Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Phosphazene additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

2

Potlining Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

Rudolf Keller

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

Acoustics by additive manufacturing:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study focuses on exploring the merging field of additive manufacturing and acoustics and introduces a new type of sound absorber which is regulating performance… (more)

Setaki, F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, is receiving attention from media, investment communities and governments around the world transforming it from obscurity to something to be talked about.

5

Research Summary Carbon Additionality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of much/reporting additionality rules. Technological Application of specific technology. Term Abatement arises within a specified

6

Writing Assessment: Additional Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29 Appendix A Writing Assessment: Additional Resources #12;30 Where can I find out more into the assessment process. On-campus resources give you with a "real person" to contact should you have questions Resources for Higher Education Outcomes Assessment http://www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/survey/resource.htm Ohio

Schweik, Charles M.

7

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

8

Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

9

Additive manufacturing method of producing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

Painter, Kevin

10

Additional Information You can find additional information about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/default.htm For additional Information contact: Quality Assurance & Audit Coordinator at414-456-8844 or Research Subject are members of IRBs. All IRBs must follow federal rules and state laws in their review of research studies

11

Additive assembly of digital materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

Tucker; Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM), Comstock; Robert H. (Gardendale, AL)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

13

Additional Resources | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of EnergyAbout Us » FAQsUCNIOFActiveAdditional Resources

14

Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuring theCommittee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies," TheASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program...

16

Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

17

Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

18

ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

19

Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

Crawford, T. Daniel

20

Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells," originally presented on February 11, 2014.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Towards Mobile Microrobot Swarms for Additive Micromanufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of independently controlled microrobots in advanced, additive manufacturing applications. Keywords Mobile Microrobotics, Multi-robot Control, Additive Manufacturing 1. Introduction Flexible manufacturing capabilities, and additive manufacturing has proven to be a disruptive technology at the small- to medium-scale. Many

Zavlanos, Michael

22

EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

Boyer, Edmond

23

Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation Mar 13 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Lonnie Love, Manufacturing Systems Research Group Transportation Science Seminar Series...

24

DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers DOE Announces Additional Energy Efficiency Enforcement Action to Protect Consumers January 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis...

25

Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures for Testing Energy Consumption of Clothes Washers with Warm Rinse Cycles, Issued: June 30, 2010. Draft of DOE...

26

A Management Strategy for Additive Manufacturing:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis is about a Management Strategy for Additive Manufacturing - how engineering change influences the NPD process through the adoption of new manufacturing technology.… (more)

Zahn, N.Z.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy A Consortium to Optimize...

28

Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on green ceramic/dielectrics Problem this technology microelectronics such as manufacture of LTCC ceramic/ Dielectric antenna and rapid PCB prototyping or repair (note: may require additional tooling/ set up time) · Rapid Prototyping & small scale manufacture

Painter, Kevin

29

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES BUILDING ADDITION March 30, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES BUILDING ADDITION March 30, 2012 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The current concept. The addition is proposed to be constructed on the east side of the existing building. The auditorium is based on building and finishing the auditorium and main level offices. The upper and basement levels

30

Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of) Promoting Well-Being, Finding Cures; (3) Building Communities, Expanding Opportunities; and (4) Harnessing

31

Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

testing Cathode: LiNi13Mn13Co13O2 Anode: MCMB Electrolyte: 1.2M LiPF6 ECEMC 37 with or without additive - Separator: Celgard 2325 Voltage for cycling:...

32

Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work proposes to survey new chemical knowledge, developed since 1984, on fluid additives used in matrix stimulation treatments of carbonate and sandstone petroleum reservoirs and describes one method of organizing this new knowledge in a...

Weidner, Jason 1981-

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fuel and Additive Characterization for HCCI Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper shows a numerical evaluation of fuels and additives for HCCl combustion. First, a long list of candidate HCCl fuels is selected. For all the fuels in the list, operating conditions (compression ratio, equivalence ratio and intake temperature) are determined that result in optimum performance under typical operation for a heavy-duty engine. Fuels are also characterized by presenting Log(p)-Log(T) maps for multiple fuels under HCCl conditions. Log(p)-Log(T) maps illustrate important processes during HCCl engine operation, including compression, low temperature heat release and ignition. Log(p)-Log(T) diagrams can be used for visualizing these processes and can be used as a tool for detailed analysis of HCCl combustion. The paper also includes a ranking of many potential additives. Experiments and analyses have indicated that small amounts (a few parts per million) of secondary fuels (additives) may considerably affect HCCl combustion and may play a significant role in controlling HCCl combustion. Additives are ranked according to their capability to advance HCCl ignition. The best additives are listed and an explanation of their effect on HCCl combustion is included.

Aceves, S M; Flowers, D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Pitz, W J; Dibble, R

2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

34

Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons panels on the roof of PBRC. DURATION OF PROJECT: September 20, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 7:30 a.m. to 4 of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades and all posted safety/detour signs

Dong, Yingfei

37

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons: November 28 to December 1, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: No accessible routes will be affected. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction project

38

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology Montana State University 310 Lewis Hall P.O. Box 173460 Bozeman, MT 59717-3460 Tel: 406-994-4548 Fax: 406-994-3190 www.montana.edu/ecology/ ecology@montana.edu The Department of Ecology at Montana State University offers undergraduate majors

Maxwell, Bruce D.

39

Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Co 13 O 2 , LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5 O 4 Anode: MCMB, LTO Electrolyte-1: 1.2M LiPF 6 ECEMC 37 with or without additive Electrolyte-2: fully or partially fluorinated...

40

Internship FBI Fingerprint Procedures and Additional Screenings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internship FBI Fingerprint Procedures and Additional Screenings ALL INTERNS: Required by DESE/Full-Year Internship) or August 1st (Spring Internship) o Web application https to get your fingerprints taken for your internship: 4 digit Registration #2301 Cost - $44.80 Valid

Gering, Jon C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received 3-12 mo. Respond to Office Action Patent attorney The patent examiner provides notification of which claims in the application have been rejected or accepted determines there are multiple inventions in 1 application. Patent Application Published 6 mo. Non

Cui, Yan

42

Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

Harwell, Lane D. (Albuquerque, NM); Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Donald L. (Corrales, NM); Pressly, Gary A. (Sandia Park, NM)

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons to August 19, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 4:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on August 17 and 18 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades and all posted safety/detour signs

Dong, Yingfei

44

Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the EffectsAcknowledgmentdynamics inforOfficeAdditive

45

Occupational health experience with organic additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

Thiess, A.M.; Wellenreuther, G.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationan overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

ANDERSON, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

CREATION OF THE MODEL ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1991, the international nuclear nonproliferation community was dismayed to discover that the implementation of safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its NPT INFCIRC/153 safeguards agreement with Iraq had failed to detect Iraq's nuclear weapon program. It was now clear that ensuring that states were fulfilling their obligations under the NPT would require not just detecting diversion but also the ability to detect undeclared materials and activities. To achieve this, the IAEA initiated what would turn out to be a five-year effort to reappraise the NPT safeguards system. The effort engaged the IAEA and its Member States and led to agreement in 1997 on a new safeguards agreement, the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between States and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards. The Model Protocol makes explicit that one IAEA goal is to provide assurance of the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities. The Model Protocol requires an expanded declaration that identifies a State's nuclear potential, empowers the IAEA to raise questions about the correctness and completeness of the State's declaration, and, if needed, allows IAEA access to locations. The information required and the locations available for access are much broader than those provided for under INFCIRC/153. The negotiation was completed in quite a short time because it started with a relatively complete draft of an agreement prepared by the IAEA Secretariat. This paper describes how the Model Protocol was constructed and reviews key decisions that were made both during the five-year period and in the actual negotiation.

Houck, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Wulf, N.

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION In this course you product development and innovation. You will develop a rich knowledge of additive manufacturing processes enabling advanced/additive manufacturing and personal fabrication. You will have the opportunity

Schumacher, Russ

50

Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

ANDERSON, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Energy Department Makes Additional $4 Billion in Loan Guarantees...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Makes Additional 4 Billion in Loan Guarantees Available for Innovative Renewable Energy and Efficient Energy Projects Energy Department Makes Additional 4 Billion in Loan...

52

The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects...

53

Effects of Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical Performance...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical Performance of Nanoscale Tantalum Oxide-Based Electrocatalysts for Effects of Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical...

54

Surface and Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High Voltage Lithium Ion Batteries. Surface and Structural Stabilities of Carbon Additives in High Voltage Lithium Ion Batteries....

55

Energy Department Seeks Additional Feedback on Draft Guidance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Seeks Additional Feedback on Draft Guidance for the Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program Energy Department Seeks Additional Feedback on Draft Guidance for the Hydroelectric...

56

Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Additives Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Bench test results showed that compared with fully-formulated engine oils, selected low-viscosity...

57

Obama Administration Announces Additional $13,969,700 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Obama Administration Announces Additional 13,969,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Alaska Obama Administration Announces Additional 13,969,700 for Local Energy...

58

Obama Administration Announces Additional $37,157,700 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Obama Administration Announces Additional 37,157,700 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Wisconsin Obama Administration Announces Additional 37,157,700 for Local Energy...

59

Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

60

Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse High Voltage Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries...

62

Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction...

63

Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department of Defense as Part of Hurricane Sandy and Nor'easter Recovery Energy Department Provides Additional Emergency Fuel Loan to Department...

64

Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells Upcoming Webinar February 11: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells February 6, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis On Tuesday, February 11,...

65

Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells February 11, 2014 5:00PM to 6:00PM EST Online...

66

Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and...

67

Fuel Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines and Engine Oils Fuel Additive Strategies for Enhancing the Performance of Engines and Engine Oils 2003 DEER Conference...

68

Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Department of Energy Announces Two Additional Loans of Oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve September 2, 2005 -...

69

Mechanisms of transition-metal catalyzed additions to olefins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................................................... 33 10 Reaction schematic for 13C KIE studies on free-radical polymerization and ATRP ........... 34 11 Transition structures for (a) the addition of methyl radical to ethylene and (b) the addition of formylmethyl radical to acrolein...

Nowlan, Daniel Thomas

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

70

Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries. Effects of additives on the stability of electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow...

71

Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

72

MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANUFACTURABILITY ANALYSIS TO COMBINE ADDITIVE AND SUBTRACTIVE PROCESSES Authors: Olivier Kerbrat of the tool may advantageously be machined or manufactured by an additive process. Originality/value: Nowadays is proposed to combine additive and subtractive processes, for tooling design and manufacturing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

additional experimental information: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Last Name First Name Middle Initial UT EID B. Childcare Expense Information Number 92 Method of Additional Structures on the Objects of a Monoidal Kleisli Category as...

74

Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells" held on...

75

EIS-0250: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, NV...

76

EIS-0369: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Notice of Public Comment Period Extension and Additional Public Meeting Supplemental Yucca Mountain Rail Corridor and Rail Alignment The Department of Energy is now announcing...

77

Obama Administration Announces Additional $14,521,300 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

4,521,300 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Rhode Island Obama Administration Announces Additional 14,521,300 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Rhode Island...

78

Obama Administration Announces Additional $52,295,100 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

52,295,100 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Maryland Obama Administration Announces Additional 52,295,100 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Maryland March 26,...

79

Obama Administration Announces Additional $102,508,400 for Local...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

02,508,400 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Pennsylvania Obama Administration Announces Additional 102,508,400 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Pennsylvania...

80

Obama Administration Announces Additional $63,817,400 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

63,817,400 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Arizona Obama Administration Announces Additional 63,817,400 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Arizona March 26,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Obama Administration Announces Additional $33,977,000 for Local...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

33,977,000 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico Obama Administration Announces Additional 33,977,000 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Puerto Rico...

82

Resource Consumption in Additive Manufacturing with a PSS Approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since the 1980’s, additive manufacturing (AM) has gradually advanced from rapid prototyping applications towards fabricating end consumer products. Many small companies may prefer accessing AM… (more)

Nopparat, Nanond; Kianian, Babak; Thompson, Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Development of a Process Planning Module for Metal Additive Manufacturing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Producing metallic parts using Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) additive manufacturing allows for a wide range of flexibility and customization while reducing waste material compared… (more)

Chernow, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

,"New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","2272015"...

85

NMAC 17.5.440 Extensions, Improvements, Additions, and Cooperative...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

440 Extensions, Improvements, Additions, and Cooperative Agreements between or among Utilities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

86

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy Characteristics and Effects of...

87

additive main effect: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D...

88

additional effective dose: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D...

89

Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of...

90

Transformer Addition Project near Page, Coconino County, Arizona  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

r * I. Categorical Exclusion for Glen Canyon 230138-kV Transformer Addition Project near Page, Coconino County, Arizona RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed...

91

Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Develop & Evaluate...

92

DOE Announces Additional Public Comment Meetings for Draft National...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in which transmission congestion may addressed, including enhanced energy efficiency, demand response, more local generation, and additional transmission capacity. To submit...

93

Remark on the additivity conjecture for the quantum depolarizing channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider bistochastic quantum channels generated by unitary representations of the discret group. The proof of the additivity conjecture for the quantum depolarizing channel $\\Phi$ based on the decreasing property of the relative entropy is given. We show that the additivity conjecture is true for the channel $\\Xi =\\Psi \\circ \\Phi $, where $\\Psi $ is the phase damping.

G. G. Amosov

2005-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

South High Rise Renovation and Addition Project OSU-109000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South High Rise Renovation and Addition Project OSU-109000 Program of Requirements February 16 Mission Project Objectives Project Budget #12;Program of Requirements South High Rises Renovation Rises Renovation & Addition Project OSU-109000 February 2010 Project Overview February 2010 Page 4

95

South High Rises Renovation and Addition Program of Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South High Rises Renovation and Addition OSU-109000 Program of Requirements October 2009 234 N Project Objectives Project Budget #12;Program of Requirements South High Rises Renovation and Addition are considered to be part of the Program of Requirements. #12;Program of Requirements South High Rises Renovation

96

DECISION-THEORETIC ELICITATION OF GENERALIZED ADDITIVE UTILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DECISION-THEORETIC ELICITATION OF GENERALIZED ADDITIVE UTILITIES by Darius BraziÂŻunas A thesis-theoretic elicitation of generalized additive utilities Darius BraziÂŻunas Doctor of Philosophy Graduate Department outcomes that can be represented by a utility function. We assume that user preferences are generalized

Toronto, University of

97

Extraction of Additives from Polystyrene and Subsequent Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extraction of fifteen (15) polymer additives with supercritical carbon dioxide which are used as antioxidants, uv stabilizers, process lubes, flame retardants and antistats from eight formulations of polystyrene is demonstrated and compared to traditional dissolution/precipitation extractions. The purpose of the study was twofold: 1) the development of a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method(s) for the additives and 2) the determination of the viability of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) for the additives from polystyrene. Separation of some of the additives was achieved using reversed phase liquid chromatography. Nine of the additives were assayed in this manner while, the remaining six additives could not be assayed using reversed phase liquid chromatography. In order to develop an extraction method for the additives, the effects of static extraction time, CO2 density, and temperature were first investigated. These preliminary extractions revealed that a static extraction period which afforded an opportunity for the polymer to swell combined with a high CO2 density and extraction temperature above the glass transition (Tg) yielded quantitative recoveries of the additives. Triplicate extractions of the

Susan H. Smith; Larry T. Taylor; Gary L. Long; James F. Wolfe; Susan H. Smith

98

Brnsted Acid Catalyzed Addition of Phenols, Carboxylic Acids, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and often toxic metal catalysts, including pal- ladium,2 rhodium,3 ruthenium,4 lanthanides,5 main group-scale applications of these reactions and often generates heavy metal impurities in the product. Direct use of simple addition methods and is an alternative to metal-catalyzed reactions. Nucleophilic addition of phenols

He, Chuan

99

additional energy savings: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

additional energy savings First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL...

100

additive antioxidant therapy: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The Study of Variations in the Properties of Biodiesel on Addition of Antioxidants. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Obama Administration Announces Additional $27,777,600 for Local...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

27,777,600 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Utah Obama Administration Announces Additional 27,777,600 for Local Energy Efficiency Improvements in Utah March 26, 2009 -...

102

Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

Farmwald, P.M.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

103

Lossless fault-tolerant data structures with additive overhead  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop the first dynamic data structures that tolerate ? memory faults, lose no data, and incur only an O(? ) additive overhead in overall space and time per operation. We obtain such data structures for arrays, linked ...

Christiano, Paul F.

104

Carbon Dioxide Addition to Microbial Fuel Cell Cathodes Maintains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (ARS), National Center for Agricultural-cathode MFC, CO2 addition resulted in a stable catholyte film pH of 6.61 ( 0.12 and a 152% increase in steady

Angenent, Lars T.

105

Novel electrolytes and electrolyte additives for PHEV applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

diagnostics. Some of these electrolytes contained the following: - Solvents: EC, PC, EMC, etc. - Salts: LiPF 6 , LiBF 4 , LiB(C 2 O 4 ) 2 , LiF 2 BC 2 O 4 , etc. - Additives:...

106

The Selection and Use of Fireside Additives on Industrial Boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As energy prices have escalated and fuel quality deteriorated, fuel chemicals have found increasing acceptance as tools for improving efficiency and reliability of combustion systems. Though application of fuel additives is not new, their use has...

Radway, J. E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Sulfurized olefin lubricant additives and compositions containing same  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lubricant additives having substantially improved extreme pressure characteristics are provided by modifying certain sulfurized olefins by reacting said olefins with a cyclic polydisulfide under controlled reaction conditions and at a temperature of at least about 130/sup 0/ C.

Braid, M.

1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

Non-Traditional Soil Additives: Can They Improve Crop Production?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-traditional soil additives include soil conditioners such as organic materials and minerals, soil activators that claim to stimulate soil microbes or inoculate soil with new beneficial organisms, and wetting agents that may be marketed...

McFarland, Mark L.; Stichler, Charles; Lemon, Robert G.

2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

Beyond 3D Printing: The New Dimensions of Additive Fabrication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive fabrication, often referred to as 3D printing, is the construction of objects by adding material. This stands in contrast to subtractive methods, which involve removing material by means of milling or cutting. ...

Keating, Steven John

110

Approaches to Maintaining Provenance throughout the Additive Manufacturing Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prototyping and 3D printing by users both in engineering and the humanities. The proposed digital signing--Digital Signing; 3D printing; 3D objects; provenance. I.INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing as a process has been

111

additive gene effects: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gustavo Glusman; Shizhen Qin; M. Raafat El-gewely; Andrew F. Siegel; Jared C. Roach; Leroy Hood; Arian F. A. Smit 19 EFFECTS OF ADDITIVE NOISE ON THE THROUGHPUT OF CDMA...

112

Additivity in the Analysis and Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the applicability of an additive treatment of substituent effects to the analysis and design of HIV protease inhibitors. Affinity data for a set of inhibitors with a common chemical framework were analyzed to ...

Jorissen, Robert N.

113

Cyanoethylated compounds as additives in lithium/lithium batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The power loss of lithium/lithium ion battery cells is significantly reduced, especially at low temperatures, when about 1% by weight of an additive is incorporated in the electrolyte layer of the cells. The usable additives are organic solvent soluble cyanoethylated polysaccharides and poly(vinyl alcohol). The power loss decrease results primarily from the decrease in the charge transfer resistance at the interface between the electrolyte and the cathode.

Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Additional Interpolators Method for Variational Analysis in Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, I describe the Additional Interpolators Method, a new technique for variational analysis in lattice QCD. It is shown to be an excellent method which uses additional interpolators to remove backward in time running states that would otherwise contaminate the signal. The proof of principle, which also makes use of the Time-Shift Trick (Generalized Pencil-of-Functions method), will be delivered at an example on a $64^4$ lattice close to the physical pion mass.

Rainer W. Schiel

2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

115

In situ combustion with metallic additives SUPRI TR 87  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ combustion is the most energy efficient of the thermal oil recovery methods. In this process, a portion of a reservoir`s oil is burned in-situ as fuel to drive the recovery process. In light oil reservoirs, too little fuel may be deposited, making sustained combustion difficult. In heavy oil reservoirs, too much fuel may be deposited leading to high air injection requirements and unfavorable economics. This study has been designed to attack these problems. Water soluble metallic additives are investigated as agents to modify fuel deposition and combustion performance. This report describes seven combustion tube runs using two cradle oils and two metallic additives. The oils are 12{degrees} and 34{degrees} API, both from Cymric (California). The metallic additives tested are ionic nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}9H{sub 2}O) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O). Iron and tin additives improved the combustion efficiency in all cases. Fluctuations in the produced gas compositions were observed in all control runs, but nearly disappeared with the iron and tin additives. The combustion front velocities were also increased by iron and tin. Changes were also observed in the apparent hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio of the fuel, heat of combustion, air requirements, and amount of fuel deposited. Iron and tin caused increases in fuel concentration while causing a decrease in air requirement. The increase in fuel concentration varied between the oils, however, tin and iron were consistently more effective than zinc. A particularly interesting result occurred with the Cymric light oil. In the control runs, a sustained combustion front was not achieved, while in the iron additive runs, stable, sustained combustion was achieved. Iron and tin salts are suitable additives to increase fuel deposition when that is needed. Additives suitable for use as a fuel reducing agent have not yet been found. 26 refs., 23 figs, 6 tabs.

Holt, R.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

In situ combustion with metallic additives SUPRI TR 87  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ combustion is the most energy efficient of the thermal oil recovery methods. In this process, a portion of a reservoir's oil is burned in-situ as fuel to drive the recovery process. In light oil reservoirs, too little fuel may be deposited, making sustained combustion difficult. In heavy oil reservoirs, too much fuel may be deposited leading to high air injection requirements and unfavorable economics. This study has been designed to attack these problems. Water soluble metallic additives are investigated as agents to modify fuel deposition and combustion performance. This report describes seven combustion tube runs using two cradle oils and two metallic additives. The oils are 12{degrees} and 34{degrees} API, both from Cymric (California). The metallic additives tested are ionic nitrate (Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}9H{sub 2}O) and zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O). Iron and tin additives improved the combustion efficiency in all cases. Fluctuations in the produced gas compositions were observed in all control runs, but nearly disappeared with the iron and tin additives. The combustion front velocities were also increased by iron and tin. Changes were also observed in the apparent hydrogen to carbon (H/C) ratio of the fuel, heat of combustion, air requirements, and amount of fuel deposited. Iron and tin caused increases in fuel concentration while causing a decrease in air requirement. The increase in fuel concentration varied between the oils, however, tin and iron were consistently more effective than zinc. A particularly interesting result occurred with the Cymric light oil. In the control runs, a sustained combustion front was not achieved, while in the iron additive runs, stable, sustained combustion was achieved. Iron and tin salts are suitable additives to increase fuel deposition when that is needed. Additives suitable for use as a fuel reducing agent have not yet been found. 26 refs., 23 figs, 6 tabs.

Holt, R.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

Qu, J. [ORNL; Viola, M. B. [General Motors Company

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Systems simulation of oil additives to grain at terminal elevators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEMS SIMULATION OF OIL ADDITIVES TO GRAIN AT TERMINAL ELEVATORS A Thesis by Kerry James Goforth Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1985 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering SYSTEMS SIMULATION OF OIL ADDITIVES TO GRAIN AT TERMINAL ELEVATORS A Thesis by KERRY J. GOFORTH Approved as to style and content by: Calvin B. Parne 1, Jr. (Chairman of Committee) tto R. Kunze...

Goforth, Kerry James

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Blast furnace coke quality in relation to petroleum coke addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The incorporation of petroleum coke as an additive in industrial coking coal blends is a practice often used by steel companies. A suitable blast furnace coke produced by replacing part of the coking coal blend with a suitable petroleum coke (addition of 5 to 15%), was made by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation and successfully tested at several blast furnaces. This coke had lower reactivity, less ash and slightly higher sulfur content than coke made without the addition of petroleum coke. In contrast with these results, it has been reported in a BCRA study that additions of petroleum coke to a strong coking coal, above 5 wt%, increased coke reactivity. These differences may be explained on the basis of the coal or blend characteristics to which petroleum coke is added. Petroleum coke addition seems to give better results if the coal/blend has high fluidity. The present situation in Spain is favorable for the use of petroleum coke. So, a study of laboratory and semi-industrial scale was made to assess the possibility of using petroleum coke as an additive to the typical industrial coal blend coked by the Spanish Steel Company, ENSIDESA. The influence of the petroleum coke particle size was also studied to semi-industrial scale.

Alvarez, R.; Diez, M.A.; Menendez, J.A.; Barriocanal, C.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Nacional del Carbon; Sirgado, M. [ENSIDESA, Aviles (Spain)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of studies including temperature programmed desorption, infrared study of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas. CO insertion is known to be a key step to the formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol from CO hydrogenation over Rh catalysts. Ethylene hydroformylation has often served as a probe to determine CO insertion capabilities of Rh catalysts. The mechanism of CO insertion in ethylene hydroformylation over Rh/SiO{sub 2} was investigated.

Chuang, S.S.C.

1989-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Undeformed (additive) energy conservation law in Doubly Special Relativity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All the Doubly Special Relativity (DSR) models studied in literature so far involve a deformation of the energy conservation rule that forces us to release the hypothesis of the additivity of the energy for composite systems. In view of the importance of the issue for a consistent formulation of a DSR statistical mechanics and a DSR thermodynamics, we show that DSR models preserving the usual (i.e. additive) energy conservation rule can be found. These models allow the construction of a DSR-covariant extensive energy. The implications of the analysis for the dynamics of DSR-covariant multiparticle systems are also briefly discussed.

Gianluca Mandanici

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

Health studies indicate MTBE is safe gasoline additive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation of the oxygenated fuels program by EPA in 39 metropolitan areas, including Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, in the winter of 1992, encountered some unexpected difficulties. Complaints of headaches, dizziness, nausea, and irritated eyes started in Fairbanks, jumped to Anchorage, and popped up in various locations in the lower 48 states. The suspected culprit behind these complaints was the main additive for oxygenation of gasoline is methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). A test program, hastily organized in response to these complaints, has indicated that MTBE is a safe gasoline additive. However, official certification of the safety of MTBE is still awaited.

Anderson, E.V.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Characteristics of yttrium oxide laser ceramics with additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neodymium- or ytterbium-doped laser ceramics with a disordered crystal-field structure formed by introduction of iso- and heterovalent elements into yttrium oxide are studied. It is shown that these additives broaden the spectral band of laser transitions, which makes it possible to use ceramics as active laser media emitting ultrashort pulses. Lasing was obtained in several samples of this ceramics. At the same time, it is shown that addition of zirconium and hafnium stimulates the Foerster quenching of upper laser levels and pump levels. (extreme light fields and their applications)

Osipov, V V; Solomonov, V I; Orlov, A N; Shitov, V A; Maksimov, R N; Spirina, A V [Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For additional information, contact: Department of Agricultural Economics & Economics Montana State.montana.edu/econ agecon@montana.edu 1 2 AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS & ECONOMICS KELLY GORHAM 1 Austin Owens traveled to Greece as mentors for students in Economics 101 4 Chris Stoddard was the recipient of a MSU Cox Family Faculty

Lawrence, Rick L.

125

www.biology.pdx.edu For additional information about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOLOGY www.biology.pdx.edu For additional information about the Biology Department: Visit: Biology Department Portland State University P.O. Box 751 Portland, OR 97207-0751/ Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Bachelor of Arts in Biology Bachelor of Science in Biology Minor in Biology Our challenging

126

For additional information, contact: Department of History, Philosophy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For additional information, contact: Department of History, Philosophy & Religious Studies Montana "Philosophy of Science," "Nature and Religion" and "The Darwinian Revolution." The World The department offers courses ranging from "Latin American Perspectives" to "Religion of Ancient Egypt" to "Philosophies of Asia

127

Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hindrance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

Sloan, E.D. Jr.; Christiansen, R.L.; Lederhos, J.P.; Long, J.P.; Panchalingam, V.; Du, Y.; Sum, A.K.W.

1997-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

128

Additives and method for controlling clathrate hydrates in fluid systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Discussed is a process for preventing clathrate hydrate masses from detrimentally impeding the possible flow of a fluid susceptible to clathrate hydrate formation. The process is particularly useful in the natural gas and petroleum production, transportation and processing industry where gas hydrate formation can cause serious problems. Additives preferably contain one or more five member, six member and/or seven member cyclic chemical groupings. Additives include polymers having lactam rings. Additives can also contain polyelectrolytes that are believed to improve conformance of polymer additives through steric hinderance and/or charge repulsion. Also, polymers having an amide on which a C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 group is attached to the nitrogen and/or the carbonyl carbon of the amide may be used alone, or in combination with ring-containing polymers for enhanced effectiveness. Polymers having at least some repeating units representative of polymerizing at least one of an oxazoline, an N-substituted acrylamide and an N-vinyl alkyl amide are preferred.

Sloan, Jr., Earle Dendy (Golden, CO); Christiansen, Richard Lee (Littleton, CO); Lederhos, Joseph P. (Wheatridge, CO); Long, Jin Ping (Dallas, TX); Panchalingam, Vaithilingam (Lakewood, CO); Du, Yahe (Golden, CO); Sum, Amadeu Kun Wan (Golden, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Original article Addition of urea to lucernes before industrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Addition of urea to lucernes before industrial dehydration: Effect on nutritional and at the end of the third cycle: lucernes 1, 2 and 3. These three samples were submitted to an industrial) digestibility measured in sheep using the three dehydrated lucernes; and ii) on ruminal degradation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

130

Request for Addition or Change to SPP Submitted By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Request for Addition or Change to SPP UM AEC Submitted By: Phone: E-mail: General Product Information Manufacturer/Product Name List of Installations within 50 Miles of Ann Arbor Years Product in Use Certification Certified wood Green Seal Standard GS-11 and Green Seal Plus (iaq) Greenguard Primarily indoor air

Kamat, Vineet R.

131

additive contents crada: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

additive contents crada First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 NIMH CRADAs Review and Approval...

132

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click predictive controller for robots to follow a virtual leader Dongbing Gu and Huosheng Hu Robotica / Volume 27. Robotica, 27, pp 905-913 doi:10.1017/S0263574708005316 Request Permissions : Click here Downloaded from

Hu, Huosheng

133

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click and Vicente Matellán Robotica / Volume 26 / Issue 06 / November 2008, pp 817 - 830 DOI: 10.1017/S (2008). A hybrid approach to fast and accurate localization for legged robots. Robotica, 26, pp 817

Hu, Huosheng

134

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click and Y. Ahmet ekerciolu Robotica / FirstView Article / October 2014, pp 1 - 13 DOI: 10.1017/S formation control of networked mobile robots in environments with obstacles. Robotica, Available on CJO 2014

Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

135

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click. Goldberg Robotica / Volume 13 / Issue 06 / November 1995, pp 565 573 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574700018646 algorithms for automatic planning by robots in stochastic environments. Robotica,13, pp 565573 doi:10.1017/S

Goldberg, Ken

136

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click Robotica / FirstView Article / September 2012, pp 1 8 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574711000774, Published online: 25 on taskoriented workspace. Robotica, Available on CJO 2011 doi:10.1017/S0263574711000774 Request Permissions

Kim, Jongwon

137

http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotica http://journals.cambridge.org/ROB Additional services for Robotica: Email alerts: Click Robotica / Volume 24 / Issue 04 / July 2006, pp 429 - 431 DOI: 10.1017/S0263574705002420, Published online positioning method for a humanoid robot. Robotica, 24, pp 429-431 doi:10.1017/S0263574705002420 Request

Hu, Huosheng

138

Service Contract Addition Please type or print information clearly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Service Contract Addition Please type or print information clearly Purchasing Department, Building for the service contract. If the item is part of an equipment system, all accessories must be listed. When adding 18. Serial Number 19. Location (Bldg./Rm.) 20. Requested Start Date 21. Service Contract Vendor 22

Wlodawer, Alexander

139

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors 23, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: Accessible routes shall be maintained. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction project

Dong, Yingfei

140

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors on the roof to June 30, 2011. DURATION OF PROJECT: May 21, 2011 to June 30, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday persons in the vicinity of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION NOTICE SUPPLEMENT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors. DURATION OF PROJECT: May 31, 2011 to June 21, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: Monday to Friday 7:30 a.m. to 4. The loading area will be closed on May 31, 2011. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction

142

Additional reductions in the k-constrained modified KP hierarchy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additional reductions in the modified k-constrained KP hierarchy are proposed. As a result we obtain generalizations of Kaup-Broer system, Korteweg-de Vries equation and a modification of Korteweg-de Vries equation that belongs to modified k-constrained KP hierarchy. We also propose solution generating technique based on binary Darboux transformations for the obtained equations.

Oleksandr Chvartatskyi; Yuriy Sydorenko

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mobile applications constantly demand additional memory, and traditional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This remote access could reduce local storage space, thereby reducing energy demands on the mobile plat- form60 Mobile applications constantly demand additional memory, and traditional designs increase- port connected ubiquitous environments. Engineers attempt to minimize network use because of its

Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

144

LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

Boyer, Edmond

145

additional energy losses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

additional energy losses First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Comparing energy loss...

146

Enclosure 1 Additional Information on Hanford Tank Wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enclosure 1 Additional Information on Hanford Tank Wastes Introduction The U. S. Nuclear Regulatory of Energy to the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency addressing the Hanford Tank and K Basin Wastes (CBFO stored in two tanks (designated as tanks 241-AW-103 and 241-AW-105) at the Hanford Site are not high

147

A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design For Manufacturing (DFM) approaches aim to integrate manufacturability aspects during the design stage. Most of DFM approaches usually consider only one manufacturing process, but products competitiveness may be improved by designing hybrid modular products, in which products are seen as 3-D puzzles with modules realized aside by the best manufacturing process and further gathered. A new DFM system is created in order to give quantitative information during the product design stage of which modules will benefit in being machined and which ones will advantageously be realized by an additive process (such as Selective Laser Sintering or laser deposition). A methodology for a manufacturability evaluation in case of a subtractive or an additive manufacturing process is developed and implemented in a CAD software. Tests are carried out on industrial products from automotive industry.

Kerbrat, Olivier; Hascoët, Jean-Yves; 10.1016/j.compind.2011.04.003

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Mass spectral characterization of petroleum dyes, tracers, and additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum dyes, additives, and tracers are important for identifying gasolines in spill and contamination problems. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used for the characterization of 21 commercial petroleum dyes. Many contained common chromophores, typically azo or anthraquinone groups, and often differed only in their degree of alkyl substitution. Few dyes were pure and typically contained several chromogens with homologous series of substituents. A separation method was developed to concentrate the polar fractions containing the additives. Subsequent characterization of the polar fraction by GC/MS showed distinct differences between different gasolines. Various colorless tracers were evaluated in terms of detectability, soil adsorption, and cost. Many tracers exhibited soil adsorption and interferences which limited their detectability. Alcohols in the C8-C10 range were found to be the most suitable tracers with GC/MS detection limits of 1 ppm. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

Youngless, T.L.; Swansiger, J.T.; Danner, D.A.; Greco, M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Additive for iron disulfide cathodes used in thermal batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention comprises thermal batteries employing an FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer itself. A minor amount of CaSi/sub 2/ preferably 1-3% by weight is provided as an additive in the FeS/sub 2/ depolarizer to eliminate the voltage transient (spike) which normally occurs upon activation of batteries of this type. The amount of FeS/sub 2/ by weight generally comprises 64 to 90%.

Not Available

1982-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

150

Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment2015 InformationAGuidefor the OfficeAdditional

151

A dynamical perspective on additional planets in 55 Cancri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Five planets are known to orbit the star 55 Cancri. The recently-discovered planet f at 0.78 AU (Fischer et al. 2008) is located at the inner edge of a previously-identified stable zone that separates the three close-in planets from planet d at 5.9 AU. Here we map the stability of the orbital space between planets f and d using a suite of n-body integrations that include an additional, yet-to-be-discovered planet g with a radial velocity amplitude of 5 m/s (planet mass = 0.5-1.2 Saturn masses). We find a large stable zone extending from 0.9 to 3.8 AU at eccentricities below 0.4. For each system we quantify the probability of detecting planets b-f on their current orbits given perturbations from hypothetical planet g, in order to further constrain the mass and orbit of an additional planet. We find that large perturbations are associated with specific mean motion resonances (MMRs) with planets f and d. We show that two MMRs, 3f:1g (the 1:3 MMR between planets g and f) and 4g:1d cannot contain a planet g. The 2f:1g MMR is unlikely to contain a planet more massive than about 20 Earth masses. The 3g:1d and 5g:2d MMRs could contain a resonant planet but the resonant location is strongly confined. The 3f:2g, 2g:1d and 3g:2d MMRs exert a stabilizing influence and could contain a resonant planet. Furthermore, we show that the stable zone may in fact contain 2-3 additional planets, if they are ~50 Earth masses each. Finally, we show that any planets exterior to planet d must reside beyond 10 AU.

Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Noel Gorelick

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Immobilization of uranium in contaminated soil by natural apatite addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Serbian natural mineral apatite as soil additive for reducing the migration of uranium from contaminated sediments. In laboratory study we investigated the sorption properties of domestic apatite upon different experimental conditions, such as pH, adsorbent mass, reaction period, concentration of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite, solid/liquid ratio. In second part of study, we did the quantification of uranium in soil samples, taken from uranium mine site 'Kalna', by sequential extraction method. The same procedure was, also, used for uranium determination in contaminated soil samples after apatite addition, in order to determine the changes in U distribution in soil fraction. The obtained results showed the significant level of immobilization (96.7%) upon certain conditions. Increase of %P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite and process of mechano-chemical activation led to increase of immobilization capacity from 17.50% till 91.64%. The best results for uranium binding were obtained at pH 5.5 and reaction period 60 days (98.04%) The sequential extraction showed the presence of uranium (48.2%) in potentially available soil fractions, but with the apatite addition uranium content in these fractions decreased (30.64%), what is considering environmental aspect significant fact. In situ immobilization of radionuclide using inexpensive sequestering agents, such as apatite, is very adequate for big contaminated areas of soil with low level of contamination. This investigation study on natural apatite from deposit 'Lisina' Serbia was the first one of this type in our country. Key words: apatite, uranium, immobilization, soil, contamination. (authors)

Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena; Stojanovic, Mirjana; Milosevic, Sinisa; Iles, Deana; Zildzovic, Snezana [Institute for Technology of Nuclear and other Mineral Raw Materials, Franche d' Epere 86, Belgrade (Serbia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

EIS-0396: Notice of Additional Public Hearing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThis EIS evaluates The DepartmentNotice of additional public

154

Oregon Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4InputAdditions

155

Pennsylvania Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0Sales (BillionDecade Year-0InputAdditions

156

South Carolina Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) YearPriceThousandThousand479,741 476,85520 40Additions (Million

157

South Dakota Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) YearPriceThousandThousand479,7416.18Decade Year-0 Year-1Additions

158

Tennessee Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2 10,037.24. U.S.YearYear JanAdditions

159

Iowa Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0Year JanDecade Year-0Additions

160

Maryland Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Additions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SciTech Connect: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systems controllerAdditive Manufacturing for Ceramics Citation Details

162

Rhode Island Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998Hampshire"RhodeWest Virginia" "EmissionDecade Year-0 Year-1Additions

163

Connecticut Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623 42 180NumberDecade Year-0Additions

164

Washington Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases349,980Additions (Million Cubic Feet)

165

Microsoft Word - Directives Requiring Additional Documentation.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8 - Outline andPROPOSAL68R18Requiring Additional

166

International Workshops to Foster Implementation of the IAEA Additional Protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A country’s adherence to the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) Additional Protocol is an important statement to the world of that country’s commitment to nuclear nonproliferation. Without the Additional Protocol (AP) it is possible, as demonstrated in Iraq, for a country party to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to clandestinely work toward nuclear weapons and be undetected by the IAEA. This is because classical safeguards under the NPT are directed at diversion of nuclear material from declared activities. But a country may instead build undeclared activities to produce weapons-grade nuclear material. The AP is directed at detecting those undeclared activities. As of May 2003, 73 countries had signed the AP, but only 35 have entered into force. To further adherence to the AP, the IAEA has held regional, high-level seminars in Japan, South Africa, Kazakhstan, Peru, Romania, and Malaysia to explain AP provisions. To supplement these policy-level seminars, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken to develop a set of modules of technical competencies required to implement the AP. The intent is to work closely with the IAEA by providing these technical competencies to countries as well as to complement the IAEA’s regional seminars and other outreach efforts. This paper briefly describes the technical competency modules.

Killinger, Mark H.; Coates, Cameron W.; Bedke, Michael L.

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

167

Microstructural characterization of superalloy 718 with boron and phosphorus additions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron and phosphorus additions are known to improve the stress rupture properties of IN-718. One possible mechanism to explain this property improvement relies on the boron and phosphorus additions slowing down the growth of {gamma}{double_prime} and {gamma}{prime} precipitates during high temperature service or aging. However, atom probe analysis found no segregation of boron and phosphorus to {gamma}-{gamma}{double_prime} or to {gamma}-{gamma}{prime} interfaces in the alloys with the high boron and high phosphorus levels. No difference in growth rates were found by transmission electron microscopy in the sizes of the {gamma}{double_prime} or {gamma}{prime} in alloys with high phosphorus and high boron as compared to commercial alloys and to alloys with even lower levels of phosphorus and boron. Atom probe analysis further found that much of the phosphorus, boron, and carbon segregated to grain boundaries. Creep curves comparing the alloys with high levels of phosphorus and boron and alloys with low levels of phosphorus and boron show a large difference in strain rate in the first hours of the test. These results suggest that the boron and phosphorus may have a direct effect on dislocation mobility by some pinning mechanism.

Horton, J.A.; McKamey, C.G.; Miller, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cao, W.D.; Kennedy, R.L. [Teledyne Allvac, Monroe, NC (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Naphthenic acids as antiwear additives for jet fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the ways in which the antiwear properties of jet fuels can be improved is the use of lubricity agents, otherwise known as antiwear additives. Among the various compounds that have antiwear properties in these fuels, naphthenic, acids merit special attention. These are alicyclic carboxylic acids, in most cases monobasic, with five- and six-membered carbon rings; they have the general formula R(CH{sub 2}){sub n}COOH, where R is a naphthene radical. Natural naphthenic acids consist mainly of acids of the cyclopentane series, beginning with the simplest, in particular cyclopentylacetic acid. The lower naphthenic acids are monocyclic; the higher acids, beginning with C{sub 13}, are bicyclic and polycyclic. Naphthenic acids of the cyclohexane series are encountered less frequently; they may be found, for example, in Baku, California, and Sakhalin crudes. The most widely used method for obtaining naphthenic acids is the treatment of light distillates, lube distillates, and diesel fuels. The standard GOST 13302-77 establishes several grades of naphthenic acids, depending on the raw material and the production technology. This work was aimed at the utilization of wastes containing naphthenic acids, with subsequent use as jet fuel additives.

Deineko, P.S.; Vasil`eva, E.N.; Popova, O.V.; Bashkatova, S.T.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Comparing Environmental Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machining via Life-Cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Social Impacts of Additive Manufacturing vs CNC MachiningImpacts of Additive Manufacturing vs. Traditional Machiningcutting! Impacts of Additive Manufacturing in Literature

Faludi, Jeremy; Bayley, Cindy; Bhogal, Suraj; Iribarne, Myles

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Irvine, Kevin (Huntsville, AL); Berger, Paul (Rome, NY); Comstock, Robert (Bel Air, MD)

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

Thermochemical Kinetics for Multireference Systems: Addition Reactions of Ozone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of ozone to ethyne and ethene provide extreme examples of multireference singlet-state chemistry, and they are examined here to test the applicability of several approaches to thermochemical kinetics of systems with large static correlation. Four different multireference diagnostics are applied to measure the multireference characters of the reactants, products, and transition states; all diagnostics indicate significant multireference character in the reactant portion of the potential energy surfaces. We make a more complete estimation of the effect of quadruple excitations than was previously available, and we use this with CCSDT/CBS estimation of Wheeler et al. (Wheeler, S. E.; Ess, D. H.; Houk, K. N. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 1798.) to make new best estimates of the van der Waals association energy, the barrier height, and the reaction energy to form the cycloadduct for both reactions. Comparing with these best estimates, we present comprehensive mean unsigned errors for a variety of coupled cluster, multilevel, and density functional methods. Several computational aspects of multireference reactions are considered: (i) the applicability of multilevel theory, (ii) the convergence of coupled cluster theory for reaction barrier heights, (iii) the applicability of completely renormalized coupled cluster methods to multireference systems, (iv) the treatment by density functional theory, (v) the multireference perturbation theory for multireference reactions, and (vi) the relative accuracy of scaling-type multilevel methods as compared with additive ones. It is found that scaling-type multilevel methods do not perform better than the additive-type multilevel methods. Among the 48 tested density functionals, only M05 reproduces the best estimates within their uncertainty. Multireference perturbation theory based on the complete-active-space reference wave functions constructed using a small number of reaction-specific active orbitals gives accurate forward barrier heights; however, it significantly underestimates reaction energies.

Zhao, Yan; Tishchenko, Oksana; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse; Piecuch, Piotr; Truhlar, Donald G.

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEV/EV Lithium-ion Battery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives...

173

Optimization of soil mixing technology through metallic iron addition.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhanced soil mixing is a process used to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil. In this process, also known as soil mixing with thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction, or SM/TESVE, a soil mixing apparatus breaks up and mixes a column of soil up to 9 m (30 ft) deep; simultaneously, hot air is blown through the soil. The hot air carries the VOCs to the surface where they are collected and safely disposed of. This technology is cost effective at high VOC concentrations, but it becomes cost prohibitive at low concentrations. Argonne National Laboratory-East conducted a project to evaluate ways of improving the effectiveness of this system. The project investigated the feasibility of integrating the SM/TESVE process with three soil treatment processes--soil vapor extraction, augmented indigenous biodegradation, and zero-valent iron addition. Each of these technologies was considered a polishing treatment designed to remove the contaminants left behind by enhanced soil mixing. The experiment was designed to determine if the overall VOC removal effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the SM/TESVE process could be improved by integrating this approach with one of the polishing treatment systems.

Moos, L. P.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

Jumate, E.; Manea, D. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Civil Engineering. 15 C Daicoviciu Str., 400020, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Department of Physics and Chemistry, 25 G. Baritiu Str., 400027, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

175

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy efficiency standards set minimum levels of energy efficiency that must be met by new products. Depending on the dynamics of the market and the level of the standard, the effect on the market for a given product may be small, moderate, or large. Energy efficiency standards address a number of market failures that exist in the buildings sector. Decisions about efficiency levels often are made by people who will not be responsible for the energy bill, such as landlords or developers of commercial buildings. Many buildings are occupied for their entire lives by very temporary owners or renters, each unwilling to make long-term investments that would mostly reward subsequent users. And sometimes what looks like apathy about efficiency merely reflects inadequate information or time invested to evaluate it. In addition to these sector-specific market failures, energy efficiency standards address the endemic failure of energy prices to incorporate externalities. In the U.S., energy efficiency standards for consumer products were first implemented in California in 1977. National standards became effective starting in 1988. By the end of 2001, national standards were in effect for over a dozen residential appliances, as well as for a number of commercial sector products. Updated standards will take effect in the next few years for several products. Outside the U.S., over 30 countries have adopted minimum energy performance standards. Technologies and markets are dynamic, and additional opportunities to improve energy efficiency exist. There are two main avenues for extending energy efficiency standards. One is upgrading standards that already exist for specific products. The other is adopting standards for products that are not covered by existing standards. In the absence of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards, it is likely that many new products will enter the stock with lower levels of energy efficiency than would otherwise be the case. Once in the stock, it is either impossible or more costly to improve the energy efficiency. Therefore, by not expanding or upgrading energy efficiency standards, opportunities for saving energy would be lost. In the past two decades, standards have significantly raised the level of energy efficiency for new products. How much more might be gained by making standards more stringent on products already subject to them, or by extending standards to products not yet covered? The main goal of this study is to estimate key national impacts of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment. These impacts approximate the opportunity for national benefits that may be lost if standards are not upgraded and expanded from current levels. This study also identifies the end uses where the largest opportunities exist. This analysis was prepared for the National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP). It uses an analytical approach that is similar in concept to that used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to set standard levels. It relies on much less data and uses more simplified assumptions than the detailed and complex formulations used in DOE's standard-setting process. The results of this analysis should thus be viewed as a first approximation of the impacts that would actually be achieved by new standards. All monetary values in this report are in 2002 dollars.

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

WATEQ3 geochemical model: thermodynamic data for several additional solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical models such as WATEQ3 can be used to model the concentrations of water-soluble pollutants that may result from the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. However, for a model to competently deal with these water-soluble pollutants, an adequate thermodynamic data base must be provided that includes elements identified as important in modeling these pollutants. To this end, several minerals and related solid phases were identified that were absent from the thermodynamic data base of WATEQ3. In this study, the thermodynamic data for the identified solids were compiled and selected from several published tabulations of thermodynamic data. For these solids, an accepted Gibbs free energy of formation, ..delta..G/sup 0//sub f,298/, was selected for each solid phase based on the recentness of the tabulated data and on considerations of internal consistency with respect to both the published tabulations and the existing data in WATEQ3. For those solids not included in these published tabulations, Gibbs free energies of formation were calculated from published solubility data (e.g., lepidocrocite), or were estimated (e.g., nontronite) using a free-energy summation method described by Mattigod and Sposito (1978). The accepted or estimated free energies were then combined with internally consistent, ancillary thermodynamic data to calculate equilibrium constants for the hydrolysis reactions of these minerals and related solid phases. Including these values in the WATEQ3 data base increased the competency of this geochemical model in applications associated with the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. Additional minerals and related solid phases that need to be added to the solubility submodel will be identified as modeling applications continue in these two programs.

Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seminar Title: Additive Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Functionally Integrated Composite Structures, Augsburg, Germany ME Faculty Candidate Abstract: Additive Manufacturing ­ Advanced Manufacturing of Polymer and Composite Components Additive manufacturing technologies

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

178

Printing 3D Electrical Traces in Additive Manufactured Parts via Low Melting Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Printing 3D Electrical Traces in Additive Manufactured Parts via Low where commercial Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques can be used to concurrently construct quality and robustness of systems produced using additive manufacturing (AM) techniques is beginning

Dollar, Aaron M.

179

Carbon/Sulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications CarbonSulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur...

180

Carbon/Sulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Additives and Cathode Materials for High-Energy Lithium Sulfur Batteries CarbonSulfur Nanocomposites and Additives for High-Energy Lithium...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative binders additives Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Design and Development of a LayerDesign and Development of a Layer--Based Additive Manufacturing... Based Additive Manufacturing Process for the Realization of Metal Parts...

182

Additive Manufacturing Symposium This event is supported by the Department of Energy's Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive Manufacturing Symposium This event is supported by the Department of Energy's Science of Additive Manufacturing (AM) to: n Engage policy and research leaders in a dialogue on what potential AM has an Additive Manufacturing Summit in 2013. 9:00 am Welcome and Opening Comments 9:35 Additive Manufacturing

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

183

Additional Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following resources are focused on Federal new construction and major renovation projects, sustainable construction, and the role of renewable energy technologies in such facilities. These...

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional cases including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: additional cases including Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 SWE 214 (062) Chapter 21: Refining the Use Cases Slide 1 Chapter 21 Summary: requirements. The additional use-case...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - approved food additive Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

food additive Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: approved food additive Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Phone: 206.616.1623 Fax:...

186

Analizing Aqueous Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Fracturing Fluid Additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pertinent chemical additives on fluid imbibition and intercalation into shale samples. We do this with the hope that we will eventually be able to determine how natural phenomena and additives affect long term resource production from unconventional oil...

Qureshi, Maha

2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

187

Analyzing Aqueous Solution Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Fracturing Fluid Additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pertinent chemical additives on fluid imbibition and intercalation into shale samples. We do this with the hope that we will eventually be able to determine how natural phenomena and additives affect long term resource production from unconventional oil...

Plamin, Sammazo Jean-bertrand

2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Analyzing Aqueous Solution Imbibition into Shale and the Effects of Optimizing Critical Chemical Additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pertinent chemical additives on fluid imbibition and intercalation into shale samples. We do this with the hope that we will eventually be able to determine how natural phenomena and additives affect long term resource production from unconventional oil...

Wiese, Matthew Michael

2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

Fuel additives: Excluding aviation fuels. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning compositions, applications and performance of additives in fuels. Evaluations and environmental testing of additives in automotive, diesel, and boiler fuels are discussed. Additive effects on air pollution control, combustion stability, fuel economy and fuel storage are presented. Aviation fuel additives are covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fuel additives: Excluding aviation fuels. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning compositions, applications and performance of additives in fuels. Evaluations and environmental testing of additives in automotive, diesel, and boiler fuels are discussed. Additive effects on air pollution control, combustion stability, fuel economy and fuel storage are presented. Aviation fuel additives are covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 231 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The oxidative addition of simple selenium molecules to an unsaturated iridium (I) compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

addition reactions of Lewis acids such as hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen selenide, selenols and thiols to Vaska's compound (trans-chlorocarbonylbis(triphenylphosphine)- iridium'(I)) have been described. The addition products, which have a metal-hydrogen... for the organization of transition metal chemistry. Compounds which possess either polar or nonpolar bonds csn 8 react with unsaturated d complexes to form "oxidized" addition products. Examples of "additive oxidizing agents" include 5 6 7 6 8 8 hydrogen, ' oxygen...

Hsieh, Mel-Lin Mary

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

Finite deformation plasticity based on the additive split of the rate of deformation and hyperelasticity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that an additive decomposition of Lagrangian strain, 1. Current address: The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, D

Fish, Jacob

193

Fuel additives and heat treatment effects on nanocrystalline zinc ferrite phase composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel additives and heat treatment effects on nanocrystalline zinc ferrite phase composition Ping Hu October 2010 Keywords: Zinc ferrite Fuel additive Heat treatment Phase composition a b s t r a c, carbamide and acrylic acid as fuel additives. Pure spinel zinc ferrite with the crystallite size of about 15

Volinsky, Alex A.

194

Effect of additives on the reduction of nitrogen oxides using cyanuric acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Cylinder Concentrations of Flow Constituents. . . . . 16 Table 2. Maximum Output and Use of Flow ControHers. . . . 17 Table 3. Manufacturers and Purity Levels of Four Liquid Additives. . . . 30 Table 4. Nominal Inlet Concentrations of Simulated... OF THE EXPERIMENT Experimental Apparatus Species Calibration . Liquid Additive Mixture Preparation. Baseline Testing Additive Testing . . Data Acquisition and Reduction. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Baseline Case . . Hydrogen . Methane. . . Ethylene...

Standridge, Brad Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ignition, cold flow improvers, additives offer options to boost diesel cetane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The options of investing in processing for cetane improvement, whether modifications to existing units or the construction of new units, can be costly. Additives are used to improve cetane quality. Depending on the function of the additive, the effect can be either direct or indirect. The following sections discuss some of the available additives and their applications and costs.

Collins, J.M.; Unzelman, G.H.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Edinburgh Research Explorer Intelligibility enhancement of HMM-generated speech in additive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edinburgh Research Explorer Intelligibility enhancement of HMM-generated speech in additive noise enhancement of HMM- generated speech in additive noise by modifying Mel cepstral coefficients to increase claim. Download date: 15. Sep. 2014 #12;Intelligibility enhancement of HMM-generated speech in additive

Edinburgh, University of

197

Title of the paper: A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title of the paper: A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing Authors approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing 1. Introduction In order to stay competitive, technical improvements in additive manufacturing processes provide the opportunity to manufacture real

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

198

A new global approach to design for additive manufacturing R. PONCHE 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new global approach to design for additive manufacturing R. PONCHE 1 J.Y. HASCOET, O. KERBRAT, P directly through additive manufacturing. It is now accepted that these new processes can increase of these processes, with the Design For Additive Manufacturing (DFAM) concept. In this context, a methodology

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Highly enantioselective copper-catalyzed conjugate addition of diethylzinc to cyclic enones with spirocyclic phosphoramidite ligands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly enantioselective copper-catalyzed conjugate addition of diethylzinc to cyclic enones spirocyclic diol (R)-5. These monodentate ligands have been applied in copper-catalyzed conjugate addition ligands com- bined with copper salts have shown excellent enantio- selectivities in the conjugate addition

Zhang, Xumu

200

Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Predictions of capillary oxygen transport in the presence of fluorocarbon additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predictions of capillary oxygen transport in the presence of fluorocarbon additives CHARLES D in the presence of fluorocarbon additives. Am. J. Physiol. 275 (Heart Circ. Physiol. 44): H2250­H2257, 1998.--A solubility, e.g., by the addition of an intravascular fluorocarbon emulsion. The effect of increased plasma

Eggleton, Charles

202

Analysis of synthetic motor oils for additive elements by ICP-AES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Standard motor oils are made by blending paraffinic or naphthenic mineral oil base stocks with additive packages containing anti-wear agents, dispersants, corrosion inhibitors, and viscosity index improvers. The blender can monitor the correct addition of the additives by determining the additive elements in samples dissolved in a solvent by ICP-AES. Internal standardization is required to control sample transport interferences due to differences in viscosity between samples and standards. Synthetic motor oils, made with poly-alpha-olefins and trimethylol propane esters, instead of mineral oils, pose an additional challenge since these compounds affect the plasma as well as having sample transport interference considerations. The synthetic lubricant base stocks add significant oxygen to the sample matrix, which makes the samples behave differently than standards prepared in mineral oil. Determination of additive elements in synthetic motor oils will be discussed.

Williams, M.C.; Salmon, S.G. [Texaco Inc., Beacon, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - additive citric acid Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C7H... ) are related to marine origin. Additionally, GFs were measured for acidic ammoniated sulfate particles created... were studied: citric ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - additive emulsifying agent Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

agents... additives is confusing. It is often assumed that any material that lowers the surface tension of water... : wetting agents, penetrants, spreaders, ......

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional catalysts include Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS Summary: had unimpregnated support material in addition to...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional generation capacity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Berkeley Collection: Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants 5 AIRPORT TROUGHPUT CAPACITY LIMITS FOR DEMAND MANAGEMENT Vivek Kumar, Lance Sherry Summary: and additional costs...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional quantitative fit-testing Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mask fit testing equipment Develop information resources... ) additional fit-testing machine d. Essential Positions Personnel in the following roles have been cross......

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon addition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to invest in carbon reducing activities in developing... is the influence carbon markets will have on additional benefits from land-use systems such as rural...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional foundation settlements Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

foundation settlements Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: additional foundation settlements Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Is the...

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional surgical procedures Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surgical procedures Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: additional surgical procedures Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ppmcsurgery 1...

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - additive irradiation procedures Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

irradiation procedures Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: additive irradiation procedures Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 IRRADIANCE MAPS...

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional information relating Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 of 7 INTENDED ATTACHMENT LIST ADDITIONAL... : Name: Title: Office Phone: Home Phone: Cell Phone: Provided by Public Relations 12;Briefing details... Page 5 of 7 TABLE GUEST...

213

Implications of additive manufacturing on complexity management within supply chains in a production environment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ph. D. This dissertation focuses on developing a generic framework for using additive manufacturing as an appropriate production method to address the management of complexity… (more)

Kieviet, Andre, 1977-

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

RELATING MICROSTRUCTURE TO PROCESS VARIABLES IN BEAM-BASED ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING OF INCONEL 718.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The advancement of laser or electron beam-based additive manufacturing requires the ability to control solidification microstructure. Previous work combined analytical point source solutions and nonlinear… (more)

Thompson, John Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Development of Design Guidelines for Metal Additive Manufacturing and Process Selection.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Producing parts using metal additive manufacturing (AM) allows for creativity and flexibility while minimizing waste material that comes with traditional subtracting manufacturing techniques. However, in… (more)

Samperi, Matthew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Additive Manufacturing Methodology and System for Fabrication of Porous Structures with Functionally Graded Properties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The focus of this dissertation is on the development of an additive manufacturing system and methodology for fabricating structures with functionally graded porous internal properties… (more)

Vlasea, Mihaela

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of Machine Positional Errors on Geometric Tolerances in Additive Manufacturing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Additive Manufacturing (AM) is the process of producing 3D parts from a digital model in a layer by layer manner without the need for part… (more)

Bhatia, Shaleen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Future of Additive Manufacturing in Facade design: a strategic roadmap towards a preferable future:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Additive manufacturing (AM) is a relatively new discipline that offers great potential for designers in every industry. When further developed, this new method of manufacturing,… (more)

Volkers, J.N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Quantitative Study of the Impact of Additive Manufacturing in the Aircraft Spare Parts Supply Chain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Additive manufacturing is a promising manufacturing technology which is finding its way into mainstream manufacturing industry. As compared to conventional manufacturing it has a number… (more)

Mokasdar, Abhiram S., M.S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

In vitro and in vivo assessment of bioactive composite scaffolds fabricated via additive manufacturing technology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Additive manufacturing (AM) technology was implemented together with new composite material comprising a synthetic materials, namely, polycaprolactone and bioactive glass with the ultimate aim of… (more)

Poh, Su Ping Patrina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - additive classification tree Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that taxa 1...8 form a monophyletic group excluding taxon 9, while input tree 2 places the additional taxa... will have its own closure implying dierent...

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional sex combs Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

consequences for their sex investment strategy. Regulation depends... about both comb conditions and nectar intake. 3. CONTROL OF COMB TYPE In addition to deciding when......

223

Additions to list of Nominating Bodies Organisation Website and Address Qualifications for nominating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annex A Additions to list of Nominating Bodies Organisation Website and Address Qualifications plc is the world's leading semiconductor intellectual property supplier. Instead of bearing the costs

Glasgow, University of

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional reserve recovery Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recovery Summary: , measuring the recovery of congeners of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs). In addition, we measured... and showed satisfactory recoveries of all of the...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - additive genetic variability Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trends in genetic fuzzy rule-based systems In addition to those presented in previous section... Ten Years of Genetic Fuzzy Systems: Current Framework and New Trends O....

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect additional nitrogen Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nitrate solution to determine what happened to the nitrogen and how the deposition affected... on a range of key microbial activities. The nitrogen additions decreased the rate...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional diagnostic tests Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 4 5 > >> 1 Copyright 1996 Lucent Technologies This paper may be reproduced for the PLoP Conference and its proceedings, September, 1996. Summary: provide additional diagnostic...

228

Evaluation of potential performance additives for the advanced lithium bromide chiller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effectiveness and stability of potential heat-and-mass transfer (performance) additives for an advanced lithium bromide (LiBr) chiller were evaluated in a series of experimental studies. These studies of additive effectiveness and stability were necessary because many currently used performance additives decompose at the high generator temperatures (220{degrees}C to 260{degrees}C) desired for this particular advanced LiBr chiller. For example, one common performance additive, 2-ethyl-l-hexanol (2EH), reacts with the corrosion inhibitor, lithium chromate (Li{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}), even at moderate generator temperatures ({ge}180{degrees}C). These stability problems can be mitigated by using less reactive corrosion inhibitors such as lithium molybdate (Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4}) and by using more stable performance additives such as 1-heptanol (HEP) or 1H,1H,7H-dodecafluoro-1-heptanol (DFH). There seems to be a trade-off between additive stability and effectiveness: the most effective performance additives are not the most stable additives. These studies indicate that HEP or DFH may be effective additives in the advanced LiBr chiller if Li{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} is used as a corrosion inhibitor.

Reiner, R.H.; Del Cul, W.; Perez-Blanco, H.; Ally, M.R.; Zaltash, A.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional retentive features Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R. - Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Kansas Collection: Chemistry 8 Records Management USER GUIDE | II Summary: retention periods. In addition to the common...

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - additives estabilizacao radiolitica Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of 10): Additional service ... Source: Chinnam, Ratna Babu - Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Wayne State University Collection: Engineering 13 Introduction...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - additives Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of 10): Additional service ... Source: Chinnam, Ratna Babu - Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Wayne State University Collection: Engineering 2 Introduction...

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional test positions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Engineering 10 Power-Aware Test Planning in the Early System-on-Chip Design Exploration Process Summary: . The additional required wiring corresponds to 20 units. The...

233

E-Print Network 3.0 - additive genetic control Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biology Collection: Biology and Medicine 2 Evolutionary Genetics Human Health, Privacy, Safety and Culture Summary: modify or alter the phenotype in spite of or in addition to...

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid coupled addition Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In addition, 177 the fusion enthalpies... UNCORRECTEDPROOF 2 Vaporization, fusion and sublimation enthalpies of the 3 dicarboxylic ... Source: Chickos, James S. - Department of...

235

advanced mn-base additives: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at Madison, University of 3 MAE SEMINAR Recent advances in Additive Manufacturing3D Printing Technologies, Material Science and Engineering Websites Summary: MAE SEMINAR Recent...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional critical experiments Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in design process 15 additional CEF critical... Experiments - Critical and Subcritical Experiments at the Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) Now Being ... Source: Danon,...

237

EIS-0403: BLM Notice of Availability of Maps and Additional Public...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BLM Notice of Availability of Maps and Additional Public Scoping from the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Second Scoping Period) EIS-0403: BLM Notice of Availability...

238

addition 2003-2006 chapter: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fall 2004 IntroductionChapter 1 (&Chapter 9) Mathematics Websites Summary: calculations SPC and engineering feedback control PID control algorithms "Advanced" Control Charts...

239

EFFECTS OF HYDROGEN ADDITION ON THE MARKSTEIN LENGTH AND FLAMMABILITY LIMIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion at lean mixture conditions. In the case of natural gas engines, enriching the fuel with hydrogenEFFECTS OF HYDROGEN ADDITION ON THE MARKSTEIN LENGTH AND FLAMMABILITY LIMIT OF STRETCHED METHANE, Ann Arbor, MI, USA A computational study is performed to investigate the effects of hydrogen addition

Im, Hong G.

240

Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae, and for other species. Keywords: Ocean acidification; Pacific oyster; Larval stages; Hydrated lime; Shellfish No.: 577 Title of Project: Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Degree of polarization estimation in the presence of nonuniform illumination and additive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of additive Gaussian detector noise. We first study the performance of standard DOP estimators and propose estimation, the influence of speckle noise [7] and of coupled speckle and photon noise in low-flux-intensity im- ages [8] has been studied. More recently, we have ad- dressed the case of additive Gaussian noise

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

242

Introduction The use of ethanol as a gasoline additive is likely to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction The use of ethanol as a gasoline additive is likely to increase in the near future will also lead to additional ethanol use. There- fore, it is important to understand how ethanol affects that the presence of ethanol could have undesirable effects on the biodegradation of BTEX (i.e., benzene, toluene

Alvarez, Pedro J.

243

DESIGN OF FUEL-ADDITIVES USING HYBRID NEURAL NETWORKS AND EVOLUTIONARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DESIGN OF FUEL-ADDITIVES USING HYBRID NEURAL NETWORKS AND EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHMS Anantha Wickliffe, Ohio Abstract Fuel-additives play an important role in deposit reduction on the valves and combustion chamber of the automobile. They reduce cold-start problems, emissions and improve fuel

Venkatasubramanian, Venkat

244

Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite in the presence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite.reiller@cea.fr The influence of addition order and contact time in the system hematite (-Fe2O3) ­ humic acid (HA) ­ thorium (IV) was studied in batch experiments. Thorium (IV) is considered here as a chemical analogue of other actinides

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

245

LETTER 1371 An Improved Procedure for Asymmetric Aldol Additions with N-Acyl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equivalent of titanium tetrachloride, one equivalent of diisopropylethylamine and one equivalent of N asymmetric aldol addition is one of the most general and widely used methods for asymmetric carbon-carbon-acyloxazolidinones in aldol additions, prepared by soft enolization using titani- um tetrachloride and diisopropylethylamine

246

he increasing frequency of detection of the widely used gasoline additive methyl tert-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T he increasing frequency of detection of the widely used gasoline additive methyl tert- butyl, the September 15, 1999, Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline (1) states that between 5 with large releases (e.g., LUFTs). Unprecedented growth in use Use of MTBE as a gasoline additive began

247

Beyond Additionality in Cap-and-Trade Offset Policy Reuters/Nguyen Huy Kham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), continues to cite additionality as the most important part of any offset for additionality rules. Ironically, even as programs such as RGGI have stopped rewarding higher emitters through gases (GHGs), including the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), the Western Climate Initiative

248

MAE SEMINAR Recent advances in Additive Manufacturing/3D Printing Technologies, Material Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAE SEMINAR Recent advances in Additive Manufacturing/3D Printing Technologies, Material Science Samueli School of Engineering University of California Irvine 3D printing or Additive Manufacturing in different shapes. 3D printing is also considered distinct from traditional machining techniques, which

Mease, Kenneth D.

249

Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases Emissions--Carbon Dioxide Emissions--Sequestration and Storage--Biochar--Basalt--Organic Fertilizers, this investigation focuses on the range of potential of different soil additives to enhance sequestration and storage

Vallino, Joseph J.

250

Determining the effectiveness of additives for the control of sweep and mobility in steamflooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steamflooding is currently the major EOR method used by industry. However, the recovery efficiency is often lowered by gravity override, viscous fingering, and reservoir heterogeneity effects. The injection of additives with steam to generate foam in situ has been proposed as a means to lessen these problems. This topical report details the experiments done so far with screening tests designed to predict the effectiveness of additives in improving the oil recovery efficiency by steam injection. The Foamability Screening, High Temperature-Pressure Foamability, and Mobility Control tests were used to evaluate an initial set of surfactant additives. Each test provided a comparison of surfactants according to the individual conditions of the tests. It was found that the rate of degradation of foams is sensitive to brine concentration, the higher the brine concentration the faster the degradation. In addition, it was found that the mobility is associated with the static foam stability of those additives. 22 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Strycker, A.R.; Madden, M.P.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effects of lithium additions on processing of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconducting tapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium additions to the high-temperature superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} (2212) increased superconducting transition temperatures and improved resistance to effects of magnetic fields. In addition, these additions lowered the melting point of 2212 and increased reaction kinetics. Ag-clad tapes fabricated from 2212 with and without Li exhibited profound differences. For heating to temperatures less than or equal to 840{degrees}C, grain growth and sintering were much more substantial in the tapes containing Li.

Goretta, K.C.; Li, Y.F.; Poeppel, R.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wu, S.; Guo, J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Schwartz, J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Investigation of the effectiveness of smoke suppressant fuel additives for turbojet applications. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven fuel additives were tested to investigate their effectiveness at reducing exhaust stack gas opacity in a turbojet test cell. Exhaust particle sizes and mass concentrations were determined at the engine and stack exhausts using measurements of light transmittance at three frequencies. Particle samples were also collected at the engine exhaust and measured with a scanning electron microscope to verify the optical technique. Nitrous oxide emissions were measured at the test cell stack exhaust. Four of the additives tested were found effective at reducing stack exhaust opacity and particulate mass concentration. None of the additives had any measurable effect on particle diameters. No meaningful changes in particle size or mass occurred between the engine and stack exhausts. The optical technique for determining particle size was verified effective using the scanning electron microscope. No additive had any significant effect on nitrous oxide production.

Bramer, J.R.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Proceedings of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 39, 2011 Additive Manufacturing based on Optimized Mask Video  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 39, 2011 Additive Manufacturing based on Optimized Mask Video of NAMRI/SME, Vol. 39, 2011 horizontal planes. Each slice is then converted into a two- dimensional (2D

Chen, Yong

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional heating systems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

heating systems Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: additional heating systems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 World Class. Face to Face....

256

Effects of Y_(2)O_(3) and ?-ZrP Additives on Lubrication of Grease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of novel additives in lubricants is a promising approach for high performance and energy saving devices. Those include automotive, marine, and wind turbines. In a wind turbine, the unplanned break-down rate of bearings caused by improper...

Kim, Chung Jwa

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

257

Boron-based Additives in Oil and Grease for Wind Turbine Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research investigates the tribological performance of crystalline and amorphous powders of boron as additives in lubricants: grease and mineral oil for potential applications of wind turbine. This research is focused on the wear resistance...

Kim, Jun-Hyeok

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

258

Synthesis of Densely Functionalized Cyclopropanes via Diastereoselective Nucleophilic Additions to in Situ Generated Cyclopropenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the development and application of methods for the diastereoselective synthesis of substituted cyclopropanes. The methodology described in this dissertation is based on the addition of ...

Ryabchuk, Pavel

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Additional Phase and Assessment Descriptive Quality Indicators for Single-case Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This table presents a rating scale for additional phase and assessment descriptive quality indicators in single-case research. This table is adapted from CEC (2014), Horner et al. (2005), Reichow (2008), and Wolery (2013)....

Boles, Margot

2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional historical solid Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

>> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 81 Historical Wetlands of the Southern California Coast An AtlAS of US CoASt SUrvey t-SHeetS, 1851-1889 Summary: incorporate additional historical and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol gas additives Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alcohol. In addition, you will not want to use... , methyl gas, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, wood alcohol, carbon, water, and a lot of other... if gas storage tanks...

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - additive space-time white Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

space-time white Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: additive space-time white Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Click to Submit...

263

Carbon black: A low cost colloidal additive for controlling gas-migration in cement slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of different additives on the permeability of cement slurries to formation gas has been studied with the aid of a gas flow apparatus. The performance of two commercial additives (polymer latex and silica fume) has been compared to that of a novel additive (carbon black) that has been developed in the authors laboratories with the aim of simplifying the cement slurry composition and reducing field operational costs. Data on the thickening time, fluid loss, rheology and compressive strength are also presented to provide a clear picture of the potential of carbon black as a substitute for silica fume and polymer latex in some field applications. Finally, the paper describes the results of a field application using carbon black as a gas-block additive in the cement slurry.

Calloni, G.; Moroni, N.; Miano, F.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional radial velocity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: additional radial velocity Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 3D Least Squares Velocity from 3D Doppler Radial X. Chen, J.L. Barron, R.E. Mercer Summary:...

265

Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEV/EV Lithium-ion Battery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

performance (cell improver): For conventional electrolyte (for example 1.2M LiPF 6 ECEMC), the SEI additive is the performance improver. 2-1. Artificial SEI forms prior the...

266

Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEV/EV Lithium-ion Battery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Li-ion Cell Performance: For conventional electrolyte (for example 1.2M LiPF 6 ECEMC 37), the SEI additive is the performance improver. Artificial SEI forms prior the...

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - additive anti-cancer effect Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anti-cancer effect Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: additive anti-cancer effect Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Silica Cages Help...

268

Geography Access Control / Identification Application Application Type: New Update/Addition Replacement Temporary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Addition Replacement Temporary The following is to be completed by the employee (type or print legibly): Last name _____________________ $15 Access & Identification, $10 Identification Card only, $10 replacement fee for either Affiliation

California at Santa Barbara, University of

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional external forces Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vectors, so you must use the rules for vector addition to find the net force acting... Law - Alternative Statement In the absence of external forces, when viewed from an...

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional steady-state acquisition Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: additional steady-state acquisition Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 IEEE TRANS. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING 52 (8), 1450-1460, 2005 1 Automated Correction of Spin-History Related...

271

WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact: National Cover Page: Photographs: Kathryn Conant Striped bass graphic: Duane Raver I #12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK Table of Contents Fish Need Wetlands

272

Study of electrostatic charge generation and antistatic additive effects in used transformer oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDY OF ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE GENERATION AND ANTISTATIC ADDITIVE EFFECTS IN USED TRANSFORMER OIL A Thesis by FERNANDO RANGEL CLAVIJO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8tM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Safety Engineering STUDY OF ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE GENERATION AND ANTISTATIC ADDITIVE EFFECTS IN USED TRANSFORMER OIL A Thesis by FERNANDO RANGEL CLAVIJO Approved as to style...

Rangel Clavijo, Fernando

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electrodeposition of nickel-chromium-phosphorous alloys in the presence of additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL-CHROMIUM- PHOSPHOROUS ALLOYS IN THE PRESENCE OF ADDITIVES A Thesis by RAHUL BINDLISH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL-CHROMIUM- PHOSPHOROUS ALLOYS IN THE PRESENCE OF ADDITIVES A Thesis by RAHUL BINDLISH Approved as to style and content by: Ralph E. White (Chair...

Bindlish, Rahul

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

275

Uv-Light Stabilization Additive Package For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultraviolet light stabilization additive package is used in an encapsulant material that may be used in solar cell modules, laminated glass and a variety of other applications. The ultraviolet light stabilization additive package comprises a first hindered amine light stabilizer and a second hindered amine light stabilizer. The first hindered amine light stabilizer provides thermal oxidative stabilization, and the second hindered amine light stabilizer providing photo-oxidative stabilization.

Hanoka, Jack I. (Brookline, MA); Klemchuk, Peter P. (Watertown, CT)

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

276

Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Cancels DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order defines requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States, the Protocol to the Agreement, the Additional Protocol to the Agreement, and the Subsidiary Arrangements to the Agreement and Additional Protocol. Cancels DOE O 142.2. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, cancels DOE O 142.1A. Certified 12-3-14.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

The effect of additives on effective diffusivities in solidified/stabilized wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Technology; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Bill Batchelor The electrical conductivity method is capable of predicting effective diffusivity of ions in a solidified portland cement matrix in a relatively short period of time. The usefulness... of this method in determining the effective diffusivities of ions through wastes treated by mixtures of portland cement and various additives, and the effectiveness of the additives to promote physical immobilization are investigated. The electrical...

Kyi, Aye Aye

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to estimate bioconcentration potential of petroleum additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lubricant additives can be released into the environment during transport, usage, or improper disposal. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate these substances for their potential to cause adverse environmental effects. Because lubricant additives tend to be large molecular size hydrophobic substances with very limited water solubility, they could possibly bioconcentrate if released into the environment. A test was developed using SPMD technology to assess the bioconcentration potential of lubricant additives. SPMDs are low-density polyethylene tubing with an effective pore size of 600 daltons, similar to that of cellular membranes. SPMDs filled with triolein, the predominant lipid in fish, function as model fish or mollusks, with selective membranes and lipid reservoirs to concentrate organic compounds from water. Using the SPMD test system, bioconcentration factors were determined for a poly alpha olefin (PAO) base stock and lubricant additive compounds that represent three additive use categories. The SPMD test system was validated using a radiocarbon-labeled calcium detergent lubricant additive in side-by-side exposures to SPMDs and aquatic organisms. Radiocarbon-labeled pyrene was used as a reference compound in the tests.

Crecelius, E.A. [Battelle Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States); Rausina, G.A.; Biggs, W.R.; Gala, W.R. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States); Stonebraker, P.M. [Chevron Chemical Co., Richmond, CA (United States). Oronite Additives Div.; Gilfoil, T.J. [Battelle Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EBSD analysis of magnesium addition on inclusion formation in SS400 structural steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of magnesium addition on the inclusion formation in SS400 steel was investigated. The experimental specimens with and without Mg addition treatment were compared. The microstructure was observed using optical microscopy after etching with 3% nital. The morphology and chemical composition of the inclusions were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The lattice structure and orientation of the inclusions were identified by electron backscattering diffraction. The average size of inclusions in SS400 was between 0.67 and 0.75 ?m, and between 0.65 and 0.68 ?m in SS400 + Mg. The 2 ppm Mg addition resulted in the oxide formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and in the inclusion formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS. Moreover, a simple-phase MnS with an average grain size of 1 ?m to 2 ?m was observed in rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms. - Highlights: • The effect of magnesium addition was investigated for SS400 steel. • 2 ppm Mg addition changes the inclusion formation from Al2O3-MnS to MgO·Al2O3-MnS. • MnS observed in inclusions exhibits rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms.

Luo, Sin-Jie [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Su, Yen-Hao Frank; Lu, Muh-Jung [China Steel Corporation, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Jui-Chao, E-mail: jckuo@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

HEAT: High accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry. III. Additional improvements and overview.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of increased basis-set size as well as a correlated treatment of the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer approximation are studied within the context of the high-accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry (HEAT) theoretical model chemistry. It is found that the addition of these ostensible improvements does little to increase the overall accuracy of HEAT for the determination of molecular atomization energies. Fortuitous cancellation of high-level effects is shown to give the overall HEAT strategy an accuracy that is, in fact, higher than most of its individual components. In addition, the issue of core-valence electron correlation separation is explored; it is found that approximate additive treatments of the two effects have limitations that are significant in the realm of <1 kJ mol{sup -1} theoretical thermochemistry.

Harding, M. E.; Vazquez, J.; Ruscic, B.; Wilson, A. K.; Gauss, J.; Stanton, J. F.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. t Mainz; The Univ. of Texas; Univ. of North Texas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Phosphazene Based Additives for Improvement of Safety and Battery Lifetimes in Lithium-Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There need to be significant improvements made in lithium-ion battery technology, principally in the areas of safety and useful lifetimes to truly enable widespread adoption of large format batteries for the electrification of the light transportation fleet. In order to effect the transition to lithium ion technology in a timely fashion, one promising next step is through improvements to the electrolyte in the form of novel additives that simultaneously improve safety and useful lifetimes without impairing performance characteristics over wide temperature and cycle duty ranges. Recent efforts in our laboratory have been focused on the development of such additives with all the requisite properties enumerated above. We present the results of the study of novel phosphazene based electrolytes additives.

Mason K Harrup; Kevin L Gering; Harry W Rollins; Sergiy V Sazhin; Michael T Benson; David K Jamison; Christopher J Michelbacher

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

Evans, Ryan D. [Timken Company; Nixon, H. P. [Timken Company; Darragh, Craig V. [Timken Company; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Coffey, Dorothy W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

Kakati, B., E-mail: bharatkakati15@gmail.com; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup 782402, Assam (India); Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Design of additive quantum codes via the code-word-stabilized framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider design of the quantum stabilizer codes via a two-step, low-complexity approach based on the framework of codeword-stabilized (CWS) codes. In this framework, each quantum CWS code can be specified by a graph and a binary code. For codes that can be obtained from a given graph, we give several upper bounds on the distance of a generic (additive or nonadditive) CWS code, and the lower Gilbert-Varshamov bound for the existence of additive CWS codes. We also consider additive cyclic CWS codes and show that these codes correspond to a previously unexplored class of single-generator cyclic stabilizer codes. We present several families of simple stabilizer codes with relatively good parameters.

Kovalev, Alexey A.; Pryadko, Leonid P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Dumer, Ilya [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Effect of Nitrogen Additives on Flame Retardant Action of Tributyl Phosphate: Phosphorus – Nitrogen Synergism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of nitrogen additives like urea, guanidine carbonate and melamine formaldehyde on the flame retardant efficacy of tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been investigated. From the LOI tests on treated cotton it is clear that the nitrogen additives have synergistic action. Estimation of activation energy of decomposition of treated cotton indicated that nitrogen additives enhance the thermal stability during the burning process. SEM pictures of chars formed after LOI test showed the formation of protective polymeric coating on the surface. The surface of chars formed were evaluated using FTIR-ATR and XPS analysis which showed that the coating was composed of Phosphorus-Nitrogen-Oxygen containing species. Formation of this coating during the burning process could lead to the synergistic interaction of phosphorus and nitrogen. Based on the experimental data we have further proposed several reaction mechanisms which could contribute to synergistic action and formation of protective coating on the surface of char.

Gaan, Sabyasachi; Sun, Gang; Hutches, Katherine; Engelhard, Mark H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The effects of beryllium additions on the oxidation of nickel aluminide and titanium aluminide based intermetallics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of Be additions on the oxidation behavior of {beta}-NiAl in moist air at 1,000 C and borderline alumina-forming {gamma} (TiAl) + Laves Ti-Al-Cr based alloys at 800 C and 1,000 C in dry and moist air were investigated. The addition of Be to {beta}-NiAl suppressed the formation of transient alumina, and resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In dry air, the addition of Be to the Ti-Al-Cr alloys also resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In moist air, only Ti-Al-Cr-Be alloys with a high Cr content (10 to 15 a/o) formed the protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} scale.

Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Chen, K.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.; Brady, M.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., NM (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

The effects of beryllium additions on the oxidation of nickel aluminide and titanium aluminide based intermetallics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of Be additions on the oxidation behavior of {beta}-NiAl in moist air at 1,000 C as well as on the borderline alumina-forming {gamma} + Laves Ti-Al-Cr based alloys at 800 C and 1,000 C in dry and moist air were investigated. The addition of Be to {beta}-NiAl suppressed the formation of transient alumina and resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In dry air, the addition of Be to the Ti-Al-Cr alloys also resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In moist air, only Ti-Al-Cr-Be alloys with a high Cr content (10 to 15 a/o) formed the protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} scale.

Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Chen, K.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.; Brady, M.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A stochastic multi-symplectic scheme for stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate a stochastic multi-symplectic method for stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise. Based on the stochastic version of variational principle, we find a way to obtain the stochastic multi-symplectic structure of three-dimensional (3-D) stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise. We propose a stochastic multi-symplectic scheme and show that it preserves the stochastic multi-symplectic conservation law and the local and global stochastic energy dissipative properties, which the equations themselves possess. Numerical experiments are performed to verify the numerical behaviors of the stochastic multi-symplectic scheme.

Hong, Jialin, E-mail: hjl@lsec.cc.ac.cn [Institute of Computational Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Ji, Lihai, E-mail: jilihai@lsec.cc.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Zhang, Liying, E-mail: lyzhang@lsec.cc.ac.cn [Institute of Computational Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

LONG-TERM DEMONSTRATION OF SORBENT ENHANCEMENT ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term demonstration tests of advanced sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) technologies have been completed at five coal-fired power plants. The targeted removal rate was 90% from baseline conditions at all five stations. The plants included Hawthorn Unit 5, Mill Creek Unit 4, San Miguel Unit 1, Centralia Unit 2, and Hoot Lake Unit 2. The materials tested included powdered activated carbon, treated carbon, scrubber additives, and SEAs. In only one case (San Miguel) was >90% removal not attainable. The reemission of mercury from the scrubber at this facility prevented >90% capture.

Jason D. Laumb; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John P. Kay; Christopher L. Martin; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Nicholas B. Lentz; Alexander Azenkeng; Kevin C. Galbreath; Lucinda L. Hamre

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

292

Microstructural refinement of W-Ni-Fe heavy alloys by alloying additions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This communication describes the effect of alloying additions on grain refinement in tungsten heavy alloys and the resulting changes in mechanical properties. The body-centered-cubic refractory metals, like molybdenum and tantalum, have total solubility in tungsten and a high solubility in the matrix. The solubility of the additive in tungsten provides a means to increase the strength by solid-solution hardening. Alternatively, the solubility of tungsten in the matrix is the key to grain growth and possible strengthening by a reduction in the grain-growth size.

German, R.M.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Addition of photosensitive dopants to the D0 liquid argon calorimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of photosensitive dopants to liquid argon greatly enhances the signal from heavily ionizing particles. Since binding energy losses we correlated with the heavily ionizing component in hadronic showers, the addition of photosensitive dopants has been suggested as a mechanism to tune the e/[pi] ratio in liquid argon calorimeters. A measurement was performed at the FNAL test beam, adding 4 ppM tetramethylgermanium to the D[phi] uranium-liquid argon calorimeter. An increase in response for electromagnetic and hadronic showers was observed, with no net change in the e/[pi] ratio.

Amos, N.A.; Anderson, D.F.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Effect of flame-retarding additives on surface chemistry in Li-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examined the properties of 1 wt.% vinylene carbonate (VC), vinyl ethylene carbonate (VEC), and diphenyl octyl phosphate (DPOF) additive electrolytes as a promising way of beneficially improving the surface and cell resistance of Li-ion batteries. Surface film formation on the negative and positive electrodes was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In conclusion, EIS, FT-IR spectroscopy and SEM results confirmed that DPOF is an excellent additive to the electrolyte in the Li-ion batteries due to the improved co-intercalation of the solvent molecules.

Nam, N.D.; Park, I.J. [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.G., E-mail: kimjg@skku.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-Dong, Jangan-Gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.S. [Battery Research Group, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)] [Battery Research Group, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

NMR Spectroscopic Investigations of Mixed Aggregates Underlying Highly Enantioselective 1,2-Additions of Lithium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,2-Additions of Lithium Cyclopropylacetylide to Quinazolinones Rodney L. Parsons, Jr.,*, Joseph M. Fortunak Abstract: The solution structures of mixed aggregates derived from lithium alkoxides and lithium acetylides that mixtures of lithium cyclopropylacetylide (RCCLi), a (+)-carene-derived amino alkoxide (R*OLi), and lithium

Collum, David B.

296

The effect of hydrogen addition on flammability limit and NOx emission in ultra-lean counterflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. They indicated that the addition of hydrogen to natural gas or methane resulted in an increase in NOx for most increases, and then decreases with the increase in the fraction of hydrogen. Overall, hydrogen enrichment rights reserved. Keywords: Hydrogen enrichment; NOx; Extinction limit; Ultra-lean premixed flame. 1

GĂĽlder, Ă?mer L.

297

Effect of Hydrogen Addition on the Flammability Limit of Stretched Methane/Air Premixed Flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], thereby enabling stable combustion at lean mixture conditions. In the case of natural gas engines, enriching the fuel with hydrogen has the proven benefits of improving the combustion stability and reducingEffect of Hydrogen Addition on the Flammability Limit of Stretched Methane/Air Premixed Flames

Im, Hong G.

298

REGISTRATION IN iSIS Additional information about fall 2013 course registration, per the ASE Registrar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#04022013 REGISTRATION IN iSIS Additional information about fall 2013 course registration, per the ASE Registrar This year, fall 2013 registration will happen in iSIS, Tufts' new Integrated Student Information System, located at http://go.tufts.edu/isis. Accessing iSIS Log into iSIS with your Tufts Username

Tufts University

299

Nitrogen Addition Increases Carbon Storage in Soils, But Not in Trees, in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nitrogen (N) species and car- bon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere globally. Received 18 August 2012Nitrogen Addition Increases Carbon Storage in Soils, But Not in Trees, in an Eastern U.S. Deciduous regions receive elevated rates of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition from air pollution. To evalu- ate

Templer, Pamela

300

Tribology Letters 6 (1999) 159169 159 Spectromicroscopy of tribological films from engine oil additives.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

antiwear additives in lubricating oils for over forty years [1]. ZDDP's act as antiwear agents by formingTribology Letters 6 (1999) 159­169 159 Spectromicroscopy of tribological films from engine oil generated from the commercial ZDDP, rubbed in base oil, show that the long chain polyphosphate is converted

Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

In addition to the intensive focus on operational energy reduction, the client and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In addition to the intensive focus on operational energy reduction, the client and design team carbon emissions of the building materials as well as the produced carbon emissions resulting from energy decommissioned Sebastiani vineyard wine vats. Due to the tight- grained quality of this old-growth wood no sealer

302

Kyotoforcommuters Offset schemes are a small but potentially useful addition to the carbon balance sheet.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kyotoforcommuters Offset schemes are a small but potentially useful addition to the carbon balance response to it is carbon offsetting, a practice that allows people to compensate for the impact of the more popular carbon offsetting schemes allow con- sumers to buy credits on an emerging, but unregulated

Cai, Long

303

RESEARCH ARTICLE Additional coating effects on textured ZnO : Al thin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory, LG Electronics, Seoul 137724, Korea ABSTRACT ZnO : Al films were additionally deposited, Devices and Materials Laboratory, LG Electronics, Seoul 137724, Korea. Email: taeho78@korea.ac.kr Received reported using transmission electron microscopy or scanning electron microscopy [4,6,7]. However, when

Park, Byungwoo

304

DOE Announces Additional Public Comment Meetings for Draft National Corridor Designations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will hold four additional public meetings for the two draft National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors (National Corridors) during the 60-day public comment period, which will close on July 6, 2007.

305

Department of Energy Announces Plans for Additional Comment Period on National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department has decided that, prior to issuing a report that designates any national interest electric transmission corridor, the Department will first issue any designation that it is considering in draft form, so as to allow additional opportunities for review and comment by affected States, regional entities, and the general public.

306

POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Electronic and Optical Devices via Additive Driven Self-Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Electronic and Optical Devices via Additive Driven Self) technologies offer the potential for continuous and cost-efficient production of materials and devices for nanoscale device fabrication that includes nanoparticle driven self-assembly to produce well-ordered polymer

Alpay, S. Pamir

307

Carbon 41 (2003) 10961099 Effect of boron carbide particle addition on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon 41 (2003) 1096­1099 Effect of boron carbide particle addition on the thermomechanical behavior of carbon matrix silicon carbide particle composites a ,1 a , b b * ´Jorge Sanchez-Coronado , D, silicon carbide is used in combination with held at the maximum temperature for 1 h in a nitrogen carbon

Chung, Deborah D.L.

308

Soil bacterial strains able to grow on the surface of oxidized polyethylene film containing prooxidant additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil bacterial strains able to grow on the surface of oxidized polyethylene film containing low-density polyethylene film containing prooxidant additives were isolated from three forest soils of adhering to the surface of oxidized polyethylene, growing there and possibly biodegrading its oxidation

Boyer, Edmond

309

Safety basis for the 241-AN-107 mixer pump installation and caustic addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety Basis was prepared to determine whether or not the proposed activities of installing a 76 HP jet mixer pump and the addition of approximately 50,000 gallons of 19 M (50:50 wt %) aqueous caustic are within the safety envelope as described by Tank Farms (chapter six of WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001, Rev. 0). The safety basis covers the components, structures and systems for the caustic addition and mixer pump installation. These include: installation of the mixer pump and monitoring equipment; operation of the mixer pump, process monitoring equipment and caustic addition; the pump stand, caustic addition skid, the electrical skid, the video camera system and the two densitometers. Also covered is the removal and decontamination of the mixer pump and process monitoring system. Authority for this safety basis is WHC-IP-0842 (Waste Tank Administration). Section 15.9, Rev. 2 (Unreviewed Safety Questions) of WHC-IP-0842 requires that an evaluation be performed for all physical modifications.

Van Vleet, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

310

Intelligibility enhancement of HMM-generated speech in additive noise by modifying Mel cepstral coefficients to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intelligibility enhancement of HMM-generated speech in additive noise by modifying Mel cepstral intelligibility enhancement for hidden Markov model (HMM) generated synthetic speech in noise. We present a method , Ranniery Maiab a The Centre for Speech Technology Research, University of Edinburgh, UK b Cambridge

Edinburgh, University of

311

The Effect of the Additivity Assumption on Time and Frequency Domain Wiener Filtering for Speech Enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under short-time analysis typi- cally used for speech enhancement. In order to achieve this we have performed speech enhancement experiments, where speech corrupted by additive white Gaussian noise degradation of enhanced speech quality. Informal listening tests show that the background noise resulting from

312

resource surveys indicate a species has elevated levels ofan element, additional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was shipped to Japan for human consumption) was delivered to the reduction industry. The total supply offish raw stock to the fish meal and oil industry (which includes Norway pout and sandeel) during the firstresource surveys indicate a species has elevated levels ofan element, additional samples

313

additives doped-uo2 pellets: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

additives doped-uo2 pellets First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Journal of Nuclear...

314

Extra Resources for Helping Scottish SMEs SIMD is now focusing additional resource on stimulating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to established medical technology SMEs, and their supply chain, as well as companies from other industriesExtra Resources for Helping Scottish SMEs SIMD is now focusing additional resource on stimulating Scottish companies to expand their medical technology product/service portfolio. This is open

Mottram, Nigel

315

Remarks on additivity of the Holevo channel capacity and of the entanglement of formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of these notes is to discuss the relation between the additivity questions regarding the quantities (Holevo) capacity of a quantum channel T and entanglement of formation of a given bipartite state. In particular, using the Stinespring dilation theorem, we give a formula for the channel capacity involving entanglement of formation. This can be used to show that additivity of the latter for some states can be inferred from the additivity of capacity for certain channels. We demonstrate this connection for a family of group--covariant channels, allowing us to calculate the entanglement cost for many states, including some where a strictly smaller upper bound on the distillable entanglement is known. This is presented in a general framework, extending recent findings of Vidal, Dur and Cirac (e-print quant-ph/0112131). In an appendix we speculate on a general relation of superadditivity of the entanglement of formation, which would imply both the general additivity of this function under tensor produc...

Matsumoto, K; Winter, A; Matsumoto, Keiji; Shimono, Toshiyuki; Winter, Andreas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

ADDITION FOR CHAPTER 10 OF THE EA/RIR/IRFA RE NEPA AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADDITION FOR CHAPTER 10 OF THE EA/RIR/IRFA RE NEPA AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS. During the Council.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Environmental Protection Agency 1995). Further, the amount of waste disposed) and the impacts of those disposals are unrelated to the percentages of the walleye pollock and Pacific cod

317

Improved Irradiation Performance of Uranium-Molybdenum/Aluminum Dispersion Fuel by Silicon Addition in Aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium-molybdenum fuel particle dispersion in aluminum is a form of fuel under development for conversion of high-power research and test reactors from highly enriched to low-enriched uranium in the U.S. Global Threat Reduction Initiative program (also known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program). Extensive irradiation tests have been conducted to find a solution for problems caused by interaction layer growth and pore formation between U-Mo and Al. Adding a small amount of Si (up to [approximately]5 wt%) in the Al matrix was one of the proposed remedies. The effect of silicon addition in the Al matrix was examined using irradiation test results by comparing side-by-side samples with different Si additions. Interaction layer growth was progressively reduced with increasing Si addition to the matrix Al, up to 4.8 wt%. The Si addition also appeared to delay pore formation and growth between the U-Mo and Al.

Yeon Soo Kim; G. L. Hofman; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effect of Al addition on the microstructure and electronic structure of HfO2 film  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Al addition on the microstructure and electronic structure of HfO2 film X. F. Wang investigated the microstructures and electronic structures of a series of hafnium aluminate HfAlO films with Al concentration ranging from 0% to 100%. When the films evolve from pure HfO2 to pure Al2O3 by increasing

Gong, Xingao

319

Catalytic conversion of glycerol to oxygenated fuel additive in a continuous flow reactor: Process optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalytic conversion of glycerol to oxygenated fuel additive in a continuous flow reactor: Process optimization Malaya R. Nanda a , Zhongshun Yuan a , Wensheng Qin b , Hassan S. Ghaziaskar c , Marc for synthesis of solketal from glycerol was optimized. A maximum yield of 94 ± 2% was obtained at optimum

Qin, Wensheng

320

Impacts of Timing of Crosslinker Addition on Water Shut Off Polymer Gel Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cl in the makeup water gave weaker gel strengths than those prepared with fresh water with an average difference of four code levels. The pre-gel viscosity of a polymer solution was also compared to the timing of crosslinker addition at ambient temperature...

Shriwal, Prashant

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

New Catalyst Might Expand Bio-Ethanol's Possible uses: fuel additives, rubber and solvents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Catalyst Might Expand Bio-Ethanol's Usefulness Possible uses: fuel additives, rubber and solvents RESULTS To turn bio-ethanol into chemicals that are typically made from petroleum, re- searchers the presence of water, allowing producers to use dilute and cheaper bio-ethanol rather than having to purify

322

Catalytic Nanoparticle Additives in the Combustion of AP/HTPB Composite Solid Propellant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented in this thesis is a study of the effects of nano-sized particles used as a catalytic additive in composite solid propellant. This study was done with titanium oxide (titania)-based particles, but much of the findings and theory...

Kreitz, Kevin R.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Study, by neutron small angle scattering, of addition of an electrolyte to reversed micellar solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-455 Study, by neutron small angle scattering, of addition of an electrolyte to reversed micellar the size of reversed micelles of the ternary system Aerosol OT-n-heptane-water by small angle neutron, highly soluble in hydro- carbon substances, which may give reversed micelles in the presence of water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

324

Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum Aluminum nanoparticles Microexplosion Particle aggregation a b s t r a c t The burning characteristics of fuel droplets containing nano and micron-sized aluminum particles were investigated. Particle size

Qiao, Li

325

Metal-air cell comprising an electrolyte with a room temperature ionic liquid and hygroscopic additive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell comprising an electrolyte comprising water and a hydrophobic ionic liquid comprising positive ions and negative ions. The electrochemical cell also includes an air electrode configured to absorb and reduce oxygen. A hydrophilic or hygroscopic additive modulates the hydrophobicity of the ionic liquid to maintain a concentration of the water in the electrolyte is between 0.001 mol % and 25 mol %.

Friesen, Cody A.; Krishnan, Ramkumar; Tang, Toni; Wolfe, Derek

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

PSO-2005 FU-5206 final report Emission control by sulphur addition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix 1: Jimmy Andersen, The Influence of Sulfur on Natural Gas Combustion, M. Sc. Thesis, Department addition for emission control in natural gas combustion in swirl-stabilized diffusion flames and in engines, unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and NO in combustion of natural gas in a swirl-stabilized burner under slightly

327

Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications.

Leshikar, G.A.

1995-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

328

Examination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional amendments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological process used for wastewater treatment is desirable to avoid discharge of untreated wastewaterExamination of microbial fuel cell start-up times with domestic wastewater and additional Available online 30 April 2011 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Domestic wastewater Startup time Substrate a b

329

Purdue AgronomyPurdue AgronomyCROP, SOIL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Septic System Additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater. Soil provides the final stage in treatment. It must effectively treat wastewater effluent through chemical, physical, and biological processes. -- Chemical treatment in the soil involves the interactions System Additives--HENV-13-W 2 -- Physical treatment of wastewater in the soil relies on the soil fabric

Holland, Jeffrey

330

Influence of certain additives and combinations of them on the structure and properties of clinker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of investigations of the influence of BaO, Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and the BaO + Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ combination on the phase composition of clinker, the contents of different forms of alite, and the burning temperature are reported. A specific feature of the clinkers taken for the investigation is that they contain over 4% MgO. The additives used in the investigation were barium-containing wastes from lithopone production and ''tailings'' from concentration of manganese ores. The barium-containing wastes contained from 30 to 40% BaO, and the Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ content in tailings from manganese ores reached 15-16%; moreover, they contained up to 60% SiO/sub 2/, which is important for raising the silica ratio. At the same time, the use of manganese wastes in the cement raw mix makes the use of cinders unnecessary. The amounts of wastes introduced into the raw mix were calculated to give BaO contents in the clinkers from 0.3 to 0.9% and Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/ contents from 0.7 to 1.4%. Introduction of alloying and modifying additives containing Ba and Mn into cement raw mixes intensifies the burning process, lowering the temperature by 100/sup 0/C. The change of the burning temperature in presence of additives is accompanied by changes of the modification composition of the principal silicate phase, alite. Lowering of the sintering temperature reveals a high degree of imperfection of the structure of cement minerals arising as the result of introduction of BaO and Mn/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Cements containing alloying and modifying additions of barium and manganese and obtained at lower temperatures have higher activity than cements without additives.

Minkina, V.N.; Sychev, M.M.; Tandilova, K.B.; Papuashvili, S.N.

1983-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Fundamentals of orifice meter chart recorders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The differential pressure chart recorder used to measure fluid flow through an orifice plate has gone through several design changes since it`s inception some sixty years ago. The present unit on the market uses two fluid filled bellows units connected together. One bellows senses the upstream pressure before the orifice plate, and the other bellows senses the downstream pressure after the orifice plate. This pressure differential created by fluid flow through the orifice plate moves the connected bellows on the back of the chart recorder, which are mechanically linked, by a rotating torque tube through the rear of the case, to the internal case linkage that is connected to an inking pen scribing a line on a circular chart. The ink line on a linear calibrated chart is proportional to the square of the now rate. While the significant information on proper recorder installation will be covered in the classroom. Due to space limitations, this paper will concentrate on a recommended method to precisely calibrate the chart recorder for maximum accuracy of measurement. The basic calibration procedure for the different pressure chart recorder (i.e. set zero, full scale and mid scale) has been taught for years. This paper does not intend to rehash old procedures that are fairly universally known. What this paper does present is a method to achieve a more accurate, more precise calibration than is prescribed in any manufacturer`s literature - and, at the same time, explain why this procedure is more accurate. In addition to being more accurate, this procedure has been proven to be faster than the compromise methods most recorder manufacturers advocate.

Whigham, S.E. [SEWCO Sales & Service, Amarillo, TX (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

ELECTRONIC CHARTS INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

199 CHAPTER 14 ELECTRONIC CHARTS INTRODUCTION 1400. The Importance of Electronic Charts Since. Electronic charts automate the process of integrating real-time positions with the chart display and allow is expected to take and plot a fix every three minutes. An electronic chart system can do it once per second

New Hampshire, University of

333

Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

Oliveira, A. C. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12630-000 Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil); Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr [Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Myrabo, L. N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

334

Titanium addition practice, and maintenance for the hearths in AHMSA`s blast furnaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Altos Hornos de Mexico (AHMSA) is a steel company located in Northern Mexico, in the state of Coahuila. Currently there are three blast furnaces in operation and one more about to finish its general repair. This last one is to remain as a back-up unit. Because of blast furnace hearth wear outs AHMSA has developed some maintenance procedures. These procedures are based on titanium ore additions and hearth thermic control monitoring. There are also some other maintenance practices adopted to the working operations to assure that such operations detect and avoid in time hearth wear outs that place personnel and/or the unit in danger (due to hearth leaks). This paper describes titanium ore addition to No. 2 blast furnace during the final campaign and it also illustrates maintenance practices and continuous monitoring of temperature trends both of which were implemented at AHMSA`s No. 5 blast furnace.

Boone, A.G.; Jimenez, G.; Castillo, J. [Altos Hornos de Mexico, Monclova (Mexico)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Extracting femtoscopic radii in the presence of significant additional correlation sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider has provided large amounts of data on collisions of small systems, such as proton-proton and proton-lead at unprecedented collision energies. Their space-time size and structure can be inferred from the measurement of the femtoscopic correlations for pairs of identical particles. The analysis is complicated by the presence of significant additional sources of two-particle correlations, which influence the correlation function in the region of the femtoscopic effect. In this work we use p-Pb events generated in a model that includes such additional correlation sources to characterize them and propose a robust method of taking them into account in the extraction of the femtoscopic information.

?ukasz Kamil Graczykowski; Adam Kisiel; Ma?gorzata Anna Janik; Przemys?aw Karczmarczyk

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

The Role of Basis Set Superposition Error in Water Addition Reactions to Ln(III) Cations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our goal in this work was to characterize the importance of basis set superposition error (BSSE) in the reaction energetics of water addition to highly charged metal ions that exhibit strong ion-dipole interactions with water. The gas phase water addition reactions, M(H?O)ł+N + H?O ? M(H?O)ł+N ? ? [M = La(III), Lu(III); N = 0–8] have been studied, with a particular emphasis on a posteriori methods for calculating BSSE and its constituent energetic components as a function of M(H?O) ł+N cluster size and water basis set. Because of accumulation of BSSE within the subclusters in the reaction series, the successive reaction counterpoise method for determining the BSSE correction interaction energies is advocated.

Kvamme, Brandon; Wander, Matthew C F.; Clark, Aurora E.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The addition of hydrogen bromide to propyne in equal molar quantities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTANTS, EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS. DISCUSSION, CONCLUSION. APPENDIX, REFERENCES. Page 10 16 17 22 2B 34 TABLE OF FIGURES Figure Apparatus Diagram. Infrared Spectra of Fraction Distilling Between 56 and 59 Degrees Centigrade (Reaction 58... at atmospheric pressure, using peroxide-free solvents and in the absence of air. Ingold. and. Ramsden (12) believed that the mode of addition of hydrogen bromide was due to the dielectric constant and internal pressures of the solvent. In a hydrocarbon...

Mejia, Joe Marcus

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Volatile sulfhydryl compounds produced in Cheddar cheese slurries upon the addition of whey protein and casein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The addition of whey protein, casein or a combination of whey protein plus 7-glutamyl transpeptidase to slurries was studied to determine the effect of these proteins on volatile sulfhydryl compound production. Milk heat treatment decreased (P&0. 05... measurable free sulfhydryl groups are present in native caseins and only limited amounts are generated by high heat treatments. Those proteins remaining in solution after removal of caseins from milk comprise about 0. 6 to 0. 7% of milk and are designated...

Sheffield, Amelia Rose

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Energy Analysis and Energy Conservation Options for the Addition to Records Storage Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT Submitted by Mohsen Farzad Dennis L. O'Neal Prepared For Energy Efficiency Division Texas Public Utility Commission Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The energy use and peak load requirements of the addition to Records Storage Building in Austin, Texas were... reflectivity and low overall heat transfer coefficient was used to study the reduction of glass conduction and glass solar loads. Other options which were studied included increasing the wall and roof insulation,- reducing the light level, temperature setback...

Farzad, M.; O'Neal, D. L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, Part W, conodonts, conoidal shells, worms, trace fossils: comments and additions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS July 11, 1966 Paper 9 TREATISE ON INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY, PART W, CONODONTS, CONOIDAL SHELLS, WORMS, TRACE FOSSILS: COMMENTS AND ADDITIONS By F. H. T. Rhodes, Walter Hüntzschel, K. J. Müller... AFFINITIES D W. Fisher Part 4. ANNELID Serpti/OldCS SOWERBY Curt Teichcrt Part 5. RECENT CONTRIBUTIONS TO KNOWLEDGE OF TRACE FOSSILS AND PROBLEMATICA Walter Hantzschel EDITORIAL PREFACE CURT TEICHERT University of Kansas This is the first of a series...

Rhodes, F. H. T.; Hä ntzschel, W.; Mü ller, K. H.; Fisher, D. W.; Teichert, C.

1966-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Relativistic velocity addition law derived from a machine gun analogy and time dilation only  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a scenario that involves a machine gun, the bullets it fires and a moving target, considered from the rest frame of the machine gun and from the rest frame of the target respectively. Involving the special relativity via its two postulates and the time dilation formula we derive the relativistic velocity addition law showing that it leads to the Lorentz transformations for the space-time coordinates of the same event.

Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Effects of Additive Elements on the Phase Formation and Morphological Stability of Nickel Monosilicide Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alloying elements can substantially affect the formation and morphological stability of nickel monosilicide. A comprehensive study of phase formation was performed on 24 Ni alloys with varying concentrations of alloying elements. Silicide films have been used for more than 15 years to contact the source, drain and gate of state-of-the-art complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices. In the past, the addition of alloying elements was shown to improve the transformation from the high resistivity C49 to the low resistivity C54-TiSi{sub 2} phase and to allow for the control of surface and interface roughness of CoSi{sub 2} films as well as produce significant improvements with respect to agglomeration of the films. Using simultaneous time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD), resistance and light scattering measurements, we follow the formation of the silicide phases in real time during rapid thermal annealing. Additions to the Ni-Si system lead to modifications in the phase formation sequence at low temperatures (metal-rich phases), to variations in the formation temperatures of NiSi and NiSi{sub 2}, and to changes in the agglomeration behavior of the films formed. Of the 24 elements studied, additions of Mo, Re, Ta and W are amongst the most efficient to retard agglomeration while elements such as Pd, Pt and Rh are most efficient to retard the formation of NiSi{sub 2}.

Lavoie,C.; Detavernier, C.; Cabral, Jr. , C.; d'Heurle, F.; Kellock, A.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Harper, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Simulation of MLI concerning the influence of an additional heat load on intermediate layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multilayer insulation (MLI) is commonly used in most cryogenic devices such as LHe cryostats or storage vessels. Numerical and experimental studies of such insulation systems are known from literature. The temperature distribution of intermediate layers has been investigated as well. Experiments using temperature sensors, for example thermocouples, to determine the temperature of intermediate layers had been described. Naturally such wiring causes additional heat load on the respective layer and influences the equilibrium temperature. A mathematical model of heat transfer through MLI has been developed to investigate the temperature distribution across the MLI layers. The model comprises a combination of radiation, residual gas conduction and conductive heat flux. An analysis for variable cold and warm boundary temperatures and various residual gases and pressures is carried out. In addition to the model an experimental test rig will be built for the verification of the model. The paper presents the influence of an additional heat load on an intermediate layer on the temperature distribution and on the overall thermal performance of MLI.

Funke, Thomas; Golle, Steffen; Haberstroh, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Bitzer-Stiftungsprofessur fuer Kaelte-, Kryo- und Kompressorentechnik, Dresden, 01062 (Germany)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

344

The Influence of Different Processing Additives on Biodegradation of Poly(E-caprolactone)*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of different processing additives on the biodegradation of poly(e-caprolactone) film in the compost with plant treatment active sludge is described in this paper. Poly(c-caprolactone) was incubated for several weeks in compost in natural and laboratory conditions. The characteristic parameters of plant treatment active sludge such as: temperature, pH, moisture content and activity of dehydrogenases and their influence on degradation of poly(c-caprolactane) are presented and discussed. The loss of weight, intrinsic viscosity, tensile strength and morphological changes were tested during the period of degradation. Results of measurement indicate that the biodegradation of poly(c-caprotactone) without additives was very fast in compost with plant treatment active sludge and after six weeks the polymer film was completely assimilated. The introducing of processing additives gives better tensile strength of the materials and less vulnerable to microorganisms attack. Key Words: biodegradation; enzymatic attack; composting; active sludge, polycaprolactone be degraded in contact with living organisms. According to the literature, degradation of aliphatic polyesters in living environments can result from enzymatic attack or from simple hydrolysis of ester bonds or both (Scheme I) [l-4]. Poly(e-caprolactone) is an important member of the aliphatic polyester family known as susceptible material to biological degradation, which has been

Maria Rutkowskal; Katarzyna Krasowska T; Ra Heimowska L

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Benefits of Installing Additional Rain Sensors within the UBC Irrigation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................................................. 6 RAIN SENSOR BACKGROUND Additional Rain Sensors within the UBC Irrigation System Michael Thiessen, Chelsie Drysdale University of Installing Additional Rain Sensors within the UBC Irrigation System A Business Case Analysis Prepared for: Dr

347

Computer Engineering Minor 2014-2015 Curriculum Chart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Engineering Minor 2014-2015 Curriculum Chart Math *Requires one additional mathematics Logic Design CMPE 110 Computer Architecture CMPE 12/L Computer Systems & Assembly Language CMPE 13/L* Computer Systems & C Programming OR CMPS 12A/L Intro to Programming OR CMPS 5J & 11 Programming in Java

Stuart, Josh

348

On the Use of Non-Additive Entropy to Determine the Presence of Vibrations in the Videos of JET Cameras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Use of Non-Additive Entropy to Determine the Presence of Vibrations in the Videos of JET Cameras

349

Organization Chart - Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LSD Logo About Us People & Organization Research News & Events Safety Internal Resources Organization Chart Departments Scientific Staff Directory Committees Organization Chart...

350

Evaluation of an eastern shale oil residue as an asphalt additive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of eastern shale oil (ESO) residue as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age hardening and moisture susceptibility was conducted by Western Research Institute (WRI). The ESO residue, have a viscosity of 23.9 Pa{lg_bullet}s at 60{degree}C (140{degree}F), was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts, ASD-1, AAK-1, and AAM-1, which are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. Rheological and infrared analyses of the unaged and aged asphalts and the blends were then conducted to evaluate oxidative age hardening. In addition, the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends were coated onto three different aggregates, Lithonia granite (RA), a low-absorption limestone (RD), and a siliceous Gulf Coast gravel (RL), and compacted into briquettes. Successive freeze-thaw cycling was then conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of the prepared briquettes. The rheological analyses of the unaged petroleum-derived asphalts and their respective blends indicate that the samples satisfy the rutting requirement. However, the aging indexes for the rolling thin film oven (RTFO)-aged and RTFO/pressure aging vessel (PAV)-aged samples indicate that the blends are stiffer than the petroleum-derived asphalts. This means that when in service the blends will be more prone to pavement embrittlement and fatigue cracking than the petroleum-derived asphalts. Infrared analyses were also conducted on the three petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends before and after RTFO/PAV aging. In general, upon RTFO/PAV aging, the amounts of carbonyls and sulfoxides in the samples increase, indicating that the addition of the ESO residue does not mitigate the chemical aging (oxidation) of the petroleum-derived asphalts. This information correlates with the rheological data and the aging indexes that were calculated for the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends.

Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Emerging Technologies in the Built Environment: Geographic Information Science (GIS), 3D Printing, and Additive Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract 1: Geographic information systems emerged as a computer application in the late 1960s, led in part by projects at ORNL. The concept of a GIS has shifted through time in response to new applications and new technologies, and is now part of a much larger world of geospatial technology. This presentation discusses the relationship of GIS and estimating hourly and seasonal energy consumption profiles in the building sector at spatial scales down to the individual parcel. The method combines annual building energy simulations for city-specific prototypical buildings and commonly available geospatial data in a GIS framework. Abstract 2: This presentation focuses on 3D printing technologies and how they have rapidly evolved over the past couple of years. At a basic level, 3D printing produces physical models quickly and easily from 3D CAD, BIM (Building Information Models), and other digital data. Many AEC firms have adopted 3D printing as part of commercial building design development and project delivery. This presentation includes an overview of 3D printing, discusses its current use in building design, and talks about its future in relation to the HVAC industry. Abstract 3: This presentation discusses additive manufacturing and how it is revolutionizing the design of commercial and residential facilities. Additive manufacturing utilizes a broad range of direct manufacturing technologies, including electron beam melting, ultrasonic, extrusion, and laser metal deposition for rapid prototyping. While there is some overlap with the 3D printing talk, this presentation focuses on the materials aspect of additive manufacturing and also some of the more advanced technologies involved with rapid prototyping. These technologies include design of carbon fiber composites, lightweight metals processing, transient field processing, and more.

New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)] [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

1Option:UCRL#! Option:Additional Information! Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:Additional Information! Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory We replicate sound speeds for N2 for pressures to 25 kbars Laboratory We also replicate sound speed data for CH4 to 35 kbars and isotherms for CO2 to 10 kbars #12, SiO2, Fe3O4, CaCO3, Ni (solid, liquid), Al2SiO5, AlN (b1-solid, b4-solid), NiO, Al6O13Si2, FeS2, Si

Kaiser, Ralf I.

354

A laboratory study of oil recovery by in-situ combustion with the addition of water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

face at the inlet and the combustion zone, the temperature in Run 2 dropped to a lower level than in Run I, because the injected water removed heat in addition to normal heat loss. The temperature in the area between the sand face and the combustion... and sixteen inches. This area is also the location of the oil bank, After water injection the steam zone increased in length. At 2. 85 hours the steam zone extended from seventeen inches to twenty-four inches. The pressure 46 profile at 2. 90 hours in Run...

Alderman, John H

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Photocatalyzed multiple additions of amines to {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated esters and nitriles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photoelectron-transfer-catalyzed intermolecular carbon-carbon bond formation of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines with {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated esters and nitriles using photosensitizers such as anthraquinone, acridone, and dicyanoanthracene has been investigated. The addition of {alpha}-aminoalkyl radicals, generated via photoelectron-transfer processes, to olefinic substrates and the subsequent 1,5-hydrogen abstraction reactions of the amine-olefin adduct radicals lead to a number of interesting multiple-olefin-added products. The adducts of the primary and secondary amines with {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated esters undergo further cyclizations to give spiro and cyclic lactams, respectively.

Das, S.; Kumar, J.S.D.; Thomas, K.G.; Shivaramayya, K. [Regional Research Lab., Trivandrum (India); George, M.V. [Regional Research Lab., Trivandrum (India)]|[Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

1994-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

356

V-shaped resonators for addition of broad-area laser diode arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for addition of broad-area semiconductor laser diode arrays are described. The system can include an array of laser diodes, a V-shaped external cavity, and grating systems to provide feedback for phase-locking of the laser diode array. A V-shaped mirror used to couple the laser diode emissions along two optical paths can be a V-shaped prism mirror, a V-shaped stepped mirror or include multiple V-shaped micro-mirrors. The V-shaped external cavity can be a ring cavity. The system can include an external injection laser to further improve coherence and phase-locking.

Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda Y.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Enhanced performance of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells upon graphene addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene has potential for applications in solar cells. We show that the short circuit current density of P3HT (Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):PCBM((6,6)-Phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester) solar cells is enhanced by 10% upon the addition of graphene, with a 15% increase in the photon to electric conversion efficiency. We discuss the performance enhancement by studying the crystallization of P3HT, as well as the electrical transport properties. We show that graphene improves the balance between electron and hole mobilities with respect to a standard P3HT:PCBM solar cell.

Robaeys, Pieter, E-mail: pieter.robaeys@uhasselt.be; Dierckx, Wouter; Dexters, Wim; Spoltore, Donato; Drijkoningen, Jeroen [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University (Belgium); Bonaccorso, Francesco [Cambridge Graphene Centre, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Graphene Labs, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Bourgeois, Emilie; D'Haen, Jan; Haenen, Ken; Manca, Jean V.; Nesladek, Milos [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC vzw (Belgium); Liesenborgs, Jori; Van Reeth, Frank [Expertise centre for Digital Media (EDM), Hasselt University (Belgium); Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C. [Cambridge Graphene Centre, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

358

SciTech Connect: An Overview of Polymer Additive Manufacturing Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systems controllerAdditive Manufacturing forProcessesAnAn Overview of

359

U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,Coal Stocks atYear JanYearAdditions

360

,"U.S. Natural Gas LNG Storage Additions (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 103.Monthly","2/2015" ,"ReleaseAdditions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Field-enhanced electrodes for additive-injection non-thermal plasma (NTP) processor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention comprises a field enhanced electrode package for use in a non-thermal plasma processor. The field enhanced electrode package includes a high voltage electrode and a field-enhancing electrode with a dielectric material layer disposed in-between the high voltage electrode and the field-enhancing electrode. The field-enhancing electrode features at least one raised section that includes at least one injection hole that allows plasma discharge streamers to occur primarily within an injected additive gas.

Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ferreri, Vincent (Westminster, CO); Kim, Yongho (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Schlieren Visualization of the Energy Addition by Multi Laser Pulse in Hypersonic Flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental results of the energy addition by multi laser pulse in Mach 7 hypersonic flow are presented. Two high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA lasers (TEA1 5.5 J, TEA2 3.9 J) were assembled sharing the same optical cavity to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The lasers can be triggered with a selectable time delay and in the present report the results obtained with delay between 30 {mu}s and 80 {mu}s are shown. The schlieren technique associated with a high speed camera was used to accomplish the influence of the energy addition in the mitigation of the shock wave formed on the model surface by the hypersonic flow. A piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to obtain the time history of the impact pressure at stagnation point of the model and the pressure reduction could be measured. The total recovery of the shock wave between pulses as well as the prolonged effect of the mitigation without recovery was observed by changing the delay.

Oliveira, A. C. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12630-000 Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil); Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr [Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Myrabo, L. N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

363

Evaluation of an eastern shale oil residue as an asphalt additive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of eastern shale oil (ESO) residue as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age-hardening and moisture susceptibility was conducted. The ESO residue, having a viscosity of 23.9 Pa{sm_bullet}s at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F), was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts, AAD-1, AAK-1, and AAM-1, that are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. Rheological and infrared analyses of the unaged and aged asphalts and the blends were then conducted to evaluate oxidative age-hardening. In addition, the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends were coated onto three different aggregates, Lithonia granite (RA), a low-absorption limestone (RD), and a silicious Gulf Coast gravel (RL), and compacted into briquets. Successive freeze-thaw cycling was then conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of the prepared briquets. The abbreviations used above for the asphalts and the aggregates are part of the Strategic Highway Research Program nomenclature.

Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

364

The consequences of helium production and nickel additions on microstructure development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to 7.5 dpa at 300 and 400 C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400 C than at 300 C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and natural nickel. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400 C. At 300 C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400 C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ethanol Addition for Enhancing Denitrification at the Uranium Mill Tailing Site in Monument Valley, AZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium mining and processing near Monument Valley, Arizona resulted in the formation of a large nitrate plume in a shallow alluvial aquifer. The results of prior field characterization studies indicate that the nitrate plume is undergoing a slow rate of attenuation via denitrification, and the results of bench-scale studies suggest that denitrification rates can potentially be increased by an order of magnitude with the addition of ethanol as a carbon substrate. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential of ethanol amendment for enhancing the natural denitrification occurring in the alluvial aquifer. Pilot tests were conducted using the single well, push-pull method and a natural-gradient test. The results showed that the concentration of nitrate decreased, while the concentration of nitrous oxide (a product of denitrification) increased. In addition, changes in aqueous concentrations of sulfate, iron, and manganese indicate the ethanol amendment effected a change in prevailing redox conditions. The results of compound-specific stable isotope analysis for nitrogen indicated that the nitrate concentration reductions were biologically mediated. Continued monitoring after completion of the pilot tests has shown that nitrate concentrations in the injection zone have remained at levels three orders of magnitude lower than the initial values, indicating that the impacts of the pilot tests have been sustained for several months.

Borden, A. K.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; McMillan, Andrew; Akyol, N. H.; Berkompas, J.; Miao, Z.; Jordan, F.; Tick, Geoff; Waugh, W. J.; Glenn, E. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Anomalous yield reduction in direct-drive DT implosions due to 3He addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glass capsules were imploded in direct drive on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et aI., Opt. Commun. 133, 495, 1997] to look for anomalous degradation in deuterium/tritium (DT) yield (i.e., beyond what is predicted) and changes in reaction history with {sup 3}He addition. Such anomalies have previously been reported for D/{sup 3}He plasmas, but had not yet been investigated for DT/{sup 3}He. Anomalies such as these provide fertile ground for furthering our physics understanding of ICF implosions and capsule performance. A relatively short laser pulse (600 ps) was used to provide some degree of temporal separation between shock and compression yield components for analysis. Anomalous degradation in the compression component of yield was observed, consistent with the 'factor of two' degradation previously reported by MIT at a 50% {sup 3}He atom fraction in D{sub 2} using plastic capsules [Rygg et aI., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)]. However, clean calculations (i.e., no fuel-shell mixing) predict the shock component of yield quite well, contrary to the result reported by MIT, but consistent with LANL results in D{sub 2}/{sup 3}He [Wilson, et aI., lml Phys: Conf Series 112, 022015 (2008)]. X-ray imaging suggests less-than-predicted compression ofcapsules containing {sup 3}He. Leading candidate explanations are poorly understood Equation-of-State (EOS) for gas mixtures, and unanticipated particle pressure variation with increasing {sup 3}He addition.

Herrmann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mack, Joseph M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Douglas C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Evans, Scott C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, Tom J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kyrala, George A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caldwell, Stephen E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Carlton A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nobile, Arthur [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wermer, Joseph R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Paglieri, Stephen N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcevoy, Aaron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yong Ho [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batha, Steven H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Horsfield, Colin J [AWE, UK; Drew, Dave [AWE, UK; Garbett, Warren [AWE, UK; Rubery, Michael [AWE, UK; Glebov, Vladimir Yu [UNIV OF ROCHESTER; Roberts, Samuel [UNIV OF ROCHESTER; Frenje, Johan A [MIT

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Integrated reservoir characterization: Improvement in heterogeneities stochastic modelling by integration of additional external constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The classical approach to construct reservoir models is to start with a fine scale geological model which is informed with petrophysical properties. Then scaling-up techniques allow to obtain a reservoir model which is compatible with the fluid flow simulators. Geostatistical modelling techniques are widely used to build the geological models before scaling-up. These methods provide equiprobable images of the area under investigation, which honor the well data, and which variability is the same than the variability computed from the data. At an appraisal phase, when few data are available, or when the wells are insufficient to describe all the heterogeneities and the behavior of the field, additional constraints are needed to obtain a more realistic geological model. For example, seismic data or stratigraphic models can provide average reservoir information with an excellent areal coverage, but with a poor vertical resolution. New advances in modelisation techniques allow now to integrate this type of additional external information in order to constrain the simulations. In particular, 2D or 3D seismic derived information grids, or sand-shale ratios maps coming from stratigraphic models can be used as external drifts to compute the geological image of the reservoir at the fine scale. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these new tools, their impact on the final reservoir model, and their sensitivity to some key parameters.

Doligez, B.; Eschard, R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France); Geffroy, F. [Centre de Geostatistique, Fontainebleau (France)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Sufficient conditions for the additivity of stall forces generated by multiple filaments or motors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments mostly work collectively under opposing forces. This opposing force may be due to cargo carried by motors, or resistance coming from cell membrane pressing against the cytoskeletal filaments. Certain recent studies have shown that the collective maximum force (stall force) generated by multiple cytoskeletal filaments or molecular motors may not always be just a simple sum of stall force for individual filaments or motors. To understand this phenomena of excess or deficit collective force generation, we study a broad class of models of both cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. We argue that the stall force generated by a group of filaments or motors is additive, i.e., the stall force of N filaments(motors) is N times the stall force of one filament (motor), when the system is in equilibrium at stall. Consequently, we show that this additivity typically does not hold when the system departs from equilibrium at stall. We thus present a novel and unified underst...

Bameta, Tripti; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Oil-Miscible and Non-Corrosive Phosphonium Ionic Liquids as Candidate Lubricant Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ionic liquids (ILs) have been receiving considerable attention from the lubricants industry as potential friction and wear-reducing additives, but their solubility in oils is an issue. Unlike most ionic liquids that are insoluble in non-polar hydrocarbon oils, this study reports phosphonium-based ILs (PP-ILs) that are fully miscible with both mineral oil-based and synthetic lubricants. Both the cation and anion in quaternary structures, long alkyl chains, and capability of pairing the cation and the anion via a H-O bond are hypothesized to improve the compatibility between ions and neutral oil molecules. The measured viscosities of the oil-IL blends agree well with the Refutas equation that is for solutions containing multiple components. High thermal stability and non-corrosiveness were observed for the PP-ILs. Effective friction reduction and anti-wear functionality have been demonstrated in tribological tests when adding 5 wt% of a PP-IL into a base oil, suggesting potential applications for using the oil-miscible PP-ILs as lubricant additives.

Yu, Bo [ORNL; Bansal, Dinesh G [ORNL; Qu, Jun [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoqi [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Mordukhovich, Gregory [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Smolenski, Donald [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Modeling of on-line catalyst addition effects in a short contact time reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently developed short-contact-time reactors (SCTR), consisting of porous alumina monoliths coated with platinum, have been shown to produce ethylene from rich ethane/oxygen(hydrogen) mixtures with yields and selectivities comparable to conventional steam cracking, using a reactor of much smaller size. Although the overall mechanism is clearly autothermal and catalytic, the details, in particular the relative contributions of heterogeneous and homogeneous chemistry, are a matter of considerable debate. Recent experiments show that reactor performance can be further enhanced by dripping a dilute platinum solution onto the SCTR front face during reaction, resulting in catalyst deposition within only a short (several millimeter) zone of the reactor. The authors have undertaken a computational study of this system, using two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations with full heat and mass transport and detailed heterogeneous and homogeneous kinetic mechanisms. The results indicate that front-face catalyst loading enhances reactor performance by limiting the opportunity for heterogeneous ethane reactions that produce methane. As a result, ethylene selectivity increases and CH{sub 4} selectivity decreases. The results strongly support a mechanism recently proposed by the authors, in which rapid, heterogeneous oxidation of adsorbed hydrogen consumes most of the oxygen. The resulting heat is then released to the gas phase, causing homogeneous pyrolysis of ethane to occur in an environment containing much less oxygen. This mechanism explains not only the effects of on-line catalyst addition, but also the increase in ethylene selectivity observed upon addition of hydrogen to the reactant mixture.

D. K. Zerkle; M. d. Allendorf; M. Wolf; O. Deutschmann

2000-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Early Career: Templating of Liquid Crystal Microstructures by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has shown that the microstructure of self-assembled copolymers can be decoupled from the polymer chemistry. The simplest polymer architecture, linear block copolymers, is valuable for a broad range of applications, including adhesives and coatings, medical devices, electronics and energy storage, because these block copolymers reproducibly self-assemble into microphase separated nanoscale domains. Unfortunately, the self-assembled microstructure is tuned by polymer composition, thus limiting the potential to simultaneously optimize chemical, mechanical, and transport properties for desired applications. To this end, much work was been put into manipulating block copolymer self-assembly independently of polymer composition. These efforts have included the use of additives or solvents to alter polymer chain conformation, the addition of a third monomer to produce ABC triblock terpolymers, architectures with mixed blocks, such as tapered/gradient polymers, and the synthesis of other nonlinear molecular architectures. This work has shown that the microstructures formed by linear ABC terpolymers can be altered by controlling the architecture of the polymer molecules at a constant monomer composition, so that the microstructure is tuned independently from the chemical properties.

Heinen, Jennifer M

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Determine Minimum Silver Flake Addition to GCM for Iodine Loaded AgZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The minimum amount of silver flake required to prevent loss of I{sub 2} during sintering in air for a SNL Glass Composite Material (GCM) Waste Form containing AgI-MOR (ORNL, 8.7 wt%) was determined to be 1.1 wt% Ag. The final GCM composition prior to sintering was 20 wt% AgI-MOR, 1.1 wt% Ag, and 80 wt% Bi-Si oxide glass. The amount of silver flake needed to suppress iodine loss was determined using thermo gravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopic off-gas analysis. These studies found that the ratio of silver to AgI-MOR required is lower in the presence of the glass than without it. Therefore an additional benefit of the GCM is that it serves to inhibit some iodine loss during processing. Alternatively, heating the AgI-MOR in inert atmosphere instead of air allowed for densified GCM formation without I{sub 2} loss, and no necessity for the addition of Ag. The cause of this behavior is found to be related to the oxidation of the metallic Ag to Ag{sup +} when heated to above ~300{degrees}C in air. Heating rate, iodine loading levels and atmosphere are the important variables that determine AgI migration and results suggest that AgI may be completely incorporated into the mordenite structure by the 550{degrees}C sintering temperature.

Terry J. Garino; Tina M. Nenoff; Mark A. Rodriguez

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Exhaust after-treatment system with in-cylinder addition of unburnt hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Certain exhaust after-treatment devices, at least periodically, require the addition of unburnt hydrocarbons in order to create reductant-rich exhaust conditions. The present disclosure adds unburnt hydrocarbons to exhaust from at least one combustion chamber by positioning, at least partially within a combustion chamber, a mixed-mode fuel injector operable to inject fuel into the combustion chamber in a first spray pattern with a small average angle relative to a centerline of the combustion chamber and a second spray pattern with a large average angle relative to the centerline of the combustion chamber. An amount of fuel is injected in the first spray pattern into a non-combustible environment within the at least one combustion chamber during at least one of an expansion stroke and exhaust stroke. The exhaust with the unburnt amount of fuel is moved into an exhaust passage via an exhaust valve.

Coleman, Gerald N. (Corby, GB); Kesse, Mary L. (Peoria, IL)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Is the Time a Dimension of an Alien Universe? (this hypothesis gives an additional redshift)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the base of the hypothesis about a nature of the time as a dimension of alien Universe relation between alteration of time with coordinates $\\frac{\\partial t}{\\partial x}$ and time {t} offered: $ \\frac{\\partial t} {\\partial x} = H_{t} t$ . This relation is an analogy of the Habble law in the time space. The consequence of it is additional redshift $Z_{DT}$ depending on differences $\\tau$ of times existence of the objects with redshift that are compared ($t_{0}$ is the time existence of more old object): $Z_{DT}=\\frac{1+\\frac{\\tau}{t_{0}}}{\\sqrt{1-(\\frac{\\tau}{t_{0}}})^{2}}-1$. The redshift of Arp galaxies may be explained if this relation is used and this explanation doe's not contradict Arp hypothesis about supernova explosions. Discussion a possibilities of experimental verification of the hypothesis is considered.

L. Ya. Kobelev

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

375

Standard Model with the additional $Z_6$ symmetry on the lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An additional $Z_6$ symmetry hidden in the fermion and Higgs sectors of the Standard Model has been found recently\\cite{BVZ2003}. A lattice regularization of the Standard Model was constructed that possesses this symmetry. In \\cite{BVZ2004} we have reported our results on the numerical simulation of the Electroweak sector of the model. In this paper we report our results on the numerical simulation of the full ($SU(3)\\otimes SU(2) \\otimes U(1)$) model. The phase diagram of the model has been investigated using static quark and lepton potentials. Various types of monopoles have been constructed. Their densities appear to be sensitive to the phase transition lines. Differences between the realizations of the Standard Model which do or do not possess the mentioned $Z_6$ symmetry, are discussed.

B. L. G. Bakker; A. I. Veselov; M. A. Zubkov

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

376

Lubricants or lubricant additives composed of ionic liquids containing ammonium cations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A lubricant or lubricant additive is an ionic liquid alkylammonium salt. The alkylammonium salt has the structure R.sub.xNH.sub.(4-x).sup.+,[F.sub.3C(CF.sub.2).sub.yS(O).sub.2].sub.2N.sup- .- where x is 1 to 3, R is independently C.sub.1 to C.sub.12 straight chain alkyl, branched chain alkyl, cycloalkyl, alkyl substituted cycloalkyl, cycloalkyl substituted alkyl, or, optionally, when x is greater than 1, two R groups comprise a cyclic structure including the nitrogen atom and 4 to 12 carbon atoms, and y is independently 0 to 11. The lubricant is effective for the lubrication of many surfaces including aluminum and ceramics surfaces.

Qu, Jun (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Truhan, Jr.,; John J. (Cookeville, TN) [Cookeville, TN; Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Blau, Peter J. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

377

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, C. [National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Papastergiou, C. (National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum author responses to request for additional information.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) submitted SAND Report SAND2009-5822 to NRC that documented the incorporation of plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. NRC responded with a Request for Additional Information (RAI), identifying information needed in connection with its review of the application. The purpose of this SAND report is to provide the authors responses to each RAI. SAND Report SAND2010-6106 containing the proposed changes to the Addendum is provided separately.

Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

RECENT ADDITIONS OF CRITICALITY SAFETY RELATED INTEGRAL BENCHMARK DATA TO THE ICSBEP AND IRPHEP HANDBOOKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-quality integral benchmark experiments have always been a priority for criticality safety. However, interest in integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of future criticality safety needs to support next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The importance of drawing upon existing benchmark data is becoming more apparent because of dwindling availability of critical facilities worldwide and the high cost of performing new experiments. Integral benchmark data from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and the International Handbook of Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments are widely used. Benchmark data have been added to these two handbooks since the last Nuclear Criticality Safety Division Topical Meeting in Knoxville, Tennessee (September 2005). This paper highlights these additions.

J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Sartori

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials.

Bitensky, Mark W. (Boston, MA); Yoshida, Tatsuro (Newton, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials. 8 figs.

Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

383

Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

Abdullah, Yusof, E-mail: yusofabd@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Ahmad, Sahrim [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Hamid, Roszilah [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga National, Jalan Ikram-Uniten, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

List III, Frederick Alyious [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Lowe, Larry E [ORNL; Sames, William J [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Rates and products of degradation for MTBE and other oxygenate fuel additives in the subsurface environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent realization that oxygenated fuel additives such as MTBE are becoming widely distributed groundwater contaminants has created a sudden and pressing demand for data on the processes that control their environmental fate. Explaining and predicting the subsequent environmental fate of these compounds is going to require extrapolations over long time frames that will be very sensitive to the quality of input data on each compound. To provide such data, they have initiated a systematic study of the pathways and kinetics of fuel oxygenate degradation under subsurface conditions. Batch experiments in simplified model systems are being performed to isolate specific processes that may contribute to MTBE degradation. A variety of degradation pathways can be envisioned that lead to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) as the primary or secondary product. However, experiments to date with a facultative iron reducing bacteria showed no evidence for TBA formation. Continuing experiments include mixed cultures from a range of aquifer materials representative of NAWQA study sites.

Tratnyek, P.G.; Church, C.D.; Pankow, J.F. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

387

Additions to the ICSBEP and IRPhEP Handbooks since NCSD 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-quality integral benchmark experiments have always been a priority for criticality safety. However, interest in integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of future criticality safety needs to support next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The importance of drawing upon existing benchmark data is becoming more apparent because of dwindling availability of critical facilities worldwide and the high cost of performing new experiments. Integral benchmark data from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and the International Handbook of Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments are widely used. Significant Benchmark data have been added to those two handbooks since the last Nuclear Criticality Safety Division Topical Meeting in Richland, Washington (September 2009). This paper highlights those additions.

John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Method for simultaneous use of a single additive for coal flotation, dewatering, and reconstitution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single dose of additive contributes to three consecutive fine coal unit operations, i.e., flotation, dewatering and reconstitution, whereby the fine coal is first combined with water in a predetermined proportion so as to formulate a slurry. The slurry is then mixed with a heavy hydrocarbon-based emulsion in a second predetermined proportion and at a first predetermined mixing speed and for a predetermined period of time. The conditioned slurry is then cleaned by a froth flotation method to form a clean coal froth and then the froth is dewatered by vacuum filtration or a centrifugation process to form reconstituted products that are dried to dust-less clumps prior to combustion.

Wen, Wu-Wey (Murrysville, PA); Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Finleyville, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Addition of NH{sub 3} to Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent computational studies on the addition of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) to the Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} cluster anion [A. Guevara-Garcia, A. Martinez, and J. V. Ortiz, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214309 (2005)] have motivated experimental and additional computational studies, reported here. Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -} is observed to react with a single NH{sub 3} molecule to form the Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}NH{sub 3}{sup -} ion in mass spectrometric studies. This is in contrast to similarly performed studies with water, in which the Al{sub 3}O{sub 5}H{sub 4}{sup -} product was highly favored. However, the anion PE spectrum of the ammoniated species is very similar to that of Al{sub 3}O{sub 4}H{sub 2}{sup -}. The adiabatic electron affinity of Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}NH{sub 3} is determined to be 2.35(5) eV. Based on comparison between the spectra and calculated electron affinities, it appears that NH{sub 3} adds dissociatively to Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}, suggesting that the time for the Al{sub 3}O{sub 3}{sup -}{center_dot}NH{sub 3} complex to either overcome or tunnel through the barrier to proton transfer (which is higher for NH{sub 3} than for water) is short relative to the time for collisional cooling in the experiment.

Wyrwas, Richard B.; Jarrold, Caroline Chick; Das, Ujjal; Raghavachari, Krishnan [Indiana University, Department of Chemistry, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7102 (United States)

2006-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Additive-assisted synthesis of boride, carbide, and nitride micro/nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General and simple methods for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides are highly desirable, since those materials have unique physical properties and promising applications. Here, a series of boride (TiB{sub 2}, ZrB{sub 2}, NbB{sub 2}, CeB{sub 6}, PrB{sub 6}, SmB{sub 6}, EuB{sub 6}, LaB{sub 6}), carbide (SiC, TiC, NbC, WC) and nitride (TiN, BN, AlN, MgSiN{sub 2}, VN) micro/nanocrystals were prepared from related oxides and amorphous boron/active carbon/NaN{sub 3} with the assistance of metallic Na and elemental S. In-situ temperature monitoring showed that the reaction temperature could increase quickly to {approx}850 Degree-Sign C, once the autoclave was heated to 100 Degree-Sign C. Such a rapid temperature increase was attributed to the intense exothermic reaction between Na and S, which assisted the formation of borides, carbides and nitrides. The as-obtained products were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and HRTEM techniques. Results in this report will greatly benefit the future extension of this approach to other compounds. - Graphical abstract: An additive-assisted approach is successfully developed for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides micro/nanocrystals with the assistance of the exothermic reaction between Na and S. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additive-assisted synthesis strategy is developed for a number of borides, carbides and nitrides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction mechanism is demonstrated by the case of SiC nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of SiC nanowires is initiated by the exothermic reaction of Na and S.

Chen, Bo [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Yang, Lishan [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Heng, Hua; Chen, Jingzhong; Zhang, Linfei; Xu, Liqiang [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Qian, Yitai, E-mail: ytqian@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Yang, Jian, E-mail: yangjian@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and upper elevation tropical rain forests in Puerto Rico to explore the responses of above- and belowground C pools to N addition. As expected, tree stem growth and litterfall productivity did not respond to N fertilization in either of these Nrich forests, indicating a lack of N limitation to net primary productivity (NPP). In contrast, soil C concentrations increased significantly with N fertilization in both forests, leading to larger C stocks in fertilized plots. However, different soil C pools responded to N fertilization differently. Labile (low density) soil C fractions and live fine roots declined with fertilization, while mineral-associated soil C increased in both forests. Decreased soil CO2 fluxes in fertilized plots were correlated with smaller labile soil C pools in the lower elevation forest (R2 = 0.65, p\\0.05), and with lower live fine root biomass in the upper elevation forest (R2 = 0.90, p\\0.05). Our results indicate that soil C storage is sensitive to N deposition in tropical forests, even where plant productivity is not N-limited. The mineral-associated soil C pool has the potential to respond relatively quickly to N additions, and can drive increases in bulk soil C stocks in tropical forests.

Cusack, D.; Silver, W.L.; Torn, M.S.; McDowell, W.H.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Additional requirements for leak-before-break application to primary coolant piping in Belgium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leak-Before-Break (LBB) technology has not been applied in the first design of the seven Pressurized Water Reactors the Belgian utility is currently operating. The design basis of these plants required to consider the dynamic effects associated with the ruptures to be postulated in the high energy piping. The application of the LBB technology to the existing plants has been recently approved by the Belgian Safety Authorities but with a limitation to the primary coolant loop. LBB analysis has been initiated for the Doel 3 and Tihange 2 plants to allow the withdrawal of some of the reactor coolant pump snubbers at both plants and not reinstall some of the restraints after steam generator replacement at Doel 3. LBB analysis was also found beneficial to demonstrate the acceptability of the primary components and piping to the new conditions resulting from power uprating and stretch-out operation. LBB analysis has been subsequently performed on the primary coolant loop of the Tihange I plant and is currently being performed for the Doel 4 plant. Application of the LBB to the primary coolant loop is based in Belgium on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. However the Belgian Safety Authorities required some additional analyses and put some restrictions on the benefits of the LBB analysis to maintain the global safety of the plant at a sufficient level. This paper develops the main steps of the safety evaluation performed by the Belgian Safety Authorities for accepting the application of the LBB technology to existing plants and summarizes the requirements asked for in addition to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules.

Roussel, G. [AIB Vincotte Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Glassy slags for minimum additive waste stabilization. Interim progress report, May 1993--February 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glassy slag waste forms are being developed to complement glass waste forms in implementing Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) for supporting DOE`s environmental restoration efforts. The glassy slag waste form is composed of various crystalline and metal oxide phases embedded in a silicate glass phase. The MAWS approach was adopted by blending multiple waste streams to achieve up to 100% waste loadings. The crystalline phases, such as spinels, are very durable and contain hazardous and radioactive elements in their lattice structures. These crystalline phases may account for up to 80% of the total volume of slags having over 80% metal loading. The structural bond strength model was used to quantify the correlation between glassy slag composition and chemical durability so that optimized slag compositions were obtained with limited crucible melting and testing. Slag compositions developed through crucible melts were also successfully generated in a pilot-scale Retech plasma centrifugal furnace at Ukiah, California. Utilization of glassy slag waste forms allows the MAWS approach to be applied to a much wider range of waste streams than glass waste forms. The initial work at ANL has indicated that glassy slags are good final waste forms because of (1) their high chemical durability; (2) their ability to incorporate large amounts of metal oxides; (3) their ability to incorporate waste streams having low contents of flux components; (4) their less stringent requirements on processing parameters, compared to glass waste forms; and (5) their low requirements for purchased additives, which means greater waste volume reduction and treatment cost savings.

Feng, X.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Gong, M.; Emery, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation of anti-wear performance of PFPE-soluble additives under sliding contact in high vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anti-wear performances of perfluoropolyether (PEPE)-soluble additives were evaluated under vacuum using a vacuum four-ball tribometer with 440C stainless steel balls as test specimens. PEPE derivatives having the hydroxyl, carboxyl and phosphate groups at the end of the Type D-PEPE molecules were studied. The addition of either PEPE-soluble carboxylic acid or PEPE-soluble phosphates to the PEPE base oil remarkably reduced steady wear rates in a vacuum environment, whereas the addition of PEPE-soluble alcohol did not. Contrary to the performance in vacuum, an appreciable increase in wear rate was observed in the air atmosphere with all the types of additives used. The effect of moisture is studied in explaining the high wear rates obtained with the additives in the air environment. The mechanism of boundary lubrication with PEPE-soluble additives is discussed.

Masuko, M.; Takeshita, N.; Okabe, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Integrated Control of Solidification Microstructure and Melt Pool Dimensions In Additive Manufacturing Of Ti - 6Al - 4V.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Additive manufacturing (AM) offers reduced material waste and energy usage, as well as an increase in precision. Direct metal AM is used not only for… (more)

Gockel, Joy E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

DOE Announces Additional Tour Seats Available: Tours of B Reactor at the Hanford Site Begin and End in Richland, Wash.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RICHLAND, Wash. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has made additional seats available for tours of the B Reactor National Historic Landmark this July and August.

397

Rapid additive manufacturing of MR compatible multipinhole collimators with selective laser melting of tungsten powder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The construction of complex collimators with a high number of oblique pinholes is very labor intensive, expensive or is sometimes impossible with the current available techniques (drilling, milling or electric discharge machining). All these techniques are subtractive: one starts from solid plates and the material at the position of the pinholes is removed. The authors used a novel technique for collimator construction, called metal additive manufacturing. This process starts with a solid piece of tungsten on which a first layer of tungsten powder is melted. Each subsequent layer is then melted on the previous layer. This melting is done by selective laser melting at the locations where the CAD design file defines solid material. Methods: A complex collimator with 20 loftholes with 500 {mu}m diameter pinhole opening was designed and produced (16 mm thick and 70 Multiplication-Sign 52 mm{sup 2} transverse size). The density was determined, the production accuracy was measured (GOM ATOS II Triple Scan, Nikon AZ100M microscope, Olympus IMT200 microscope). Point source measurements were done by mounting the collimator on a SPECT detector. Because there is increasing interest in dual-modality SPECT-MR imaging, the collimator was also positioned in a 7T MRI scanner (Bruker Pharmascan). A uniform phantom was acquired using T1, T2, and T2* sequences to check for artifacts or distortion of the phantom images due to the collimator presence. Additionally, three tungsten sample pieces (250, 500, and 750 {mu}m thick) were produced. The density, attenuation (140 keV beam), and uniformity (GE eXplore Locus SP micro-CT) of these samples were measured. Results: The density of the collimator was equal to 17.31 {+-} 0.10 g/cm{sup 3} (89.92% of pure tungsten). The production accuracy ranges from -260 to +650 {mu}m. The aperture positions have a mean deviation of 5 {mu}m, the maximum deviation was 174 {mu}m and the minimum deviation was -122 {mu}m. The mean aperture diameter is 464 {+-} 19 {mu}m. The calculated and measured sensitivity and resolution of point sources at different positions in the field-of-view agree well. The measured and expected attenuation of the three sample pieces are in a good agreement. There was no influence of the 7T magnetic field on the collimator (which is paramagnetic) and minimal distortion was noticed on the MR scan of the uniform phantom. Conclusions: Additive manufacturing is a very promising technique for the production of complex multipinhole collimators and may also be used for producing other complex collimators. The cost of this technique is only related to the amount of powder needed and the time it takes to have the collimator built. The timeframe from design to collimator production is significantly reduced.

Deprez, Karel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Van Audenhaege, Karen; Van Vaerenbergh, Jonas; Van Holen, Roel [MEDISIP, Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Ghent University-iMinds-IBiTech, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Layerwise NV, Kapeldreef 60, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); MEDISIP, Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Ghent University-iMinds-IBiTech, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Self-decomposable Fibrous Bridging Additives for Temporary Cementitious Fracture Sealers in EGS Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates compatibility of a self-degradable temporary fracture sealer with the drilling mud and plugging and self-degrading performance of different fibers to be used in combination with the sealer. The sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash (SSASC) cementitious sealer must plug fractures at 85oC to allow continuous well drilling and it must degrade and leave the fractures open for water at later times when exposed to temperatures above 200oC. The sealer showed good compatibility with the mud. Even the blend of 80/20 vol.% of sealer/mud reached a compressive strength of more than 2000 psi set as one of the material criteria, mostly due to the additional activation of the slag and Class C fly ash by the alkaline ingredient present in the drilling fluid. In contrast, the drilling fluid was detrimental to the compressive strength development in conventional Class G well cement, so that it failed to meet this criterion. Among several organic fibers tested both polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-and nylon-based fibers showed adequate plugging of the sealer in slot nozzles of 1-in. wide x 6-in. long x 0.08 in. and 0.24 in. high under pressures up to 700 psi. PVA fibers displayed better compressive toughness and self-degrading properties than nylon. The compressive toughness of sealers made by adding 1.0 wt% 6 mm-length PVA and 0.5 wt% 19 mm-length PVA was 9.5-fold higher than that of a non-bridged sealer. One factor governing the development of such high toughness was an excellent adherence of PVA to the SSASC cement. The alkali-catalyzed self-decomposition of PVA at 200°C led to the morphological transformation of the material from a fibrous structure to a microscale flake-like structure that helped the desirable conversion of the sealer into small fragments. In contrast, nylon’s decomposition provided a reticular network structure in the self-degraded sealer resulting in bigger fragments compared against the sealer with PVA. The PVA fiber has a high potential as a self-decomposable bridging additive in the SSASC cement sealer.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.; Kisslinger, K.; Iverson, B.; Bour, D.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP) Conferences. This work is also relevant to the ongoing efforts of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section XI, Working Group on Operating Plant Criteria (WGOPC) efforts to incorporate nozzle fracture mechanics solutions into a revision to ASME B&PV Code, Section XI, Nonmandatory Appendix G.

Walter, Matthew [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Yin, Shengjun [ORNL; Stevens, Gary [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Sommerville, Daniel [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc.; Palm, Nathan [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA; Heinecke, Carol [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to {approx}150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of {approx}1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L/min (face velocity = 0.013 m/s), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8 to 10 L/min). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes (m/z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts (m/z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives, rather than ozonolysis, is the main formaldehyde source in those filters. Emission rates of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were not found to be large enough to substantially increase indoor concentrations in typical building scenarios. Nevertheless, ozone reactions on HVAC filters cannot be ignored as a source of low levels of indoor irritants.

Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effects of HyperCoal addition on coke strength and thermoplasticity of coal blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ashless coal, also known as HyperCoal (HPC), was produced by thermal extraction of three coals of different ranks (Gregory caking coal, Warkworth steam coal, and Pasir subbituminous coal) with 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) at 360, 380, and 400{sup o}C. The effects of blending these HPCs into standard coal blends were investigated. Blending HPCs as 5-10% of a standard blend (Kouryusho:Goonyella:K9) enhanced the thermoplasticity over a wide temperature range. For blends made with the Pasir-HPC, produced from a noncaking coal, increasing the extraction temperature from 360 to 400{sup o}C increased the thermoplasticity significantly. Blends containing Warkworth-HPC, produced from a slightly caking coal, had a higher tensile strength than the standard blend in semicoke strength tests. The addition of 10% Pasir-HPC, extracted at 400{sup o}C, increased the tensile strength of the semicokes to the same degree as those made with Gregory-HPC. Furthermore, all HPC blends had a higher tensile strength and smaller weight loss during carbonization. These results suggest that the HPC became integrated into the coke matrix, interacting strongly with the other raw coals. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takahiro Shishido; Ikuo Saito [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan). Energy Technology Research Institute

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity of Silica-based Coating Additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superhydrophobic silica (SHS) powders are being evaluated as a potential additive to the polyurethane topcoats used in Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) systems, with the goal of improving water repellency and corrosion protection characteristics. The current generation of CARC topcoats is already highly loaded with solids, and thus there is a premium on minimization of the total SHS powder required to achieve the desired properties. Therefore, efficient surface modification of the silica and proper dispersion in the coating will be required. The effect of a dispersant on the surface modification of silica particles by chlorosilanes was addressed in this study. The properties of various SHS powders were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectroscopy. Correlations between powder modification conditions and the ultimate effects of the modified particles on hydrophobicity of CARC topcoats were assessed. The use of contact and rolling angle measurements along with scanning electron microscopy are discussed as they pertain to the ability to quantify the effects of modified silicas on corrosion prevention coatings. Furthermore, a systematic approach to modifying and testing both powders and top coats of corrosion prevention systems is presented.

Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL] [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL; Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL] [ORNL; Haynes, James A [ORNL] [ORNL; Hillesheim, Daniel A [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

Sinha, A.S.K. [SLIET, Longowal (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

405

Black liquor viscosity reduction through salt additives: A novel environmentally benign processing alternative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processing black liquor at high solids would reduce SO{sub x} emissions, facilitate the use of non-chlorine bleaching techniques and enhance the energy efficiency of the pulping process. However, black liquor exhibits and exponential increase in viscosity as its solids content rises, thus hindering its processability in the composition range of interest (>70% solids). In this study, we present a new approach for controlling viscosity at high solids content by {open_quotes}salting in{close_quotes} black liquor through addition of thiocyanate salts. These salts increases the solubility of the polymer constituents in black liquor leading to a decrease in its viscosity. Several salts capable of viscosity reduction by as much as two orders of magnitude have been identified. The effects of cation size, solution pH and temperature on viscosity reduction is presented and interpreted in terms of the underlying principles of {open_quotes}salting in{close_quotes} and how it affects aqueous solution structure.

Roberts, J.E.; Khan, S.A.; Spontak, R.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

FGD Additives to Segregate and Sequester Mercury in Solid Byproducts - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many mercury control strategies for U.S. coal-fired power generating plants involve co-benefit capture of oxidized mercury from flue gases treated by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. For these processes to be effective at overall mercury control, the captured mercury must not be re-emitted to the atmosphere or into surface or ground water. The project sought to identify scrubber additives and FGD operating conditions under which mercury re-emissions would decrease and mercury would remain in the liquor and be blown down from the system in the chloride purge stream. After exiting the FGD system, mercury would react with precipitating agents to form stable solid byproducts and would be removed in a dewatering step. The FGD gypsum solids, free of most of the mercury, could then be disposed or processed for reuse as wallboard or in other beneficial reuse. The project comprised extensive bench-scale FGD scrubber tests in Phases I and II. During Phase II, the approaches developed at the bench scale were tested at the pilot scale. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests measured the performance of precipitating agents in removing mercury from the chloride purge stream. Finally, the economic viability of the approaches tested was evaluated.

Searcy, K; Bltyhe, G M; Steen, W A

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

Clean, agile alternative binders, additives and plasticizers for propellant and explosive formulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) a clean, agile manufacturing of explosives, propellants and pyrotechniques (CANPEP) effort set about to identify new approaches to materials and processes for producing propellants, explosives and pyrotechniques (PEP). The RDX based explosive PBXN-109 and gun propellant M-43 were identified as candidates for which waste minimization and recycling modifications might be implemented in a short time frame. The binders, additives and plasticizers subgroup identified cast non-curable thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) formulations as possible replacement candidates for these formulations. Paste extrudable explosives were also suggested as viable alternatives to PBXN-109. Commercial inert and energetic TPEs are reviewed. Biodegradable and hydrolyzable binders are discussed. The applicability of various types of explosive formulations are reviewed and some issues associated with implementation of recyclable formulations are identified. It is clear that some processing and weaponization modifications will need to be made if any of these approaches are to be implemented. The major advantages of formulations suggested here over PBXN-109 and M-43 is their reuse/recyclability. Formulations using TPE or Paste could by recovered from a generic bomb or propellant and reused if they met specification or easily reprocessed and sold to the mining industry.

Hoffman, D.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hawkins, T.W. [Phillips Lab., Edwards AFB, CA (United States); Lindsay, G.A. [Naval Weapons Station, China Lake, CA (United States)] [and others

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Determination of free acid by standard addition method in potassium thiocyanate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The free acid content of solutions containing hydrolyzable ions has been determined potentiometrically by a standard addition method. Two increments of acid are added to the sample in 1M potassium thiocyanate solution. The sample concentration is calculated by solution of three simultaneous Nernst equations. The method has been demonstrated for solutions containing Al/sup 3 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Hg/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Th/sup 4 +/, or UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ with a metal-to-acid ratio of < 2.5. The method is suitable for determination of 10 ..mu..moles acid in 10 mL total volume. The accuracy can be judged from the agreement of the Nernst slopes found in the presence and absence of hydrolyzable ions. The relative standard deviation is < 2.5%. The report includes a survey of experiments with thermometric, pH, and Gran plot titrations in a variety of complexants, from which the method was evolved. Also included is a literature survey of sixty references, a discussion of the basic measurements, and a complete analytical procedure.

Baumann, E W

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Improved microstructure of cement-based composites through the addition of rock wool particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rock wool is an inorganic fibrous substance produced by steam blasting and cooling molten glass. As with other industrial by-products, rock wool particles can be used as cementitious materials or ultra fine fillers in cement-based composites. This study investigated the microstructure of mortar specimens produced with cement-based composites that include various forms of rock wool particles. It conducted compressive strength testing, rapid chloride penetration tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and scanning electronic microscopy to evaluate the macro- and micro-properties of the cement-based composites. Test results indicate that inclusion of rock wool particles in composites improved compressive strength and reduced chloride ion penetration at the age of 91 days due to the reduction of calcium hydroxide content. Microscopic analysis confirms that the use of rock wool particles contributed to the formation of a denser, more compact microstructure within the hardened paste. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis shows few changes in formation of pozzolanic reaction products and no new hydrations are formed with incorporating rock wool particles. - Highlights: • We report the microstructural characterization of cement-based composites. • Different mixes produced with various rock wool particles have been tested. • The influence of different mixes on macro and micro properties has been discussed. • The macro properties are included compressive strength and permeability. • XRD and SEM observations confirm the pozzolanic reaction in the resulting pastes.

Lin, Wei-Ting [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan 32546, Taiwan (China); Cheng, An, E-mail: ancheng@niu.edu.tw [Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan 26047, Taiwan (China); Huang, Ran; Zou, Si-Yu [Dept. of Harbor and River Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Process for producing biodiesel, lubricants, and fuel and lubricant additives in a critical fluid medium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing alkyl esters useful in biofuels and lubricants by transesterifying glyceride- or esterifying free fatty acid-containing substances in a single critical phase medium is disclosed. The critical phase medium provides increased reaction rates, decreases the loss of catalyst or catalyst activity and improves the overall yield of desired product. The process involves the steps of dissolving an input glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with an alcohol or water into a critical fluid medium; reacting the glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with the alcohol or water input over either a solid or liquid acidic or basic catalyst and sequentially separating the products from each other and from the critical fluid medium, which critical fluid medium can then be recycled back in the process. The process significantly reduces the cost of producing additives or alternatives to automotive fuels and lubricants utilizing inexpensive glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substances, such as animal fats, vegetable oils, rendered fats, and restaurant grease.

Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

411

1,4-Addition of Lithium Diisopropylamide to Unsaturated Esters: Role of Rate-Limiting Deaggregation, Autocatalysis,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1,4-Addition of Lithium Diisopropylamide to Unsaturated Esters: Role of Rate-Limiting Deaggregation, Autocatalysis, Lithium Chloride Catalysis, and Other Mixed Aggregation Effects Yun Ma, Alexander C. Hoepker.edu Abstract: Lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) in tetrahydrofuran at -78 °C undergoes 1,4-addition

Collum, David B.

412

Corrosion, Passivation, and the Effect of Water Addition on an n-GaAs(100)/Methanol Photoelectrochemical Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion, Passivation, and the Effect of Water Addition on an n-GaAs(100)/Methanol of corrosion of the cell on the PL-V profile is examined in detail. It is found that the inclusion of the redox couple gives some protection from corrosion, but the addition of a small amount of water

Richmond, Geraldine L.

413

Lithium Ephedrate-Mediated Addition of a Lithium Acetylide to a Ketone: Solution Structures and Relative Reactivities of Mixed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithium Ephedrate-Mediated Addition of a Lithium Acetylide to a Ketone: Solution Structures-1301 ReceiVed April 30, 1997. ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed NoVember 26, 1997 Abstract: Addition of lithiumLi and 13C NMR spectroscopies reveal lithium cyclopropylacetylide in THF to be a dimer

Collum, David B.

414

The Effects of Metaphylaxis and Milk Replacer Additives on Health and Growth of Neonatal Holstein Bull Calves.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/d for the next 14 d of an egg-based additive (PR); 2) 2 g/d of 96% betaine (BE); 3) both PR and BE (BP); or 4) no additives (NA). Calves were housed in individual fiberglass hutches with ad libitum access to a commercial calf starter and water. Body weight...

Holloway, Kenton S.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) -NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen Klein, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) - NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen ARM product, the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) dataset, is being augmented with the additional observational and model data. The CMBE dataset was created to serve the needs of climate model developers

416

Fuel additives. January 1984-December 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 84-Dec 91  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning effects; evaluations; and production methods of additives in automotive, aviation, diesel, and boiler fuels. Antioxidant, antiicing, antistatic, corrosion inhibitors, antiknock, and depressant additives relative to evaluations and testing are among the topics discussed. (Contains 165 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fuel additives. January 1970-August 1989 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for January 1970-August 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning effects; evaluations; and production methods of additives in automotive, aviation, diesel, and boiler fuels. Antioxidant, antiicing, antistatic, corrosion inhibitors, antiknock, and depressant additives relative to evaluations and testing are among the topics discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 223 citations, 56 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Studying the Mechanisms of Titanium Dioxide as Ultraviolet-Blocking Additive for Films and Fabrics by an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying the Mechanisms of Titanium Dioxide as Ultraviolet-Blocking Additive for Films and Fabrics November 2003 ABSTRACT: Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has good ultraviolet (UV)-blocking power and is very: inorganic UV-blocking agents; additives; films; adsorption; light scattering INTRODUCTION More frequent

Pan, Ning

419

Flying across Galaxy Clusters with Google Earth: additional imagery from SDSS co-added data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Galaxy clusters are spectacular. We provide a Google Earth compatible imagery for the deep co-added images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and make it a tool for examing galaxy clusters. Google Earth (in sky mode) provides a highly interactive environment for visualizing the sky. By encoding the galaxy cluster information into a kml/kmz file, one can use Google Earth as a tool for examining galaxy clusters and fly across them freely. However, the resolution of the images provided by Google Earth is not very high. This is partially because the major imagery google earth used is from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) (SDSS collaboration 2000) and the resolutions have been reduced to speed up the web transferring. To have higher resolution images, you need to add your own images in a way that Google Earth can understand. The SDSS co-added data are the co-addition of {approx}100 scans of images from SDSS stripe 82 (Annis et al. 2010). It provides the deepest images based on SDSS and reach as deep as about redshift 1.0. Based on the co-added images, we created color images in a way as described by Lupton et al. (2004) and convert the color images to Google Earth compatible images using wcs2kml (Brewer et al. 2007). The images are stored at a public server at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and can be accessed by the public. To view those images in Google Earth, you need to download a kmz file, which contains the links to the color images, and then open the kmz file with your Google Earth. To meet different needs for resolutions, we provide three kmz files corresponding to low, medium and high resolution images. We recommend the high resolution one as long as you have a broadband Internet connection, though you should choose to download any of them, depending on your own needs and Internet speed. After you open the downloaded kmz file with Google Earth (in sky mode), it takes about 5 minutes (depending on your Internet connection and the resolution of images you want) to get some initial images loaded. Then, additional images corresponding to the region you are browsing will be loaded automatically. So far, you have access to all the co-added images. But you still do not have the galaxy cluster position information to look at. In order to see the galaxy clusters, you need to download another kmz file that tell Google Earth where to find the galaxy clusters in the co-added data region. We provide a kmz file for a few galaxy clusters in the stripe 82 region and you can download and open it with Google Earth. In the SDSS co-added region (stripe 82 region), the imagery from Google Earth itself is from the Digitized Sky Survey (2007), which is in very poor quality. In Figure1 and Figure2, we show screenshots of a cluster with and without the new co-added imagery in Google Earth. Much more details have been revealed with the deep images.

Hao, Jiangang; Annis, James; /Fermilab

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Influence of Al/CuO reactive multilayer films additives on exploding foil initiator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation on the influence of Al/CuO reactive multilayer films (RMFs) additives on exploding foil initiator was performed in this paper. Cu film and Cu/Al/CuO RMFs were produced by using standard microsystem technology and RF magnetron sputtering technology, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy characterization revealed the distinct layer structure of the as-deposited Al/CuO RMFs. Differential scanning calorimetry was employed to ascertain the amount of heat released in the thermite reaction between Al films and CuO films, which was found to be 2024 J/g. Electrical explosion tests showed that 600 V was the most matching voltage for our set of apparatus. The explosion process of two types of films was observed by high speed camera and revealed that compared with Cu film, an extra distinct combustion phenomenon was detected with large numbers of product particles fiercely ejected to a distance of about six millimeters for Cu/Al/CuO RMFs. By using the atomic emission spectroscopy double line technique, the reaction temperature was determined to be about 6000-7000 K and 8000-9000 K for Cu film and Cu/Al/CuO RMFs, respectively. The piezoelectricity of polyvinylidene fluoride film was employed to measure the average velocity of the slapper accelerated by the explosion of the films. The average velocities of the slappers were calculated to be 381 m/s and 326 m/s for Cu film and Cu/Al/CuO RMFs, respectively, and some probable reasons were discussed with a few suggestions put forward for further work.

Zhou Xiang; Shen Ruiqi; Ye Yinghua; Zhu Peng; Hu Yan; Wu Lizhi [School of Chemical Engineeering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

Effect of MgO Additive on Volumetric Expansion of Self-Degradable Cements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We identified hard-burned magnesium oxide (MgO) as a suitable expansive additive for improving the plugging performance of self-degradable, temporary sodium silicate-activated slag/Class C fly ash (SSASC) blend cement sealers into rock fractures in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGSs). MgO extended the volumetric expansion of sealers during their exposure to a hydrothermal environment at 200 C under pressures, ranging from 300 to 1500 psi. A great expansion ratc of 19.3% was observed by adding 3.0 wt% MgO under 300 psi pressure, thus promising to plug thoroughly inner fracture. When the pressure was increased from 300 psi to 1500 psi, the expansion rate of cement markedly reduced, corresponding to the formaLion of crack-free specimens and the improvement of compressive strength. However, with 3.0 wt% MgO, the specimens still engendered the generation of numerous visual cracks, although they were prepared under a high pressure of 1500 psi. The effective content of MgO in minimizing and eliminating the generation of cracks was 2.0 wt%, which provided a moderate expansion of {ge} 0.5%. The compressive strength of 2.0 wt% MgO specimens made under a pressure of 300 psi rose {approx} 1.7-fold to 4816 psi with an increasing pressure to 1500 psi. The in-situ growth of brucite crystal formed by the hydrothermal hydration of MgO was responsive for such an expansion of the SSASC cement; meanwhile. two crystalline hydrothermal reaction products, 1.1 nm tobermorite and calcium silicate hydrated, contributed to the development of the sealer's compressive strength. Thus, the increasing pressure seems to suppress and control a growth rate of brucite crystal in response to a lower extension of expansion. Furthermore, all MgO-conlaining SSASC sealers possessed the water-catalyzed self-degradable properties.

Sugama T.; Warren, J.; Butcher, T.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

New electrolytes and electrolyte additives to improve the low temperature performance of lithium-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this program, two different approaches were undertaken to improve the role of electrolyte at low temperature performance - through the improvement in (i) ionic conductivity and (ii) interfacial behavior. Several different types of electrolytes were prepared to examine the feasibil.ity of using these new electrolytes in rechargeable lithium-ion cells in the temperature range of +40°C to -40°C. The feasibility studies include (a) conductivity measurements of the electrolytes, (b) impedance measurements of lithium-ion cells using the screened electrolytes with di.fferent electrochemical history such as [(i) fresh cells prior to formation cycles, (ii) after first charge, and (iii) after first discharge], (c) electrical performance of the cells at room temperatures, and (d) charge discharge behavior at various low temperatures. Among the different types of electrolytes investigated in Phase I and Phase II of this SBIR project, carbonate-based LiPF6 electrolytes with the proposed additives and the low viscous ester as a third component to the carbonate-based LiPF6 electrolytes show promising results at low temperatures. The latter electrolytes deliver over 80% of room temperature capacity at -20{degrees}C when the lithium-ion cells containing these electrolytes were charged at -20 °C. Also, there was no lithium plating when the lithium­-ion cells using C-C composite anode and LiPF{sub 6} in EC/EMC/MP electrolyte were charged at -20{degrees}C at C/5 rate. The studies of ionic conductivity and AC impedance of these new electrolytes, as well as the charge discharge characteristics of lithium-ion cells using these new electrolytes at various low temperatures provide new findings: The reduced capacity and power capability, as well as the problem of lithium plating at low temperatures charging of lithium-ion cells are primarily due to slow the lithium-ion intercalation/de-intercalation kinetics in the carbon structure.

Yang, Xiao-Qing

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

LIFE Chamber Chemical Equilibrium Simulations with Additive Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Nitrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to enable continuous operation of a Laser Inertial confinement Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine, the material (fill-gas and debris) in the fusion chamber must be carefully managed. The chamber chemical equilibrium compositions for post-shot mixtures are evaluated to determine what compounds will be formed at temperatures 300-5000K. It is desired to know if carbon and or lead will deposit on the walls of the chamber, and if so: at what temperature, and what elements can be added to prevent this from happening. The simulation was conducted using the chemical equilibrium solver Cantera with a Matlab front-end. Solutions were obtained by running equilibrations at constant temperature and constant specific volume over the specified range of temperatures. It was found that if nothing is done, carbon will deposit on the walls once it cools to below 2138K, and lead below 838K. Three solutions to capture the carbon were found: adding pure oxygen, hydrogen/nitrogen combo, and adding pure nitrogen. The best of these was the addition of oxygen which would readily form CO at around 4000K. To determine the temperature at which carbon would deposit on the walls, temperature solutions to evaporation rate equations needed to be found. To determine how much carbon or any species was in the chamber at a given time, chamber flushing equations needed to be developed. Major concerns are deposition of carbon and/or oxygen on the tungsten walls forming tungsten oxides or tungsten carbide which could cause embrittlement and cause failure of the first wall. Further research is needed.

DeMuth, J A; Simon, A J

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

425

Ring Walking/Oxidative Addition Reactions for the Controlled Synthesis of Conjugated Polymers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power conversion efficiencies of plastic solar cells depend strongly on the molecular weight characteristics of the semiconducting polymers used for their fabrication. The synthesis of these materials typically relies on transition metal mediated catalytic reactions. In many instances, the ideal structures cannot be attained because of deficiencies in these reactions, particularly when it comes to being able to achieve high number average molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions. Another important conjugated polymer structure of interest is one in which a single functional group is attached at the end group of the chain. Such systems would be ideal for modifying surface properties at interfaces and for labeling biomolecular probes used in fluorescent biosensors. To respond to the challenges above, our efforts have centered on the design of homogenous transition metal complexes that are easy to prepare and effective in carrying out living, or quasi-living, condensative chain polymerization reactions. The key mechanistic challenge for the success of this reaction is to force the insertion of one monomer unit at a time via a process that involves migration of the transition metal-containing fragment to one terminus of the polymer chain. Chain growth characteristics are therefore favored when the metal does not dissociate from the newly formed reductive elimination product. We have proposed that dissociation is disfavored by the formation of a Ď?-complex, in which the metal can sample various locations of the electronically delocalized framework, a process that we term â??ring-walkingâ?ť, and find the functionality where oxidative addition takes place. Success has been achieved in the nickel-mediated cross coupling reaction of Grignard reagents with aromatic halides by using bromo[1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane]phenylnickel. This reagent can yield poly(thiophene)s (one of the most widely used type of polymer in plastic solar cells) with excellent stereoregularity and molecular weight distributions with polydispersities that are consistent with a living polymerization sequence. Another important objective of this program concerned the use of these new catalysts and improved mechanistic insight for the synthesis of specific polymeric materials with prespecified properties.

Bazan, Guillermo C

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

426

Corrosion behavior of a high-chromium duplex stainless steel with minor additions of ruthenium in sulfuric acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of small ruthenium additions on the corrosion behavior of high-chromium duplex stainless steels (DSS) was studied. Ruthenium additions ({le} 0.28%) increased the corrosion resistance of the base alloy by simultaneously improving hydrogen evolution efficiency and inhibiting anodic dissolution. The corrosion behavior of the high-chromium DSS with small ruthenium additions differed somewhat from behavior of similar duplex alloys of the 22%-Cr type. The lowering of hydrogen overpotential, which promotes an elevated corrosion potential leading to passivity, was much more significant in the 29%-Cr duplex alloys than in the 22%-Cr types.

Potgieter, J.H. [Pretoria Portland Cement, Johannesburg (South Africa). Technical Services Dept.; Brookes, H.C. [Univ. of Natal, Durban (South Africa). Dept. of Chemistry

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

Killinger, Mark H.; Benjamin, Eugene L.; McNair, Gary W.

2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

A Search for Additional Planets in Five of the Exoplanetary Systems Studied by the Nasa Epoxi Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present time series photometry and constraints on additional planets in five of the exoplanetary systems studied by the EPOCh (Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization) component of the NASA EPOXI mission: ...

Ballard, Sarah

429

Bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BFMB) Anion Based Ionic Liquid As an Additive for Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Propylene carbonate (PC) is a good solvent for lithium ion battery applications due to its low melting point and high dielectric constant. However, PC is easily intercalated into graphite causing it to exfoliate, killing its electrochemical performance. Here we report on the synthesis of a new ionic liquid electrolyte based on partially fluorinated borate anion, 1-butyl-1,2-dimethylimidazolium bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BDMIm.BFMB), which can be used as an additive in 1 M LiPF6/PC electrolyte to suppress graphite exfoliation and improve cycling performance. In addition, both PC and BDMIm.BFMB can be used synergistically as additive to 1.0M LiPF6/methyl isopropyl sulfone (MIPS) to dramatically improve its cycling performance. It is also found that the chemistry nature of the ionic liquids has dramatic effect on their role as additive in PC based electrolyte.

Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL] [ORNL; Liao, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Baggetto, Loic [ORNL] [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL] [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL] [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

standard mini-alkaline lysis protocol, such as the one recom-mended below. Additionally, two separate methods for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3100 Genetic Analyzer (Applied Biosystems) · Peltier Thermal Cycler System (PTC-200/PTC-225) (MJ chromosomal DNA. Additionally, BAC and fosmid-based constructs are only present as a single copy per cell

Steve Kemp

431

The Effect Of ZnO Addition On Co/C Catalyst For Vapor And Aqueous Phase Reforming Of Ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of ZnO addition on the oxidation behavior of Co along with catalytic performance in vapor and aqueous phase reforming of ethanol were investigated on Co supported on carbon black (XC-72R). Carbon was selected to minimize the support interactions. Effect of ZnO addition during both vapor and aqueous phase reforming were compared at 250 °C. ZnO addition inhibited the reduction of cobalt oxides by H2 and created surface sites for H2O activation. During vapor phase reforming at 450 °C the redox of cobalt, driven by steam oxidation and H2 reduction, trended to an equilibrium of Co0/Co2+. ZnO showed no significant effect on cobalt oxidation, inferred from the minor changes of C1 product yield. Surface sites created by ZnO addition enhanced water activation and oxidation of surface carbon species, increasing CO2 selectivity. At 250 °C cobalt reduction was minimal, in situ XANES demonstrated that ZnO addition significantly facilitated oxidation of Co0 under vapor phase reforming conditions, demonstrated by lower C1 product yield. Sites introduced by ZnO addition improved the COx selectivity at 250 °C. Both Co/C and Co-ZnO/C rapidly oxidized under aqueous phase reaction conditions at 250 °C, showing negligible activity in aqueous phase reforming. This work suggests that ZnO affects the activation of H2O for Co catalysts in ethanol reforming.

Davidson, Stephen; Sun, Junming; Hong, Yongchun; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Wang, Yong

2014-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

The effect of chemical additives on the synthesis of ethanol. Technical progress report 5, September 16, 1988--December 15, 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to elucidate the role of various chemical additives on ethanol synthesis over Rh- and Ni-based catalysts. Chemical additives used will include S, P, Ag, Cu, Mn, and Na. The effect of additives on the surface state of the catalysts, heat of adsorption of reactant molecules, reaction intermediates, reaction pathways, reaction kinetics, and product distributions is/will be investigated by a series of studies including temperature programmed desorption, infrared study of NO adsorption, reactive probing, steady state rate measurement, and transient kinetic study. A better understanding of the role of additive may allow us to use chemical additives to manipulate the catalytic properties of Rh- and Ni-based catalysts for producing high yields of ethanol from syngas. CO insertion is known to be a key step to the formation of acetaldehyde and ethanol from CO hydrogenation over Rh catalysts. Ethylene hydroformylation has often served as a probe to determine CO insertion capabilities of Rh catalysts. The mechanism of CO insertion in ethylene hydroformylation over Rh/SiO{sub 2} was investigated.

Chuang, S.S.C.

1989-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

433

One component metal sintering additive for {beta}-SiC based on thermodynamic calculation and experimental observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: . Standard Gibbs formation free energies vs. temperature for various metal carbides. The heavy line represents the standard Gibbs free energy for {beta}-SiC. The hatched area denotes the typical liquid phase hot pressing temperature of {beta}-SiC (1973-2123 K). Highlights: {yields} Various metal elements were examined as a sintering additive for {beta}-SiC. {yields} Al and Mg enhanced the density significantly without decomposing {beta}-SiC, as predicted by thermodynamic simulation. {yields} Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W additives formed metal carbide and/or silicide compounds by decomposing {beta}-SiC. {yields} This approach would be useful for selecting effective sintering additive for high temperature ceramics. -- Abstract: Various types of metals were examined as sintering additives for {beta}-SiC by considering the standard Gibbs formation free energy and vapor pressure under hot pressing conditions (1973-2123 K), particularly for applications in nuclear reactors. Metallic elements having the low long-term activation under neutron irradiation condition, such as Cr, Fe, Ta, Ti, V and W, as well as widely used elements, Al, Mg and B, were considered. The conclusions drawn from thermodynamic considerations were compared with the experimental observations. Al and Mg were found to be effective sintering additives, whereas the others were not due to the formation of metal carbides or silicides from the decomposition of SiC under hot pressing conditions.

Noviyanto, Alfian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dang-Hyok, E-mail: dhyoon@ynu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Influence of strontium addition on the mechanical properties of gravity cast Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of strontium (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1 wt%) addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the gravity cast Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy were investigated. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the main phases are ??Mg, ??Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} and Mg{sub 2}Sn in the Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy. With addition The tensile testing results showed that the yield and ultimate tensile strength and elongation of Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy increased by adding Sr up to 0.1 wt.% and then is gradually decreased with the addition of more alloying element.

Germen, Gül?ah, E-mail: gulsahgermen@hotmail.com; ?evik, Hüseyin, E-mail: gulsahgermen@hotmail.com [Mersin University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Mersin, 33343 (Turkey); Kurnaz, S. Can [Sakarya University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Adapazarý, 54187 (Turkey)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

435

Corrections and additions to the User's Guide for SNAP (NUREG/CR-1245, SAND80-0315). [BSTAT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains corrections and additions to the User's Guide for SNAP (NUREG/CR-1245, SAND80-0315). These update the SNAP report so that it documents the most current version of SNAP. An additional program, BATLE Statistics (BSTAT), is described here. It provides a post-processing capability to analyze engagement data from SNAP simulations. The work documented by this report was performed by Pritsker and Associates, Inc., under contract to Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and the US Naval Surface Weapons Center.

Polito, J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising. The process involves dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing the alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

Moens, L.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

Synthesis of an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid comprising: dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and an alkali metal diformylamide in an organic solvent selected from the group consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, tetrahydrofuran, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and methylformate or mixtures thereof to form a suspension of an alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate ester; and hydrolyzing said alkyl 5-(N,N-diformylamino) levulinate with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-amino levulinic acid.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

CHARTING BC'S ECONOMIC FUTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARTING BC'S ECONOMIC FUTURE discussionguide 100communityconversations #12;1 Thank you for agreeing to participate in this Community Conversation about BC's economic future. Each year Simon Fraser is "Charting BC's Economic Future". Faced with an increasingly competitive global economy, it is more important

Kavanagh, Karen L.

439

Master external pressure charts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a method to develop master external pressure charts from which individual external pressure charts for each material specification may be derived. The master external charts can represent a grouping of materials with similar chemical composition, similar stress-strain curves but produced to different strength levels. External pressure charts are used by various Sections of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel and Piping Codes to design various components such as cylinders, sphered, formed heads, tubes, piping, rings and other components, subjected to external pressure or axial compression loads. These charts are pseudo stress-strain curves for groups of materials with similar stress-strain shapes. The traditional approach was originally developed in the 1940`s and is a graphical approach where slopes to the strain curves are drawn graphically from which pseudo-strain levels are calculated. The new method presented in this paper develops mathematical relationships for the material stress-strain curves and the external pressure charts. The method has the ability to calculate stress-strain curves from existing external pressure charts. The relationships are a function of temperature, the modulus of elasticity, yield strength, and two empirical material constants. In this approach, conservative assumptions used to assign materials to lower bound external pressure charts can be removed. This increases the buckling strength capability of many materials in the Code, providing economic benefits while maintaining the margin of safety specified by the Code criteria. The method can also reduce the number of material charts needed in the Code and provides for the capability to extend the existing pressure charts to higher design temperatures. The new method is shown to contain a number of improvements over the traditional approach and is presently under consideration by appropriate ASME Code committees.

Michalopoulos, E. [Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co., CT (United States). Codes and Standards Dept.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Purchasing Compost Compost, the end product of a controlled decomposition of plant and animal wastes, makes an excellent addition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purchasing Compost Compost, the end product of a controlled decomposition of plant and animal wastes, makes an excellent addition to lawn or garden soil. Adding compost to your soil helps improve both its drainage and waterholding properties. Compost stores plant nutrients and prevents them from

New Hampshire, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Additional resonant contribution to the potential model for the 12C(alpha,gamma)16O reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The additional resonant contribution to the potential model is examined in $\\alpha$+$^{12}$C elastic scattering and the low-energy $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O reaction. The excitation function of elastic scattering below $E_{c.m.}= 5$ MeV seems to be reproduced by the potential model satisfactorily, and it is not profoundly disturbed by the additional resonances. The weak coupling is good enough to describe the $^{16}$O structure in the vicinity of the $\\alpha$-particle threshold, especially below $E_{c.m.}= 8$ MeV, corresponding to the excitation energy $E_x \\approx 15$ MeV. The additional resonances give the complement of the astrophysical $S$-factors from the simple potential model. The $S$-factor of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at $E_{c.m.}=300$ keV is dominated by the $E$2 transition, which is enhanced by the subthreshold 2$^+_1$ state at $E_x= 6.92$ MeV. The contribution from the subthreshold 1$^-_1$ state at $E_x= 7.12$ MeV is predicted to be small. The additional resonances do not give the large contribution to the thermonuclear reaction rates of $^{12}$C($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$O at helium burning temperatures.

M. Katsuma

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

The multi-dimensional additionality of innovation policies. A multi-level application to Italy and Spain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Spain. Alberto Marzucchi & Sandro Montresor October 2012 Preliminary ­ Do not quote without prior, at the national and regional level (multi-level). An empirical application is carried out for Italy and Spain, while they show output additionality in Spain only, where they are also able to spur innovative

Sussex, University of

443

Philosophy 225 In addition, majors must take at least one course from each of the following area lists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

224 Philosophy 225 In addition, majors must take at least one course from each of the following area lists: History: PHIL 301 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, PHIL 302 Modern Philosophy, PHIL 308 Continental Philosophy, PHIL 321 Kant and 19th Century Philosophy Core Analytic: PHIL 303 Theory of Knowledge

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

444

Effect of Crude Oil and Chemical Additives on Metabolic Activity of Mixed Microbial Populations in Fresh Marsh Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Crude Oil and Chemical Additives on Metabolic Activity of Mixed Microbial Populations remineralization rates. Crude oil, which is known to contain toxins and reduce microbial diversity organic matter (Panicum hemitomon Shult. or Sagittaria lancifolia L. dominated marshes), crude oil

Nyman, John

445

Title: Improving Jet Engine Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings via Reactive Element Addition to the Bond Coat Alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Improving Jet Engine Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings via Reactive Element Addition engine turbine blades can shield the temperature to which the underlying superalloy is exposed modifications that should inhibit the failure of these jet engine turbine thermal barrier coatings. Research

Carter, Emily A.

446

ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both ���µCSi and ���±Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products�¢���� electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

Ridgeway, R.G.; Hegedus, S.S.; Podraza, N.J.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Sequential addition of H2O, CH3OH, and NH3 to Al3O3 : A theoretical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Al3O3 H2O 2 - and Al3O3 CH3OH 2 - , that are produced by the addition of two water or methanol be approximated by collisions between AlxOy - clusters and molecules of water, methanol, and ammonia. Products the photoelectron spectra of anions formed with two but not one molecules of water and methanol resemble

Simons, Jack

448

First Ever STEREO Images of the Entire Sun These presentations give additional information on how STEREO's first ever  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEREO 360 1 First Ever STEREO Images of the Entire Sun These presentations give additional information on how STEREO's first ever views of the entire sun will advance the study of solar and space years the STEREO spacecrafts and SDO will be able to observe the entire 360 degrees of the Sun. Credit

Christian, Eric

449

Have a sustainability idea that needs some additional support? The Sustainability Advisory Committee invites students, faculty, and staff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Have a sustainability idea that needs some additional support? The Sustainability Advisory sustainability. The Committee will review project proposals and provide direct guidance and feedback to promising and departments to broaden collaboration and support. The Sustainability Advisory Committee recommends long- term

Engel, Jonathan

450

Asymmetric Aldol Additions: Use of Titanium Tetrachloride and (-)-Sparteine for the Soft Enolization of N-Acyl Oxazolidinones,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymmetric Aldol Additions: Use of Titanium Tetrachloride and (-)-Sparteine for the Soft tetrachloride and 2 equiv of (-)-sparteine as the base or 1 equiv of (-)-sparteine and 1 equiv of N-methyl-2 important and general methods for asymmetric carbon-carbon bond formation.1 The utility of the asymmetric

451

The energy market is diversifying. In addition to traditional power sources, decision makers can choose among solar, wind, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the steps of analyzing the energy outputs and economics of a solar, wind, or geothermal project. NREL power towers. SAM even calculates the value of saved energy from a domestic solar water heating systeminnovati n The energy market is diversifying. In addition to traditional power sources, decision

452

NYU Electronic Suite for eBilling + ePayment For additional information, visit the Electronic Suite section on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NYU Electronic Suite for eBilling + ePayment For additional information, visit the Electronic Suite of options. This will link you to the secure eSuite website. If parents want to make an electronic check-check payment, parents must be invited by the student, to create an eSuite account. NYU's Electronic Suite

Mohri, Mehryar

453

Tank Problems Here are some additional problems involving flow in and out of a container. These kinds of problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9­28­1998 Tank Problems Here are some additional problems involving flow in and out of a container­order linear equations for which you can find an integrating factor. Example. A tank contains 20 gallons of pure water. Water containing 2 pounds of dissolved yogurt per gallon enters the tank at 4 gallons per

Ikenaga, Bruce

454

The effect of pressure on tricalcium silicate hydration at different temperatures and in the presence of retarding additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydration of tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S) is accelerated by pressure. However, the extent to which temperature and/or cement additives modify this effect is largely unknown. Time-resolved synchrotron powder diffraction has been used to study cement hydration as a function of pressure at different temperatures in the absence of additives, and at selected temperatures in the presence of retarding agents. The magnitudes of the apparent activation volumes for C{sub 3}S hydration increased with the addition of the retarders sucrose, maltodextrin, aminotri(methylenephosphonic acid) and an AMPS copolymer. Pressure was found to retard the formation of Jaffeite relative to the degree of C{sub 3}S hydration in high temperature experiments. For one cement slurry studied without additives, the apparent activation volume for C{sub 3}S hydration remained close to {approx} -28 cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} over the range 25 to 60 C. For another slurry, there were possible signs of a decrease in magnitude at the lowest temperature examined.

Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Funkhouser, Gary P. (Halliburton); (GIT)

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

455

Review Problems 4-108 The cylinder conditions before the heat addition process is specified. The pressure after the heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes. Analysis (a) The first case is a constant volume process. When half of the gas is withdrawn from) The second case is a constant volume and constant mass process. The ideal gas relation for this case yields k4-60 Review Problems 4-108 The cylinder conditions before the heat addition process is specified

Bahrami, Majid

456

The newesT addiTion To The UniversiTy of MinnesoTa's BioMedical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The newesT addiTion To The UniversiTy of MinnesoTa's BioMedical discovery disTricT is designed The BUilding's collegial and physical relaTionship To neighBoring faciliTies in The U's BioMedical discovery in the U's Biomedical Discovery District. "The brick, precast concrete, and curtain wall vocabulary

Weiblen, George D

457

Enhancement of mercury capture by the simultaneous addition of hydrogen bromide (HBr) and fly ashes in a slipstream facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low halogen content in tested Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and low loss of ignition content (LOI) in PRB-derived fly ash were likely responsible for higher elemental mercury content (averaging about 75%) in the flue gas and also lower mercury capture efficiency by electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet-FGD. To develop a cost-effective approach to mercury capture in a full-scale coal-fired utility boiler burning PRB coal, experiments were conducted adding hydrogen bromide (HBr) or simultaneously adding HBr and selected fly ashes in a slipstream reactor (0.152 x 0.152 m) under real flue gas conditions. The residence time of the flue gas inside the reactor was about 1.4 s. The average temperature of the slipstream reactor was controlled at about 155{sup o}C. Tests were organized into two phases. In Phase 1, only HBr was added to the slipstream reactor, and in Phase 2, HBr and selected fly ash were added simultaneously. HBr injection was effective (>90%) for mercury oxidation at a low temperature (155{sup o}C) with an HBr addition concentration of about 4 ppm in the flue gas. Additionally, injected HBr enhanced mercury capture by PRB fly ash in the low-temperature range. The mercury capture efficiency, at testing conditions of the slipstream reactor, reached about 50% at an HBr injection concentration of 4 ppm in the flue gas. Compared to only the addition of HBr, simultaneously adding bituminous-derived fly ash in a minimum amount (30 lb/MMacf), together with HBr injection at 4 ppm, could increase mercury capture efficiency by 30%. Injection of lignite-derived fly ash at 30 lb/MMacf could achieve even higher mercury removal efficiency (an additional 35% mercury capture efficiency compared to HBR addition alone). 25 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Yan Cao; Quan-Hai Wang; Jun Li; Jen-Chieh Cheng; Chia-Chun Chan; Marten Cohron; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

Impact of titanium addition on film characteristics of HfO{sub 2} gate dielectrics deposited by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of 8-to 45-at. % Ti on physical and electrical characteristics of atomic-layer-deposited and annealed hafnium dioxide was studied using vacuum-ultraviolet spectroscopic ellipsometry, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray reflectometry. The role of Ti addition on the electrical performance is investigated using molybdenum (Mo)-gated capacitors. The film density decreases with increasing Ti addition. Ti addition stabilizes the amorphous phase of HfO{sub 2}, resulting in amorphous films as deposited. After a high-temperature annealing, the films transition from an amorphous to a polycrystalline phase. Orthorhombic Hf-Ti-O peaks are detected in polycrystalline films containing 33-at. % or higher Ti content. As Ti content is decreased, monoclinic HfO{sub 2} becomes the predominant microstructure. No TiSi is formed at the dielectric/Si interface, indicating films with good thermal stability. The band gap of Hf-Ti-O was found to be lower than that of HfO{sub 2}. Well-behaved capacitance-voltage and leakage current density-voltage characteristics were obtained for Hf-Ti-O. However, an increased leakage current density was observed with Ti addition. The data from capacitance-voltage stressing indicate a smaller flatband voltage (V{sub fb}) shift in the HfO{sub 2} films with low Ti content when compared with the HfO{sub 2} films. This indicates less charge trapping with a small amount of Ti addition.

Triyoso, D.H.; Hegde, R.I.; Zollner, S.; Ramon, M.E.; Kalpat, S.; Gregory, R.; Wang, X.-D.; Jiang, J.; Raymond, M.; Rai, R.; Werho, D.; Roan, D.; White, B.E. Jr.; Tobin, P.J. [Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Advanced Products Research and Development Laboratory, 3501 Ed Bluestein Boulevard, Austin, Texas 78721 (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

REGISTRATION & ADDITIONAL INFORMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Gravel Road Maintenance · Culvert and Storm Sewer Installation and Maintenance · Preventive Maintenance Maintenance and Preservation · Traffic Engineering Fundamentals · Work Zone Traffic Control Seminar · Design & Maintenance Considerations for Erosion Control on Low­Volume Roads · Traffic Signing and Control Spring

Minnesota, University of

460

Additional Web Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7. HEALTH. American Medical Association · American Heart Asspociation ... US Government Information · Administration on Aging · Health Care Financing ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Additive Manufacturing Technology Assessment  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

quantities with high unit costs. Due to these special characteristics, the A&D 165 industry is particularly suitable for an early adoption of AM 12, 13. For instance, Boeing...

462

Arrillaga Sports Center Addition,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stadium Main Quad Escondido VillageManzanita Park Graduate School of Business; Knight Management Center 530 Peterson (550) 610 570 560 CERAS Meyer Library School of Education Fire Truck Hse. Clock Tower

Bogyo, Matthew

463

SPECIALTY SANDWICHES ADDITIONS & SIDES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/2TURKEYclubWrap...599 bone-in CHICKEN WINGS ... 519 Buffalo or BBQ Style with Buttermilk Ranch Dipping Sauce, Parmesan Cheese, Roma Tomatoes, Romaine, Lemon Wheels and Home-Style Croutons, with Caesar Dressing spicy with Passion Fruit Dressing and Tropical Salsa MediterraneanGrilled VegetableSalad... 659 Grilled Asparagus

Mills, Allen P.

464

Microsoft Word - Additional links  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

www.sciencedirect.comsciencearticlepii0269749194900701 c. Peterson, M.J., J.G. Smith, G.R. Southworth, M.G. Ryon, and G.K. Eddlemon. Trace Element Contamination in Benthic...

465

Novel Electrolytes and Additives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Point of Reference - Electrode and Electrolyte Chemistries Gen 2 electrolyte EC:EMC (3:7 by wt.) + 1.2M LiPF 6 Cu (-) Al (+) Mag-10 graphite Particle size 5 m Celgard...

466

AdditiveManufacturing Sustainable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fabrication techniques (e.g., 3D printing) into viable platforms for the realization of end-use products · VIRGINIA TECH · www.ictas.vt.edu Above: printed result of a 3D print- er. Below: researcher Amy Elliott should contact the Office for Equity and Inclusion. Key Personnel Current Activities · 3D Printing

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

467

Additive Manufacturing Technology Assessment  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South ValleyASGovLtr.pdfAboutSheet, April 2014 | Department of

468

Novel Electrolytes and Additives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Objectives - Relevance Performance, calendar-life, and safety characteristics of Li-ion cells are dictated by the nature and stability of the electrolyte and the...

469

Characterization of the Kootenai River Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Community before and after Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2003-2006. [Chapter 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kootenai River ecosystem has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam, completed in 1972 on the river near Libby Montana. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel, eliminating nutrient production and habitat diversity crucial to the functioning of a large river-floodplain ecosystem. Libby Dam continues to create large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows, and greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches. These changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to this artificial loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the Kootenay Lake's North Arm in 1992, the South Arm in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes the macroinvertebrate community in the Kootenai River and its response to experimental nutrient addition during 2005 and 2006. This report also provides an initial evaluation of cascading trophic interactions in response to nutrient addition. Macroinvertebrates were sampled at 12 sites along a 325 km section of the Kootenai River, representing an upriver unimpounded reference reach, treatment and control canyon reach sites, and braided and meandering reach sites, all downstream from Libby Dam. Principle component analysis revealed that richness explained the greatest amount of variability in response to nutrient addition as did taxa from Acari, Coleoptera, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera. Analysis of variance revealed that nutrient addition had a significant effect (p<0.0001) on invertebrate abundance, biomass, and richness at sites KR-9 and KR-9.1 combined (the zone of maximum biological response). Richness, a valuable ecological metric, increased more than abundance and biomass, which were subject to greater sampling bias. Cascading trophic interactions were observed as increased algal accrual, increased in-river invertebrate abundance, and increased invertebrate counts in mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsonii) guts samples, but were not quantitatively tested. Sampling and analyses across trophic levels are currently ongoing and are expected to better characterize ecological responses to experimental nutrient addition in the Kootenai River.

Holderman, Charlie [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho Bonners

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

470

Plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive as an ecologically beneficial component for liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive for liquid motor fuels comprises an anaerobic fermentation vessel, a gasholder, a system for removal of sulphuretted hydrogen, and a hotwell. The plant further comprises an aerobic fermentation vessel, a device for liquid substance pumping, a device for liquid aeration with an oxygen-containing gas, a removal system of solid mass residue after fermentation, a gas distribution device; a device for heavy gases utilization; a device for ammonia adsorption by water; a liquid-gas mixer; a cavity mixer, a system that serves superficial active and dispersant matters and a cooler; all of these being connected to each other by pipelines. The technical result being the implementation of a process for producing an oxygen containing additive, which after being added to liquid motor fuels, provides an ecologically beneficial component for motor fuels by ensuring the stability of composition fuel properties during long-term storage.

Siryk, Yury Paul; Balytski, Ivan Peter; Korolyov, Volodymyr George; Klishyn, Olexiy Nick; Lnianiy, Vitaly Nick; Lyakh, Yury Alex; Rogulin, Victor Valery

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

471

Theoretical investigation of the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct current argon plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study the effect of hydrogen addition on the formation and properties of soliton in direct-current (DC) argon plasma is theoretically investigated. By coupling fluid equations with Poisons equation for such multi-component plasma, the Mach number and amplitude of the soliton are determined following pseudo potential method. Addition of hydrogen in argon discharge leads to the decrease of electron, Ar{sup +} ion density while a reverse trend was observed for ArH{sup +} and hydrogen like ions. It was found that presence of hydrogen like ions in argon plasma affects the formation of soliton with its amplitude significantly decreases as concentration of hydrogen increases. On the other hand, increase in ion to electron temperature ratios of the lighter ions in the discharge also has a significant influence on the amplitude and formation of soliton. The inverse relation between solitons width and amplitude is found to be consistent for the entire range of study.

Saikia, P., E-mail: partha.008@gmail.com; Goswami, K. S.; Saikia, B. K. [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup, Assam-782 402 (India)] [Centre of Plasma Physics, Institute for Plasma Research, Nazirakhat, Sonapur, Kamrup, Assam-782 402 (India)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Plant oils and mineral oils: effects as insecticide additives and direct toxicity to Heliothis virescens (F.) and Musca domestica L.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Ware et al. 1975, 1978, 1980, Bigley et al. 1981). In his analysis of the effects of toxaphene, camphene and cottonseed oil, Bigley et al. (1981) indicated that a number of nontoxic vegetable oils were as effective as toxaphene in increasing...PLANT OILS AND MINERAL OILS: EFFECTS AS INSECTICIDE ADDITIVES AND DIRECT TOXICITY TO HELIOTHIS VIRESCENS (F. ) AND MUSCA DOMESTICA L. A Thesis by GERMAIN OCHOU OCHOU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial...

Ochou, Germain Ochou

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Program Subject(S) required in Program tyPe addition to engliSh S ma mi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Subject(S) required in Program tyPe addition to engliSh S ma mi comPuter Science (bSc) Computer Science C x x x humanitieS (ba) Aboriginal Studies (J) x x x African Studies (J) x x x American Studies (J) x x x Celtic Studies x x x Christianity and Culture x x x Christianity and Education x Cinema

474

Use of pyrolyzed carbon black as an additive (part 3. Air-cooled furnace slag). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires, generated at the rate of over 242 million each year in the United States, are recognized as one of the most significant environmental problems. Most of these scrap tires have been disposed of in landfills, stockpiles, and illegal dumps (EPA 1991). There is a need to find more useful, environmentally friendly applications for these tires. Extensive researches have been conducted in the past years on the utilization of the scrap tires. The use of scrap tires for asphalt pavement, which is complicated by the complex behavior of asphalt, has received major attention. This research aims to describe the performance of mixtures of asphalt using pyrolyzed carbon black as an additive.

Lee, K.H.; Lovell, C.W.; Salgado, R.

1996-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

475

Exploring the Additive Benefit of Parental Nurturance Training on Parent and Child Shared Reading Outcomes: A Pilot Intervention Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Anita McCormick Jorge Gonzalez Erin McTigue Head of Department, Victor Willson August 2011 Major Subject: School Psychology iii ABSTRACT Exploring the Additive Benefit of Parental Nurturance Training on Parent and Child Shared Reading... and skills. A special thank you goes out to each one of my committee members: Anita McCormick, Jorge Gonzalez, and Erin McTigue. I was blessed to have a team of scholars whose knowledge and passions were so nicely aligned to this project. I am thankful...

Terry, Megan

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

476

Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixes derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

Poston, James A. (Star City, WV)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Manual for Implementation of the Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides detailed information for implementing the requirements of DOE O 142.2A, dated 12-15-06; the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in the United States; the Original Protocol to the Agreement; the Additional Protocol to the Agreement signed by the United States and the IAEA on June 12, 1998; and the Interagency Procedures for the Implementation of the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. No cancellation. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-27-13, cancels DOE M 142.2-1. Certified 12-3-14.

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

478

Manual for Implementation of the Voluntary Offer Safeguards Agreement and Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual provides detailed information for implementing the requirements of DOE O 142.2A, dated 12-15-06; the Agreement Between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for the Application of Safeguards in the United States; the Original Protocol to the Agreement; the Additional Protocol to the Agreement signed by the United States and the IAEA on June 12, 1998; and the Interagency Procedures for the Implementation of the U.S.-IAEA Safeguards Agreement. No cancellation. Admin Chg 1, 6-27-13

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

479

High-temperature ignition of propane with MTBE as an additive: Shock-tube experiments and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of propane has been studied in a shock tube and by computational modeling to determine the effect of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a fuel additive. MTBE and isobutene were added in amounts up to 25% of the fuel to propane-oxygen-argon mixtures in shock-tube experiments covering a range of temperatures between 1450 and 1800 K. Ignition delays were measured from chemiluminescence at 432 nm due to excited CH radicals. The temperature dependence of the ignition rates was analyzed to yield Arrhenius parameters of E{sub a}{approximately}40 kcal/mol and log (A){approximately} 9.0 sec{sup {minus}1} for the overall reaction. Reactions involving MTBE and its decomposition products were combined with an established propane mechanism in a numerical model to describe the kinetic interaction of this additive with a typical hydrocarbon fuel. The experiments and the kinetic model both show that MTBE and isobutene retard propane ignition with nearly equal efficiency. The kinetic model demonstrates that isobutene kinetics are responsible for inhibition by both MTBE and isobutene, and the specific elementary reactions which produce this behavior are identified.

Gray, J.A. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)); Westbrook, C.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

High-temperature ignition of propane with MTBE as an additive: Shock-tube experiments and modeling. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of propane has been studied in a shock tube and by computational modeling to determine the effect of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a fuel additive. MTBE and isobutene were added to amounts up to 25% of the fuel to propane-oxygen-argon mixtures to shock-tube experiments covering a range of temperatures between 1450 and 1800 K. Ignition delays were measured from chemiluminescence at 432 nm due to excited CH radicals. The temperature dependence of the ignition rates was analyzed to yield Arrhenium parameters of E{sub a}{sup {minus}}40 kcal/mol and log(A) {sup {minus}}9.0 sec{sup {minus}1} for the overall reaction. Reactions involving MTBE and its decomposition products were combined with an established propane mechanism in a numerical model to describe the kinetic interaction of this additive with a typical hydrocarbon fuel. The experiments and the kinetic model both show that MTBE and isobutene retard propane ignition with nearly equal efficiency. The kinetic model demonstrates that isobutene kinetics are responsible for inhibition by both MTBE and isobutene, and the specific elementary reactions which produce this behavior are identified. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Gray, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "additional charts additional" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

High-temperature ignition of propane with MTBE as an additive: Shock-tube experiments and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of propane has been studied in a shock tube and by computational modeling to determine the effect of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a fuel additive. MTBE and isobutene were added in amounts up to 25% of the fuel to propane-oxygen-argon mixtures in shock-tube experiments covering a range of temperatures between 1450 and 1800 K. Ignition delays were measured from chemiluminescence at 432 nm due to excited CH radicals. The temperature dependence of the ignition rates was analyzed to yield Arrhenius parameters of E{sub a}{approximately}40 kcal/mol and log (A){approximately} 9.0 sec{sup {minus}1} for the overall reaction. Reactions involving MTBE and its decomposition products were combined with an established propane mechanism in a numerical model to describe the kinetic interaction of this additive with a typical hydrocarbon fuel. The experiments and the kinetic model both show that MTBE and isobutene retard propane ignition with nearly equal efficiency. The kinetic model demonstrates that isobutene kinetics are responsible for inhibition by both MTBE and isobutene, and the specific elementary reactions which produce this behavior are identified.

Gray, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

482

High-temperature ignition of propane with MTBE as an additive: Shock-tube experiments and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition of propane has been studied in a shock tube and by computational modeling to determine the effect of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as a fuel additive. MTBE and isobutene were added to amounts up to 25% of the fuel to propane-oxygen-argon mixtures to shock-tube experiments covering a range of temperatures between 1450 and 1800 K. Ignition delays were measured from chemiluminescence at 432 nm due to excited CH radicals. The temperature dependence of the ignition rates was analyzed to yield Arrhenium parameters of E{sub a}{sup {minus}}40 kcal/mol and log(A) {sup {minus}}9.0 sec{sup {minus}1} for the overall reaction. Reactions involving MTBE and its decomposition products were combined with an established propane mechanism in a numerical model to describe the kinetic interaction of this additive with a typical hydrocarbon fuel. The experiments and the kinetic model both show that MTBE and isobutene retard propane ignition with nearly equal efficiency. The kinetic model demonstrates that isobutene kinetics are responsible for inhibition by both MTBE and isobutene, and the specific elementary reactions which produce this behavior are identified. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Gray, J.A. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)); Westbrook, C.K. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Large-scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-based Lubrication Additives for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was funded under the Department of Energy (DOE) Lab Call on Nanomanufacturing for Energy Efficiency and was directed toward the development of novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives for improving the friction and wear performance of machine components in a wide range of industrial and transportation applications. Argonne?s research team concentrated on the scientific and technical aspects of the project, using a range of state-of-the art analytical and tribological test facilities. Argonne has extensive past experience and expertise in working with boron-based solid and liquid lubrication additives, and has intellectual property ownership of several. There were two industrial collaborators in this project: Ashland Oil (represented by its Valvoline subsidiary) and Primet Precision Materials, Inc. (a leading nanomaterials company). There was also a sub-contract with the University of Arkansas. The major objectives of the project were to develop novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives and to optimize and verify their performance under boundary-lubricated sliding conditions. The project also tackled problems related to colloidal dispersion, larger-scale manufacturing and blending of nano-additives with base carrier oils. Other important issues dealt with in the project were determination of the optimum size and concentration of the particles and compatibility with various base fluids and/or additives. Boron-based particulate additives considered in this project included boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), boron oxide, and borax. As part of this project, we also explored a hybrid MoS{sub 2} + boric acid formulation approach for more effective lubrication and reported the results. The major motivation behind this work was to reduce energy losses related to friction and wear in a wide spectrum of mechanical systems and thereby reduce our dependence on imported oil. Growing concern over greenhouse gas emissions was also a major reason. The transportation sector alone consumes about 13 million barrels of crude oil per day (nearly 60% of which is imported) and is responsible for about 30% of the CO{sub 2} emission. When we consider manufacturing and other energy-intensive industrial processes, the amount of petroleum being consumed due to friction and wear reaches more than 20 million barrels per day (from official energy statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration). Frequent remanufacturing and/or replacement of worn parts due to friction-, wear-, and scuffing-related degradations also consume significant amounts of energy and give rise to additional CO{sub 2} emission. Overall, the total annual cost of friction- and wear-related energy and material losses is estimated to be rather significant (i.e., as much as 5% of the gross national products of highly industrialized nations). It is projected that more than half of the total friction- and wear-related energy losses can be recovered by developing and implementing advanced friction and wear control technologies. In transportation vehicles alone, 10% to 15% of the fuel energy is spent to overcome friction. If we can cut down the friction- and wear-related energy losses by half, then we can potentially save up to 1.5 million barrels of petroleum per day. Also, less friction and wear would mean less energy consumption as well as less carbon emissions and hazardous byproducts being generated and released to the environment. New and more robust anti-friction and -wear control technologies may thus have a significant positive impact on improving the efficiency and environmental cleanliness of the current legacy fleet and future transportation systems. Effective control of friction in other industrial sectors such as manufacturing, power generation, mining and oil exploration, and agricultural and earthmoving machinery may bring more energy savings. Therefore, this project was timely and responsive to the energy and environmental objectives of DOE and our nation. In this project, most of the boron-based mater

Erdemir, Ali [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

484

Atlas of Coordinate Charts on de Sitter Spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The de Sitter manifold admits a wide variety of interesting coordinatizations. The 'atlas' is a compilation of the coordinate charts referenced throughout the literature, and is presented in the form of tables, the starting point being the embedding in a higher-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. The metric tensor and the references where the coordinate frame is discussed or used in applications are noted. Additional information is given for the entries with significant use: a convenient tetrad and the form taken by the Killing vectors in the respective coordinate frame.

Gabriel Pascu

2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

485

Evaluation of a zirconium additive for the mitigation of molten ash formation during combustion of residual fuel oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Florida Power & Light Company (FP&L) currently fires a residual fuel oil (RFO) containing catalyst fines, which results in a troublesome black aluminosilicate liquid phase that forms on heat-transfer surfaces, remains molten, and flows to the bottom of the boiler. When the unit is shut down for a scheduled outage, this liquid phase freezes to a hard black glass that damages the contracting waterwalls of the boiler. Cleaning the boiler bottom and repairing damaged surfaces increase the boiler downtime, at a significant cost to FP&L. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) proposed to perform a series of tests for FP&L to evaluate the effectiveness of a zirconium additive to modify the mechanism that forms this liquid phase, resulting in the formation of a dry refractory phase that may be easily handled during cleanup of the boiler.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

EFFECTS OF QUARTZ PARTICLE SIZE AND SUCROSE ADDITION ON MELTING BEHAVIOR OF A MELTER FEED FOR HIGH-LEVEL GLASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 {micro}m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-{micro}m quartz particles; particles {ge}150 {micro}m formed clusters. Particles of 5 {micro}m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles {ge}150 {micro}m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles. Over 100 sites in the United States are currently tasked with the storage of nuclear waste. The largest is the Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State with 177 subterranean tanks containing over fifty-million gallons of nuclear waste from plutonium production from 1944 through 1987. This waste will be vitrified at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. In the vitrification process, feed is charged into a melter and converted into glass to be ultimately stored in a permanent repository. The duration of waste-site cleanups by the vitrification process depends on the rate of melting, i.e., on the rate of the feed-to-glass conversion. Foaming associated with the melting process and the rate of dissolution of quartz particles (silica being the major glass-forming additive) are assumed to be important factors that influence the rate of melting. Previous studies on foaming of high-alumina feed demonstrated that varying the makeup of a melter feed has a significant impact on foaming. The volume of feeds that contained 5-{micro}m quartz particles substantially increased because of foaming. The extent of foaming decreased as the particle size of quartz increased. Moreover, samples containing quartz particles 195 {micro}m formed agglomerates at temperatures above 900 C that only slowly dissolved in the melt. This study continues previous work on the feed-melting process, specifically on the effects of the size of silica particles on the formation of nuclear-waste glasses to determine a suitable range of silica particle sizes that causes neither excessive foaming nor undesirable agglomeration. Apart from varying the silica-particle size, carbon was added in the form of sucrose. Sucrose has been used to accelerate the rate of melting. In this study, we have observed its impact on feed foaming and quartz dissolution.

MARCIAL J; KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; SCHWEIGER MJ; SWEARINGEN KJ; TEGROTENHUIS WE; HENAGER SH

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

487

Photovoltaic properties and morphology of organic solar cells based on liquid-crystal semiconducting polymer with additive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk heterojunction organic solar cell based on liquid crystal semiconducting polymers of poly[9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-bithiophene] (F8T2) as p-type semiconductors and fullerenes (C{sub 60}) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as electron donor and acceptor has been fabricated and characterized for improving photovoltaic and optical properties. The photovoltaic performance including current voltage curves in the dark and illumination of the F8T2/C{sub 60} conventional and inverted bulk heterojunction solar cells were investigated. Relationship between the photovoltaic properties and morphological behavior was focused on tuning for optimization of photo-voltaic performance under annealing condition near glass transition temperature. Additive-effect of diiodooctane (DIO) and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) on the photovoltaic performance and optical properties was investigated. Mechanism of the photovoltaic properties of the conventional and inverted solar cells will be discussed by the experimental results.

Suzuki, Atsushi; Zushi, Masahito; Suzuki, Hisato; Ogahara, Shinichi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Oku, Takeo [Department of Materials Science, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka, Hikone, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan)

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

488

A dominant role of oxygen additive on cold atmospheric-pressure He + O{sub 2} plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present in this paper how oxygen additive impacts on the cold atmospheric-pressure helium plasmas by means of a one-dimensional fluid model. For the oxygen concentration [O{sub 2}]?>??0.1%, the influence of oxygen on the electron characteristics and the power dissipation becomes important, e.g., the electron density, the electron temperature in sheath, the electron-coupling power, and the sheath width decreasing by 1.6 to 16 folds with a two-log increase in [O{sub 2}] from 0.1% to 10%. Also the discharge mode evolves from the ? mode to the ? mode. The reactive oxygen species are found to peak in the narrow range of [O{sub 2}]?=?0.4%–0.9% in the plasmas, similar to their power-coupling values. This applies to their wall fluxes except for those of O* and O{sub 2}{sup ?}. These two species have very short lifetimes, thus only when generated in boundary layers within several micrometers next to the electrode can contribute to the fluxes. The dominant reactive oxygen species and the corresponding main reactions are schematically presented, and their relations are quantified for selected applications.

Yang, Aijun; Liu, Dingxin, E-mail: liudingxin@gmail.com, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Xiaohua, E-mail: liudingxin@gmail.com, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Centre for Plasma Biomedicine, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Kong, Michael G. [Centre for Plasma Biomedicine, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Frank Reidy Research Center for Bioelectrics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23508 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

Lessons Learned at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Entry into Force of the U.S. Additional Protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a number of years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been preparing for the entry into force of the U.S. Additional Protocol (AP). These preparations included attending training, participating in tabletop exercises, preparing draft declarations, developing INL-specific guidance documents, preparing for and hosting a mock complementary access visit, and preparing declarations for official submittal. All of these activities, the training materials, and software developed by other U.S. DOE national laboratories (PNNL, ORNL, LANL, and BNL) were very helpful in preparing for the entry into force of the AP. As with any endeavor of this size and complexity, however, there are always instances where even the best preparations and advanced planning do not anticipate every challenge. As the DOE's lead nuclear energy research and development facility, the INL faced many unique challenges. The majority of research conducted at the INL is nuclear fuel cycle related, most of which is not protected by the National Security Exclusion. This paper describes the lessons learned from the INL’s experience of preparing for the entry into force of the AP, specifically how translating and implementing general principles into actual activities proved to be one of many challenges, and provides general suggestions on how to respond effectively and efficiently to routine annual data calls and other AP requests.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Shauna A. Hoiland

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

PSU ARL Additive Manufacturing Capstone Project For the first time the PSU ARL, the IE480W CIMP-3D Group at Penn State showed that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PSU ARL Additive Manufacturing Capstone Project For the first time the PSU ARL, the IE480W CIMP-3D Processing by Direct Digital Deposition (CIMP-3D), is a program utilizing Additive Manufacturing (AM was to develop an understanding of how key operating parameters such as layer thickness, manufacturing

Demirel, Melik C.

491

Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

Ayala, Raul E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

A comparison of the additional protocols of the five nuclear weapon states and the ensuing safeguards benefits to international nonproliferation efforts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the 6 January 2009 entry into force of the Additional Protocol by the United States of America, all five declared Nuclear Weapon States that are part of the Nonproliferation Treaty have signed, ratified, and put into force the Additional Protocol. This paper makes a comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the five Additional Protocols in force by the five Nuclear Weapon States with respect to the benefits to international nonproliferation aims. This paper also documents the added safeguards burden to the five declared Nuclear Weapon States that these Additional Protocols put on the states with respect to access to their civilian nuclear programs and the hosting of complementary access activities as part of the Additional Protocol.

Uribe, Eva C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, M Analisa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Marisa N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leitch, Rosalyn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Microstructures and mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V welds with filler additions of tantalum and FS85  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many applications in the nuclear industry require that titanium alloys be welded to refractory metal alloys. Because of the widely dissimilar properties of these materials, the homogeneity of the fusion zone os of particular concern. To address this issue, a study was conducted to characterize the fusion zones of Ti-6Al-4V welds made with filler additions of tantalum and FS85 (Nb-28Wt%Ta-10wt%W-1wt%Zr). A goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of making microstructural predictions based on calculated fusion zone electron/atom (e/a) ratios. The welds were made by placing tantalum or FS85 shims between two pieces of 2.5 mm (0.1 in.) thick Ti-6Al-4V and making an electron beam weld along the length of the shim. With complete mixing, these shims were expected to produce fusion zone e/a ratios of 3.63{emdash}4.14 for the Ta series and 3.63{emdash}4.06 for the FS85 series, and microstructures consisting of {alpha}`, {alpha}`, and perhaps {omega}. The weld macro- and microstructures were characterized using optical and electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The mechanical properties of the welds were assessed using transverse and all-weld-metal tensile tests. The results showed a general increase in strength and decrease in ductility with increasing {beta} stabilizer level. As a result of this study, parameters were developed to increase the fusion zone size and increase mixing of the components. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC04-76DR00789, and at Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

Damkroger, B.K.; Dixon, R.D.; Cotton, J.D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Additional Reserve Recovery Using New Polymer Treatment on High Water Oil Ratio Wells in Alameda Field, Kingman County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Flooding process, like a polymer treatment, as a tertiary (enhanced) oil recovery process can be a very good solution based on the condition of this field and its low cost compared to the drilling of new wells. It is an improved water flooding method in which high molecular-weight (macro-size molecules) and water-soluble polymers are added to the injection water to improve the mobility ratio by enhancing the viscosity of the water and by reducing permeability in invaded zones during the process. In other words, it can improve the sweep efficiency by reducing the water mobility. This polymer treatment can be performed on the same active oil producer well rather than on an injector well in the existence of strong water drive in the formation. Some parameters must be considered before any polymer job is performed such as: formation temperature, permeability, oil gravity and viscosity, location and formation thickness of the well, amount of remaining recoverable oil, fluid levels, well productivity, water oil ratio (WOR) and existence of water drive. This improved oil recovery technique has been used widely and has significant potential to extend reservoir life by increasing the oil production and decreasing the water cut. This new technology has the greatest potential in reservoirs that are moderately heterogeneous, contain moderately viscous oils, and have adverse water-oil mobility ratios. For example, many wells in Kansas's Arbuckle formation had similar treatments and we have seen very effective results. In addition, there were previous polymer treatments conducted by Texaco in Alameda Field on a number of wells throughout the Viola-Simpson formation in the early 70's. Most of the treatments proved to be very successful.

James Spillane

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Reference Alloy Waste Form Fabrication and Initiation of Reducing Atmosphere and Reductive Additives Study on Alloy Waste Form Fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the fabrication of two reference alloy waste forms, RAW-1(Re) and RAW-(Tc) using an optimized loading and heating method. The composition of the alloy materials was based on a generalized formulation to process various proposed feed streams resulting from the processing of used fuel. Waste elements are introduced into molten steel during alloy fabrication and, upon solidification, become incorporated into durable iron-based intermetallic phases of the alloy waste form. The first alloy ingot contained surrogate (non-radioactive), transition-metal fission products with rhenium acting as a surrogate for technetium. The second alloy ingot contained the same components as the first ingot, but included radioactive Tc-99 instead of rhenium. Understanding technetium behavior in the waste form is of particular importance due the longevity of Tc-99 and its mobility in the biosphere in the oxide form. RAW-1(Re) and RAW-1(Tc) are currently being used as test specimens in the comprehensive testing program investigating the corrosion and radionuclide release mechanisms of the representative alloy waste form. Also described in this report is the experimental plan to study the effects of reducing atmospheres and reducing additives to the alloy material during fabrication in an attempt to maximize the oxide content of waste streams that can be accommodated in the alloy waste form. Activities described in the experimental plan will be performed in FY12. The first aspect of the experimental plan is to study oxide formation on the alloy by introducing O2 impurities in the melt cover gas or from added oxide impurities in the feed materials. Reducing atmospheres will then be introduced to the melt cover gas in an attempt to minimize oxide formation during alloy fabrication. The second phase of the experimental plan is to investigate melting parameters associated with alloy fabrication to allow the separation of slag and alloy components of the melt.

S.M. Frank; T.P. O'Holleran; P.A. Hahn

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_001b.htm06/07/2004 13:02:41 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Income 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_001d.htm06/07/2004 13:02:52 #12;5 Year

498

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0029.htm06/07/2004 13:01:23 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Income 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_002d.htm06/07/2004 13:01:34 #12;5 Year

499

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities & Reserves http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_0067.htm06/07/2004 13 Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_006b.htm06/07/2004 13:04:46 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - Assets 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Assets Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18

500

5 Year Financial Profile -Charts 5 Year Financial Profile Charts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Income Expenditure Assets Liabilities Income Breakdown Expenditure Breakdown http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18 Charts Income Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_005b.htm06/07/2004 13:00:29 #12;5 Year Financial Profile - Charts - zoom 5 Year Financial Profile Charts Expenditure Back http://www.fin.mmu.ac.uk/f18_005c.htm06