclear Criticality Safety Division Topical Meeting in Knoxville, Tennessee (September 2005). This paper highlights these additions.

  11. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have notmore »been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3?B/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.« less

  12. How and why Tampa Electric Company selected IGCC for its next generating capacity addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    As the title indicates, the purpose of this paper is to relate how and why Tampa Electric Company decided to select the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) for their next capacity addition at Polk Power Station, Polk Unit No. 1. For a complete understanding of this process, it is necessary to review the history related to the initial formulation of the IGCC concept as it was proposed to the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Initiative Round Three. Further, it is important to understand the relationship between Tampa Electric Company and TECO Pay Services Corporation (TPS). TECO Energy, Inc. is an energy related holding company with headquarters in Tampa, Florida. Tampa Electric Company is the principal, wholly-owned subsidiary of TECO Energy, Inc. Tampa Electric Company is an investor-owned electric utility with about 3200 MW of generation capacity of which 97% is coal fired. Tampa Electric Company serves about 2,000 square miles and approximately 470,000 customers, in west central Florida, primarily in and around Hillsborough County and Tampa, Florida. Tampa Electric Company generating units consist of coal fired units ranging in size from a 110 MW coal fired cyclone unit installed in 1957 to a 450 MW pulverized coal unit with wet limestone flue gas desulfurization installed in 1985. In addition, Tampa Electric Company has six (6) No. 6 oil fired steam units totaling approximately 220 MW. Five (5) of these units, located at the Hookers Point Station, were installed in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Tampa Electric also has about 150 MW of No. 2 oil fired start-up and peaking combustion turbines. The company also owns a 1966 vintage 12 MW natural gas fired steam plant (Dinner Lake) and two nO. 6 oil fired diesel units with heat recovery equipment built in 1983 (Phillips Plant).

  13. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  14. Additional requirements for leak-before-break application to primary coolant piping in Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roussel, G. [AIB Vincotte Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) technology has not been applied in the first design of the seven Pressurized Water Reactors the Belgian utility is currently operating. The design basis of these plants required to consider the dynamic effects associated with the ruptures to be postulated in the high energy piping. The application of the LBB technology to the existing plants has been recently approved by the Belgian Safety Authorities but with a limitation to the primary coolant loop. LBB analysis has been initiated for the Doel 3 and Tihange 2 plants to allow the withdrawal of some of the reactor coolant pump snubbers at both plants and not reinstall some of the restraints after steam generator replacement at Doel 3. LBB analysis was also found beneficial to demonstrate the acceptability of the primary components and piping to the new conditions resulting from power uprating and stretch-out operation. LBB analysis has been subsequently performed on the primary coolant loop of the Tihange I plant and is currently being performed for the Doel 4 plant. Application of the LBB to the primary coolant loop is based in Belgium on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. However the Belgian Safety Authorities required some additional analyses and put some restrictions on the benefits of the LBB analysis to maintain the global safety of the plant at a sufficient level. This paper develops the main steps of the safety evaluation performed by the Belgian Safety Authorities for accepting the application of the LBB technology to existing plants and summarizes the requirements asked for in addition to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules.

  15. Hampton Roads Chart 12245

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton Roads Chart 12245 BookletChart Commemorative Edition ­ June, 2012 A reduced scale NOAA ­ East Coast VIRGINIA HAMPTON ROADS The chart on the cover is Coast Chart No. 31, Chesapeake Bay­York River, Hampton Roads, Chesapeake Entrance, published in 1863 by the U.S. Coast and Geo- detic Survey

  16. Aviation-fuel additives. January 1970-December 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1970-December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning research and development of aviation-fuel additives, together with pertinent characteristics. Included are studies on antioxidants, antimist, antistatic, lubricity, corrosion inhibition, and icing inhibition additives. Other characteristics are covered in investigations into additives for vulnerability reduction, thermal stability, and storage stability of aviation fuels. (This updated bibliography contains 212 citations, 22 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  17. Request for Exception to APM 600.14, Additional Compensation UC Riverside --Fiscal-Year Faculty Only1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Request for Exception to APM 600.14, Additional Compensation UC Riverside -- Fiscal-Year Faculty percentage of time. I certify the information above is correct

  18. DOE Announces Additional Tour Seats Available: Tours of B Reactor at the Hanford Site Begin and End in Richland, Wash.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made additional seats available for tours of the B Reactor National Historic Landmark this July and August.

  19. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP) Conferences. This work is also relevant to the ongoing efforts of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section XI, Working Group on Operating Plant Criteria (WGOPC) efforts to incorporate nozzle fracture mechanics solutions into a revision to ASME B&PV Code, Section XI, Nonmandatory Appendix G.

  20. Implementation of the IAEA Additional Protocol in the Philippines: USDOE/PNRI Cooperation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sequis, Julietta E.; Cain, Ronald A.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Hansen, Linda H.; VanSickle, Matthew; Killinger, Mark H.; Elkhamri, Oksana O.

    2011-07-19

    The Philippines entered into force the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Additional Protocol (AP) in February 2010. The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) is the government agency responsible for implementing the AP. In June 2010 the IAEA invited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to help conduct a joint national training seminar on the AP. DOE presented to PNRI its AP international technical assistance program, administered by the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP), which helps partner countries implement the AP. In coordination with the IAEA, DOE established this program in 2008 to complement IAEA AP seminars with long-term country-specific cooperation from the perspective of a Member State. The US version of the AP is the same version as that of non-nuclear weapon states except for the addition of a national security exclusion. Due to this, DOE cooperation with other countries enables the sharing of valuable lessons learned in implementing the AP. DOE/INSEP described to PNRI the various areas of cooperation it offers to interested countries, whether they are preparing for entry into force or already implementing the AP. Even countries that have entered the AP into force are sometimes not fully prepared to implement it well, and welcome cooperation to improve their implementation process. PNRI and DOE/INSEP subsequently agreed to cooperate in several areas to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the Philippines AP implementation. These areas include providing working-level training to PNRI staff and preparing an information document that details that training for future reference, assisting with the development of an outreach program and procedures for AP reporting and complementary access, and identifying Annex II equipment and non-nuclear materials whose export must be reported under the AP. DOE laboratory representatives, funded by INSEP, met again with PNRI in February 2011 to provide training for PNRI AP staff and investigate specific ways to improve implementation. Another meeting in July 2011 focused on preparations for outreach to industry and universities. In this paper PNRI describes current implementation of the AP in the Philippines, and both DOE/INSEP and PNRI provide their perspectives on their cooperation to enhance that implementation.

  1. Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

    2011-05-01

    Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to {approx}150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of {approx}1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L/min (face velocity = 0.013 m/s), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8 to 10 L/min). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes (m/z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts (m/z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives, rather than ozonolysis, is the main formaldehyde source in those filters. Emission rates of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not found to be large enough to substantially increase indoor concentrations in typical building scenarios. Nevertheless, ozone reactions on HVAC filters cannot be ignored as a source of low levels of indoor irritants.

  2. Self-decomposable Fibrous Bridging Additives for Temporary Cementitious Fracture Sealers in EGS Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.; Kisslinger, K.; Iverson, B.; Bour, D.

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluates compatibility of a self-degradable temporary fracture sealer with the drilling mud and plugging and self-degrading performance of different fibers to be used in combination with the sealer. The sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash (SSASC) cementitious sealer must plug fractures at 85oC to allow continuous well drilling and it must degrade and leave the fractures open for water at later times when exposed to temperatures above 200oC. The sealer showed good compatibility with the mud. Even the blend of 80/20 vol.% of sealer/mud reached a compressive strength of more than 2000 psi set as one of the material criteria, mostly due to the additional activation of the slag and Class C fly ash by the alkaline ingredient present in the drilling fluid. In contrast, the drilling fluid was detrimental to the compressive strength development in conventional Class G well cement, so that it failed to meet this criterion. Among several organic fibers tested both polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-and nylon-based fibers showed adequate plugging of the sealer in slot nozzles of 1-in. wide x 6-in. long x 0.08 in. and 0.24 in. high under pressures up to 700 psi. PVA fibers displayed better compressive toughness and self-degrading properties than nylon. The compressive toughness of sealers made by adding 1.0 wt% 6 mm-length PVA and 0.5 wt% 19 mm-length PVA was 9.5-fold higher than that of a non-bridged sealer. One factor governing the development of such high toughness was an excellent adherence of PVA to the SSASC cement. The alkali-catalyzed self-decomposition of PVA at 200°C led to the morphological transformation of the material from a fibrous structure to a microscale flake-like structure that helped the desirable conversion of the sealer into small fragments. In contrast, nylon’s decomposition provided a reticular network structure in the self-degraded sealer resulting in bigger fragments compared against the sealer with PVA. The PVA fiber has a high potential as a self-decomposable bridging additive in the SSASC cement sealer.

  3. FGD Additives to Segregate and Sequester Mercury in Solid Byproducts - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Bltyhe, G M; Steen, W A

    2012-02-28

    Many mercury control strategies for U.S. coal-fired power generating plants involve co-benefit capture of oxidized mercury from flue gases treated by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. For these processes to be effective at overall mercury control, the captured mercury must not be re-emitted to the atmosphere or into surface or ground water. The project sought to identify scrubber additives and FGD operating conditions under which mercury re-emissions would decrease and mercury would remain in the liquor and be blown down from the system in the chloride purge stream. After exiting the FGD system, mercury would react with precipitating agents to form stable solid byproducts and would be removed in a dewatering step. The FGD gypsum solids, free of most of the mercury, could then be disposed or processed for reuse as wallboard or in other beneficial reuse. The project comprised extensive bench-scale FGD scrubber tests in Phases I and II. During Phase II, the approaches developed at the bench scale were tested at the pilot scale. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests measured the performance of precipitating agents in removing mercury from the chloride purge stream. Finally, the economic viability of the approaches tested was evaluated.

  4. Diesel engine experiments with oxygen enrichment, water addition and lower-grade fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. ); Schaus, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The concept of oxygen enriched air applied to reciprocating engines is getting renewed attention in the context of the progress made in the enrichment methods and the tougher emissions regulations imposed on diesel and gasoline engines. An experimental project was completed in which a direct injection diesel engine was tested with intake oxygen levels of 21% -- 35%. Since an earlier study indicated that it is necessary to use a cheaper fuel to make the concept economically attractive, a less refined fuel was included in the test series. Since a major objection to the use of oxygen enriched combustion air had been the increase in NO{sub x} emissions, a method must be found to reduce NO{sub x}. Introduction of water into the engine combustion process was included in the tests for this purpose. Fuel emulsification with water was the means used here even though other methods could also be used. The teat data indicated a large increase in engine power density, slight improvement in thermal efficiency, significant reductions in smoke and particulate emissions and NO{sub x} emissions controllable with the addition of water. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane at millisecond contact times: Effect of H{sub 2} addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodke, A.S.; Henning, D.; Schmidt, L.D.; Bharadwaj, S.S.; Maj, J.J.; Siddall, J.

    2000-04-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane using Pt/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and various bimetallic catalysts operating at {approximately}1,000 C and very short contact times is examined with H{sub 2} addition to the feed. When H{sub 2} is added with a Pt catalyst, the ethylene selectivity rises from 65 to 72% but ethane conversion drops from 70 to 52%. However, using a Pt-Sn/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst, the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} selectivity increases from 70 to greater than 85%, while the conversion remains {approximately}70%. The process also produces approximately as much H{sub 2} as is added to the feed. Effects of other metal promoters, sphere bed and fibermat supports, preheat, pressure, nitrogen dilution, and flow rate are examined in an effort to further elucidate the mechanism. Deactivation of the Pt-Sn catalyst is examined, and a simple method of regenerating the activity on-line is demonstrated. Possible mechanisms to explain high selectivities to ethylene are discussed. Although the process can be regarded as a simple two-step reaction sequence with the exothermic oxidation of hydrogen or ethane driving the endothermic dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene, the exact contributions of heterogeneous or gas-phase reactions and their spatial variations within the catalyst are yet to be determined.

  6. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  7. Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil.

  8. Recovery of near-anhydrous ethanol as gasoline additive from fermentation products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boukouvalas, C.; Markoulaki, E.; Magoulas, K.; Tassios, D. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece)

    1995-06-01

    The use of near-anhydrous ethanol, obtained from fermentation products through low pressure distillation, as a gasoline additive is examined. To this purpose, a reliable model for predicting the azeotropic composition of an ethanol-water mixture as a function of the pressure is presented. It is developed by considering the available thermodynamic consistent experimental data and using the Wilson and the virial equations for the liquid-and vapor-phase nonideality, respectively. It is concluded that, for an area with no extremely cold winters-minimum ambient temperature -20{degrees}C-alcohol with 96.5%(wt) purity can be used in a 90/10 (vol) gasohol mixture. Such an alcohol can be produced with a single distillation column operating at 140 mmHg pressure with an energy consumption of 5150 kJ/kg of product; or with a system of two columns with lower energy consumption but higher capital cost. These energy consumptions are very sensitive to the accuracy of the predicted azeotropic composition at the operating pressures.

  9. Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, A.S.K.

    2008-09-15

    This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

  10. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  11. Effects of HyperCoal addition on coke strength and thermoplasticity of coal blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takahiro Shishido; Ikuo Saito [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan). Energy Technology Research Institute

    2008-05-15

    Ashless coal, also known as HyperCoal (HPC), was produced by thermal extraction of three coals of different ranks (Gregory caking coal, Warkworth steam coal, and Pasir subbituminous coal) with 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) at 360, 380, and 400{sup o}C. The effects of blending these HPCs into standard coal blends were investigated. Blending HPCs as 5-10% of a standard blend (Kouryusho:Goonyella:K9) enhanced the thermoplasticity over a wide temperature range. For blends made with the Pasir-HPC, produced from a noncaking coal, increasing the extraction temperature from 360 to 400{sup o}C increased the thermoplasticity significantly. Blends containing Warkworth-HPC, produced from a slightly caking coal, had a higher tensile strength than the standard blend in semicoke strength tests. The addition of 10% Pasir-HPC, extracted at 400{sup o}C, increased the tensile strength of the semicokes to the same degree as those made with Gregory-HPC. Furthermore, all HPC blends had a higher tensile strength and smaller weight loss during carbonization. These results suggest that the HPC became integrated into the coke matrix, interacting strongly with the other raw coals. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Process for producing biodiesel, lubricants, and fuel and lubricant additives in a critical fluid medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2005-05-03

    A process for producing alkyl esters useful in biofuels and lubricants by transesterifying glyceride- or esterifying free fatty acid-containing substances in a single critical phase medium is disclosed. The critical phase medium provides increased reaction rates, decreases the loss of catalyst or catalyst activity and improves the overall yield of desired product. The process involves the steps of dissolving an input glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with an alcohol or water into a critical fluid medium; reacting the glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with the alcohol or water input over either a solid or liquid acidic or basic catalyst and sequentially separating the products from each other and from the critical fluid medium, which critical fluid medium can then be recycled back in the process. The process significantly reduces the cost of producing additives or alternatives to automotive fuels and lubricants utilizing inexpensive glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substances, such as animal fats, vegetable oils, rendered fats, and restaurant grease.

  13. Alternative Data Reduction Procedures for UVES: Wavelength Calibration and Spectrum Addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodger I. Thompson; Jill Bechtold; John H. Black; C. J. A. P. Martins

    2008-12-05

    This paper addresses alternative procedures to the ESO supplied pipeline procedures for the reduction of UVES spectra of two quasar spectra to determine the value of the fundamental constant mu = Mp/Me at early times in the universe. The procedures utilize intermediate product images and spectra produced by the pipeline with alternative wavelength calibration and spectrum addition methods. Spectroscopic studies that require extreme wavelength precision need customized wavelength calibration procedures beyond that usually supplied by the standard data reduction pipelines. An example of such studies is the measurement of the values of the fundamental constants at early times in the universe. This article describes a wavelength calibration procedure for the UV-Visual Echelle Spectrometer on the Very Large Telescope, however, it can be extended to other spectrometers as well. The procedure described here provides relative wavelength precision of better than 3E-7 for the long-slit Thorium-Argon calibration lamp exposures. The gain in precision over the pipeline wavelength calibration is almost entirely due to a more exclusive selection of Th/Ar calibration lines.

  14. A blasting additive that renders wastes non hazardous in lead paint abatement projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R.; Rapp, D.J.; McGrew, M.

    1994-12-31

    Maintenance of steel structures often produces abrasive wastes that are considered toxic and hazardous due to the lead content of the old paint system present in spent abrasives. Environmental regulations in the US and Canada effectively preclude on-site treatment and disposal of these wastes, thereby forcing them into costly transport and secure disposal options. The authors have developed an abrasive additive that allows dry or wet blasting to remove old paint systems, but the resultant wastes are considered non-hazardous and are eligible for recycling or non-hazardous waste disposal, both at sharply reduced costs. The agent does not ``mask`` environmental test results, but does produce a stable residue suitable for long term disposal or reuse. Surface conditions after application of abrasives appear to be amenable to virtually all paint systems tested. The process is in use on an estimated 10% of all steel based lead paint abatement projects in the US, and is experiencing considerable growth in market acceptance. The technology may allow disposal cost reductions in excess of 50%.

  15. Determination of free acid by standard addition method in potassium thiocyanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, E W

    1982-06-01

    The free acid content of solutions containing hydrolyzable ions has been determined potentiometrically by a standard addition method. Two increments of acid are added to the sample in 1M potassium thiocyanate solution. The sample concentration is calculated by solution of three simultaneous Nernst equations. The method has been demonstrated for solutions containing Al/sup 3 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Hg/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Th/sup 4 +/, or UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with a metal-to-acid ratio of < 2.5. The method is suitable for determination of 10 ..mu..moles acid in 10 mL total volume. The accuracy can be judged from the agreement of the Nernst slopes found in the presence and absence of hydrolyzable ions. The relative standard deviation is < 2.5%. The report includes a survey of experiments with thermometric, pH, and Gran plot titrations in a variety of complexants, from which the method was evolved. Also included is a literature survey of sixty references, a discussion of the basic measurements, and a complete analytical procedure.

  16. PIXE, Micro-PIXE and RBS Analysis of Thermal Aged Rubber Material : On The Additives Behaviour Versus Aging Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    PIXE, Micro-PIXE and RBS Analysis of Thermal Aged Rubber Material : On The Additives Behaviour Villeurbanne Cedex-France. ABSTRACT PIXE, micro-PIXE and RBS techniques were employed to monitor the behaviour of the rubber material itself. Keywords : PIXE, micro-PIXE, RBS, Rubber, Thermal Aging, Segregation, Additives

  17. 41424 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 136 / Friday, July 16, 2010 / Proposed Rules requests for additional information from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for additional information from DOE, particularly regarding the WIPP waste inventory and groundwater (karst whether the WIPP continues to comply with the radiation protection standards for disposal. EPA will also consider any additional public comments and other information relevant to WIPP's compliance. The Agency

  18. 1,4-Addition of Lithium Diisopropylamide to Unsaturated Esters: Role of Rate-Limiting Deaggregation, Autocatalysis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collum, David B.

    1,4-Addition of Lithium Diisopropylamide to Unsaturated Esters: Role of Rate-Limiting Deaggregation, Autocatalysis, Lithium Chloride Catalysis, and Other Mixed Aggregation Effects Yun Ma, Alexander C. Hoepker.edu Abstract: Lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) in tetrahydrofuran at -78 °C undergoes 1,4-addition

  19. Additional Entry Points in the Academic Year: Key Principles (Academic and Business) for Campus-Based Programmes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    Additional Entry Points in the Academic Year: Key Principles (Academic and Business) for Campus-Based Programmes The Key Principles (Academic and Business) for Additional Entry points in the Academic Year operates on the basis of a two-semester academic year with a main, formal entry point in September

  20. TANK 40 FINAL SB5 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS PRIOR TO NP ADDITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Click, D.

    2010-01-06

    A sample of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). This sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. Prior to radionuclide inventory analyses, a final sample of the H-canyon Np stream will be added to bound the Np addition anticipated for Tank 40. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to DWPF as SB5. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB5 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene vessel and solids allowed to settle overnight. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 239 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four in Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Due to the use of Zr crucibles and Na in the peroxide fusions, Na and Zr cannot be determined from this preparation. Additionally, other alkali metals, such as Li and K that may be contaminants in the Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} are not determined from this preparation. Three Analytical Reference Glass - 14 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. The ARG-1 glass allows for an assessment of the completeness of each digestion. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis of masses 81-209 and 230-252, and cold vapor atomic absorption (CV-AA) analysis for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the peroxide fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB5 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for ion chromatography (IC), total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC), and total base analyses. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results reported here: (1) The elemental ratios of the major elements for the SB5 WAPS sample, whose major Tank 51 Qualification sample component underwent Al dissolution, are similar to those measured for the SB4 WAPS sample. (2) The elemental composition of this sample and the analyses conducted here are reasonable and consistent with DWPF batch data measurements in light of DWPF pre-sample concentration and SRAT product heel contributions to the DWPF SRAT receipt analyses. (3) Fifty percent of the sulfur in the SB5 WAPS sample is insoluble, and this represents a significantly larger fraction than that observed in previous sludge batches. (4) The noble metal and Ag concentrations predicted from the measured values for the Tank 51 Confirmation sample and Tank 40 SB4 WAPS sample using a two-thirds Tank 51, one-third Tank 40 heel blend ratio used to arrive at the final SB5 composition, agree with the values for the Tank 40 SB5 WAPS sample measured for this report.

  1. Flying across Galaxy Clusters with Google Earth: additional imagery from SDSS co-added data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Jiangang; Annis, James; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Galaxy clusters are spectacular. We provide a Google Earth compatible imagery for the deep co-added images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and make it a tool for examing galaxy clusters. Google Earth (in sky mode) provides a highly interactive environment for visualizing the sky. By encoding the galaxy cluster information into a kml/kmz file, one can use Google Earth as a tool for examining galaxy clusters and fly across them freely. However, the resolution of the images provided by Google Earth is not very high. This is partially because the major imagery google earth used is from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) (SDSS collaboration 2000) and the resolutions have been reduced to speed up the web transferring. To have higher resolution images, you need to add your own images in a way that Google Earth can understand. The SDSS co-added data are the co-addition of {approx}100 scans of images from SDSS stripe 82 (Annis et al. 2010). It provides the deepest images based on SDSS and reach as deep as about redshift 1.0. Based on the co-added images, we created color images in a way as described by Lupton et al. (2004) and convert the color images to Google Earth compatible images using wcs2kml (Brewer et al. 2007). The images are stored at a public server at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and can be accessed by the public. To view those images in Google Earth, you need to download a kmz file, which contains the links to the color images, and then open the kmz file with your Google Earth. To meet different needs for resolutions, we provide three kmz files corresponding to low, medium and high resolution images. We recommend the high resolution one as long as you have a broadband Internet connection, though you should choose to download any of them, depending on your own needs and Internet speed. After you open the downloaded kmz file with Google Earth (in sky mode), it takes about 5 minutes (depending on your Internet connection and the resolution of images you want) to get some initial images loaded. Then, additional images corresponding to the region you are browsing will be loaded automatically. So far, you have access to all the co-added images. But you still do not have the galaxy cluster position information to look at. In order to see the galaxy clusters, you need to download another kmz file that tell Google Earth where to find the galaxy clusters in the co-added data region. We provide a kmz file for a few galaxy clusters in the stripe 82 region and you can download and open it with Google Earth. In the SDSS co-added region (stripe 82 region), the imagery from Google Earth itself is from the Digitized Sky Survey (2007), which is in very poor quality. In Figure1 and Figure2, we show screenshots of a cluster with and without the new co-added imagery in Google Earth. Much more details have been revealed with the deep images.

  2. Sixty-seven Additional L Dwarfs Discovered by the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Davy Kirkpatrick; I. Neill Reid; James Liebert; John E. Gizis; Adam J. Burgasser; David G. Monet; Conard C. Dahn; Brant Nelson; Rik J. Williams

    2000-03-22

    We present JHKs photometry, far red spectra, and spectral classifications for an additional 67 L dwarfs discovered by the Two Micron All Sky Survey. One of the goals of this new search was to locate more examples of the latest L dwarfs. Of the 67 new discoveries, 17 have types of L6 or later. Analysis of these new discoveries shows that H-alpha emission has yet to be convincingly detected in any L dwarf later than type L4.5, indicating a decline or absence of chromospheric activity in the latest L dwarfs. Further analysis shows that 16 (and possibly 4 more) of the new L dwarfs are lithium brown dwarfs and that the average line strength for those L dwarfs showing lithium increases until roughly type L6.5 V then declines for later types. This disappearance may be the first sign of depletion of atomic lithium as it begins to form into lithium-bearing molecules. Another goal of the search was to locate nearer, brighter L dwarfs of all subtypes. Using absolute magnitudes for 17 L dwarf systems with trigonometric parallax measurements, we develop spectrophotometric relations to estimate distances to the other L dwarfs. Of the 67 new discoveries, 21 have photometric distances placing them within 25 parsecs of the Sun. A table of all known L and T dwarfs believed to lie within 25 parsecs - 53 in total - is also presented. Using the distance measurement of the coolest L dwarf known, we calculate that the gap in temperature between L8 and the warmest known T dwarfs is less than 350K and probably much less. If the transition region between the two classes spans a very small temperature interval, this would explain why no transition objects have yet been uncovered. This evidence, combined with model fits to low-resolution spectra of late-M and early-L dwarfs, indicates that L dwarfs span the range 1300K < Teff < 2000K.

  3. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

  4. Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Benjamin, Eugene L.; McNair, Gary W.

    2001-02-20

    The United States has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

  5. Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H; Benjamin, Eugene L; McNair, Gary W

    2001-02-20

    The US has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

  6. Ring Walking/Oxidative Addition Reactions for the Controlled Synthesis of Conjugated Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazan, Guillermo C

    2012-04-03

    Power conversion efficiencies of plastic solar cells depend strongly on the molecular weight characteristics of the semiconducting polymers used for their fabrication. The synthesis of these materials typically relies on transition metal mediated catalytic reactions. In many instances, the ideal structures cannot be attained because of deficiencies in these reactions, particularly when it comes to being able to achieve high number average molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions. Another important conjugated polymer structure of interest is one in which a single functional group is attached at the end group of the chain. Such systems would be ideal for modifying surface properties at interfaces and for labeling biomolecular probes used in fluorescent biosensors. To respond to the challenges above, our efforts have centered on the design of homogenous transition metal complexes that are easy to prepare and effective in carrying out living, or quasi-living, condensative chain polymerization reactions. The key mechanistic challenge for the success of this reaction is to force the insertion of one monomer unit at a time via a process that involves migration of the transition metal-containing fragment to one terminus of the polymer chain. Chain growth characteristics are therefore favored when the metal does not dissociate from the newly formed reductive elimination product. We have proposed that dissociation is disfavored by the formation of a Ď?-complex, in which the metal can sample various locations of the electronically delocalized framework, a process that we term â??ring-walkingâ?ť, and find the functionality where oxidative addition takes place. Success has been achieved in the nickel-mediated cross coupling reaction of Grignard reagents with aromatic halides by using bromo[1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane]phenylnickel. This reagent can yield poly(thiophene)s (one of the most widely used type of polymer in plastic solar cells) with excellent stereoregularity and molecular weight distributions with polydispersities that are consistent with a living polymerization sequence. Another important objective of this program concerned the use of these new catalysts and improved mechanistic insight for the synthesis of specific polymeric materials with prespecified properties.

  7. Baltimore Harbor Chart 12281

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltimore Harbor Chart 12281 BookletChart Commemorative Edition ­ June, 2012 A reduced scale NOAA ­ East Coast MARYLAND BALTIMORE HARBOR The chart on the cover is a plan of the city of Baltimore compiled of Maryland and by Lewis Brantz, Esqr. under authority of the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore by Fielding

  8. A Preliminary Environmental and Archaeological Assessment of the 9.07 Acre Proposed Woodway Park Addition in Brazos County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, William; Pettus, David

    2015-06-05

    A preliminary environmental and archaeological assessment of the 9.07 acre site of the proposed Woodway Park addition in Brazos County, Texas was conducted by archaeologist William E. Moore of Brazos Valley Research Associates and geologist David S...

  9. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Michael-Type Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Ronald Lee (Lakewood, CO); Elliott, Brian John (Superior, CO); Luebben, Silvia DeVito (Golden, CO); Myers, Andrew William (Arvada, CO); Smith, Bryan Matthew (Boulder, CO)

    2005-05-03

    A new class of surface modified particles and a multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process for the preparation of the same is provided. The multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process involves two or more reactions to compatibilize particles with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through reactive organic linking groups. Specifically, these reactive groups are activated carbon—carbon pi bonds and carbon and non-carbon nucleophiles that react via Michael or Michael-type additions.

  10. J. Phys. Chem. 1995,99, 15163-15171 15163 Statistical Distributions and Collision Rates of Additive Molecules in Compartmentalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bales, Barney

    J. Phys. Chem. 1995,99, 15163-15171 15163 Statistical Distributions and Collision Rates of Additive, Northridge, Califomia 91330 Received: March 27, 1995; In Final Form: June 23, 1995@ A technique to study

  11. Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Effects of lubricant additive chemistries and exhaust conditions on ash properties affecting diesel particulate filter performance. Comparison of ash characteristics such as packing density and elemental composition in field and laboratory aged DPFs.

  12. A new continuous-flow process for catalytic conversion of glycerol to oxygenated fuel additive: Catalyst screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Wensheng

    in acetone/glycerol molar ratio or a decrease in WHSV enhanced the glycerol conversion as expected promoter as the addition of ketals and ethers in gasoline engines improve the octane number, cold flow

  13. (9-11/94)(2,3/97)(12/05)(1-6/06) Neuman Chapter 16 Addition and Substitution Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christopher A.

    Acid Catalyzed Formation of Acetals (16.4B) 16-21 Acetal Formation Mechanism Acetals Serve) 16-33 Overview Magnesium, Lithium and Zinc Reagents Addition of "R-M" to Aldehydes and Ketones (16.6C

  14. Bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BFMB) Anion Based Ionic Liquid As an Additive for Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL] [ORNL; Liao, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Baggetto, Loic [ORNL] [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL] [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL] [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Propylene carbonate (PC) is a good solvent for lithium ion battery applications due to its low melting point and high dielectric constant. However, PC is easily intercalated into graphite causing it to exfoliate, killing its electrochemical performance. Here we report on the synthesis of a new ionic liquid electrolyte based on partially fluorinated borate anion, 1-butyl-1,2-dimethylimidazolium bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BDMIm.BFMB), which can be used as an additive in 1 M LiPF6/PC electrolyte to suppress graphite exfoliation and improve cycling performance. In addition, both PC and BDMIm.BFMB can be used synergistically as additive to 1.0M LiPF6/methyl isopropyl sulfone (MIPS) to dramatically improve its cycling performance. It is also found that the chemistry nature of the ionic liquids has dramatic effect on their role as additive in PC based electrolyte.

  15. Asymmetric Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation gamma to a Carbonyl Group: Phosphine-Catalyzed Addition of Nitromethane to Allenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Sean W.

    A chiral phosphine catalyzes the addition of a carbon nucleophile to the ? position of an electron-poor allene (amide-, ester-, or phosphonate-substituted), in preference to isomerization to a 1,3-diene, in good ee and ...

  16. Review and evaluation of literature on testing of chemical additives for scale control in geothermal fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    A selected group of reported tests of chemical additives in actual geothermal fluids are reviewed and evaluated to summarize the status of chemical scale-control testing and identify information and testing needs. The task distinguishes between scale control in the cooling system of a flash plant and elsewhere in the utilization system due to the essentially different operating environments involved. Additives for non-cooling geothermal fluids are discussed by scale type: silica, carbonate, and sulfide.

  17. Effect of TiO{sub 2} additives to the sintering of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Issa, Tarik Talib; Majeed, Kawakib Jassim; Ibrahim, Harith J. [University of Baghdad, College of Science, Physics Department, Jadiriya, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2013-12-16

    The effect of sintering additive on the microstructure development of yttrium oxide was investigated. Different combinations of yttrium oxide with TiO{sub 2} were used as x-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis (DTA) were sintering additive. The investigated and microstructure of resulting compacts were characterized by, using scanning electron microscopy, porosity and sintering density for all compacting samples sintered at different sintering temperature under static air.

  18. Seismic sequence stratigraphy of Pliocene-Pleistocene turbidite systems, Ship Shoal South Addition, Northwestern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Booyong

    2004-09-30

    STRATIGRAPHY OF PLIOCENE- PLEISTOCENE TURBIDITE SYSTEMS, SHIP SHOAL SOUTH ADDITION, NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by BOOYONG KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISMIC SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY OF PLIOCENE- PLEISTOCENE TURBIDITE SYSTEMS, SHIP SHOAL SOUTH ADDITION, NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis...

  19. Plant oils and mineral oils: effects as insecticide additives and direct toxicity to Heliothis virescens (F.) and Musca domestica L. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochou, Germain Ochou

    1985-01-01

    PLANT OILS AND MINERAL OILS: EFFECTS AS INSECTICIDE ADDITIVES AND DIRECT TOXICITY TO HELIOTHIS VIRESCENS (F. ) AND MUSCA DOMESTICA L. A Thesis by GERMAIN OCHOU OCHOU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Entomology PLANT OILS AND MINERAL OILS: EFFECTS AS INSECTICIDE ADDITIVES AND DIRECT TOXICITY TO HELIOTHIS VIRESCENS (F. ) AND MUSCA DOMESTICA L. A Thesis...

  20. The Effect Of ZnO Addition On Co/C Catalyst For Vapor And Aqueous Phase Reforming Of Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Stephen; Sun, Junming; Hong, Yongchun; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Wang, Yong

    2014-02-05

    The effect of ZnO addition on the oxidation behavior of Co along with catalytic performance in vapor and aqueous phase reforming of ethanol were investigated on Co supported on carbon black (XC-72R). Carbon was selected to minimize the support interactions. Effect of ZnO addition during both vapor and aqueous phase reforming were compared at 250 °C. ZnO addition inhibited the reduction of cobalt oxides by H2 and created surface sites for H2O activation. During vapor phase reforming at 450 °C the redox of cobalt, driven by steam oxidation and H2 reduction, trended to an equilibrium of Co0/Co2+. ZnO showed no significant effect on cobalt oxidation, inferred from the minor changes of C1 product yield. Surface sites created by ZnO addition enhanced water activation and oxidation of surface carbon species, increasing CO2 selectivity. At 250 °C cobalt reduction was minimal, in situ XANES demonstrated that ZnO addition significantly facilitated oxidation of Co0 under vapor phase reforming conditions, demonstrated by lower C1 product yield. Sites introduced by ZnO addition improved the COx selectivity at 250 °C. Both Co/C and Co-ZnO/C rapidly oxidized under aqueous phase reaction conditions at 250 °C, showing negligible activity in aqueous phase reforming. This work suggests that ZnO affects the activation of H2O for Co catalysts in ethanol reforming.

  1. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

  2. Influence of strontium addition on the mechanical properties of gravity cast Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germen, Gül?ah ?evik, Hüseyin; Kurnaz, S. Can

    2013-12-16

    In this study, the effect of strontium (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1 wt%) addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the gravity cast Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy were investigated. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the main phases are ??Mg, ??Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} and Mg{sub 2}Sn in the Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy. With addition The tensile testing results showed that the yield and ultimate tensile strength and elongation of Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy increased by adding Sr up to 0.1 wt.% and then is gradually decreased with the addition of more alloying element.

  3. Pseudopotential calculations of electron and hole addition spectra of InAs, InP, and Si quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franceschetti, Alberto; Zunger, Alex

    2000-07-15

    The electron and hole addition energies, the quasiparticle gap, and the optical gap of InAs, InP, and Si quantum dots are calculated using microscopic pseudopotential wave functions. The effects of the dielectric mismatch between the quantum dot and the surrounding material are included using a realistic profile for the dielectric constant {epsilon}(r). We find that the addition energies and the quasiparticle gap depend strongly on the dielectric constant of the environment {epsilon}{sub out}, while the optical gap is rather insensitive to {epsilon}{sub out}. We compare our results with recent tunneling spectroscopy measurements for InAs nanocrystals, finding excellent agreement. Our calculations for the addition energies and the quasiparticle gap of InP and Si nanocrystals serve as predictions for future experiments. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raji Heyrovska

    2008-06-21

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and its reduced form are presented based on the additivity of the same set of atomic radii as for other biological molecules.

  5. Atomic Structures of Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) and its Reduced Form with Bond Lengths Based on Additivity of Atomic Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown recently that chemical bond lengths, in general, like those in the components of nucleic acids, caffeine related compounds, all essential amino acids, methane, benzene, graphene and fullerene are sums of the radii of adjacent atoms constituting the bond. Earlier, the crystal ionic distances in all alkali halides and lengths of many partially ionic bonds were also accounted for by the additivity of ionic as well as covalent radii. Here, the atomic structures of riboflavin and its reduced form are presented based on the additivity of the same set of atomic radii as for other biological molecules.

  6. Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, L.

    1999-05-25

    A process is disclosed for preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising. The process involves dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing the alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

  7. Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

    1999-01-01

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising: dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures thereof to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing said alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

  8. Singlet-triplet dispersion reveals additional frustration in the triangular dimer compound Ba$_3$Mn$_2$O$_8$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Lumsden, Mark D [ORNL; Chang, S. [Ames Laboratory; Samulon, Eric C [Stanford University; Batista, C. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Ian R [Stanford University

    2008-01-01

    We present single crystal inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the $S=1$ dimerized quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet Ba$_3$Mn$_2$O$_8$. The singlet-triplet dispersion reveals nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic interactions between adjacent bilayers that compete against each other. Although the inter-bilayer exchange is comparable to the intra-bilayer exchange, this additional frustration reduces the effective coupling along the $c$-axis and leads to a quasi-two dimensional behavior. In addition, the obtained exchange values are able to reproduce the four critical fields in the phase diagram.

  9. An investigation of the use of lime as a soil additive to modify the detrimental effects of frost action 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earnest, Clyde Talley

    1959-01-01

    AN INVESTIGATION OF THE USE OF LIME AS A SOIL ADDITIVE TO MODIFI THE DETfEMENTAL EFFECTS OF FROST ACTION GLIDE T. EARNEST~ JR. Captain~ Corps of Engineers Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1959 Ma)or Sub)acts Civil Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF THE USE OF LIME AS A SOIL ADDITIVE TO MODIFY THE DETRIMENTAL EFFECTS OF FROST ACTION A Thesis CLYDE T...

  10. Weather Charts - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meteorological Station > Met and Climate Data Summary Products > Historical Weather Charts Hanford Meteorological Station Real Time Met Data from Around the Site Current HMS...

  11. HARMFUL ALGAE POSE ADDITIONAL CHALLENGES FOR OYSTER RESTORATION: IMPACTS OF THE HARMFUL ALGAE KARLODINIUM VENEFICUM AND PROROCENTRUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Elizabeth W.

    HARMFUL ALGAE POSE ADDITIONAL CHALLENGES FOR OYSTER RESTORATION: IMPACTS OF THE HARMFUL ALGAE deformed within 48 h in one experimental trial, but not in a second trial in which algae were difficult. KEY WORDS: oysters, larvae, harmful algae, HABs, Chesapeake Bay, oyster restoration, Karlodinium

  12. ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgeway, R.G.; Hegedus, S.S.; Podraza, N.J.

    2012-08-31

    Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both ���µCSi and ���±Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products�¢���� electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

  13. Thesis Track In addition to HIS 5060, thesis students must complete 21 hours of graduate course work including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Thesis Track In addition to HIS 5060, thesis students must complete 21 hours of graduate course a minimum of twelve (12) hours of course work in their primary or thesis field, and at least nine (9) hours in a non-thesis field. Checklist for Thesis Track. Students considering the thesis-track option should

  14. Anti-Wear Performance and Mechanism of an Oil-Miscible Ionic Liquid as a Lubricant Additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun; Bansal, Dinesh G; Yu, Bo; Howe, Jane Y; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Li, Huaqing; Blau, Peter Julian; Bunting, Bruce G; Mordukhovich, Gregory; Smolenski, Donald

    2012-01-01

    An ionic liquid (IL) trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate has been investigated as a potential anti-wear lubricant additive. Unlike most other ILs that have very low solubility in non-polar fluids, this IL is fully miscible with various hydrocarbon oils. In addition, it is thermally stable up to 347 oC, showed no corrosive attack to cast iron in ambient environment, and has excellent wettability on solid surfaces (e.g., contact angle on cast iron <8o). Most importantly, this phosphonium-based IL has demonstrated effective anti-scuffing and anti-wear characteristics when blended with lubricating oils. For example, a 5 wt.% addition into a synthetic base oil eliminated the scuffing failure experienced by the neat oil and, as a result, reduced the friction coefficient by 60% and the wear rate by three orders of magnitude. A synergistic effect on wear protection was observed with the current anti-wear additive when added into a fully-formulated engine oil. Nanostructure examination and composition analysis revealed a tribo-boundary film and subsurface plastic deformation zone for the metallic surface lubricated by the IL-containing lubricants. This protective boundary film is believed to be responsible for the IL s anti-scuffing and anti-wear functionality.

  15. Mechanistic analysis of an asymmetric palladium-catalyzed conjugate addition of arylboronic acids to -substituted cyclic enones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    Mechanistic analysis of an asymmetric palladium-catalyzed conjugate addition of arylboronic acids 12 m/z = 511.15 19 m/z = 511.15 N N O Pd O S6: Putative structures of the palladium-enone-complex 12 and the enolate-complex. Scheme S4: Calculated structures and relative energies of palladium enone-complex 12

  16. Have a sustainability idea that needs some additional support? The Sustainability Advisory Committee invites students, faculty, and staff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jonathan

    Have a sustainability idea that needs some additional support? The Sustainability Advisory sustainability. The Committee will review project proposals and provide direct guidance and feedback to promising and departments to broaden collaboration and support. The Sustainability Advisory Committee recommends long- term

  17. Langerhans Lab Protocols DRILL additions checklist.docx revised 8/30/12 by JW Page 1 of 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    Langerhans Lab Protocols DRILL additions checklist.docx revised 8/30/12 by JW Page 1 of 7 Checklist for Adding a Collection to the DRILL Photos Images: 1. Take dorsal and lateral photos. 2. Sort images in their collection folder into the specific file in Images Ready For DRILL folder on the FTP server. 4. Transfer

  18. An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect of water addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Li

    . Introduction Synthetic gas (syngas) is a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen in various compositionsAn experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect 20 December 2011 Keywords: Syngas combustion Elevated temperatures Water addition Laminar flame speed

  19. Additionally, a key based primarily on vegetative features is pro-vided for North Carolina species of Desmodium.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Alexander

    Additionally, a key based primarily on vegetative features is pro- vided for North Carolina species of Desmodium. METHODS The foliar morphology of North Carolina Desmodium species was critically studied based by Wilbur (1963). RESULTS and DISCUSSION North Carolina Desmodium species can be artificially categorized

  20. The energy market is diversifying. In addition to traditional power sources, decision makers can choose among solar, wind, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the steps of analyzing the energy outputs and economics of a solar, wind, or geothermal project. NREL power towers. SAM even calculates the value of saved energy from a domestic solar water heating systeminnovati n The energy market is diversifying. In addition to traditional power sources, decision