Sample records for addition future developments

  1. International Development Studies Additional Requirement Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Development Studies Additional Requirement Form The IDS additional program email. You may find additional scheduled possibilities by looking at the International Programs

  2. Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program...

  3. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  4. Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Component R&D within the ABR Program, 2009 thru 2013 Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  5. Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    characteristics of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure sufficient...

  6. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure...

  7. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse High Voltage Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries...

  8. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Cell Comp't Thermal Reactivity & Improvements Develop & Evaluate...

  9. ORNL, CINCINNATI partner to develop commercial large-scale additive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory 865-574-7308 ORNL, CINCINNATI partner to develop commercial large-scale additive manufacturing system (From left) David Danielson, the Energy Department's...

  10. NNSA Awards Additional Support to Accelerate the Development...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Additional Support to Accelerate the Development of Domestic Mo-99 in the U.S. without the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook...

  11. Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in Europe - Euro 5 for LDV, amendment of EURO 5 for HDV Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission...

  12. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 Emissions Reduction from Energy Displaced by Additional Solar Water Heaters (Mt CO2) LPG Natural Gas Electricity

  13. ENGINEERING SYSTEMS THE FUTURE OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS: DEVELOPMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    ENGINEERING SYSTEMS MONOGRAPH THE FUTURE OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS: DEVELOPMENT OF ENGINEERING LEADERS OF ENGINEERING SYSTEMS: DEVELOPMENT OF ENGINEERING LEADERS Daniel Hastings INTRODUCTION From birth through death, inhabitants of developed societies live supported in a complex, interconnected set of overlapping systems

  14. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to promoting energy efficiency, China has actively pursued alternative energy development as a strategy to reduce its energy demand and carbon emissions. One area of particular focus has been to raise the share of alternative energy in China’s rapidly growing electricity generation with a 2020 target of 15% share of total primary energy. Over the last ten years, China has established several major renewable energy regulations along with programs and subsidies to encourage the growth of non-fossil alternative energy including solar, wind, nuclear, hydro, geothermal and biomass power as well as biofuels and coal alternatives. This study thus seeks to examine China’s alternative energy in terms of what has and will continue to drive alternative energy development in China as well as analyze in depth the growth potential and challenges facing each specific technology. This study found that despite recent policies enabling extraordinary capacity and investment growth, alternative energy technologies face constraints and barriers to growth. For relatively new technologies that have not achieved commercialization such as concentrated solar thermal, geothermal and biomass power, China faces technological limitations to expanding the scale of installed capacity. While some alternative technologies such as hydropower and coal alternatives have been slowed by uneven and often changing market and policy support, others such as wind and solar PV have encountered physical and institutional barriers to grid integration. Lastly, all alternative energy technologies face constraints in human resources and raw material resources including land and water, with some facing supply limitations in critical elements such as uranium for nuclear, neodymium for wind and rare earth metals for advanced solar PV. In light of China’s potential for and barriers to growth, the resource and energy requirement for alternative energy technologies were modeled and scenario analysis used to evaluate the energy and emission impact of two pathways of alternative energy development. The results show that China can only meets its 2015 and 2020 targets for non-fossil penetration if it successfully achieves all of its capacity targets for 2020 with continued expansion through 2030. To achieve this level of alternative generation, significant amounts of raw materials including 235 Mt of concrete, 54 Mt of steel, 5 Mt of copper along with 3 billion tons of water and 64 thousand square kilometers of land are needed. China’s alternative energy supply will likely have relatively high average energy output to fossil fuel input ratio of 42 declining to 26 over time, but this ratio is largely skewed by nuclear and hydropower capacity. With successful alternative energy development, 32% of China’s electricity and 21% of its total primary energy will be supplied by alternative energy by 2030. Compared to the counterfactual baseline in which alternative energy development stumbles and China does not meet its capacity targets until 2030, alternative energy development can displace 175 Mtce of coal inputs per year and 2080 Mtce cumulatively from power generation by 2030. In carbon terms, this translates into 5520 Mt of displaced CO{sub 2} emissions over the twenty year period, with more than half coming from expanded nuclear and wind power generation. These results illustrate the critical role that alternative energy development can play alongside energy efficiency in reducing China’s energy-related carbon emissions.

  15. The pipeline and future of drug development in schizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, J A; Roth, B L

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pipeline and Future of Drug Development in SchizophreniaThe Drug Discovery Pipeline in Schizophrenia Keywords:discuss the current pipeline of drugs for schizophrenia,

  16. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    development and transmission planning between the State Council, State Electricity Regulatory Council, grid companies, renewable energy developers and local

  17. Developing biotechnology company's future positioning strategy in prefilled syringe market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joonhaeng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal for the thesis is to develop a recommendation for Amgen's future prefilled syringe strategy related to its drug process development, supplier relationship management plan, supply and sourcing, and procurement. ...

  18. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of biomass co-firing in Europe. ” Biomass andprimarily in Europe. China have also developed small biomass

  19. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable energy such as solar and wind, policy support forWind Energy Development In spite of the recent boom of China’s wind industry following various supporting policiesWind Energy Development . 27 3.5.1 Grid Connection and Integration Challenges .. 28 3.5.2 Technical Challenges to Wind Development 28 3.5.3 Policy

  20. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outer Continental Shelf Alternative Energy and Alternate Usealternative non-fossil and alternative energy technologiesbe effectively addressed and alternative energy development

  1. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    clean energy capacity with unprecedented investment in gridclean energy development. However, despite recent policies that have enabled extraordinary capacity and investment

  2. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    32 Table 13. Total Resource Requirements for Hydropower23 Figure 12. China's Hydropower Installed Capacity, 1980-and costs of China’s hydropower: Development or slowdown? ”

  3. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Alternative Energy Technology . 75Figure 25. Range in Alternative Energy EROEIs in Existingof Energy Output for Alternative Energy Development, 2010-

  4. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    companies are also working on developing larger commercial solarCompany. Yuan, Xueliang, Jian Zuo and Chunyuan Ma, 2011, “Social acceptance of solar

  5. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The benefits and costs of China’s hydropower: Development orpower in China: A case study of nonrenewable energy cost andCost of rapeseed-based biodiesel as alternative energy in China. ”

  6. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    application of additive manufacturing in China’s aviationAnalysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats,an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

  7. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examine the application of additive manufacturing in China’sBulletin Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China:an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry is

  8. Future NTP Development Synergy Leveraged from Current J-2X Engine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, Richard O. [Liquid Engine and Main Propulsion Systems Branch, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a discussion of how the many long-lead development elements required for the realization of a future nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system can be effectively leveraged from the ongoing work being conducted on the J-2X engine program for the Constellation Program. Development studies conducted to date for NTP forward planning have identified a number of technical areas that will require advancement to acceptable technology readiness levels (TRLs) before they can be utilized in NTP system development. These include high-temperature, high-area ratio nozzle extension; long-life, low-NPSP turbomachinery; and low-boiloff propellant management, and a qualified nuclear fuel element. The current J-2X program is working many of these areas that can be leveraged to support NTP development in a highly compatible and synergistic fashion. In addition to supporting technical development, there are other programmatic issues being worked in the J-2X program that can be leveraged by a future NTP development program. These include compliance with recently-evolved space system requirements such as human-rating, fault tolerance and fracture control. These and other similar mandatory system requirements have been adopted by NASA and can result in a significant technical impact beyond elevation of the root technologies required by NTP. Finally, the exploitation of experience, methodologies, and procedures developed by the J-2X program in the areas of verification, qualification, certification, altitude simulation testing, and facility definition will be especially applicable to a future NTP system. The similarities in system mission (in-space propulsion) and operational environment (vacuum, zero-gee) between J-2X and NTP make this highly synergistic. Thus, it can be shown that the collective benefit of leveraging experience and technologies developed during the J-2X program can result in significant savings in development cost and schedule for NTP.

  9. Software-Based Challenges of Developing the Future Distribution Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila; McParland, Charles

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The software that the utility industry currently uses may be insufficient to analyze the distribution grid as it rapidly modernizes to include active resources such as distributed generation, switch and voltage control, automation, and increasingly complex loads. Although planners and operators have traditionally viewed the distribution grid as a passive load, utilities and consultants increasingly need enhanced analysis that incorporates active distribution grid loads in order to ensure grid reliability. Numerous commercial and open-source tools are available for analyzing distribution grid systems. These tools vary in complexity from providing basic load-flow and capacity analysis under steady-state conditions to time-series analysis and even geographical representations of dynamic and transient events. The need for each type of analysis is not well understood in the industry, nor are the reasons that distribution analysis requires different techniques and tools both from those now available and from those used for transmission analysis. In addition, there is limited understanding of basic capability of the tools and how they should be practically applied to the evolving distribution system. The study reviews the features and state of the art capability of current tools, including usability and visualization, basic analysis functionality, advanced analysis including inverters, and renewable generation and load modeling. We also discuss the need for each type of distribution grid system analysis. In addition to reviewing basic functionality current models, we discuss dynamics and transient simulation in detail and draw conclusions about existing software?s ability to address the needs of the future distribution grid as well as the barriers to modernization of the distribution grid that are posed by the current state of software and model development. Among our conclusions are that accuracy, data transfer, and data processing abilities are key to future distribution grid modeling, and measured data sources are a key missing element . Modeling tools need to be calibrated based on measured grid data to validate their output in varied conditions such as high renewables penetration and rapidly changing topology. In addition, establishing a standardized data modeling format would enable users to transfer data among tools to take advantage of different analysis features. ?

  10. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wang Huaming Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) Huanglaser metal deposition (LMD), a type of additive manufacturing,Manufacturing Center) http://mat.hust.edu.cn:8080/3d/ Wuhan Yu Shengshi Selective laser

  11. Developments in Assisting Countries in Implementing the IAEA Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Hansen, Linda H.; Cain, Ronald A.; Kovacic, Don N.; Apt, Kenneth E.; VanSickle, Matthew

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began assisting selected non-nuclear weapon states in planning and preparing for implementation of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Additional Protocol (AP). Since then, the AP international implementation program has contributed to the substantial progress made by Vietnam, Thailand, Iraq, and Malaysia in preparing for entry-into-force of the AP. An overall engagement plan has been developed with components designed to train government AP implementing agencies, inform policy makers, conduct outreach to industry and universities, make AP reporting software available and useful, and plan a detailed approach for implementing the declaration and complementary access provisions of the AP. DOE recently began collaborating with Indonesia, which has already entered the AP into force, requiring a second method of engagement somewhat different from that taken with countries that have not entered the AP into force. The AP international implementation program, administered by the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program, is working more closely with DOE’s International Nonproliferation Export Control Program to ensure countries are aware of and prepared to implement the export/import provisions of the AP. As the AP implementation program matures and helps move countries closer to entry-into-force or improved AP implementation, it is identifying characteristics of a country’s “end-state” that indicate that DOE assistance is no longer required. The U.S. AP Implementation Act and Senate Resolution of Ratification require the Administration to report annually to Congress on measures taken to achieve the adoption of the AP in non-nuclear weapon states. DOE’s AP international implementation program is a significant part of these measures. This paper describes recent developments to increase the scope and effectiveness of the program.

  12. Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    Modeling Climate Change Adaptation: Challenges, Recent Developments and Future Directions Karen of modeling practice in the field of integrated assessment of climate change and ways forward. Past efforts assessments of climate change have concentrated on developing baseline emissions scenarios and analyzing

  13. State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine Technologies State of the Art and Future Developments In Natural Gas Engine Technologies 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Cummins...

  14. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure...

  15. Section III, Division 5 - Development and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. K. Morton; R I Jetter; James E Nestell; T. D. Burchell; T L (Sam) Sham

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development. Portions of this paper were based on Chapter 17 of the Companion Guide to the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, Fourth Edition, © ASME, 2012, Reference.

  16. DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF COATINGS FOR FUTURE POWER GENERATION TURBINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, Maryanne; Klotz, K.; McMordie, B.; Gleeson, B.; Zhu, D.; Warnes, B.; Kang, B.; Tannenbaum, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NETL-Regional University Alliance (RUA) continues to advance technology development critical to turbine manufacturer efforts for achieving DOE Fossil Energy (FE's) Advanced Turbine Program Goals. In conjunction with NETL, Coatings for Industry (CFI), the University of Pittsburgh, NASA GRC, and Corrosion Control Inc., efforts have been focused on development of composite thermal barrier coating (TBC) architectures that consist of an extreme temperature coating, a commercially applied 7-8 YSZ TBC, a reduced cost bond coat, and a diffusion barrier coating that are applied to nickel-based superalloys or single crystal airfoil substrate materials for use at temperatures >1450 C (> 2640 F). Additionally, construction of a unique, high temperature ({approx}1100 C; {approx}2010 F), bench-scale, micro-indentation, nondestructive (NDE) test facility at West Virginia University (WVU) was completed to experimentally address in-situ changes in TBC stiffness during extended cyclic oxidation exposure of coated single crystal coupons in air or steam containing environments. The efforts and technical accomplishments in these areas are presented in the following sections of this paper.

  17. Transportation Electrification Load Development For a Renewable Future Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, Tony; Mai, Trieu; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrification of the transportation sector offers the opportunity to significantly reduce petroleum consumption. The transportation sector accounts for 70% of US petroleum consumption. The transition to electricity as a transportation fuel will create a new load for electricity generation. In support of a recent US Department of Energy funded activity that analyzed a future generation scenario with high renewable energy technology contributions, a set of regional hourly load profiles for electrified vehicles were developed for the 2010 to 2050 timeframe. These load profiles with their underlying assumptions will be presented in this paper. The transportation electrical energy was determined using regional population forecast data, historical vehicle per capita data, and market penetration growth functions to determine the number of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in each analysis region. Two market saturation scenarios of 30% of sales and 50% of sales of PEVs consuming on average {approx}6 kWh per day were considered. Results were generated for 3109 counties and were consolidated to 134 Power Control Areas (PCA) for the use NREL's's regional generation planning analysis tool ReEDS. PEV aggregate load profiles from previous work were combined with vehicle population data to generate hourly loads on a regional basis. A transition from consumer-controlled charging toward utility-controlled charging was assumed such that by 2050 approximately 45% of the transportation energy demands could be delivered across 4 daily time slices under optimal control from the utility perspective. No other literature has addressed the potential flexibility in energy delivery to electric vehicles in connection with a regional power generation study. This electrified transportation analysis resulted in an estimate for both the flexible load and fixed load shapes on a regional basis that may evolve under two PEV market penetration scenarios. EVS25 Copyright.

  18. FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT SECTION 12 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 12-1 September 13, 1995 to Columbia River Basin fish and wildlife by hydropower development and operations in the past. But the future drainage basins that contain important anadromous fish habitat. However, most new hydroelectric development

  19. Recovery of uranium from seawater-status of technology and needed future research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelmers, A. D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey of recent publications concerning uranium recovery from seawater shows that considerable experimental work in this area is currently under way in Japan, less in European countries. Repeated screening programs have identified hydrous titanium oxide as the most promising candidate adsorbent; however, many of its properties, such as distribution coefficient, selectivity, loading, and possibly stability, appear to fall far short of those required for a practical recovery system. In addition, various evaluations of the energy efficiency of pumped or tidal power schemes for contacting the sorbent and seawater are in serious disagreement. Needed future research and development tasks have been identified. A fundamental development program to achieve significantly improved adsorbent properties would be required to permit economical recovery of uranium from seawater. Unresolved engineering aspects of such recovery systems are also identified and discussed. 63 references.

  20. Developing Louisiana's Forest Products Industry: Adding Value for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a manufacturingThe increased value at each stage of a manufacturing assembly processassembly process Those and necessaryimportant and necessary Addition of net economic valueAddition of net economic value Value can be added through manufacturing orValue can be added through manufacturing or marketingmarketing Why Add Value

  1. Better Buildings Case Competition Helps Develop Future Clean Energy Leaders

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher|for Consumers anymore | Department|

  2. Health physics innovations developed during Cassini for future space applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickell, Rod [Health Physics Office (United States); Rutherford, Theresa [Health Physics Office, BOC-022, Kennedy Space Center, Florida 32899 (United States); Marmaro, George [NASA Radiation Protection Officer, JJ-C, Kennedy Space Center, Florida 32899 (United States)

    1999-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a long history of space missions involving Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) devices starting with the Transit 4A Spacecraft (1961), on through the Apollo, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Mars Pathfinder, and most recently, Cassini (1997). All of these Major Radiological Source (MRS) missions were processed at the Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Station (KSC/CCAS) Launch Site in full compliance with program and regulatory requirements. The cumulative experience gained supporting these past missions has led to significant innovations which will be useful for bench-marking future MRS ground processing.

  3. Environmental screening of future gasoline additives : computational tools to estimate chemical partitioning and forecast widespread groundwater contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arey, J. Samuel (Jeremy Samuel), 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) application of Raoult's law for the same set of systems. An approach was developed which relates the empirical LSER solute polarity parameter, pi2Ĥ, to two more fundamental quantities: a polarizability term and a ...

  4. Local alternative energy futures: developing economies/building communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Totten, M.; Glass, B.; Freedberg, M.; Webb, L.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the three parts of the conference. A sufficient range of information is presented to enable interested parties to explore the viable alternatives for community self-sufficiency. The parts are entitled: Financial Incentives and Funding Sources; Standards, Regulations, Mandates, Ordinances, Covenants; and Community/Economic Development. (MCW)

  5. Advances and future needs in particle production and transport code developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of accelerators and ever expanding needs of existing accelerators demand new developments and additions to Monte-Carlo codes, with an emphasis on enhanced modeling of elementary particle and heavy-ion interactions and transport. Challenges arise from extremely high beam energies and beam power, increasing complexity of accelerators and experimental setups, as well as design, engineering and performance constraints. All these put unprecedented requirements on the accuracy of particle production predictions, the capability and reliability of the codes used in planning new accelerator facilities and experiments, the design of machine, target and collimation systems, detectors and radiation shielding and minimization of their impact on environment. Recent advances in widely-used general-purpose all-particle codes are described for the most critical modules such as particle production event generators, elementary particle and heavy ion transport in an energy range which spans up to 17 decades, nuclide inventory and macroscopic impact on materials, and dealing with complex geometry of accelerator and detector structures. Future requirements for developing physics models and Monte-Carlo codes are discussed.

  6. Transportation Electrification Load Development For A Renewable Future Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, T.; Mai, T.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition to electricity as a transportation fuel will create a new load for electricity generation. A set of regional hourly load profiles for electrified vehicles was developed for the 2010 to 2050 timeframe. The transportation electrical energy was determined using regional population forecast data, historical vehicle per capita data, and market penetration growth functions to determine the number of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in each analysis region. Market saturation scenarios of 30% and 50% of sales of PEVs consuming on average approx. 6 kWh per day were considered. PEV aggregate load profiles from previous work were combined with vehicle population data to generate hourly loads on a regional basis. A transition from consumer-controlled charging toward utility-controlled charging was assumed such that by 2050 approximately 45% of the transportation energy demands could be delivered across four daily time slices under optimal control from the utility?s perspective. This electrified transportation analysis resulted in an estimate for both the flexible load and fixed load shapes on a regional basis that may evolve under two PEV market penetration scenarios.

  7. Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camillo A. DiNunzio Framatome ANP DE& S; Dr. Abhinav Gupta Assistant Professor NCSU; Dr. Michael Golay Professor MIT Dr. Vincent Luk Sandia National Laboratories; Rich Turk Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems; Charles Morrow, Sandia National Laboratories; Geum-Taek Jin, Korea Power Engineering Company Inc.

    2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

  8. Future challenges and DOE/NNSA-JAEA cooperation for the development of advanced safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, Rebecca S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Clelland - Kerr, John [NNSA-NA-242; Senzaki, Masao [JAEA; Hori, Masato [JAEA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has been cooperating with Japan on nuclear safeguards for over thirty years. DOE/NNSA has collaborated with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and its predecessors in addressing the need for innovative solutions to nuclear transparency and verification issues in one of the world's most advanced nuclear fuel cycle states. This collaboration includes over ninety activities that have involved nearly every facility in the JAEA complex and many national laboratories in the U.S. complex. The partnership has yielded new technologies and approaches that have benefited international safeguards not only in Japan, but around the world. The International Atomic Energy Agency uses a number of safeguards solutions developed under this collaboration to improve its inspection efforts in Japan and elsewhere. Japanese facilities serve as test beds for emerging safeguards technologies and are setting the trend for new nuclear energy and fuel cycle development worldwide. The collaboration continues to be an essential component of U.S. safeguards outreach and is integral to the DOE/NNSA's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative. In addition to fostering international safeguards development, the cooperation is an opportunity for U.S. scientists to work in facilities that have no analog in the United States, thus providing crucial real-life experience for and aiding development of the next generation of U.S. safeguards specialists. It is also an important element of promoting regional transparency thereby building confidence in the peaceful nature of nuclear programs in the region. The successes engendered by this partnership provide a strong basis for addressing future safeguards challenges, in Japan and elsewhere. This paper summarizes these challenges and the associated cooperative efforts that are either underway or anticipated.

  9. The consequences of helium production and nickel additions on microstructure development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to 7.5 dpa at 300 and 400 C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400 C than at 300 C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and natural nickel. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400 C. At 300 C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400 C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  10. Engineering Change Towards a sustainable future in the developing world The Royal Academy of Engineering 73

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    the goals of sustainable development. The human species is living an unsustainable existence. The scientificEngineering Change Towards a sustainable future in the developing world The Royal Academy to grow from 6 billion today to 9 billion by 2050, and living standards are predicted to increase

  11. Invited Feature History and scenarios of future development of Baltic Sea eutrophication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dippner, Joachim W.

    Invited Feature History and scenarios of future development of Baltic Sea eutrophication Maren Voss: eutrophication climatic changes land use models catchment area Baltic Sea a b s t r a c t Nutrient loads from watersheds, atmospheric deposition, and cyanobacterial nitrogen fixation have led to eutrophication

  12. Goal Practice & Experience: Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy Development in China

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3D—Fostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy Development in China Huiyong Zhuang, Research Professor, National Energy Research Center of Liquid Biofuel, National Bio Energy Co., Ltd.

  13. National Policy of Future Nuclear Fusion Research and Development (Tentative Translation)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Policy of Future Nuclear Fusion Research and Development (Tentative Translation) 26 October 2005 Atomic Energy Commission Advisory Committee on Nuclear Fusion #12;2 Contents Preface Chapter and Environmental Problems 1.2 Significance and Necessity of Fusion R&D in Nuclear Energy Policy Chapter 2 Status

  14. FUTURES OF AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY AND CHALLENGES ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND MOBILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    FUTURES OF AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY AND CHALLENGES ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND MOBILITY BRANDÃ?O MONIZ for the next 10 to 20 years. But this exercise can not be focus only on the technical aspects of the automobile of the automobile industry, on the steps that should be taken and on the visions about technological needs

  15. Anomalous light-by-light scattering at the LHC: recent developments and future perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fichet, Sylvain

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The installation of forward proton detectors at the LHC will provide the possibility to perform new high-precision measurements, opening a novel window on physics beyond the Standard Model. We review recent simulations and theoretical developments about the measurement of anomalous light-by-light scattering. The search for this process is expected to provide bounds on a wide range of new particles. Future perspectives for precision QED at the LHC are also briefly discussed.

  16. Plasma-Material Interface Development for Future Spherical Tokamak-based Devices in NSTX.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    et. al, V

    2011-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The divertor plasma-material interface (PMI) must be able to withstand steady-state heat fluxes up to 10 MW/m{sup 2} (a limit imposed by the present day divertor material and engineering constraints) with minimal material erosion, as well as to provide impurity control and ion density pumping capabilities. In spherical tokamaks (STs), the compact divertor geometry and the requirement of low core electron collisionality n*{sub e} at n{sub e} < 0.5-0.7 n{sub G} (where n{sub G} is the Greenwald density) for increased neutral beam current drive efficiency impose much greater demands on divertor and first-wall particle and heat flux mitigation solutions. In NSTX, divertor heat flux mitigation and impurity control with an innovative 'snowflake' divertor configuration and ion density pumping by evaporated lithium wall and divertor coatings are studied. Lithium coatings have enabled ion density reduction up to 50% in NSTX through the reduction of wall and divertor recycling rates. The 'snowflake' divertor configuration was obtained in NSTX in 0.8-1 MA 4-6 MW NBI-heated H-mode lithium-assisted discharges using three divertor coils. The snowflake divertor formation was always accompanied by a partial detachment of the outer strike point with an up to 50% increase in divertor radiation from intrinsic carbon, the peak divertor heat flux reduction from 3-6 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-1 MW/m{sup 2}, and a significant increase in divertor volume recombination. High core confinement was maintained with the snowflake divertor, evidenced by the t{sub E}, W{sub MHD} and the H98(y,2) factors similar to those of the standard divertor discharges. Core carbon concentration and radiated power were reduced by 30-70%, apparently as a result of reduced divertor physical and chemical sputtering in the snowflake divertor and ELMs. In the SFD discharges, the MHD stability of the H-mode pedestal region was altered leading to the re-appearance of medium size (DW/W = 5-10%), Type I, ELMs otherwise suppressed due to lithium conditioning. Fast divertor measurements showed that impulsive particle and heat fluxes due to the ELMs were significantly dissipated in the high magnetic flux expansion region of the snowflake divertor. The snowflake divertor configuration is being combined in experiments with extrinsic deuterium or impurity gas puffing for increased dissipative divertor power losses, additional upper divertor nulls for increased power sharing between the upper and the lower divertors, and lithium coated plasma facing components for large area ion pumping. These efforts are aimed at the development of an integrated PMI for future ST-based devices for fusion development applications.

  17. PNNL Future Power Grid Initiative-developed GridOPTICS Software System (GOSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The power grid is changing and evolving. One aspect of this change is the growing use of smart meters and other devices, which are producing large volumes of useful data. However, in many cases, the data can’t be translated quickly into actionable guidance to improve grid performance. There's a need for innovative tools. The GridOPTICS(TM) Software System, or GOSS, developed through PNNL's Future Power Grid Initiative, is open source and became publicly available in spring 2014. The value of this middleware is that it easily integrates grid applications with sources of data and facilitates communication between them. Such a capability provides a foundation for developing a range of applications to improve grid management.

  18. The Influence on Climate Change of Differing Scenarios for Future Development Analyzed Using the MIT Integrated Global System Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    A wide variety of scenarios for future development have played significant roles in climate policy discussions. This paper presents projections of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations, sea level rise due to thermal expansion ...

  19. Negotiating future climates for public policy: a critical assessment of the development of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    ) or of seasonal forecasting (a few months): Earth system models aim to simulate future climatic evolution over

  20. HVDC submarine power cables systems state of the art and future developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenza, D.; Cipollini, G. [Pirelli Cavi S.p.A., Milano (Italy)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper begins with an introduction on the reasons that lead to the use of HVDC submarine cable links. The main aspects for the choice of direct current are presented as well as the advantages deriving from the utilization of submarine cables. The second part is dedicated to a discussion on the various type of insulation that could be used in power cables and their possible application to HVDC submarine cables. In the following there is a description of the main characteristics and technical details of some particular project that at present time (1995) are in progress. Two projects are briefly presented: Spain-Morocco, a 26 km long interconnection for the transmission, in a first phase, of 700 MW from Spain to Morocco at 400 kV a.c. by means of three cables, plus one spare, of the fluid filled type. The cables are designed for a future change to d.c. 450 kV, allowing a transmission of 500 MW each (i.e., 2 GW total). One of the peculiarities of the link is the maximum water depth of 615 m (world record for submarine power cables at the time of installation). Italy-Greece, a 1km long interconnection for the transmission of 500 MW (bi-directional) by means of one paper insulated mass impregnated cable having 1,250 sq mm conductor size and insulated for a rated voltage of 400 kV. This link (the installation of which will be posterior to the Spain-Morocco) will attain the world record for the maximum water depth for submarine power cables: 1,000 m. The last part deals with the future developments expected in this field, in terms of conductor size and voltage, that means an increase in transmissible capacity.

  1. Developing the Fuels of the Future Road transport accounts for 21% of the CO2 emissions of the UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing the Fuels of the Future ·Road transport accounts for 21% of the CO2 emissions of the UK required to develop new fuels, reducing NOx, CO2, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates. All new secondary Where : ·One of the most important properties of a fuel. Affects many aspects of combustion. ·Defined

  2. The SAMGrid database server component: its upgraded infrastructure and future development path

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loebel-Carpenter, L.; White, S.; Baranovski, A.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; /Fermilab; Burgon-Lyon, M.; St. Denis, R.; /Glasgow U.; Belforte, S.; /INFN, Trieste; Kerzel, U.; /Karlsruhe U.; Bartsch, V.; Leslie, M.; /Oxford

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SAMGrid Database Server encapsulates several important services, such as accessing file metadata and replica catalog, keeping track of the processing information, as well as providing the runtime support for SAMGrid station services. Recent deployment of the SAMGrid system for CDF has resulted in unification of the database schema used by CDF and D0, and the complexity of changes required for the unified metadata catalog has warranted a complete redesign of the DB Server. We describe here the architecture and features of the new server. In particular, we discuss the new CORBA infrastructure that utilizes python wrapper classes around IDL structs and exceptions. Such infrastructure allows us to use the same code on both server and client sides, which in turn results in significantly improved code maintainability and easier development. We also discuss future integration of the new server with an SBIR II project which is directed toward allowing the DB Server to access distributed databases, implemented in different DB systems and possibly using different schema.

  3. ASSESS (Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security) update: Current status and future developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Ayat, R.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Cousins, T.D. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA)); Hoover, E.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) has been released for use by DOE field offices and their contractors. In October, 1989, we offered a prototype workshop to selected representatives of the DOE community. Based on the prototype results, we held the first training workshop at the Central Training Academy in January, 1990. Four additional workshops are scheduled for FY 1990. ASSESS is a state-of-the-art analytical tool for management to conduct integrated evaluation of safeguards systems at facilities handling facilities. Currently, ASSESS focuses on the threat of theft/diversion of special nuclear material by insiders, outsiders, and a special form of insider/outsider collusion. ASSESS also includes a neutralization module. Development of the tool is continuing. Plans are underway to expand the capabilities of ASSESS to evaluate against violent insiders, to validate the databases, to expand the neutralization module, and to assist in demonstrating compliance with DOE Material Control and Accountability (MC A) Order 5633.3. These new capabilities include the ability to: compute a weighted average for performance capability against a spectrum of insider adversaries; conduct defense-in-depth analyses; and analyze against protracted theft scenarios. As they become available, these capabilities will be incorporated in our training program. ASSESS is being developed jointly by Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security.

  4. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Benefits of Installing Additional Rain Sensors within the UBC Irrigation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Additional Rain Sensors within the UBC Irrigation System Michael Thiessen, Chelsie Drysdale University of Installing Additional Rain Sensors within the UBC Irrigation System A Business Case Analysis Prepared for: Dr................................................................................................................................................................... 5 DESCRIPTION OF CURRENT UBC IRRIGATION WATER USE

  5. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the...

  6. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prices, environmental improvement, reduced water consumption, rural economic development, and employment opportunities in the renewable energy

  7. Developing and Implementing Sustainability Education through the Integration of Behavioral Science Achieving a sustainable future requires that individuals adopt different values,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Developing and Implementing Sustainability Education through the Integration of Behavioral Science sustainability education, which can be used to guide the development and evaluation of action Abstract Achieving a sustainable future requires that individuals adopt different values, attitudes, habits

  8. Development of U and Pu Co-Recovery Process (Co-Processing) for Future Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, K.; Yanagibashi, F.; Fujimoto, I.; Sato, T.; Ohbu, T.; Taki, K.; Hayashi, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-processing process, which is the modified Purex process focused on co-recovery of Pu and U, has been studied at Operation Testing Laboratory, Tokai Reprocessing Plant in JAEA. The set up of the process was performed with flow-sheets study by process calculation to avoid Pu isolation in the whole process and to co-recover Pu/U product solution with a suitable Pu/U ratio (0.5< Pu/U <2). The initial Pu/U ratios of the feed solutions were taken as 1%, 3% and 20% considering the composition of the future spent fuels. The verification of the flow-sheets for each feed solutions were carried out with mixer-setters and active Pu/U feed solutions, focusing on the partitioning unit, and favorable back extraction performances of Pu accompanied by U were observed at all cases of the given feed solutions. According to these results, the co-processing process showed a good prospect to treat all kinds of future fuels from LWR, LWR-MOX and FBR, and a good prospect to be simplified by omitting the Pu/U purification cycle.

  9. Abstract-Most fast developing countries have set targets to achieve a developed status in the near future.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    is comparing developed countries with those of Latin America or Africa. The two latter do not yet satisfy the case of Chile. Index Terms--energy policy, low carbon economy, renewable energy, electricity regulation to increase the use of renewable energies to 20% of total production by 2020. Most fast developing countries

  10. Incorporating the past into one's future : a framework for conservation and economic development in Guayaquil, Ecuador

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Kristin S., 1968-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conservation and revitalization efforts in Latin America have been typically centered on the preservation of individual monuments and historic buildings. This approach has recently led to the development of more integrated ...

  11. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andWind Power Development in the United States: Current94720 Abstract: The U.S. wind power industry is in an era of

  12. Development of mirrors made of chemically tempered glass foils for future X-ray telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salmaso, B; Brizzolari, B; Basso, S; Ghigo, M; Pareschi, G; Spiga, D; Proserpio, L; Suppiger, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin slumped glass foils are considered good candidates for the realization of future X-ray telescopes with large effective area and high spatial resolution. However, the hot slumping process affects the glass strength, and this can be an issue during the launch of the satellite because of the high kinematical and static loads occurring during that phase. In the present work we have investigated the possible use of Gorilla glass (produced by Corning), a chemical tempered glass that, thanks to its strength characteristics, would be ideal. The un-tempered glass foils were curved by means of an innovative hot slumping technique and subsequently chemically tempered. In this paper we show that the chemical tempering process applied to Gorilla glass foils does not affect the surface micro-roughness of the mirrors. On the other end, the stress introduced by the tempering process causes a reduction in the amplitude of the longitudinal profile errors with a lateral size close to the mirror length. The effect of the ov...

  13. Cerium Doped LSO/LYSO Crystal Development for future High Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2012-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of their high stopping power and fast and bright scintillation, cerium doped LSO and LYSO crystals have attracted a broad interest in the physics community pursuing precision electromagnetic calorimeter for future high energy physics experiments. Their excellent radiation hardness against gamma-rays, neutrons and charged hadrons also makes them a preferred material for calorimeters to be operated in a severe radiation environment, such as the HL-LHC. An effort was made at SIPAT to grow 25 X{sub 0} (28 cm) long LYSO crystals for high energy physics applications. In this paper, the optical and scintillation properties and its radiation hardness against gamma-ray irradiations up to 1 Mrad are presented for the first 2.5 X 2.5 X 28 cm LYSO sample. An absorption band was found at the seed end of this sample and three other 20 cm long samples, which was traced back to a bad seed crystal used in the corresponding crystal growth process. Significant progresses in optical and scintillation properties were achieved for large size LYSO crystals after eliminating this absorption band.

  14. Present Status and Future Prospects of Geothermal Development in Italy with an Appendix on Reservoir Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldi, R.; Calamai, A.; Neri, G.; Manetti, G.

    1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper consists of two parts and an appendix. In the first part a review is made of the geothermal activity in Italy from 1975 to 1982, including electrical and non-electrical applications. Remarks then follow on the trends that occurred and the operational criteria that were applied in the same period, which can be considered a transitional period of geothermal development in Italy. Information on recent trends and development objectives up to 1990 are given in the second part of the paper, together with a summary on program activities in the various geothermal areas of Italy. The appendix specifically reviews the main reseroir engineering activities carried out in the past years and the problems likely to be faced in the coming years in developing Itallian fields.

  15. Severe Accident Related Research and Development at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe for Present and Future Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholtyssek, Werner; Heusener, Gerhard; Hofmann, Fritz; Plitz, Helmut [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany)

    2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research and development program at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, performed within the Program Nuclear Safety Research, is centered around phenomena and processes that could possibly endanger the containment integrity of a large pressurized water reactor after a severe accident. The program includes three activities.The first activity is in-vessel steam explosion. Premixing phenomena are studied in the QUEOS and PREMIX test series. The efficiency of energy conversion is the subject of ECO tests. The BERDA experimental program investigates the load capacity of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in steam explosion events.The second activity is hydrogen behavior and mitigation. Advanced models and numerical tools are developed to describe hydrogen sources, distribution of gases in containment, the various modes of hydrogen combustion, and corresponding structural loads.The third activity is ex-vessel melt behavior. The release behavior of melt after RPV failure is studied in DISCO and KAJET tests. In support of core catcher development, interaction with sacrificial and refractory materials, further melt spreading and cooling phenomena are investigated in KAPOOL, KATS, and COMET tests.The goal is to describe and quantify the governing mechanisms and to develop verified models and numerical tools that are able to predict maximum possible loads for severe accident scenarios on full plant scale. The work supported the development and assessment of the safety design of the French-German European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR). It led to a broader understanding of severe accident phenomena and of controlling and mitigating measures that can also be of benefit for existing plants.

  16. EA-1958: Future Development in proximity to the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with proposed future development on the South Federal Campus of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site, in Benton County, Washington.

  17. PICMG xTCA Standards Extensions for Physics: New Developments & Future Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    After several years of planning and workshop meetings, a decision was reached in late 2008 to organize PICMG xTCA for Physics Technical Subcommittees to extend the ATCA and MTCA telecom standards for enhanced system performance, availability and interoperability for physics controls and applications hardware and software. Since formation in May-June 2009, the Hardware Technical Subcommittee has developed a number of ATCA, ARTM, AMC, MTCA and RTM extensions to be completed in mid-to-late 2010. The Software Technical Subcommittee is developing guidelines to promote interoperability of modules designed by industry and laboratories, in particular focusing on middleware and generic application interfaces such as Standard Process Model, Standard Device Model and Standard Hardware API. The paper describes the prototype design work completed by the lab-industry partners to date, the timeline for hardware releases to PICMG for approval, and the status of the software guidelines roadmap. The paper also briefly summarizes the program of the 4th xTCA for Physics Workshop immediately preceding the RT2010 Conference. he case for developing ATCA and MicroTCA (xTCA) specification extensions for physics has been covered in several previous papers. Briefly, ATCA and MicroTCA is the first all-serial communication platform available to the physics community to support both massively complex accelerator controls and massively large, high bandwidth and throughput experimental data acquisition systems. The major strength of xTCA is its multi-layer highly scalable managed platform architecture designed to achieve the highest possible system availability. Physics research imaging technologies have driven industrial applications in a wide range of medical scanners, for example, and in turn continue to evolve to exponentially higher speeds and resolution through new computer, communications industry and analog-to-digital conversion chip developments. The high availability managed platform is an important new tool for the instrumentation and control systems of these most complex scientific machines and instruments ever invented. Adaptation of the xTCA platforms to physics was undertaken by a collaboration starting in May-June 2009 with the PICMG open specifications industry consortium. The remainder of this paper discusses the results of lab-industry committee work as well as important concomitant prototype developments among participating laboratories and industries.

  18. Reservoir description and future development plans for the Unam/Mfem Fields, OML 67, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kofron, B.M.; Jenkinson, J.T.; Maxwell, G.S. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technology Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Unam/Mfem fields, which are currently produced from three platforms, are, located 25 km offshore (southeastern Nigeria) in water depths of 60 feet to 100 feet. Over 100 MMBO have been produced to date from both unconformity bounded and fault trap reservoirs in the Upper and Middle Biafra Sands. These structural and stratigraphic geometries define at least eleven different reservoirs that are not interconnected. STOIIP for all eleven reservoirs is estimated to exceed 900 MMBO based on a recently completed reservoir characterization study. A two year reservoir description study followed the acquisition of a 1991 3-D seismic survey and resulted in the drilling of six successful wells and two sidetracks. A 3-D model of reservoir geometries and fluid flow properties was generated by integrating geologic, geophysical, and reservoir engineering data. These diverse data sets were interpreted using a combination of workstations, software packages, and displays that included Landmark, IREX, wireline log and seismic correlation charts. A detailed stratigraphic zonation scheme with 28 zones was defined and correlated field wide and subregionally to build the reservoir framework. Twenty seismic horizons were created. More than 300 critical compute, generated grids were then used to calculate STOIIP volumes. This study led to the identification of new pay zones along with a much better understanding of the spatial distribution of all pays within the fields. A revised exploitation strategy has subsequently been proposed which calls for 5 new platforms and the drilling of 21 additional wells over the next few years.

  19. The development of a realistic source term for sodium-cooled fast reactors : assessment of current status and future needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Phillips, Jesse; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Middleton, Bobby D.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) continue to be proposed and designed throughout the United States and the world. Although the number of SFRs actually operating has declined substantially since the 1980s, a significant interest in advancing these types of reactor systems remains. Of the many issues associated with the development and deployment of SFRs, one of high regulatory importance is the source term to be used in the siting of the reactor. A substantial amount of modeling and experimental work has been performed over the past four decades on accident analysis, sodium coolant behavior, and radionuclide release for SFRs. The objective of this report is to aid in determining the gaps and issues related to the development of a realistic, mechanistically derived source term for SFRs. This report will allow the reader to become familiar with the severe accident source term concept and gain a broad understanding of the current status of the models and experimental work. Further, this report will allow insight into future work, in terms of both model development and experimental validation, which is necessary in order to develop a realistic source term for SFRs.

  20. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  1. Phosphazene additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  2. LOS ALAMOS NEUTRON SCIENCE CENTER CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE POWER REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GAVRON, VICTOR I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HILL, TONY S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PITCHER, ERIC J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; TOVESSON, FREDERIK K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a large spallation neutron complex centered around an 800 MeV high-currently proton accelerator. Existing facilities include a highly-moderated neutron facility (Lujan Center) where neutrons between thermal and keV energies are produced, and the Weapons Neutron Research Center (WNR), where a bare spallation target produces neutrons between 0.1 and several hundred MeV.The LANSCE facility offers a unique capability to provide high precision nuclear data over a large energy region, including that for fast reactor systems. In an ongoing experimental program the fission and capture cross sections are being measured for a number of minor actinides relevant for Generation-IV reactors and transmutation technology. Fission experiments makes use of both the highly moderated spallation neutron spectrum at the Lujan Center, and the unmoderated high energy spectrum at WNR. By combininb measurements at these two facilities the differential fission cross section is measured relative to the {sup 235}U(n,f) standard from subthermal energies up to about 200 MeV. An elaborate data acquisition system is designed to deal with all the different types of background present when spanning 10 energy decades. The first isotope to be measured was {sup 237}Np, and the results were used to improve the current ENDF/B-VII evaluation. Partial results have also been obtained for {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu, and the final results are expected shortly. Capture cross sections are measured at LANSCE using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). This unique instrument is highly efficient in detecting radiative capture events, and can thus handle radioactive samples of half-lives as low as 100 years. A number of capture cross sections important to fast reaction applications have been measured with DANCE. The first measurement was on {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}), and the results have been submitted for publication. Other capture measurements in progress include {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu. The United States recently announced the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), with the goal of closing the commercial nuclear fuel cycle while minimizing proliferation risk. GNEP achieves these goals using fast-spectrum nuclear reactors powered by new transmutation fuels that contain significant quantities of minor actinides. The proposed Materials Test Station (MTS) will provide the GNEP with a cost-effective means of obtaining domestic fast-spectrum irradiations of advanced transmutation fuel forms and structural materials, which is an important step in the fuels qualification process. The MTS will be located at the LANSCE, and will be driven by a 1.08-MW proton beam. Th epeak neutron flux in the irradiation region is 1.67 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s, and the energy spectrum is similar to that of a fast reactor, with the addition of a high-energy tail. The facility is expected to operate at least 4,400 hours per year. Fuel burnup rates will exceed 4% per year, and the radiation damage rate in iron will be 18 dpa (displacements per atom) per year. The construction cost is estimated to be $73M (including 25% contingency), with annual operating costs in the range of $6M to $10M. Appropriately funded, the MTS could begin operation in 2010.

  3. Development of an IAEA Training Course for Future U.S. Inspectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savannah Avgerinos Fitzwater; Amanda R. Rynes; David S. Bracken; Richard R. M. Metcalf; James D. West

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. citizens currently make up only 12% of the positions held in the IAEA’s Department of Safeguards. While the United States has maintained a high level of support for the Agency over the duration of its history, the number of American inspectors currently in the field does not reflect this level of involvement. As a result, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of International Relations, as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) mission, has tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to develop a rigorous two week hands-on training program to encourage and operationally acclimatize U.S. Citizens who are interested in applying for IAEA inspector positions using IAEA authorized equipment at INL. Idaho National Laboratory is one-of-a-kind in its ability to train IAEA inspectors by including training at nuclear facilities on site and includes, for example, direct measurement of an active spent fuel storage cooling pond. This accredited course will introduce and train attendees on the major IAEA systems used in collecting nuclear safeguards data and performing safeguards inspections. Unique in the United States, these classes will give attendees direct hands-on training and will address equipment purpose, function, operating principles, application, and troubleshooting, based upon what would be expected of an IAEA Safeguards Inspector in the field and in the office. Upon completion, U.S. applicants will be better qualified to pursue a position in the IAEA Department of Safeguards Operational Divisions. In support, INL has recently established a new laboratory space to house state of the art nuclear safeguards instrumentation. Currently, equipment installed in the laboratory space includes attended systems: 3DLR (3-D Imaging Laser) for design information verification, a Digital Cerenkov Viewing Device for measurement of spent fuel, HM-5 handheld radiation detectors, quantitative neutron and gamma systems; unattended monitoring systems including: NGAM and MiniGRAND radiation systems and a DMOS camera system, and VACOSS/EOSS Optical Sealing Systems..

  4. Basic Electropolishing Process Research and Development in Support of Improved Reliable Performance SRF Cavities for the Future Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Tian, C.E. Reece,M.J. Kelley

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future accelerators require unprecedented cavity performance, which is strongly influenced by interior surface nanosmoothness. Electropolishing is the technique of choice to be developed for high-field superconducting radiofrequency cavities. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and related techniques point to the electropolishing mechanism of Nb in a sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid electrolyte of controlled by a compact surface salt film under F- diffusion-limited mass transport control. These and other findings are currently guiding a systematic characterization to form the basis for cavity process optimization, such as flowrate, electrolyte composition and temperature. This integrated analysis is expected to provide optimum EP parameter sets for a controlled, reproducible and uniform surface leveling for Nb SRF cavities.

  5. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Develop & evaluate...

  6. Potential for future development of salt cavern storage in the upper Silurian Syracuse Formation of south-central New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, J.P.; Sarwar, G.; Guo, B. [Brooklyn College of the City Univ. of New York, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although depleted reservoirs remain the dominant structures used for storage fulfilling the demand for base load gas supply during the heating season, the current general surge in storage projects, nationwide, takes advantage of opportunities in Order 636, and makes greater use of salt caverns for gas storage. This reflects the increasing need by gas users, local distribution companies in particular, to quickly cycle a storage facility`s gas supply for services such as peak shaving, emergency supply, and system balancing to meet hourly swings. Occurrence of thick deposits of bedded salt deposits provides New York the capability to develop high deliverability salt cavern storage facilities. Furthermore, New York is uniquely positioned at the gateway to major northeastern markets to provide peak load storage services of natural gas supply. The thickest units of bedded salt in New York occur in the {open_quotes}F{close_quotes} horizon of the Upper Silurian Syracuse Formation. Three bedded salt cavern storage facilities have been recently proposed in New York. Two of these projects is much larger (with 5 Bcfg ultimate capacity), is under construction, and will provide valuable storage service to the Ellisburg-Leidy market center hub in Pennsylvania. Identification of possible sites for future salt cavern storage projects has been achieved chiefly by defining areas of thick beds of salt at sufficient depths close to gas transmission lines, with access to a freshwater supply for leaching, and possessing an acceptable method of brine disposal.

  7. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives Develop & Evaluate...

  8. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Electrolyte Additives Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery...

  9. Abstract--In order to develop precision vertex detectors for the future linear collider, fast active monolithic active pixel sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -to-voltage conversion factors were obtained using amplifiers with different gains or diode sizes. Pixel architectures in future vertex detectors of high energy physics experiments. The maximum charge-to-voltage conversion with DC and AC coupling to charge sensing element were proposed. As far, hits from conversion of 55 Fe

  10. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CRS Sirrine (CRSS) is evaluating a novel IGCC process in which gases exiting the gasifier are burned in a gas turbine combustion system. The turbine exhaust gas is used to generate additional power in a conventional steam generator. This results in a significant increase in efficiency. However, the IGCC process requires development of novel approaches to control SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions and alkali vapors which can damage downstream turbine components. Ammonia is produced from the reaction of coal-bound nitrogen with steam in the reducing zone of any fixed bed coal gasifier. This ammonia can be partially oxidized to NO{sub x} when the product gas is oxidized in a gas turbine combustor. Alkali metals vaporize in the high-temperature combustion zone of the gasifier and laser condense on the surface of small char or ash particles or on cooled metal surfaces. It these alkali-coated materials reach the gas turbine combustor, the alkali will revaporize condense on turbine blades and cause rapid high temperature corrosion. Efficiency reduction will result. PSI Technology Company (PSIT) was contracted by CRSS to evaluate and recommend solutions for NO{sub x} emissions and for alkali metals deposition. Various methods for NO{sub x} emission control and the potential process and economic impacts were evaluated. This included estimates of process performance, heat and mass balances around the combustion and heat transfer units and a preliminary economic evaluation. The potential for alkali metal vaporization and condensation at various points in the system was also estimated. Several control processes and evaluated, including an order of magnitude cost for the control process.

  11. French Atomic Energy Commission innovation program for future reactors research and development on safety systems and new technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, P. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, St. Paul lez Durance (France)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CEA R&D program for water nuclear reactors is mainly divided in three program issues: R&D for operating reactors, R&D for the next generation of reactor in support of the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR) project - Innovative systems and future reactors. This {open_quotes}Innovative Systems and future reactors{close_quotes} R&D program involves various mean and long term studies on the following fields: Advanced Core Design and Fuel Cycle Strategies; New safety systems and technologies - Severe accident - Reactors evaluation and design - Advanced fuels, absorbers and burnable poisons. In the following communication, we will present the motivations, the objectives and the main results of the various research programs linked to these items. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  12. The future steelmaking industry and its technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J.; Paxton, H.W.; Giarratani, F.; Lave, L. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to develop a vision of the future steelmaking industry including its general characteristics and technologies. In addition, the technical obstacles and research and development opportunities for commercialization of these technologies are identified. The report is being prepared by the Sloan Steel Industry Competitiveness Study with extensive input from the industry. Industry input has been through AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute), SMA (Steel Manufacturers Association) and contacts with individual company executives and technical leaders. The report identifies the major industry drivers which will influence technological developments in the industry for the next 5--25 years. Initially, the role of past drivers in shaping the current industry was examined to help understand the future developments. Whereas this report concentrates on future technologies other major factors such as national and international competition, human resource management and capital concerns are examined to determine their influence on the future industry. The future industry vision does not specify specific technologies but rather their general characteristics. Finally, the technical obstacles and the corresponding research and development required for commercialization are detailed.

  13. PLANS FOR FUTURE MEGAWATT FACILITIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROSER,T.

    2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton accelerators producing beam powers of up to 1 MW are presently either operating or under construction and designs for Multi-Megawatt facilities are being developed. High beam power has applications in the production of high intensity secondary beams of neutrons, muons, kaons and neutrinos as well as in nuclear waste transmutation and accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors. Each of these applications has additional requirements on beam energy and duty cycle. This paper will review how present designs for future Multi-Megawatt facilities meet these requirements and will also review the experience with present high power facilities.

  14. Additive manufacturing method of producing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

  15. The Hanford Story: Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Future Chapter of the Hanford Story illustrates the potential and possibilities offered by a post-cleanup Hanford. From land use plans and preservation at Hanford to economic development and tourism opportunities, the Future chapter touches on a variety of local economic, cultural and environmental perspectives.

  16. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

  17. Did you know that you can borrow training videos from PDLM? In addition to our classroom and online training programs, the OHRM Professional Development &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Did you know that you can borrow training videos from PDLM? In addition to our classroom and online facilitator to your campus. Many videos in our library include leader guides, participant handouts, and other Video Learning Library contains an extensive list of titles in a variety of topics, including

  18. Challenges and Recommendations for ‘Visitors’ Teaching Design in the Developing World towards Sustainable Equitable Futures: Four Divided Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jann, Marga

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; in the developing world singularities like culture shock, climate adaptation, health issues (e.g. dengue, malaria, heat exhaustion, poor diet etc.), 3 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sayre's_law last... ) allowed a connection which eventually helped the students to see they were wasting their parents’ money and cheating themselves out of the full opportunity offered. Conflict in Sri Lanka resulted in students banning a fieldtrip hours before departure...

  19. Development of pyro-processing technology at CRIEPI for carving out the future of nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iizuka, M.; Koyama, T.; Sakamura, Y.; Uozumi, K.; Fujihata, K.; Kato, T.; Murakami, T.; Tsukada, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Glatz, J.P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyro-processing has been attracting increasing attention as a promising candidate as an advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology. It provides economic advantage as well as reduction in proliferation risk and burden of long live radioactive waste, especially when it is combined with advanced fuels such as metallic or nitride fuel which gives excellent burning efficiency of minor actinides (MA). CRIEPI has been developing pyro-processing technology since late eighties with both domestic and international collaborations. In the early stage, electrochemical and thermodynamic properties in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt, and fundamental feasibility of core technology like electrorefining were chiefly investigated. Currently, stress in the process chemistry development is also placed on supporting technologies, such as treatment of anode residue and high temperature distillation for cathode product from electrorefining, and so on. Waste treatment process development, such as studies on adsorption behavior of various FP elements into zeolite and conditions for the fabrication of glass-bonded sodalite waste form, are steadily improved as well. In parallel, dedicated pyro-processing equipment such as zeolite column for treatment of spent electro-refiner salt is currently in progress. Recently, an integrated engineering-scale fuel cycle tests were performed funded by Japanese government (MEXT) as an important step before proceeding to large scale hot demonstration of pyro-processing. Oxide fuels can be readily introduced into the pyro-processing by reducing them to metals by adoption of electrochemical reduction technique. Making use of this advantage, the pyro-processing is currently under preliminary evaluation for its applicability to the treatment of the corium, mainly consisting of (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, formed in different composition during the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. (authors)

  20. Additive assembly of digital materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

  1. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Harriz, J.T.; Ostrowski, E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost estimate provided for the DOE sponsored study of Air Blown Coal Gasification was developed from vendor quotes obtained directly for the equipment needed in the 50 MW, 100 MW, and 200 MW sized plants and from quotes from other jobs that have been referenced to apply to the particular cycle. Quotes were generally obtained for the 100 MW cycle and a scale up/down factor was used to generate the cost estimates for the 200 MW and 50 MW cycles, respectively. Information from GTPro (property of Thermoflow, Inc.) was used to estimate the cost of the 200 MW and 50 MW gas turbine, HRSG, and steam turbines. To available the use of GTPro's estimated values for this equipment, a comparison was made between the quotes obtained for the 100 MW cycle (ABB GT 11N combustion turbine and a HSRG) against the estimated values by GTPro.

  2. ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL ACHIEVABLE ENERGY SAVINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ESTIMATES OF ADDITIONAL ACHIEVABLE ENERGY SAVINGS Supplement to California Energy. There are also likely additional savings from initiatives that are neither finalized nor funded are referred to as additional achievable energy efficiency (AAEE) impacts. Staff developed five AAEE

  3. Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countriesand what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in theResidential Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of air conditioning are of particular interestto energy analysts, both because of the high energy consumption of thisproduct, but also its disproportionate impact on peak load. This paperaddresses the special role of this end use as a driver of residentialelectricity consumption in rapidly developing economies. Recent historyhas shown that air conditioner ownership can grow grows more rapidly thaneconomic growth in warm-climate countries. In 1990, less than a percentof urban Chinese households owned an air conditioner; by 2003 this numberrose to 62 percent. The evidence suggests a similar explosion of airconditioner use in many other countries is not far behind. Room airconditioner purchases in India are currently growing at 20 percent peryear, with about half of these purchases attributed to the residentialsector. This paper draws on two distinct methodological elements toassess future residential air conditioner 'business as usual' electricityconsumption by country/region and to consider specific alternative 'highefficiency' scenarios. The first component is an econometric ownershipand use model based on household income, climate and demographicparameters. The second combines ownership forecasts and stock accountingwith geographically specific efficiency scenarios within a uniqueanalysis framework (BUENAS) developed by LBNL. The efficiency scenariomodule considers current efficiency baselines, available technologies,and achievable timelines for development of market transformationprograms, such as minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) andlabeling programs. The result is a detailed set of consumption andemissions scenarios for residential air conditioning.

  4. Cast heat-resistant austenitic steel with improved temperature creep properties and balanced alloying element additions and methodology for development of the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pankiw, Roman I; Muralidharan, Govindrarajan; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Maziasz, Philip J

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention addresses the need for new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures. The new austenitic steel compositions retain desirable phases, such as austenite, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and MC in its microstructure to higher temperatures. The present invention also discloses a methodology for the development of new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures.

  5. Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framtidens lantbruk / Future Agriculture Future Agriculture ­ Livestock, Crops and Land Use Report from a multidisciplinary research platform. Phase I (2009 ­ 2012) #12;Future Agriculture ­ Livestock Waldenström Utgivningsår: 2012, Uppsala Utgivare: SLU, Framtidens lantbruk/Future Agriculture Layout: Pelle

  6. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  7. Yet another additivity conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiji Matsumoto

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known that the additivity conjecture of Holevo capacity, output minimum entoropy, and the entanglement of formation (EoF), are equivalent with each other. Among them, the output minimum entropy is simplest, and hence many researchers are focusing on this quantity. Here, we suggest yet another entanglement measure, whose strong superadditivity and additivity are equivalent to the additivity of the quantities mentioned above. This quantity is as simple as the output minimum entropy, and in existing proofs of additivity conjecture of the output minimum entropy for the specific examples, they are essentially proving the strong superadditivity of this quantity.

  8. Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

  9. Research Summary Carbon Additionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of muchResearch Summary Carbon Additionality Additionality is widely considered to be a core aspect controversy in national carbon accounting, international regulatory frameworks and carbon markets. A review

  10. Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 Voltage (V) 1 st cycle 500 th cycle 1000 th cycle I 240 mA.g -1 TMSEMC 1M LiTFSI EMS 1M LiTFSI EMS 1.0M LiPF 6 EMSEMC 55 1.0M LiPF 6 EMSEMC 55 9 1M...

  11. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    limited overcharge stability Cyclic voltammograms of ANL-1 (10 mM) in 1.2 M LiPF 6 in ECEMC (3:7 by weight) 100mVs. E redox 4.2 V vs LiLi + Voltage and capacity retention...

  12. Additions to LAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, John L.

    1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to the description on page 13 of AI Memo 116A LAP has the following features: Current Assembly Location Reference, Assembly Time Arithmetic, Constants, Multiple Entry Routines, and Defined Machine Operations ...

  13. Texas Industries of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, K.

    The purpose of the Texas Industries of the Future program is to facilitate the development, demonstration and adoption of advanced technologies and adoption of best practices that reduce industrial energy usage, emissions, and associated costs...

  14. Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated aging of1.1Energy DPFFOA ||

  15. Buildings of the Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are developing a vision for future buildings—at least one hundred years from today—based on the collective views of thought leaders. As part of this effort, we will explore technology and demographic trends that could revolutionize the built environment across energy, water, environment, resilient design, health, security, and productivity.

  16. MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumacher, Russ

    MECH 502: Advanced/Additive Manufacturing Engineering COURSE DESCRIPTION In this course you product development and innovation. You will develop a rich knowledge of additive manufacturing processes enabling advanced/additive manufacturing and personal fabrication. You will have the opportunity

  17. Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy Development in China Goal Practice & Experience : Status Quo and Future for Industrial Scale Biomass Energy...

  18. Writing Assessment: Additional Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    29 Appendix A Writing Assessment: Additional Resources #12;30 Where can I find out more into the assessment process. On-campus resources give you with a "real person" to contact should you have questions Resources for Higher Education Outcomes Assessment http://www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA/survey/resource.htm Ohio

  19. Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 CarbonFix Standard (CFS) 28 Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) 28 Forest Carbon Standard (FCS) 28

  20. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  1. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Bruce; Volz, Sara; Male, Johnathan; Wolfson, Johnathan; Pray, Todd; Mayfield, Stephen; Atherton, Scott; Weaver, Brandon

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a short documentary film showcasing examples of bioenergy innovations across the biomass supply chain and the United States. The film highlights a few stories of individuals and companies who are passionate about achieving the promise of biofuels and addressing the challenges of developing a thriving bioeconomy. This outreach product supports media initiatives to expand the public's understanding of the bioenergy industry and sustainable transportation and was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Green Focus Films, and BCS, Incorporated.

  2. Visit the CAHNRS Alumni and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    in Our Future................................................... 14 WSU gears up to develop bioeconomy

  3. Additive Manufacturing Technology Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 ofEmergencyAcrobat PDFMakerAdam GarberAdditive

  4. Computation and Information Hierarchy for a Future Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computation and Information Hierarchy for a Future Grid Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power;#12;Computation and Information Hierarchy for a Future Grid Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable This white paper was developed as one of nine white papers in the project "The Future Grid to Enable

  5. NRC policy on future reactor designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 13, 1983, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued for public comment a ''Proposed Commission Policy Statement on Severe Accidents and Related Views on Nuclear Reactor Regulation'' (48 FR 16014). This report presents and discusses the Commission's final version of that policy statement now entitled, ''Policy Statement on Severe Reactor Accidents Regarding Future Designs and Existing Plants.'' It provides an overview of comments received from the public and the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards and the staff response to these. In addition to the Policy Statement, the report discusses how the policies of this statement relate to other NRC programs including the Severe Accident Research Program; the implementation of safety measures resulting from lessons learned in the accident at Three Mile Island; safety goal development; the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issues and other Generic Safety Issues; and possible revisions of rules or regulatory requirements resulting from the Severe Accident Source Term Program. Also discussed are the main features of a generic decision strategy for resolving Regulatory Questions and Technical Issues relating to severe accidents; the development and regulatory use of new safety information; the treatment of uncertainty in severe accident decision making; and the development and implementation of a Systems Reliability Program for both existing and future plants to ensure that the realized level of safety is commensurate with the safety analyses used in regulatory decisions.

  6. Living a Sustainable Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solve the energy crisis through biological methods, including genetically engineering algae and cyanobacteria. Create a Sustainable Future: Living Living a Sustainable Future How...

  7. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

  8. Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jason 1981-

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes to survey new chemical knowledge, developed since 1984, on fluid additives used in matrix stimulation treatments of carbonate and sandstone petroleum reservoirs and describes one method of organizing this new knowledge in a...

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

  10. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  11. Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional...

  12. Future of the Lakes Scenarios for the Future of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    about what to do today. We try to anticipate the future when making decisions, but plans are always as a type of war game analysis. Scenario planning later became a part of business planning. The oil company Royal Dutch/Shell further developed scenario planning, which played a role in that company's success

  13. Zinc electrode with cement additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charkey, Allen (Brookfield, CT)

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A zinc electrode having a cement additive, preferably, Portland Cement, distributed in the zinc active material.

  14. STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL ADDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL ADDITIONS CEC- CF-1R ADD (Revised 03/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Prescriptive Certificate of Compliance: CF-1R ADD Residential Additions (Page 1 of 8) Site Address Orientation: N, E, S, W or Degrees ________ Conditioned Floor Area of Addition (CFA): New Addition Size: Less

  15. Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Engineering Laboratory Magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors are rapidly becoming the technology of choiceFuture Directions for Magnetic Sensors: HYBRIDMATERIALS Our goal is to develop the scientific expertise needed to allow modeling and simulation to become the driving force in improving magnetic sensors

  16. Building bridges from B.C. to Brazil; Ties being developed through student exchanges will provide a foundation for future relationships that benefit all

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Building bridges from B.C. to Brazil; Ties being developed through student exchanges will provide growth and a new-found confidence to compete in complex industries with established world leaders. Brazil is one of these new powerhouses. With a population of more than 190 million, Brazil is set to become one

  17. FutureGen Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabe, Jim; Elliott, Mike

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the comprehensive siting, permitting, engineering, design, and costing activities completed by the FutureGen Industrial Alliance, the Department of Energy, and associated supporting subcontractors to develop a first of a kind near zero emissions integrated gasification combined cycle power plant and carbon capture and storage project (IGCC-CCS). With the goal to design, build, and reliably operate the first IGCC-CCS facility, FutureGen would have been the lowest emitting pulverized coal power plant in the world, while providing a timely and relevant basis for coal combustion power plants deploying carbon capture in the future. The content of this report summarizes key findings and results of applicable project evaluations; modeling, design, and engineering assessments; cost estimate reports; and schedule and risk mitigation from initiation of the FutureGen project through final flow sheet analyses including capital and operating reports completed under DOE award DE-FE0000587. This project report necessarily builds upon previously completed siting, design, and development work executed under DOE award DE-FC26- 06NT4207 which included the siting process; environmental permitting, compliance, and mitigation under the National Environmental Policy Act; and development of conceptual and design basis documentation for the FutureGen plant. For completeness, the report includes as attachments the siting and design basis documents, as well as the source documentation for the following: • Site evaluation and selection process and environmental characterization • Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permit Application including well design and subsurface modeling • FutureGen IGCC-CCS Design Basis Document • Process evaluations and technology selection via Illinois Clean Coal Review Board Technical Report • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for slurry-fed gasifier configuration • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for dry-fed gasifier configuration • Full capital cost report and cost category analysis (CAPEX) • Full operating cost report and assumptions (OPEX) Comparative technology evaluations, value engineering exercises, and initial air permitting activities are also provided; the report concludes with schedule, risk, and cost mitigation activities as well as lessons learned such that the products of this report can be used to support future investments in utility scale gasification and carbon capture and sequestration. Collectively, the FutureGen project enabled the comprehensive site specific evaluation and determination of the economic viability of IGCC-CCS. The project report is bound at that determination when DOE formally proposed the FutureGen 2.0 project which focuses on repowering a pulverized coal power plant with oxy-combustion technology including CCS.

  18. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  1. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  2. Catalyst and process development for hydrogen preparation from future fuel-cell feedstocks. Final report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, H.S.; Feins, I.R.; Yarrington, R.M.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract was to develop and demonstrate processes for the production of gaseous fuel cell feeds from high sulfur distillate fuels. The processes considered and studied in this program were high temperature steam reforming with hydrogen recycle, catalytic partial oxidation, and autothermal reforming. Even with hydrogen recycle, high temerature steam reforming of No. 2 oil proved to be dfficult due to carbon formation in the preheat section. Several steam reforming catalysts were evaluated during this phase of the program. (WHK)

  3. CHARTING BC'S ECONOMIC FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    CHARTING BC'S ECONOMIC FUTURE discussionguide 100communityconversations #12;1 Thank you for agreeing to participate in this Community Conversation about BC's economic future. Each year Simon Fraser is "Charting BC's Economic Future". Faced with an increasingly competitive global economy, it is more important

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary NREL is a national laboratory of the U for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U Sandor, D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  7. FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiser, Gernot

    FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY Delivering Innovation The Future Logistics Living Lab that will provide logistics solutions for the future. The Living Lab is a demonstration, exhibition and work space by a group of logistics companies, research organisations, universities, and IT providers that includes NICTA

  8. Back to the FutureGen?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After years of political wrangling, Democrats may green-light the experimental clean coal power plants. The article relates how the project came to be curtailed, how Senator Dick Durbin managed to protect $134 million in funding for FutureGen in Mattoon, and how once Obama was in office a $2 billion line item to fund a 'near zero emissions power plant(s)' was placed in the Senate version of the Stimulus Bill. The final version of the legislation cut the funding to $1 billion for 'fossil energy research and development'. In December 2008 the FutureGen Alliance and the City of Mattoon spent $6.5 billion to purchase the plants eventual 440 acre site. A report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said that Bush's inaction may have set back clean coal technology in the US by as much as a decade. If additional funding comes through construction of the plant could start in 2010. 1 fig., 1 photo.

  9. Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Blake Marshall, AMO's lead for Additive Manufacturing Technologies, will provide an overview of current R&D activities in additive manufacturing and its application to fuel cell prototyping and...

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Sandor, D.; Wiser, R.; Schneider, T.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  11. Lubrication with boric acid additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-lubricating resin compositions including a boric acid additive and a synthetic polymer including those thermoset materials.

  12. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 5, Appendix D: Cost support information: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Harriz, J.T.; Ostrowski, E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost estimate provided for the DOE sponsored study of Air Blown Coal Gasification was developed from vendor quotes obtained directly for the equipment needed in the 50 MW, 100 MW, and 200 MW sized plants and from quotes from other jobs that have been referenced to apply to the particular cycle. Quotes were generally obtained for the 100 MW cycle and a scale up/down factor was used to generate the cost estimates for the 200 MW and 50 MW cycles, respectively. Information from GTPro (property of Thermoflow, Inc.) was used to estimate the cost of the 200 MW and 50 MW gas turbine, HRSG, and steam turbines. To available the use of GTPro`s estimated values for this equipment, a comparison was made between the quotes obtained for the 100 MW cycle (ABB GT 11N combustion turbine and a HSRG) against the estimated values by GTPro.

  13. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  14. Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEV/EV Lithium-ion Battery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Electrolyte Additives for PHEVEV Lithium-ion Battery Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives...

  15. Education for the ManufacturingEducation for the Manufacturing Industries of the FutureIndustries of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Growth. Every $1.00 in manufactured goods generates an additional $1.43 worth of additional economic© ATI 2006 Education for the ManufacturingEducation for the Manufacturing Industries of the FutureIndustries of the Future presented to thepresented to the 2006 MIT Manufacturing Summit:2006 MIT Manufacturing Summit

  16. A Primer on Food Additives.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    45.7 8-1208 :08 A Primer on Food Additives Extension Foods and Nutrition Specialists The Texas A&M University System Consumers today are very concerned about what goes into their food. This primer on food additives describes what food... additives do and why modern food technology has made them necessary, and recounts how Congress and the Federal Government have responded to con sumer demands for controls. Atter spending many months with the mid European immigrants who found work...

  17. Additivity relations in quantum correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seungho Yang; Hyunseok Jeong; Wonmin Son

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Does the sum of correlations in subsystems constitute the correlation in the total system? Such a concept can be expressed by an additivity relationship of correlations. From a strong subadditivity condition of von Neumann entropy, four different additivity relations in total correlation are derived and quantified. Based upon the classification of the additivity in total correlation, we identify the corresponding additive relationships in entanglement. It is also discussed that similar relationships are satisfied for quantum discord of pure states, but it is not always true for mixed states.

  18. Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    probe. The development of CW SCRF technology, also used inCW superconducting RF (SCRF) linac provides high repetitionThe great attractions of CW SCRF for future FEL facilities

  19. My Amazing Future 2012

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory's My Amazing Future program gives 8th grade women the opportunity to experience careers in science and engineering.

  20. Future City Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Competition is an unique opportunity for middle school children to combine skills in engineering, environmental science, and art to create a vision for the future. Exercising your...

  1. Nuclear Futures Analysis and Scenario Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, E.D.; Beller, D.; Canavan, G.H.; Krakowski, R.A.; Peterson, P.; Wagner, R.L.

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This LDRD project created and used advanced analysis capabilities to postulate scenarios and identify issues, externalities, and technologies associated with future ''things nuclear''. ''Things nuclear'' include areas pertaining to nuclear weapons, nuclear materials, and nuclear energy, examined in the context of future domestic and international environments. Analysis tools development included adaptation and expansion of energy, environmental, and economics (E3) models to incorporate a robust description of the nuclear fuel cycle (both current and future technology pathways), creation of a beginning proliferation risk model (coupled to the (E3) model), and extension of traditional first strike stability models to conditions expected to exist in the future (smaller force sizes, multipolar engagement environments, inclusion of actual and latent nuclear weapons (capability)). Accomplishments include scenario development for regional and global nuclear energy, the creation of a beginning nuclear architecture designed to improve the proliferation resistance and environmental performance of the nuclear fuel cycle, and numerous results for future nuclear weapons scenarios.

  2. Bright Future NW Energy Coalition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quickly set CO2 emission limits and establish mechanisms to meet them. But the Northwest must not waitAs Usual We have two choices for providing our electrical needs by 2050. We can either develop more of ourCoal Energy Efficiency/CHP 6¢/kWh With this extra 1,500 aMW in Bright Future we can power more electric

  3. Comments on Hastings' Additivity Counterexamples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohisa Fukuda; Christopher King; David Moser

    2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Hastings recently provided a proof of the existence of channels which violate the additivity conjecture for minimal output entropy. In this paper we present an expanded version of Hastings' proof. In addition to a careful elucidation of the details of the proof, we also present bounds for the minimal dimensions needed to obtain a counterexample.

  4. Additive angles in H_3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriy G. Pavlov; Sergey S. Kokarev

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of Berwald-Moor Geometry in H_3, the paper studies the construction of additive poly-angles (bingles and tringles). It is shown that, considering additiveness in the large, there exist an infinity of such poly-angles.

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

  10. Options for Kentucky's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three important imperatives are being pursued by the Commonwealth of Kentucky: ? Developing a viable economic future for the highly trained and experienced workforce and for the Paducah area that today supports, and is supported by, the operations of the US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). Currently, the PGDP is scheduled to be taken out of service in May, 2013. ? Restructuring the economic future for Kentucky’s most abundant indigenous resource and an important industry – the extraction and utilization of coal. The future of coal is being challenged by evolving and increasing requirements for its extraction and use, primarily from the perspective of environmental restrictions. Further, it is important that the economic value derived from this important resource for the Commonwealth, its people and its economy is commensurate with the risks involved. Over 70% of the extracted coal is exported from the Commonwealth and hence not used to directly expand the Commonwealth’s economy beyond the severance taxes on coal production. ? Ensuring a viable energy future for Kentucky to guarantee a continued reliable and affordable source of energy for its industries and people. Today, over 90% of Kentucky’s electricity is generated by burning coal with a delivered electric power price that is among the lowest in the United States. Anticipated increased environmental requirements necessitate looking at alternative forms of energy production, and in particular electricity generation.

  11. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accessed 3 June 2011. Green Energy Information Network,Wheat Cassava Source: Green Energy Information Network 2011.

  12. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential of different solar PV technologies, including both2007, p. 28. Status of Solar PV Technology China has been anResearch, 2010. Solar PV technology applications in China

  13. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and subsidies initiated in the last few years, China’s solarChina has established several major renewable energy regulations along with programs and subsidies to encourage the growth of non-fossil alternative energy including solar,

  14. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gasification systems known as fixed bed gasifier are usedgenerating power. These fixed bed gasifiers are very small

  15. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    been revised over time and small hydro currently is definedChina. Prior to 1990, small hydro in China was defined hydroand does not include small hydro, which are often not grid-

  16. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ag/Forestry Residues Biogas from org effluent Municipalmil m2 Mtce Mt consumption Biogas and Biomass GasificationBesides solar water heaters, biogas is another alternative

  17. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    national average biomass electricity price of 0.63 RMB perapproved a new biomass electricity price of 0.75 RMB per kWhbiomass power plants in order to prevent regionalized overinvestment and subsequent inflation of local crop prices.

  18. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Offshore Wind Generation .. 23 Figure 11. ProjectedTransmission for Offshore Wind Generation Source: Vestasof over 100 studies on wind generation (Kubiszewski, et al,

  19. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4. Solar PV Cell Production and Installed Capacity, 2000-23 Figure 12. China's Hydropower Installed Capacity, 1980-4 Table 2. China Installed Capacity for Alternative Energy

  20. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7 Figure 3. Map of China's Solar Resourceand Wang Sicheng, 2007, “China Solar PV Report. ” Beijing:tower. Figure 3. Map of China's Solar Resource Distribution

  1. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy in China. ” Renewable Energy 36 (5): 1374-1378. Chen,GoC/World Bank/GEF China Renewable Energy Scale-up Programwind power systems. ” Renewable Energy 35: 218-225. Lechon

  2. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and onshore sited wind power plants based on Vestas V90-3.0The Vestas offshore wind power plant study, in contrast, hadChinese offshore wind power plants. 3.4 Policies Enabling

  3. Underwater Gliders: Recent Developments and Future Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    technology with a large cost-saving potential over current ocean sampling technolo- gies for sustained (month and to enhance Fig. 1. Dredging and sounding arrangements on board the Challenger. Photo Credit: NOAA Photo gliders, represent a rapidly-maturing tech- nology with a large cost-saving potential over currently

  4. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    factors for China’s coal generation results largely from therelative share of coal generation decreases significantlycompetitive with coal-fired generation (Wang, 2010).

  5. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    31. China's Electricity Generation Output by Fuel under33. China's Electricity Generation Output by Fuel under31. China's Electricity Generation Output by Fuel under

  6. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biomass, biofuel and solar water heaters, and fossil-basedhigher, and hydro and solar water heater was 112% higherused for biomass, CTL and solar water heaters, the two power

  7. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    output by each alternative energy type from 2010 to 2030 isof each alternative energy technology type, an energy returntypes of PV power plants with CIS having the lowest water intensity of all alternative energy

  8. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10. Assumed Material Intensity for Wind Turbines (tons/wind turbine technologies, the derived material intensitythe wind turbines and the wind farm, from which material

  9. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of thermosiphon solar water heaters. ” Solar Energy 83: 39-2011e, “Shoddy solar water heaters threaten reputation. ”54 Outlook of Solar Water Heaters in the Residential

  10. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chen et. al. solar study involves an environmental extendedand environmental life cycle analysis of thermosiphon solaris solar water heaters, which have environmental benefits in

  11. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into three main categories: off-grid remote solar PV and PV-of the investment for off-grid remote PV projects subsidizedused in China for rural, off-grid electricity generation

  12. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gasoline, diesel and other oil products through direct coal1.1 Mt of fuel and oil products, including 715,000 tons ofreach 30 million tons of oil products per year by 2020, with

  13. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the earliest one- and two-loop PWR design and the CNP-1000as the standard three-loop PWR design with a high burn-upCPR-1000 and 1000+ Generation II PWR designs and the AP1000

  14. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into gaseous uranium fluoride (UF6); enrichment; fuel rodU-235 Concentration in UF6 Losses (conversion, fuelgaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF6) can be liquefied at lower

  15. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    61 Table 24. Five Major Bioethanol Producers inBioethanol Gasification Liquid Biofuels Bioethanol Biodiesel mil rural

  16. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    51 Table 23. Biodiesel Producers by Productionexempt consumption tax on biodiesel. ” Reuters, 27 Decemberarticle/2010/12/27/us- china-biodiesel-idUSTRE6BQ2EM20101227

  17. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Runqing Hu, 2005, “Solar thermal in China: Overview andperspectives of the Chinese solar thermal market. ” RefocusProspectives for China’s solar thermal power technology

  18. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14% for conventional district heating and 14% for geothermalgeothermal heat to a district heating system. Since low tom 2 in 2007, and district space heating from 13 million m 2

  19. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable technology sectors including hydropower, biomass,and biomass power generation are two other renewableTotal Renewable Power Hydropower Pumped Hydro (2011) Biomass

  20. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dominate the solar water heating market with an 86% share inChinese solar water heating market, only vacuum tube solarmarket for solar water heaters. In the major solar water heating

  1. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    54 7.1 Solar Water Heating Technologies18. Urban Household Water Heating Technology Shares, 2010 -households. Solar Water Heating Technologies Overview Solar

  2. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s reliance on grain-based fuel ethanol and its competitionanalysis of cassava-based fuel ethanol in China. ” Journalscale application of fuel ethanol in 1999 and continued

  3. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Water Heater Geothermal energy Biomass Pellets mil m2an increasingly important geothermal energy user in the lastin direct use of geothermal energy through ground source

  4. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology. ” London: Renewable UK. Available at: http://tower plant in China. ” Renewable and Sustainable Energyby plant in Guangxi." Renewable and Sustainable Energy

  5. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hybrid systems for rural electrification, on-grid buildingdriven by the Township Electrification Program for rural PVWhile rural PV have grown under the Township Electrification

  6. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    findings from various nuclear plant construction lifecycle2011c, “New nuclear power plants ‘set to be approved. ’”energy implications of nuclear power plants but the results

  7. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulations along with programs and subsidies to encourage the growth of non-fossil alternative energy including solar,

  8. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Keyof a 1.5 MW solar power tower plant in China. ” Renewablelarger commercial solar power tower plants in Northwestern

  9. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integrated water heaters and use a water tank that acts asthe water tanks and pipes of solar water heaters installed

  10. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biomass, biofuel and solar water heaters, and fossil-basedknown as integrated water heaters and use a water tank thatgas, electric and LPG water heaters and each water heater’s

  11. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more expensive than coal and energy security concerns ofPetroleum Input Coal Input Total Energy Input EROEI Per MJOutput Efficiency Coal Electricity Total Energy Water (tons/

  12. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s 102 MW Donghaiqiao offshore wind farm becoming the firstoperating large-scale offshore wind farm. In Octoberto construct four offshore wind farms in Jiangsu province

  13. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) (Zhou et al. , Anothernuclear companies as China’s NNSA lacks independence andAs mentioned previously, the NNSA has limited staffing

  14. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    33 Nuclear Technology34 5.1 Nuclear Technology Overview: Current Status anddevelopment. 5. Nuclear Technology Outlook Nuclear

  15. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dish stirling technology with a parabolic reflector, China has only recently started exploring small-scale solardish/stirling engines and line- focusing Fresnel reflect systems (Wang, 2010). 2.5 Remaining Challenges to Solar

  16. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Energy Association (BWEA), 2005, “BWEA Briefing Sheet: Wind Turbineturbines with expected annual production capacity of 450 MW (Xinhua, 2011c). 3.5 Remaining Challenges for Wind Energy

  17. Safety Case Development: Current Practice, Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Tim

    and maintenance, and the problems engineers face in these areas. 1.1 The Purpose and Content of a Safety Case and evidence aspects of the safety case are combined; · Safety Case Maintenance - examining the need the safety requirements, so long as the lanes fail independently. · SE - the results of hardware reliability

  18. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China. Prior to 1990, small hydro in China was defined hydrorevised over time and small hydro currently is defined asand does not include small hydro, which are often not grid-

  19. Current Status and Potential Future Developments for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -20, 2005 #12;Why Forest Certification? Initially, concerns about rapid deforestation and illegal logging in response to public concern about tropical deforestation and demand for an international wood

  20. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar collectors, tower receiver, energy storage systemCSP Solar Tower are distinguished as separate energy typesembodied energy and resource requirements for CSP tower to

  1. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    total primary energy will be supplied by alternative energy by 2030 with the 2030 electricity supply

  2. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    curtail-chinas-coal- gasification-for-fuel-yet-conversion-Biogas and Biomass Gasification Liquid Biofuels Bioethanolcombustion, biomass gasification and biomass co-fired coal

  3. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as both storage and solar collector and uses gravity flow toSteel Concrete Solar collectors, tower receiver, energycontrol room Glass Solar collectors (heliostats) Copper

  4. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    maintaining system stability and power quality highlightsstability with high penetration of renewables such as low voltage ride-through, active power control systems,

  5. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    71 Table 33. Silicon and Rare Earth Metal Requirements forneodymium for wind and rare earth metals for advanced solaraluminum, copper), rare earth metals (neodymium, indium,

  6. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind power in China: A case study of nonrenewable energy costand cost- sharing arrangement mandated in the Renewable Energy Law and its impact on grid connections for new wind

  7. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high average energy output to fossil fuel input ratio of 42analyze the life-cycle fossil fuel energy requirements andalternative energy source to fossil fuels. Since 2000,

  8. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    its remaining potential as a renewable energy source and itsrenewable energy source and with abundant solar resources in China, particularly in the western regions, solar power generation has very high growth potential

  9. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Shanghai and western Inner Mongolia and Shandong, withof Xinjiang and Inner Mongolia with some installed capacityin the regions of Inner Mongolia and parts of Xinjiang with

  10. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    15 Table 7. Material Intensity for CSP13 Figure 6. Components and Layout of Proposed CSP Tower in12 CSP Tower Modeling

  11. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission which canhigh voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission, an increase

  12. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    curtail-chinas-coal- gasification-for-fuel-yet-conversion-coal as a feedstock, coal gasification produces syngas whichCoal to Methanol Gasification Coal to Synthetic Methanol

  13. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailings Assay (% U-235 in depleted uranium tailings) U-235and tailings also known as depleted uranium which have much

  14. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    new rules for small wind farm projects. ” Xinhua News, 11NEA, 2011). In some wind farms in Gansu, there have beendecrease line loss and the wind farm control system are

  15. Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimating total offshore wind potential of 200 GW (Cheung,most of this offshore wind potential is located off China’sConstraints A potential resource constrain for wind power is

  16. Additivity and non-additivity of multipartite entanglement measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huangjun Zhu; Lin Chen; Masahito Hayashi

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the additivity property of three multipartite entanglement measures, i.e. the geometric measure of entanglement (GM), the relative entropy of entanglement and the logarithmic global robustness. First, we show the additivity of GM of multipartite states with real and non-negative entries in the computational basis. Many states of experimental and theoretical interests have this property, e.g. Bell diagonal states, maximally correlated generalized Bell diagonal states, generalized Dicke states, the Smolin state, and the generalization of D\\"{u}r's multipartite bound entangled states. We also prove the additivity of other two measures for some of these examples. Second, we show the non-additivity of GM of all antisymmetric states of three or more parties, and provide a unified explanation of the non-additivity of the three measures of the antisymmetric projector states. In particular, we derive analytical formulae of the three measures of one copy and two copies of the antisymmetric projector states respectively. Third, we show, with a statistical approach, that almost all multipartite pure states with sufficiently large number of parties are nearly maximally entangled with respect to GM and relative entropy of entanglement. However, their GM is not strong additive; what's more surprising, for generic pure states with real entries in the computational basis, GM of one copy and two copies, respectively, are almost equal. Hence, more states may be suitable for universal quantum computation, if measurements can be performed on two copies of the resource states. We also show that almost all multipartite pure states cannot be produced reversibly with the combination multipartite GHZ states under asymptotic LOCC, unless relative entropy of entanglement is non-additive for generic multipartite pure states.

  17. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world`s major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  18. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world's major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  20. Breaking Barriers in Polymer Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Post, Brian K [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Lloyd, Peter D [ORNL; Kunc, Vlastimil [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) enables the creation of complex structures directly from a computer-aided design (CAD). There are limitations that prevent the technology from realizing its full potential. AM has been criticized for being slow and expensive with limited build size. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a large scale AM system that improves upon each of these areas by more than an order of magnitude. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system directly converts low cost pellets into a large, three-dimensional part at a rate exceeding 25 kg/h. By breaking these traditional barriers, it is possible for polymer AM to penetrate new manufacturing markets.

  1. additional thermomechanical treatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatments Subsequent to Addition of the CiteSeer Summary: The development and testing of word-retrieval treatments for aphasia has generally focused on approaches that...

  2. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  3. Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Grid: The Environment Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Future Grid: The Environment Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Systems" Funded by the U

  4. Remembering a Future Caribbean Gender, Generation and Memory: Remembering a Future Caribbean1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Remembering a Future Caribbean Gender, Generation and Memory: Remembering a Future Caribbean1 by D, in the dusk of her life, there was little that was memorable in the contemporary Caribbean. This is a provocatively harsh opening, one that a glance at any Human Development Report ­ which notes that the Caribbean

  5. Additional Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated aging of1.1Energy DPFFOA |

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

  7. Buying Hedge with Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Mark; Kastens, Terry L.

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural Economist, Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. Many bulk purchasers of agricultural com- modities need price risk management tools to help stabilize input prices. Livestock feeders... anticipating future feed needs or grain export- ers making commitments to sell grain are two users of agricultural commodities who could benefit from input price management strate- gies. A common tool is a buying, or long, hedge using futures. Producers...

  8. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Renewable energy for the future...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Renewable energy for the future. Local government options for promoting development of renewable energy resources Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map |...

  9. Tulsa Programs For additional information,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Tulsa Programs For additional information, please contact: Vickie E. Lake, Ph.D. (918) 660 entirety on the Tulsa campus. Course delivery is typically in the evenings. If enrolled full- time: http://gradweb.ou.edu PROGRAM COORDINATOR Vickie E. Lake, Assistant Professor University of Oklahoma-Tulsa

  10. Urologic robots and future directions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mozer, Pierre; Stoianovici, Dan; 10.1097/MOU.0b013e32831cc1ba

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in urology has gained immense popularity with the daVinci system, but a lot of research teams are working on new robots. The purpose of this study is to review current urologic robots and present future development directions. RECENT FINDINGS: Future systems are expected to advance in two directions: improvements of remote manipulation robots and developments of image-guided robots. SUMMARY: The final goal of robots is to allow safer and more homogeneous outcomes with less variability of surgeon performance, as well as new tools to perform tasks on the basis of medical transcutaneous imaging, in a less invasive way, at lower costs. It is expected that improvements for a remote system could be augmented in reality, with haptic feedback, size reduction, and development of new tools for natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery. The paradigm of image-guided robots is close to clinical availability and the most advanced robots are presented with end-use...

  11. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker; Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM), Comstock; Robert H. (Gardendale, AL)

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  12. DENSE PHASE REBURN COMBUSTION SYSTEM (DPRCS) DEMONSTRATION ON A 154 MWE TANGENTIAL FURNACE: ADDITIONAL AREA OF INTEREST-TO DEVELOP AND DEMONSTRATE AN IN-FURNACE MULTI-POLLUTANT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE NOx, SO2 & Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen C. Wiley; Steven Castagnero; Geoff Green; Kevin Davis; David White

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Semi-dense phase pneumatic delivery and injection of calcium and sodium sorbents, and microfine powdered coal, at various sidewall elevations of an online operating coal-fired power plant, was investigated for the express purpose of developing an in-furnace, economic multi-pollutant reduction methodology for NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} & Hg. The 154 MWe tangentially-fired furnace that was selected for a full-scale demonstration, was recently retrofitted for NO{sub x} reduction with a high velocity rotating-opposed over-fire air system. The ROFA system, a Mobotec USA technology, has a proven track record of breaking up laminar flow along furnace walls, thereby enhancing the mix of all constituents of combustion. The knowledge gained from injecting sorbents and micronized coal into well mixed combustion gases with significant improvement in particulate retention time, should serve well the goals of an in-furnace multi-pollutant reduction technology; that of reducing back-end cleanup costs on a wide variety of pollutants, on a cost per ton basis, by first accomplishing significant in-furnace reductions of all pollutants.

  13. Water for future Mars astronauts?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water for future Mars astronauts? Water for future Mars astronauts? Within its first three months on Mars, NASA's Curiosity Rover saw a surprising diversity of soils and sediments...

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  15. Introduction to Futures Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mintert, James R.; Welch, Mark

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    are some terms and definitions. Figure 1. Marking-to-Market Buyer and Seller Accounts at Exchange Clearinghouse. Buyer (Long) Date Action Price Day 1 Buy at $6.00/bu Day 2 No action (but price increases) $6.10/bu $0.10/bu gain x 5,000 bu... $500 gain from day 1 Seller (Short) Date Action Price Day 1 Sell at $6.00/bu Day 2 No action (but price increases) $6.10/bu $0.10/bu loss x 5,000 bu $500 loss from day 1 Long A buyer of a futures contract. Someone who buys a futures...

  16. Promoting the event Additional Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Developing Budget Organizing the group Assessment Decision Making Brainstorming Getting down and dirty IF you Describe ten specific resources (facilities, money, people, etc) available to your group. x Generate

  17. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuring theCommittee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies," TheASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

  18. Precision and Energy Usage for Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemon, Lee; Sudradjat, Anton; Jaquez, Maribel; Krishna, Aditya; Rammah, Marwan; Dornfeld, David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hague, "Sustainability of additive manufacturing: measuringASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies,"ASTM Committee F42 on Additive Manufacturing Technologies. -

  19. Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 ofEmergencyAcrobat PDFMakerAdam GarberAdditive Lower

  20. Quantum motor and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgeny G. Fateev

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a popular language, the possibilities of the Casimir expulsion effect are presented, which can be the basis of quantum motors. Such motors can be in the form of a special multilayer thin film with periodic and complex nanosized structures. Quantum motors of the type of the Casimir platforms can be the base of transportation, energy and many other systems in the future.

  1. Shaping the Future SHAPE YOUR FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    furnished accom- modation for the duration of their studies at SLU. When living in SLU's student housing-class university in the fields of life and environmental sciences. With a focus on global sustainable development, SLU's research and educational programmes are helping to create a healthier, more sustainable world

  2. PRESENT AND FUTURE TECHNOLOGY OF HIGH VOLTAGE SYSTEMS FOR NEUTRAL BEAM INJECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, W.R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling, additional parallel elements, or a draBtic change in the system configuration or operating procedure (see section below on Simplifying Future

  3. Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry, Government Policy and Future Opportunities. Fuel cells (FCs)are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several

  4. Catalyst and process development for hydrogen preparation from future fuel cell feedstocks. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980. [Pt/Rh, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ni/Rh, Rh/Re, Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarrington, R M; Feins, I R; Hwang, H S

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalysts are being screened to steam reform hydrocarbons in an autothermal reformer (STR). Twenty-one samples have been screened in a 1-in.-diam (ATR) reactor using No. 2 oil as the hydrocarbon feed. A series of platinum-rhodium catalysts were evaluated to study the effect of varying compositions. A sample containing 1.7% Pt/0.3% Rh was most active but the difference among the samples was within the range of test variability. Development of a more realistic test has been started. The effect of O/sub 2//C level on the gas composition leaving the catalytic partial oxidation section has been determined. The amount of unreacted oil increases as O/sub 2//C level decreases. The unreacted oil is more aromatic than the feedstock. The gas composition contains considerably more olefins as the O/sub 2//C level decreases. Post-run catalyst characterization indicates that the catalyst carrier does not deteriorate in the ATR test. A drastic decrease in CO chemisorption is noted on the Pt/Rh samples. This decline in CO chemisorption could either be due to metal sintering or to carbon deposition on the metal. Other analysis are required to determine which is causing the decline in CO chemisorption. Very low coke levels were found on Pt, Rh, and Pt/Rh samples. Addition of Rh to nickel reduces the coke level over that observed for nickel catalysts.

  5. FUTURES with Jaime Escalante

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy awarded the Foundation for Advancements in Science and Education (FASE) $826,000 as support to produce the second set of FUTURES segments consisting of 12, 15-minute programs. The programs provide motivation for students to study math by connecting math to the work place and real-life problem scenarios. The programs are broadcast in 50 states through PBS Elementary and Secondary Service (E/SS). The grant term ended on December 16, 1993 and this final report documents program and financial activity results. The 12 episodes are titled: Animal Care, Meteorology, Mass Communication, Advanced Energy, Oceanography, Graphic Design, Future Habitats, Environmental Science & Technology, Fitness & Physical Performance, Interpersonal Communications, Advanced Transportation and Product Design. Each program addresses as many as ten careers or job types within the broader field named. Minority and gender-balanced role models appear throughout the programs.

  6. Assessing the Additionality of the Clean Development Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Glachant3, Anna Schröder4 1 Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change for emission reduction credits. The CDM provides countries committed to climate countries like Canada, New Zealand, Russia, and Japan who have decided

  7. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    baney, Ronald; Tulenko, James

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  8. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    html. Study of Innovation and Technology in ChinaOffice. Study of Innovation and Technology in China SITCRevolution. ” Study of Innovation and Technology in China

  9. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    protection 5 Recent Accomplishments and Progress SEI formation on different carbon anodes o Material investigated: MCMB-1028, 3 types of surface modified graphite from...

  10. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industry. 17 “China’s 3D Printing: Not a Revolution–Yet,”18 Rose Brooks, “3D Printing in the Emerging Markets:Academician Deciphers 3D Printing Tech- nology], ?????? [

  11. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  12. Additive Manufacturing in China: Threats, Opportunities, and Developments (Part I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3-D Printing Will Change the World,” Harvard Business Review, March 2013, http://hbr.org/2013/03/3-d-print-

  13. DOE Announces Additional Steps in Developing Sustainable Biofuels Industry

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentI Office of ENERGYAgreesof Energy DOE|

  14. DOE Announces Additional Steps in Developing Sustainable Biofuels Industry

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact UsDepartmentConsumers | Department of| Department

  15. ORNL, CINCINNATI partner to develop commercial large-scale additive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627HomelandACRF Archive: Raymond McCord, Giri

  16. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E LGeothermal *abuseDepartmenta

  17. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I E LGeothermal *abuseDepartmentaOvercharge

  18. Development of Advanced Electrolytes and Electrolyte Additives | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S H I ETechnology |Department ofof Energy

  19. Future directions for QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New directions for exploring QCD at future high-energy colliders are sketched. These include jets within jets. BFKL dynamics, soft and hard diffraction, searches for disoriented chiral condensate, and doing a better job on minimum bias physics. The new experimental opportunities include electron-ion collisions at HERA, a new collider detector at the C0 region of the TeVatron, and the FELIX initiative at the LHC.

  20. Steganography: Past, Present, Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judge, J C

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steganography (a rough Greek translation of the term Steganography is secret writing) has been used in various forms for 2500 years. It has found use in variously in military, diplomatic, personal and intellectual property applications. Briefly stated, steganography is the term applied to any number of processes that will hide a message within an object, where the hidden message will not be apparent to an observer. This paper will explore steganography from its earliest instances through potential future application.

  1. Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.; Cullen, Daniel; Hibbett, David; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Jeffries, Thomas W.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Kuske, Cheryl; Magnuson, Jon K.; Martin, Francis; Spatafora, Joey; Tsang, Adrian; Baker, Scott E.

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Fungi play important roles across the range of current and future biofuel production processes. From crop/feedstock health to plant biomass saccharification, enzyme production to bioprocesses for producing ethanol, higher alcohols or future hydrocarbon biofuels, fungi are involved. Research and development are underway to understand the underlying biological processes and improve them to make bioenergy production efficient on an industrial scale. Genomics is the foundation of the systems biology approach that is being used to accelerate the research and development efforts across the spectrum of topic areas that impact biofuels production. In this review, we discuss past, current and future advances made possible by genomic analyses of the fungi that impact plant/feedstock health, degradation of lignocellulosic biomass and fermentation of sugars to ethanol, hydrocarbon biofuels and renewable chemicals.

  2. SPADs for Vertex Tracker detectors in Future Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilella, E; Vila, A; Dieguez, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics aims at the future linear colliders impose such stringent requirements on detector systems that exceed those met by any previous technology. Amongst other novel technologies, SPADs (Single Photon Avalanche Diodes) detectors are being developed to track high energy particles at ILC (International Linear Collider) and CLIC (Compact LInear Collider). These sensors offer outstanding qualities, such as an extraordinary high sensitivity, ultra-fast response time and virtually infinite gain, in addition to compatibility with standard CMOS technologies. As a result, SPAD detectors enable the direct conversion of a single particle event onto a CMOS digital signal in the sub-nanosecond time scale, which leads to the possibility of single BX (bunch crossing) resolution at some particle colliders. However, SPAD detectors suffer from two main problems, namely the noise pulses generated by the sensor and the low fill-factor. The noise pulses worsen the detector occupancy, while the low fill-factor reduces the detec...

  3. Primer on electricity futures and other derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoft, S.; Belden, T.; Goldman, C.; Pickle, S.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increased competition in bulk power and retail electricity markets is likely to lower electricity prices, but will also result in greater price volatility as the industry moves away from administratively determined, cost-based rates and encourages market-driven prices. Price volatility introduces new risks for generators, consumers, and marketers. Electricity futures and other derivatives can help each of these market participants manage, or hedge, price risks in a competitive electricity market. Futures contracts are legally binding and negotiable contracts that call for the future delivery of a commodity. In most cases, physical delivery does not take place, and the futures contract is closed by buying or selling a futures contract on or near the delivery date. Other electric rate derivatives include options, price swaps, basis swaps, and forward contracts. This report is intended as a primer for public utility commissioners and their staff on futures and other financial instruments used to manage price risks. The report also explores some of the difficult choices facing regulators as they attempt to develop policies in this area.

  4. Coal: Energy for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared in response to a request by the US Department of energy (DOE). The principal objectives of the study were to assess the current DOE coal program vis-a-vis the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), and to recommend the emphasis and priorities that DOE should consider in updating its strategic plan for coal. A strategic plan for research, development, demonstration, and commercialization (RDD and C) activities for coal should be based on assumptions regarding the future supply and price of competing energy sources, the demand for products manufactured from these sources, technological opportunities, and the need to control the environmental impact of waste streams. These factors change with time. Accordingly, the committee generated strategic planning scenarios for three time periods: near-term, 1995--2005; mid-term, 2006--2020; and, long-term, 2021--2040. The report is divided into the following chapters: executive summary; introduction and scope of the study; overview of US DOE programs and planning; trends and issues for future coal use; the strategic planning framework; coal preparation, coal liquid mixtures, and coal bed methane recovery; clean fuels and specialty products from coal; electric power generation; technology demonstration and commercialization; advanced research programs; conclusions and recommendations; appendices; and glossary. 174 refs.

  5. Toward an energy surety future.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatro, Marjorie L.; Jones, Scott A.; Covan, John Morgan; Kuswa, Glenn W.; Menicucci, David F.; Robinett, Rush D. III (.; )

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the inevitable depletion of fossil fuels and the corresponding release of carbon to the environment, the global energy future is complex. Some of the consequences may be politically and economically disruptive, and expensive to remedy. For the next several centuries, fuel requirements will increase with population, land use, and ecosystem degradation. Current or projected levels of aggregated energy resource use will not sustain civilization as we know it beyond a few more generations. At the same time, issues of energy security, reliability, sustainability, recoverability, and safety need attention. We supply a top-down, qualitative model--the surety model--to balance expenditures of limited resources to assure success while at the same time avoiding catastrophic failure. Looking at U.S. energy challenges from a surety perspective offers new insights on possible strategies for developing solutions to challenges. The energy surety model with its focus on the attributes of security and sustainability could be extrapolated into a global energy system using a more comprehensive energy surety model than that used here. In fact, the success of the energy surety strategy ultimately requires a more global perspective. We use a 200 year time frame for sustainability because extending farther into the future would almost certainly miss the advent and perfection of new technologies or changing needs of society.

  6. Sustainability protects resources for future generations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses the steps necessary to provide livable urban centers for future generations through sustainable development, or sustainability. To illustrate this concept, nonsustainable cities and sustainable cities are compared. Sustainable city projects for several major US cites are reviewed.

  7. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 3, Appendix B: NO{sub x} and alkali vapor control strategies: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CRS Sirrine (CRSS) is evaluating a novel IGCC process in which gases exiting the gasifier are burned in a gas turbine combustion system. The turbine exhaust gas is used to generate additional power in a conventional steam generator. This results in a significant increase in efficiency. However, the IGCC process requires development of novel approaches to control SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions and alkali vapors which can damage downstream turbine components. Ammonia is produced from the reaction of coal-bound nitrogen with steam in the reducing zone of any fixed bed coal gasifier. This ammonia can be partially oxidized to NO{sub x} when the product gas is oxidized in a gas turbine combustor. Alkali metals vaporize in the high-temperature combustion zone of the gasifier and laser condense on the surface of small char or ash particles or on cooled metal surfaces. It these alkali-coated materials reach the gas turbine combustor, the alkali will revaporize condense on turbine blades and cause rapid high temperature corrosion. Efficiency reduction will result. PSI Technology Company (PSIT) was contracted by CRSS to evaluate and recommend solutions for NO{sub x} emissions and for alkali metals deposition. Various methods for NO{sub x} emission control and the potential process and economic impacts were evaluated. This included estimates of process performance, heat and mass balances around the combustion and heat transfer units and a preliminary economic evaluation. The potential for alkali metal vaporization and condensation at various points in the system was also estimated. Several control processes and evaluated, including an order of magnitude cost for the control process.

  8. FIRST STEPS INTO AN ENERGY EFFECIENT FUTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARRETT, JANE L.

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians proposes to develop a more sustainable, affordable and autonomous energy future for Tribal Members. The Band will develop the capacity to conduct energy audits, to implement energy efficiency measures in tribal homes, and to build more energy efficient housing. This will be done by providing direct classroom and on the job training for Tribal members to conduct the energy audits and the installation of insulation.

  9. ARM - Future Trends

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature StoriesgovCampaignsSurfacegovFrontFuture

  10. Future Mobility in Maryland

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2Y-12 Press98918,FUTURE

  11. Future City Competition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey Campbell is theOpportunities HighFusionFusionFuture

  12. Milk Futures, Options and Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haigh, Michael; Stockton, Matthew; Anderson, David P.; Schwart Jr., Robert B.

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The milk futures and options market enables producers and processors to manage price risk. This publication explains hedging, margin accounts, basis and how to track it, and other fundamentals of the futures and options market....

  13. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Additive Manufacturing University of Kansas of additive manufacturing. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered using additive manufacturing in applications such as, but not limited to the net shape manufacture of

  14. The research programme Future Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The research programme Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use Welcome to a lunch.slu.se/futureagriculture For questions, please contact KatarinaVrede (katarina.vrede@slu.se) About Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use The changes and challenges facing agriculture in the future will be substantial, not only

  15. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies: Current Challenges and Future Plans - 12558

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Andrew [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Fuel Cycle Technologies office (FCT program) is to provide options for possible future changes in national nuclear energy programs. While the recent draft report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future stressed the need for organization changes, interim waste storage and the establishment of a permanent repository for nuclear waste management, it also recognized the potential value of alternate fuel cycles and recommended continued research and development in that area. With constrained budgets and great expectations, the current challenges are significant. The FCT program now performs R and D covering the entire fuel cycle. This broad R and D scope is a result of the assignment of new research and development (R and D) responsibilities to the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), as well as reorganization within NE. This scope includes uranium extraction from seawater and uranium enrichment R and D, used nuclear fuel recycling technology, advanced fuel development, and a fresh look at a range of disposal geologies. Additionally, the FCT program performs the necessary systems analysis and screening of fuel cycle alternatives that will identify the most promising approaches and areas of technology gaps. Finally, the FCT program is responsible for a focused effort to consider features of fuel cycle technology in a way that promotes nonproliferation and security, such as Safeguards and Security by Design, and advanced monitoring and predictive modeling capabilities. This paper and presentation will provide an overview of the FCT program R and D scope and discuss plans to analyze fuel cycle options and support identified R and D priorities into the future. The FCT program is making progress in implanting a science based, engineering driven research and development program that is evaluating options for a sustainable fuel cycle in the U.S. Responding to the BRC recommendations, any resulting legislative changes, and meeting the needs of the commercial nuclear industry (including developing and evaluating fuel concepts that may enhance accident tolerance in light water reactors while possibly improving fuel performance) are program priorities. Continuing to build partnerships and collaborations with industry, universities, international organizations, and other DOE programs are essential to addressing the challenges facing the FCT program. (authors)

  16. Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy SHARE Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources...

  17. Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Additive Manufacturing Workshop Poster Abstract Submission - deadline July 10, 2015 Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials using in situ sensors,...

  18. Analysis of environmental constraints on expanding reserves in current and future reservoirs in wetlands. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, B.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Louisiana wetlands require careful management to allow exploitation of non-renewable resources without destroying renewable resources. Current regulatory requirements have been moderately successful in meeting this goal by restricting development in wetland habitats. Continuing public emphasis on reducing environmental impacts of resource development is causing regulators to reassess their regulations and operators to rethink their compliance strategies. We examined the regulatory system and found that reducing the number of applications required by going to a single application process and having a coherent map of the steps required for operations in wetland areas would reduce regulatory burdens. Incremental changes can be made to regulations to allow one agency to be the lead for wetland permitting at minimal cost to operators. Operators need cost effective means of access that will reduce environmental impacts, decrease permitting time, and limit future liability. Regulators and industry must partner to develop incentive based regulations that can provide significant environmental impact reduction for minimal economic cost. In addition regulators need forecasts of future E&P trends to estimate the impact of future regulations. To determine future activity we attempted to survey potential operators when this approach was unsuccessful we created two econometric models of north and south Louisiana relating drilling activity, success ratio, and price to predict future wetland activity. Results of the econometric models indicate that environmental regulations have a small but statistically significant effect on drilling operations in wetland areas of Louisiana. We examined current wetland practices and evaluated those practices comparing environmental versus economic costs and created a method for ranking the practices.

  19. Introduction The use of ethanol as a gasoline additive is likely to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Introduction The use of ethanol as a gasoline additive is likely to increase in the near future will also lead to additional ethanol use. There- fore, it is important to understand how ethanol affects that the presence of ethanol could have undesirable effects on the biodegradation of BTEX (i.e., benzene, toluene

  20. Calculation Method for the Projection of Future Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. McLeod

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the calculation method developed for the projection of future utility spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharges in regard to their timing, quantity, burnup, and initial enrichment. This projection method complements the utility-supplied RW-859 data on historic discharges and short-term projections of SNF discharges by providing long-term projections that complete the total life cycle of discharges for each of the current U.S. nuclear power reactors. The method was initially developed in mid-1999 to update the SNF discharge projection associated with the 1995 RW-859 utility survey (CRWMS M&O 1996). and was further developed as described in Rev. 00 of this report (CRWMS M&O 2001a). Primary input to the projection of SNF discharges is the utility projection of the next five discharges from each nuclear unit, which is provided via the revised final version of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) 1998 RW-859 utility survey (EIA 2000a). The projection calculation method is implemented via a set of Excel 97 spreadsheets. These calculations provide the interface between receipt of the utility five-discharge projections that are provided in the RW-859 survey, and the delivery of projected life-cycle SNF discharge quantities and characteristics in the format requisite for performing logistics analysis to support design of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). Calculation method improvements described in this report include the addition of a reactor-specific maximum enrichment-based discharge burnup limit. This limit is the consequence of the enrichment limit, currently 5 percent. which is imposed as a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license condition on nuclear fuel fabrication plants. In addition, the calculation method now includes the capability for projecting future nuclear plant power upratings, consistent with many such recent plant uprates and the prospect of additional future uprates. Finally. this report summarizes the results of the 2002 Reference SNF Discharge Projection.

  1. Foundation futures: Energy saving opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant energy savings will result from compliance to the foundation insulation recommendations in ASHRAE Standard 90.2P, /open quotes/Energy Efficient Design of New, Low-Rise Residential Buildings/close quotes/ (ASHRAE 1987). This paper summarizes an assessment of current US energy savings from foundation insulation and estimates future savings resulting from broad-scale adoption of ASHRAE 90.2P. The assessment is based on the premise that the detailed analysis behind ASHRAE 90.2P and its systematic method of determining insulation levels in a balanced manner will allow it to become the accepted base energy performance standard for all residential construction. The total energy currently being saved by foundation insulation (30% of 1.7 million new units) in one year's worth of new housing starts in the United States is estimated at 9.6 /times/ 10/sup 12/ Btu/yr (10.1 PJ/yr (petajoule = 10/sup 15/ joule)). The full compliance with ASHRAE 90.2P leads to more than a doubling of current foundation insulation energy savings. The extrapolation of existing practice and the addition of other contributions resulting from compliance with ASHRAE 90.2 lead to an estimated energy savings by the year 2010 between 0.38 and 0.45 quad/yr (400 and 475 PJ/yr (quad = 10/sup 15/ Btu)). 11 refs., 14 tabs., 7 figs.

  2. Demand response enabling technology development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Auslander, David; Huizenga, Charlie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior in developing a demand response future. Phase_II_Demand Response Enabling Technology Development Phase IIYi Yuan The goal of the Demand Response Enabling Technology

  3. Leadership Development | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Professional Development Resource WIST Talk: The Art of Networking video Leadership Development Argonne has a long-term vision for its workforce, recognizing that future challenges...

  4. Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    #12;Out of Bounds Additive Manufacturing Christopher Holshouser, Clint Newell, and Sid Palas, Tenn. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing system has the potential to manufacture parts completely) are working on an additive manufacturing (AM) system (Big Area Additive Manufacturing, or BAAM) capable

  5. ICME & MGI Big Area Additive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICME & MGI · Big Area Additive Manufacturing · Neutron Characterization for AM · Materials problems in additive manu- facturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing of the world's most advanced neu- tron facilities, the HFIR and SNS, to characterize additive manufactured

  6. Fuel Cells for a Sustainable Future? Jane Powell, Michael Peters,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Fuel Cells for a Sustainable Future? Jane Powell, Michael Peters, Alan Ruddell and Jim Halliday March 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 50 #12;Fuel Cells for a Sustainable Future? A review of the opportunities and barriers to the development of fuel cell technology Powell, J

  7. Taking the China Challenge: China and the Future of Latin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufts University

    Taking the China Challenge: China and the Future of Latin American Economic Development Kevin P-author of the new book, The Dragon in the Room: China and the Future of Latin American Industrialization, Stanford University Press. The author would like to thank Elen Shrethsa for research as- sistance #12;Taking the China

  8. Economics of Current and Future Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, L.; Aden, A.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents detailed comparative analysis on the production economics of both current and future biofuels, including ethanol, biodiesel, and butanol. Our objectives include demonstrating the impact of key parameters on the overall process economics (e.g., plant capacity, raw material pricing, and yield) and comparing how next-generation technologies and fuels will differ from today's technologies. The commercialized processes and corresponding economics presented here include corn-based ethanol, sugarcane-based ethanol, and soy-based biodiesel. While actual full-scale economic data are available for these processes, they have also been modeled using detailed process simulation. For future biofuel technologies, detailed techno-economic data exist for cellulosic ethanol from both biochemical and thermochemical conversion. In addition, similar techno-economic models have been created for n-butanol production based on publicly available literature data. Key technical and economic challenges facing all of these biofuels are discussed.

  9. The Future of Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Future of Biofuels The Future of Biofuels Addthis Description Secretary Chu discusses why feedstock grasses such as miscanthus could be the future of biofuels. Speakers...

  10. Futures for energy cooperatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A listing of Federal agencies and programs with potential funding for community-scale cooperatives using conservation measures and solar technologies is presented in Section 1. Section 2 presents profiles of existing community energy cooperatives describing their location, history, membership, services, sources of finance and technical assistance. A condensed summary from a recent conference on Energy Cooperatives featuring notes on co-op members' experiences, problems, and opportunities is presented in Section 3. Section 4 lists contacts for additional information. A National Consumer Cooperative Bank Load Application is shown in the appendix.

  11. Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine: New Development Rersults Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the...

  12. U.S. Energy: Present State and Future Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Michael

    developing countries, considerable uncertainty exists with the future supply and price of imported oil well being of every citizen. This paper outlines the relationship between energy supply, energy use p11 Petroleum (Oil) p12

  13. Rethinking the Future Grid: Integrated Nuclear Renewable Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rethinking the Future Grid: Integrated Nuclear Renewable Energy Systems: Preprint Re-direct Destination: The U.S. DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more...

  14. Wind Energy Status and Future Wind Engineering Challenges: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thresher, R.; Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Veers, P.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the current status of wind energy technology, the potential for future wind energy development and the science and engineering challenges that must be overcome for the technology to meet its potential.

  15. Hybrid APNT: Terrestrial Radionavigation to Support Future Aviation Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    University and the director of the Stanford GPS Laboratory. 1. INTRODUCTION The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Alternative Positioning Navigation & Timing (APNT) program is developing and examining1 Hybrid APNT: Terrestrial Radionavigation to Support Future Aviation Needs Sherman Lo, Yu

  16. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Real-time High-Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Real-time High-Performance Computing Infrastructure for Next- Generation Power Grid Analysis OBJECTIVE » We are developing infrastructure, software, formal models for real Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) national electric

  17. Rationale for State Support of Industries of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trabachino, C.; Muller, M.

    Through its Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy, the US DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) seeks to develop and deploy advanced technologies and practices that will increase energy efficiency, environmental performance...

  18. James Smith: Building the Energy Future Shaping the Future Lecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    James Smith: Building the Energy Future Shaping the Future Lecture James Smith was appointed been involved in Shell business in a number of Middle Eastern countries and in the US. James Smith `ought'to do in response and assess what society will `choose'to do in reality. James Smith will identify

  19. The future of IAEA safeguards: challenges and responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Budlong - Sylvester, Kory W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For nearly two decades, the International Atomic Energy Agency (lAEA) has been transforming its safeguards system to address the challenges posed by undeclared nuclear programs, the associated revelation of an extensive non-State nuclear procurement network and other issues, including past limits to its verification mandate and the burden of noncompliance issues. Implementing the new measures, including those in the Additional Protocol, and integrating new and old safeguards measures, remains a work in progress. Implementation is complicated by factors including the limited teclmological tools that are available to address such issues as safeguarding bulk handling facilities, detection of undeclared facilities/activities, especially related to enrichment, etc. As this process continues, new challenges are arising, including the demands of expanding nuclear power production worldwide, so-called safeguards by design for a new generation of facilities, the possible IAEA role in a fissile material cutoff treaty and other elements of the arms control and disarmament agenda, the possible role in 'rollback' cases, etc. There is no doubt safeguards will need to evolve in the future, as they have over the last decades. In order for the evolutionary path to proceed, there will inter alia be a need to identify technological gaps, especially with respect to undeclared facilities, and ensure they are filled by adapting old safeguards technologies, by developing and introducing new and novel safeguards teclmologies and/or by developing new procedures and protocols. Safeguards will also need to respond to anticipated emerging threats and to future, unanticipated threats. This will require strategic planning and cooperation among Member States and with the Agency. This paper will address challenges to IAEA safeguards and the technological possibilities and R&D strategies needed to meet those challenges in the context of the forty-year evolution of safeguards, including the ongoing transformation of safeguards by the Agency.

  20. Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells," originally presented on February 11, 2014.

  1. Towards Mobile Microrobot Swarms for Additive Micromanufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavlanos, Michael

    of independently controlled microrobots in advanced, additive manufacturing applications. Keywords Mobile Microrobotics, Multi-robot Control, Additive Manufacturing 1. Introduction Flexible manufacturing capabilities, and additive manufacturing has proven to be a disruptive technology at the small- to medium-scale. Many

  2. BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES BUILDING ADDITION March 30, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES BUILDING ADDITION March 30, 2012 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The current concept is for a 33,000 sf addition ­ with approximately 22,000 sf built above ground with an 11,000 sf basement. The addition is proposed to be constructed on the east side of the existing building. The auditorium

  3. EFFECTIVE STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING WITH ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    will be presented for components that can be processed by additive manufacturing (AM) or 3D printing. The origin structures. KEYWORDS : structural health monitoring methodology, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, fatigue, intelligent structure INTRODUCTION Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing or Rapid

  4. Future Climate Engineering Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technology development Achieve GHG reductions by using energy more wisely Action needed in the transport for Norway. . . . . . . . . .27 Summary of National Report from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, UK for Germany. . . . . . . . . . .39 The Strategy of Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME

  5. Future Steelmaking Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. R. J. Fruehan

    2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing demand for an ironmaking process with lower capital cost, energy consumption and emissions than a blast furnace. It is the hypothesis of the present work that an optimized combination of two reasonable proven technologies will greatly enhance the overall process. An example is a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) linked to a smelter (e.g., AISI, HIsmelt). The objective of this research is to select promising process combinations, develop energy, materials balance and productivity models for the individual processes, conduct a limited amount of basic research on the processes and evaluate the process combinations. Three process combinations were selected with input from the industrial partners. The energy-materials and productivity models for the RHF, smelter, submerged arc furnace and CIRCOFER were developed. Since utilization of volatiles in coal is critical for energy and CO{sub 2} emission reduction, basic research on this topic was also conducted. The process models developed are a major product developed in this research. These models can be used for process evaluation by the industry. The process combinations of an RHF-Smelter and a simplified CIRCOFER-Smelter appear to be promising. Energy consumption is reduced and productivity increased. Work on this project is continuing using funds from other sources.

  6. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

  7. The house of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn what it will take to create tomorrow's net-zero energy home as scientists reveal the secrets of cool roofs, smart windows, and computer-driven energy control systems. The net-zero energy home: Scientists are working to make tomorrow's homes more than just energy efficient -- they want them to be zero energy. Iain Walker, a scientist in the Lab's Energy Performance of Buildings Group, will discuss what it takes to develop net-zero energy houses that generate as much energy as they use through highly aggressive energy efficiency and on-site renewable energy generation. Talking back to the grid: Imagine programming your house to use less energy if the electricity grid is full or price are high. Mary Ann Piette, deputy director of Berkeley Lab's building technology department and director of the Lab's Demand Response Research Center, will discuss how new technologies are enabling buildings to listen to the grid and automatically change their thermostat settings or lighting loads, among other demands, in response to fluctuating electricity prices. The networked (and energy efficient) house: In the future, your home's lights, climate control devices, computers, windows, and appliances could be controlled via a sophisticated digital network. If it's plugged in, it'll be connected. Bruce Nordman, an energy scientist in Berkeley Lab's Energy End-Use Forecasting group, will discuss how he and other scientists are working to ensure these networks help homeowners save energy.

  8. The house of the future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn what it will take to create tomorrow's net-zero energy home as scientists reveal the secrets of cool roofs, smart windows, and computer-driven energy control systems. The net-zero energy home: Scientists are working to make tomorrow's homes more than just energy efficient -- they want them to be zero energy. Iain Walker, a scientist in the Lab's Energy Performance of Buildings Group, will discuss what it takes to develop net-zero energy houses that generate as much energy as they use through highly aggressive energy efficiency and on-site renewable energy generation. Talking back to the grid: Imagine programming your house to use less energy if the electricity grid is full or price are high. Mary Ann Piette, deputy director of Berkeley Lab's building technology department and director of the Lab's Demand Response Research Center, will discuss how new technologies are enabling buildings to listen to the grid and automatically change their thermostat settings or lighting loads, among other demands, in response to fluctuating electricity prices. The networked (and energy efficient) house: In the future, your home's lights, climate control devices, computers, windows, and appliances could be controlled via a sophisticated digital network. If it's plugged in, it'll be connected. Bruce Nordman, an energy scientist in Berkeley Lab's Energy End-Use Forecasting group, will discuss how he and other scientists are working to ensure these networks help homeowners save energy.

  9. Simplifying additivity problems using direct sum constructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohisa Fukuda; Michael M. Wolf

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the additivity problems for the classical capacity of quantum channels, the minimal output entropy and its convex closure. We show for each of them that additivity for arbitrary pairs of channels holds iff it holds for arbitrary equal pairs, which in turn can be taken to be unital. In a similar sense, weak additivity is shown to imply strong additivity for any convex entanglement monotone. The implications are obtained by considering direct sums of channels (or states) for which we show how to obtain several information theoretic quantities from their values on the summands. This provides a simple and general tool for lifting additivity results.

  10. The Future of Geothermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) on the United States in the 21st Century #12;The Future of Geothermal Energy Impact of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS and Renewable Energy, Office of Geothermal Technologies, Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-05ID

  11. Rights, Obligations, and Future Generations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strole, Donald

    the right to use whatever we can regardless of the effects such action may have on future persons.2 On the other extreme are people who argue that future generations are entitled to a polution free environment, vast food reserves, and an abundance...

  12. APS: Lighting up the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potent, V.J.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) involves the construction and supporting research and development for a national user facility for synchrotron radiation research in the x-ray region. The facility, when operational in 1997, will provide super-intense x-ray beams for many areas of basic research and will serve the entire US x-ray research community of several thousand users. This paper describes the pertinent features of the design, construction and planned operation of the facility; and the impact quality has had in these areas. In addition, the introduction of several quality management techniques such as total quality management, reliability/availability planning, and user interface are discussed concerning their status and success.

  13. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, J. [ORNL; Viola, M. B. [General Motors Company

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  14. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  15. Preparing for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , they developed the multi-college, multi- department water program. ?There will be tremendous job opportunities for A&M graduates of this program,? Giardino said. (Left) Water Management and hydrologic sciences graduate student Alyson McDonald down- loads... data from a data logger. McDonald is studying groundwater and surface water hydrology at Texas A&M to compliment her background in soils and plant ecology. (Right) Master?s degree candidate Nick Russo works with the Harris County Storm Water...

  16. Addressing an Uncertain Future Using Scenario Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has had a longstanding goal of introducing uncertainty into the analysis it routinely conducts in compliance with the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) and for strategic management purposes. The need to introduce some treatment of uncertainty arises both because it would be good general management practice, and because intuitively many of the technologies under development by EERE have a considerable advantage in an uncertain world. For example, an expected kWh output from a wind generator in a future year, which is not exposed to volatile and unpredictable fuel prices, should be truly worth more than an equivalent kWh from an alternative fossil fuel fired technology. Indeed, analysts have attempted to measure this value by comparing the prices observed in fixed-price natural gas contracts compared to ones in which buyers are exposed to market prices (see Bolinger, Wiser, and Golove and (2004)). In addition to the routine reasons for exploring uncertainty given above, the history of energy markets appears to have exhibited infrequent, but troubling, regime shifts, i.e., historic turning points at which the center of gravity or fundamental nature of the system appears to have abruptly shifted. Figure 1 below shows an estimate of how the history of natural gas fired generating costs has evolved over the last three decades. The costs shown incorporate both the well-head gas price and an estimate of how improving generation technology has gradually tended to lower costs. The purpose of this paper is to explore scenario analysis as a method for introducing uncertainty into EERE's forecasting in a manner consistent with the preceding observation. The two questions are how could it be done, and what is its academic basis, if any. Despite the interest in uncertainty methods, applying them poses some major hurdles because of the heavy reliance of EERE on forecasting tools that are deterministic in nature, such as the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is the source of the influential Annual Energy Outlook whose business-as-usual (BAU) case, the Reference Case, forms the baseline for most of the U.S. energy policy discussion. NEMS is an optimizing model because: 1. it iterates to an equilibrium among modules representing the supply, demand, and energy conversion subsectors; and 2. several subsectoral models are individually solved using linear programs (LP). Consequently, it is deeply rooted in the recent past and any effort to simulate the consequences of a major regime shift as depicted in Figure 1 must come by applying an exogenously specified scenario. And, more generally, simulating futures that lie outside of our recent historic experience, even if they do not include regime switches suggest some form of scenario approach. At the same time, the statistical validity of scenarios that deviate significantly outside the ranges of historic inputs should be questioned.

  17. Additional Staff Appointments Announced by the Administrator...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Staff Appointments Announced by the Administrator of NNSA Press Release May 31, 2001 Additional Staff Appointments Announced by the Administrator of NNSA (PDF - 0.03Mb)...

  18. Redox Shuttle Additives | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    available for licensing: A series of novel redox shuttle additives for lithium-ion batteries Seven-technology suite helps reduce battery costs Provides overcharge...

  19. Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing Opportunities for Transportation Mar 13 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Lonnie Love, Manufacturing Systems Research Group Transportation Science Seminar Series...

  20. Additive Relation and Algebraic System of Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziqian Wu

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additive relations are defined over additive monoids and additive operation is introduced over these new relations then we build algebraic system of equations. We can generate profuse equations by additive relations of two variables. To give an equation with several known parameters is to give an additive relation taking these known parameters as its variables or value and the solution of the equation is just the reverse of this relation which always exists. We show a core result in this paper that any additive relation of many variables and their inverse can be expressed in the form of the superposition of additive relations of one variable in an algebraic system of equations if the system satisfies some conditions. This result means that there is always a formula solution expressed in the superposition of additive relations of one variable for any equation in this system. We get algebraic equations if elements of the additive monoid are numbers and get operator equations if they are functions.

  1. Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Additional Guidance Regarding Application of Current Procedures for Testing Energy Consumption of Clothes Washers with Warm Rinse Cycles, Issued: June 30, 2010. Draft of DOE...

  2. MTBE demand as a oxygenated fuel additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MTBE markets are in the state of flux. In the U.S. the demand has reached a plateau while in other parts of the world, it is increasing. The various factors why MTBE is experiencing a global shift will be examined and future volumes projected.

  3. Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Through partnerships with industry, academia, and national laboratories, the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program sponsors research and development (R&D) in addition to activities...

  4. The Future of Microbial Genomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrpides, Nikos [Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute

    2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nikos Kyrpides, head of the Genome Biology group at the DOE Joint Genome Institute discusses current challenges in the field of microbial genomics on June 2, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  5. Israel Careers ACCELERATE YOUR FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rimon, Elon

    Lithography Control products within the product lifecycle process including defining requirements, settingIsrael Careers ACCELERATE YOUR FUTURE Product Marketing Manager Job Description: Product Marketing Manager at the Optical Metrology Division is responsible for product strategy and customer interface

  6. Future Fuels: Issues and Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    R Y S L E R G R O U P Fuel Quality Issues * Cetane * Lubricity * Aromatics * Sulfur * Biodiesel - adequate quality standards needed * GTL, CTL, and BTL -- The Future 9142005 2 C...

  7. Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on green ceramic/dielectrics Problem this technology (note: may require additional tooling/ set up time) · Rapid Prototyping & small scale manufacture microelectronics such as manufacture of LTCC ceramic/ Dielectric antenna and rapid PCB prototyping or repair

  8. Full Additivity of the Entanglement of Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo A. Paz-Silva; John H. Reina

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general strategy that allows a more flexible method for the construction of fully additive multipartite entanglement monotones than the ones so far reported in the literature of axiomatic entanglement measures. Within this framework we give a proof of a conjecture of outstanding implications in information theory: the full additivity of the Entanglement of Formation.

  9. Extending additivity from symmetric to asymmetric channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohisa Fukuda

    2005-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a lemma which allows one to extend results about the additivity of the minimal output entropy from highly symmetric channels to a much larger class. A similar result holds for the maximal output $p$-norm. Examples are given showing its use in a variety of situations. In particular, we prove the additivity and the multiplicativity for the shifted depolarising channel.

  10. Future Agriculture When: 29th of Mars 2012, 13.0014.30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Agriculture When: 29th of Mars 2012, 13.00­14.30 Where: Loftets Hörsal, Duhrevägen 8, Ultuna.magnusson@slu.se). The seminar will be filmed and posted on the Future Agriculture website: www.slu.se/futureagriculture. Future Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use, is a research pro- gramme developed at the Swedish University

  11. Emerging Technologies in the Built Environment: Geographic Information Science (GIS), 3D Printing, and Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract 1: Geographic information systems emerged as a computer application in the late 1960s, led in part by projects at ORNL. The concept of a GIS has shifted through time in response to new applications and new technologies, and is now part of a much larger world of geospatial technology. This presentation discusses the relationship of GIS and estimating hourly and seasonal energy consumption profiles in the building sector at spatial scales down to the individual parcel. The method combines annual building energy simulations for city-specific prototypical buildings and commonly available geospatial data in a GIS framework. Abstract 2: This presentation focuses on 3D printing technologies and how they have rapidly evolved over the past couple of years. At a basic level, 3D printing produces physical models quickly and easily from 3D CAD, BIM (Building Information Models), and other digital data. Many AEC firms have adopted 3D printing as part of commercial building design development and project delivery. This presentation includes an overview of 3D printing, discusses its current use in building design, and talks about its future in relation to the HVAC industry. Abstract 3: This presentation discusses additive manufacturing and how it is revolutionizing the design of commercial and residential facilities. Additive manufacturing utilizes a broad range of direct manufacturing technologies, including electron beam melting, ultrasonic, extrusion, and laser metal deposition for rapid prototyping. While there is some overlap with the 3D printing talk, this presentation focuses on the materials aspect of additive manufacturing and also some of the more advanced technologies involved with rapid prototyping. These technologies include design of carbon fiber composites, lightweight metals processing, transient field processing, and more.

  12. Past, Present And Future Implications Of Human Supervisory Control In Space Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim, L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving the United States’ Vision for future Space Exploration will necessitate far greater collaboration between humans and automated technology than previous space initiatives. However, the development of methodologies ...

  13. Additive-assisted synthesis of boride, carbide, and nitride micro/nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Bo [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Yang, Lishan [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Heng, Hua; Chen, Jingzhong; Zhang, Linfei; Xu, Liqiang [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Qian, Yitai, E-mail: ytqian@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Yang, Jian, E-mail: yangjian@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry (Shandong University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Chemistry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    General and simple methods for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides are highly desirable, since those materials have unique physical properties and promising applications. Here, a series of boride (TiB{sub 2}, ZrB{sub 2}, NbB{sub 2}, CeB{sub 6}, PrB{sub 6}, SmB{sub 6}, EuB{sub 6}, LaB{sub 6}), carbide (SiC, TiC, NbC, WC) and nitride (TiN, BN, AlN, MgSiN{sub 2}, VN) micro/nanocrystals were prepared from related oxides and amorphous boron/active carbon/NaN{sub 3} with the assistance of metallic Na and elemental S. In-situ temperature monitoring showed that the reaction temperature could increase quickly to {approx}850 Degree-Sign C, once the autoclave was heated to 100 Degree-Sign C. Such a rapid temperature increase was attributed to the intense exothermic reaction between Na and S, which assisted the formation of borides, carbides and nitrides. The as-obtained products were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and HRTEM techniques. Results in this report will greatly benefit the future extension of this approach to other compounds. - Graphical abstract: An additive-assisted approach is successfully developed for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides micro/nanocrystals with the assistance of the exothermic reaction between Na and S. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additive-assisted synthesis strategy is developed for a number of borides, carbides and nitrides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction mechanism is demonstrated by the case of SiC nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of SiC nanowires is initiated by the exothermic reaction of Na and S.

  14. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; KL Gaustad

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into 4 sections: (1) for news about ingests currently under development, (2) for current production ingests, (3) for future ingest development plans, and (4) for information on retired ingests.

  15. Catalytic conversion of glycerol to oxygenated fuel additive in a continuous flow reactor: Process optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Wensheng

    of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111, Iran d Imperial Oil Limited, Supply additive, and the process was optimized in this study using response surface methodology. A model biodiesel process [1,2]. Hence a huge amount of glycerol is expected on the market in near future. Due

  16. Polymerizable Additive for Passivating High Voltage Cathodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In this research project, we are studying the use of organic monomers as electrolyte additives that will oxidize and polymerize to form stable passivation films on the surface of...

  17. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    testing Cathode: LiNi13Mn13Co13O2 Anode: MCMB Electrolyte: 1.2M LiPF6 ECEMC 37 with or without additive - Separator: Celgard 2325 Voltage for cycling:...

  18. Physics Needs for Future Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lykken, J D

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: 1. Prologomena to any meta future physics 1.1 Physics needs for building future accelerators 1.2 Physics needs for funding future accelerators 2. Physics questions for future accelerators 2.1 Crimes and misapprehensions 2.1.1 Organized religion 2.1.2 Feudalism 2.1.3 Trotsky was right 2.2 The Standard Model as an effective field theory 2.3 What is the scale of new physics? 2.4 What could be out there? 2.5 Model-independent conclusions 3. Future accelerators 3.1 What is the physics driving the LHC? 3.2 What is the physics driving the LC? 3.2.1 Higgs physics is golden 3.2.2 LHC won't be sufficient to unravel the new physics as the TeV scale 3.2.3 LC precision measurements can pin down new physics scales 3.3 Why a Neutrino Factory? 3.4 Pushing the energy frontier

  19. Physics Needs for Future Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph D. Lykken

    2000-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contents: 1. Prologomena to any meta future physics 1.1 Physics needs for building future accelerators 1.2 Physics needs for funding future accelerators 2. Physics questions for future accelerators 2.1 Crimes and misapprehensions 2.1.1 Organized religion 2.1.2 Feudalism 2.1.3 Trotsky was right 2.2 The Standard Model as an effective field theory 2.3 What is the scale of new physics? 2.4 What could be out there? 2.5 Model-independent conclusions 3. Future accelerators 3.1 What is the physics driving the LHC? 3.2 What is the physics driving the LC? 3.2.1 Higgs physics is golden 3.2.2 LHC won't be sufficient to unravel the new physics as the TeV scale 3.2.3 LC precision measurements can pin down new physics scales 3.3 Why a Neutrino Factory? 3.4 Pushing the energy frontier

  20. Nuclear materials safeguards for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tape, J.W.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of domestic and international safeguards are described, with an emphasis on safeguards systems for the fuel cycles of commercial power reactors. Future trends in institutional and technical measures for nuclear materials safeguards are outlined. The conclusion is that continued developments in safeguards approaches and technology, coupled with institutional measures that facilitate the global management and protection of nuclear materials, are up to the challenge of safeguarding the growing inventories of nuclear materials in commercial fuel cycles in technologically advanced States with stable governments that have signed the nonproliferation treaty. These same approaches also show promise for facilitating international inspection of excess weapons materials and verifying a fissile materials cutoff convention.

  1. Internal dosimetry monitoring equipment: Present and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, J. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Carbaugh, E.H.; Lynch, T.P.; Strom, D.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Lardy, M.M. [International Technology Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have attempted to characterize the current and future status of in vivo and in vitro measurement programs coupled with the associated radioanalytical methods and workplace monitoring. Developments in these areas must be carefully integrated by internal dosimetrists, radiochemists and field health physicists. Their goal should be uniform improvement rather than to focus on one specific area (e.g., dose modeling) to the neglect of other areas where the measurement capabilities are substantially less sophisticated and, therefore, the potential source of error is greatest.

  2. EIS-0403: BLM Notice of Availability of Maps and Additional Public...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BLM Notice of Availability of Maps and Additional Public Scoping from the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Second Scoping Period) Solar Energy Development in Six...

  3. Prospects for hot dry rock in the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, M.E.; Murphy, H.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. The program was reviewed five times in the past three years. Three of these reviews were done by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and a fourth was conducted by the National Research Council at the request of DOE. In addition, HDR was evaluated in the Energy Research Advisory Board's Solid Earth Sciences Report. Recent economic studies for HDR have been performed by Bechtel National, Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute, and the United Kingdom. These studies are reviewed in light of recent progress at Fenton Hill in reducing drilling costs, and mapping and in identifying drilling targets. All of the attention focused on HDR has resulted in evaluating the way in which HDR fits within the nation's energy mix and in estimating when HDR will contribute to energy security. To establish a framework for evaluating the future of HDR, the status and progress of HDR are reviewed and the remaining Fenton Hill program is outlined. Recommendations are also made for follow-on activities that will lead to achieving full development of HDR technologies in the appropriate time frame.

  4. Hydrogen and the materials of a sustainable energy future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalbowitz, M. [ed.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Educator`s Workshop (NEW): Update 96 was held October 27--30, 1996, and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This was the 11th annual conference aimed at improving the teaching of material science, engineering and technology by updating educators and providing laboratory experiments on emerging technology for teaching fundamental and newly evolving materials concepts. The Hydrogen Education Outreach Activity at Los Alamos National Laboratory organized a special conference theme: Hydrogen and the Materials of a Sustainable Energy Future. The hydrogen component of the NEW:Update 96 offered the opportunity for educators to have direct communication with scientists in laboratory settings, develop mentor relationship with laboratory staff, and bring leading edge materials/technologies into the classroom to upgrade educational curricula. Lack of public education and understanding about hydrogen is a major barrier for initial implementation of hydrogen energy technologies and is an important prerequisite for acceptance of hydrogen outside the scientific/technical research communities. The following materials contain the papers and view graphs from the conference presentations. In addition, supplemental reference articles are also included: a general overview of hydrogen and an article on handling hydrogen safely. A resource list containing a curriculum outline, bibliography, Internet resources, and a list of periodicals often publishing relevant research articles can be found in the last section.

  5. Edmund G. Brown Jr. LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmund G. Brown Jr. Governor LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: SMART LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE LIGHTING's Future: Smart LightEmitting Diode Lighting in Residential Fans. California Energy Commission, PIER

  6. Performance Limitations of Linear Systems over Additive White Noise Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yiqian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control over additive white noise channels . . . . . . . 1.3Additive white noise channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Angaussian systems over additive gaussian wireles fading

  7. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

  8. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Decision Support for Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    data to generate and share mission-critical analysis and insights. November 2012 PNNL-SA-90020 Gariann Gelston Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (509) 372-4480 gariann.gelston@pnnl.gov Angie Dalton Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (509) 371-6607 angela.dalton@pnnl.gov ABOUT FPGI The Future Power Grid

  9. Future Electron-Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V.

    2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Outstanding research potential of electron-hadron colliders (EHC) was clearly demonstrated by first - and the only - electron-proton collider HERA (DESY, Germany). Physics data from HERA revealed new previously unknown facets of Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD). EHC is an ultimate microscope probing QCD in its natural environment, i.e. inside the hadrons. In contrast with hadrons, electrons are elementary particles with known initial state. Hence, scattering electrons from hadrons provides a clearest pass to their secrets. It turns EHC into an ultimate machine for high precision QCD studies and opens access to rich physics with a great discovery potential: solving proton spin puzzle, observing gluon saturation or physics beyond standard model. Access to this physics requires high-energy high-luminosity EHCs and a wide reach in the center-of-mass (CM) energies. This paper gives a brief overview of four proposed electron-hadron colliders: ENC at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany), ELIC/MEIC at TJNAF (Newport News, VA, USA), eRHIC at BNL (Upton, NY, USA) and LHeC at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). Future electron-hadron colliders promise to deliver very rich physics not only in the quantity but also in the precision. They are aiming at very high luminosity two-to-four orders of magnitude beyond the luminosity demonstrated by the very successful HERA. While ENC and LHeC are on opposite side of the energy spectrum, eRHIC and ELIC are competing for becoming an electron-ion collider (EIC) in the U.S. Administrations of BNL and Jlab, in concert with US DoE office of Nuclear Physics, work on the strategy for down-selecting between eRHIC and ELIC. The ENC, EIC and LHeC QCD physics programs to a large degree are complimentary to each other and to the LHC physics. In last decade, an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) collaboration held about 25 collaboration meetings to develop physics program for EIC with CM energy {approx}100 GeV. One of these meetings was held at GSI, where ENC topic was in the center of discussions. First dedicated LHeC workshop was held in 2008, with a number of dedicated workshops following it. Intense accelerator R&D program is needed to address the challenges posed by the EIC.

  10. Additional EIPC Study Analysis: Interim Report on High Priority Topics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 13 topics was developed for further analysis; this paper discusses the first five.

  11. Composite filter aids for cleanup of additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, L.I.; Sklyar, V.Y.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the properties of composite filter aids in additive cleanup using two- and three-component filter aid composites based on perlite, kieselguhr, diatomite, asbestos, and wood flour. Filtration tests were run on naphtha solutions of the additive zinc dialkyldithiophosphate. The laboratory studies indicate that composites of perlite and kieselguhr with fibrous materials (wood flour or asbestos) show great promise for the removal of solid contaminants from the zinc disalkydithiophosphate additive. The advantages of the filter aid composite based on perlite, kieselguhr, and wood flour in comparison with the two-component composites are the higher filtration rate (by 26%) and the smaller losses of additive (by a factor of 2.1) and isobutyl alcohol (by a factor of 1.6). It is demonstrated that the filtration rate with the three components is 50-60% higher than with the composite of perlite with kieselguhr. The filtration of the zinc dialkyldithiophosphate additive using the composite filter aid based on perlite, kieselguhr, and wood flour, has been adopted at the Volgograd Petroleum Refinery. Includes 2 tables.

  12. Fuel and Additive Characterization for HCCI Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Pitz, W J; Dibble, R

    2003-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows a numerical evaluation of fuels and additives for HCCl combustion. First, a long list of candidate HCCl fuels is selected. For all the fuels in the list, operating conditions (compression ratio, equivalence ratio and intake temperature) are determined that result in optimum performance under typical operation for a heavy-duty engine. Fuels are also characterized by presenting Log(p)-Log(T) maps for multiple fuels under HCCl conditions. Log(p)-Log(T) maps illustrate important processes during HCCl engine operation, including compression, low temperature heat release and ignition. Log(p)-Log(T) diagrams can be used for visualizing these processes and can be used as a tool for detailed analysis of HCCl combustion. The paper also includes a ranking of many potential additives. Experiments and analyses have indicated that small amounts (a few parts per million) of secondary fuels (additives) may considerably affect HCCl combustion and may play a significant role in controlling HCCl combustion. Additives are ranked according to their capability to advance HCCl ignition. The best additives are listed and an explanation of their effect on HCCl combustion is included.

  13. Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours,Dioxide and Methane |science

  14. On complementary channels and the additivity problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Holevo

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore complementarity between output and environment of a quantum channel (or, more generally, CP map), making an observation that the output purity characteristics for complementary CP maps coincide. Hence, validity of the mutiplicativity/additivity conjecture for a class of CP maps implies its validity for complementary maps. The class of CP maps complementary to entanglement-breaking ones is described and is shown to contain diagonal CP maps as a proper subclass, resulting in new class of CP maps (channels) for which the multiplicativity/additivity holds. Covariant and Gaussian channels are discussed briefly in this context.

  15. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to about 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution. 4 figs.

  16. Stabilization of polyaniline solutions through additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stabilized non-conductive polyaniline solution comprising from about 1 to bout 10 percent by weight polyaniline or a polyaniline derivative, from about 90 to about 99 percent by weight N-methylpyrrolidone, and from about 0.5 percent by weight to about 15 percent by weight of a solution stabilizing additive selected from the group consisting of hindered amine light stabilizers, polymeric amines, and dialkylamines, percent by weight of additive based on the total weight of polyaniline or polyaniline derivative is provided together with a method for stabilizing a polyaniline solution.

  17. LESSONS LEARNED Biosurveillance Mobile App Development Intern Competition (Summer 2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noonan, Christine F.; Henry, Michael J.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the lessons learned document for the BEOWulf Biosurveillance Mobile App Development Intern Competition is to capture the project’s lessons learned in a formal document for use by other project managers on similar future projects. This document may be used as part of new project planning for similar projects in order to determine what problems occurred and how those problems were handled and may be avoided in the future. Additionally, this document details what went well with the project and why, so that other project managers may capitalize on these actions. Project managers may also use this document to determine who the project team members were in order to solicit feedback for planning their projects in the future. This document will be formally communicated with the organization and will become a part of the organizational assets and archives.

  18. Envision your future in engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    , or construction or to persist in your program As you read about a woman's experience of overcoming health issues and construction, and on the future of our society cannot be overstated With great pride, Heidi Sherick Assistant various national laboratories, including the Gran Sasso Laboratory. After traveling, we went to Princeton

  19. Future Prospects of Synthetic Fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fryback, M. G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important for the future of this nation to reach the goal of demonstrated definition and quantification of the parameters which influence the ability to use this country's vast resources of coal and oil shale for production of synthetic fuels...

  20. Future Prospects of Synthetic Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fryback, M. G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is important for the future of this nation to reach the goal of demonstrated definition and quantification of the parameters which influence the ability to use this country's vast resources of coal and oil shale for production of synthetic fuels...

  1. A small RTG for future planetary missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cockfield, R.D.; Kull, R.A. [Lockheed Martin Missiles Space P.O. Box 8555 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania19101 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design study was conducted to characterize conceptual designs for a small Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), one that might be suitable for future planetary missions. Conceptual design configurations were derived from the General Purpose Heat Source{emdash}RTG (GPHS-RTG), with the design goal of providing 70 watts of electrical power at the end of a ten year mission life. Design improvements for mass minimization were evaluated, considering also the technical risk of the corresponding engineering development required. It was concluded that an RTG mass of 18 kg could be achieved with moderate risk. Further studies are recommended to define in detail the testing and other development activities that would be required to bring the conceptual design for such an RTG to reality. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION STATE'S PERSPECTIVE. CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS POR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA

  3. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Ritschard, R.L.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION STATE'S PERSPECTIVE. CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS POR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA

  4. CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yingfei

    CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons panels on the roof of PBRC. DURATION OF PROJECT: September 20, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 7:30 a.m. to 4 of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades and all posted safety/detour signs

  5. CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons: November 28 to December 1, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. ACCESSIBLE ROUTES: No accessible routes will be affected. ADVISORY: All persons in the vicinity of this construction project

  6. For additional information, contact: Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    For additional information, contact: Department of Physics Montana State University 264 EPS Building P.O. Box 173840 Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 Tel: 406-994-3614 Fax: 406-994-4452 www.physics.montana.edu physics@montana.edu As a physics major at Montana State University, you will study some of the most

  7. Internship FBI Fingerprint Procedures and Additional Screenings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Internship FBI Fingerprint Procedures and Additional Screenings ALL INTERNS: Required by DESE/Full-Year Internship) or August 1st (Spring Internship) o Web application https to get your fingerprints taken for your internship: 4 digit Registration #2301 Cost - $44.80 Valid

  8. Modelling Additive Transport in Metal Halide Lamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    doctor aan de Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr.ir. C.J. van-DATA LIBRARY TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Beks, Mark Louwrens Modelling Additive Transport in Metal Halide Lamps/ door Beks, M.L. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2008. Proefschrift. ISBN: 978

  9. Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    Patent Issued Additional Office Actions Received 3-12 mo. Respond to Office Action Patent attorney The patent examiner provides notification of which claims in the application have been rejected or accepted determines there are multiple inventions in 1 application. Patent Application Published 6 mo. Non

  10. For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    For additional information, contact: Department of Ecology Montana State University 310 Lewis Hall P.O. Box 173460 Bozeman, MT 59717-3460 Tel: 406-994-4548 Fax: 406-994-3190 www.montana.edu/ecology/ ecology@montana.edu The Department of Ecology at Montana State University offers undergraduate majors

  11. Titanium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Additions of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Patrick J.

    Titanium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Additions of Alkyl Groups to Aldehydes: Mechanistic Studies by zinc- or titanium- based catalysts. While the mechanism of the zinc/amino alcohol catalysts has received significant attention, the titanium-based catalysts have been less studied. This Account

  12. Total correlations as fully additive entanglement monotones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo A. Paz-Silva; John H. Reina

    2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize the strategy presented in Refs. [1, 2], and propose general conditions for a measure of total correlations to be an entanglement monotone using its pure (and mixed) convex-roof extension. In so doing, we derive crucial theorems and propose a concrete candidate for a total correlations measure which is a fully additive entanglement monotone.

  13. Electrolytes - Advanced Electrolyte and Electrolyte Additives

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Co 13 O 2 , LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5 O 4 Anode: MCMB, LTO Electrolyte-1: 1.2M LiPF 6 ECEMC 37 with or without additive Electrolyte-2: fully or partially fluorinated...

  14. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE's national laboratories to promote the development and deployment of technologies capable of generating environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity from the nation's water resources.

  15. Forest Products Industry of the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc (LATA) conducted an evaluation of the potential impact and value of a portion of the current portfolio of r&d projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technology and the Forest Products Industry of the Future. The mission of the evaluation was to (a) assess the potential impact of the projects to meet the critical goals of the industry as identified in the vision and roadmapping documents. (b) Evaluate the relationship between the current portfolio of projects and the Agenda 202 Implementation Plan. In addition, evaluate the relationship between the portfolio and the newly revised draft technology strategy being created by the industry. (c) Identify areas where current efforts are making significant progress towards meeting industry goals and identify areas where additional work my be required to meet these goals. (d) Make recommendations to the DOE and the Forest Products Industry on possible improvements in the portfolio and in the current methodology that DOE uses to assess potential impacts on its R&D activities.

  16. CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yingfei

    CONSTRUCTION ALERT Additional Notice to Ongoing Project TO: Deans, Directors, Chairpersons to August 19, 2011 HOURS OF CONSTRUCTION: 4:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on August 17 and 18 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p of this construction project are advised to respect all construction barricades and all posted safety/detour signs

  17. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harwell, Lane D. (Albuquerque, NM); Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Donald L. (Corrales, NM); Pressly, Gary A. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  18. Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jason 1981-

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    critical detail of weak acid chemistry. One concern when using any acid in oilfield operations is the corrosion of well tubulars. Thus operators often choose to pump corrosion inhibitor, a chemical additive electrostatically attracted... to the negative charge of the well casing or production tubing, to decrease the rate at which the acid accesses well tubular surfaces (Crowe and Minor 1985). A typical working concentration of corrosion inhibitor is 1-2 wt% of injected acid (Smith et al. 1978...

  19. Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

  20. Occupational health experience with organic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiess, A.M.; Wellenreuther, G.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

  1. Maps of crude oil futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masters, C.D.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Crude Oil Futures presentation shows their concept of the quantity of oil possibly present (the combination of conventional demonstrated reserves plus undiscovered recoverable resources) within the areas outlined. The Crude Oil Futures is not as an exploration map but as a perspective on the distribution of world oil. The occurrence of oil is, after all, a function of particular geologic factors that are not everywhere present. Furthermore, large amounts of oil can occur only where the several necessary independent variables (geologic factors) combine optimally. In the Western Hemisphere, similar minimal crude oil futures are shown for North America and South America. This similarity is a reflection not of similar geology but rather of the fact that most of the oil has already been produced from North America, whereas South America as a whole (except for Venezuela) possesses a geology less likely to produce oil. In Europe, Africa, and Asia, four regions are dominant: the Middle East, Libya, North Sea, and west Siberia. Paleogeography and source rock distribution were keys to this distribution - the Middle East and Libya reflecting the Tethyan association, and the North Sea and west Siberia benefitting from the Late Jurassic marine transgression into geographic environments where ocean circulation was restricted by tectonic events.

  2. Future Technologies to Enhance Geothermal Energy Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J J; Kaahaaina, N; Aines, R; Zucca, J; Foxall, B; Atkins-Duffin, C

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal power is a renewable, low-carbon option for producing base-load (i.e., low-intermittency) electricity. Improved technologies have the potential to access untapped geothermal energy sources, which experts estimate to be greater than 100,000 MWe. However, many technical challenges in areas such as exploration, drilling, reservoir engineering, and energy conversion must be addressed if the United States is to unlock the full potential of Earth's geothermal energy and displace fossil fuels. (For example, see Tester et al., 2006; Green and Nix, 2006; and Western Governors Association, 2006.) Achieving next-generation geothermal power requires both basic science and applied technology to identify prospective resources and effective extraction strategies. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a long history of research and development work in support of geothermal power. Key technologies include advances in scaling and brine chemistry, economic and resource assessment, direct use, exploration, geophysics, and geochemistry. For example, a high temperature, multi-spacing, multi-frequency downhole EM induction logging tool (GeoBILT) was developed jointly by LLNL and EMI to enable the detection and orientation of fractures and conductive zones within the reservoir (Figure 1). Livermore researchers also conducted studies to determine how best to stave off increased salinity in the Salton Sea, an important aquatic ecosystem in California. Since 1995, funding for LLNL's geothermal research has decreased, but the program continues to make important contributions to sustain the nation's energy future. The current efforts, which are highlighted in this report, focus on developing an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) and on improving technologies for exploration, monitoring, characterization, and geochemistry. Future research will also focus on these areas.

  3. Eltron Research & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard; Faull, John

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report covers technical work conducted under contract DE-FC26-05NT42469 between FY06 Q1 through FY14 Q2. The project evolved through several budget periods, budget revisions and continuation applications. This report covers work performed under the “base” program. In 2010 ARRA funding was added to the project. A separate report covering the ARRA portion of the project was submitted to DOE. The original project was focused on research and development for scale-up of hydrogen separation membrane for a FutureGen type power plant. The work included membrane testing and evaluation of metal alloy flat plates vs. tubes and metal membranes vs. cermet membranes. In addition, economic analysis and process modeling was performed. The original project team included CoorsTek, NORAM, and Praxair. In FY10Q2 a continuation application was filed for conducting a scale-up test at Eastman Chemical. In this part of the project a Subscale Engineering Prototype (SEP) membrane skid was designed, fabricated, and operated on a gasified coal slip-stream on Eastman’s site in Kingsport, TN. Following operation, the project was reorganized and a second continuation application with a new statement of work was initiated in FY12Q1. Finally, based on DOE’s decision not to proceed with a Process Development Unit (PDU) field test, a third continuation application and statement of work was initiated in FY13Q1 to close out the project.

  4. Electric Vehicle Manufacturing in Southern California: Current Developments, Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Allen J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battery contmnmentsystem HughesAn’craft Torrance Inductive chargingbattery monitor system, motor controller for performanceoptimization, and an on-board inductive charging

  5. Electric Vehicle Manufacturing in Southern California: Current Developments, Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Allen J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power plants) that produce the electricity required to recharge EVs, given the fuel generat~tng mix of Southern California,

  6. The Brief History and Future Development of Earth System Models...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committee Interagency Working Group (IARPC) Integration of Science and Technology for Sustainability Task Force National Earth Observations Task Force (NEO) Disaster Reduction...

  7. Electric Vehicle Manufacturing in Southern California: Current Developments, Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Allen J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil Oil/water separator sludge Unspecified waste offsludge Metal dust Other morgamc solid waste Halogenatedsolvents Oxygenatedsolvents Hydrocarbon solvents Unspecified solvent mlxture Waste andmixed oil

  8. Better Buildings Case Competition Helps Develop Future Clean...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    be replicated by businesses, Alschuler is now responsible for writing the competition's case studies as an Energy Department employee. As part of the MIT team, Alschuler helped...

  9. Software-Based Challenges of Developing the Future Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Emma

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Golden  CO:  National  Renewable  Energy  Laboratory  energy  resources.  IET   Renewable  Power  Generation,  Golden  CO:  National  Renewable  Energy  Laboratory  

  10. Software-Based Challenges of Developing the Future Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Emma

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at   http://www.nist.gov/smartgrid/upload/NIST_Framework_http://w3.usa.siemens.com/smartgrid/us/en/transmission-­?

  11. "Developing Nationally Significant Infrastructure: the Future Role of Energy Planning"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    to about 1/3 of current overall capacity. The 2003 Energy Review placed growing emphasis on renewable energy. There is currently a national target of 5% renewable generation by 2007, and 10% by 2015 infrastructure in 2005.4 Emphasis was placed upon clean energy: renewable energy and the efficient use of natural

  12. Modularity and Commonality Research: Past Developments and Future Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fixson, Sebastian K.

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on modularity and commonality has grown substantially over the past 15 years. Searching 36 journals over more than the past 35 years, I identify over 160 references in the engineering and management literature ...

  13. Automated construction technologies : analyses and future development strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoang, Han (Han Mai)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Substandard productivity and the lack of skilled workers in the construction industry have led major corporations all over the world aiming to produce various types of automated construction technologies. During the process, ...

  14. Software-Based Challenges of Developing the Future Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Emma

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for  each  inverter  or  equivalent  PV  system,  there  system  studies.     Currently  there  is  no  approved  PV  inverter  

  15. Electric Vehicle Manufacturing in Southern California: Current Developments, Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Allen J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stealth" bomber the F-19 fighter, for example,both employadvancedplastics and metal and composite materials.

  16. 2013 CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT REPORT Working out our future together

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Nations Global Compact, a global platform which convenes companies together with United Nations agencies

  17. Motion Sensor Driven Gestrure Recognition for Future Internet Application Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrakis, Euripides G.M.

    for motion sensor driven gesture recognition systems utilizing cloud technology and the FI- WARE core for training, monitoring movements, rehabilitation actions as well as educating purposes. In this work we focus and a motion sensor API for transforming specific hand language and gestures into system commands. The system

  18. Electric Vehicle Manufacturing in Southern California: Current Developments, Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Allen J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy source (zinc/air battery, carbon/potassiumhydroxide/Vehzcle Zn Zinc Zn-Atr Zinc-Air Battery XV Executive SummaryZn-Air) battery The zinc-air battery is also considered a

  19. Electric Vehicle Manufacturing in Southern California: Current Developments, Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Allen J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    battery recharging, EVservicing and at training; 3) fleet buyersare more likely to take total life-cycle costsbattery) to provide ample acceleration; 3) a life cycle long enough to offset the initial inexpensive battery; cost,Battery Type Spectfie Energy (wh/kg) Energy Density 6Vh/l) Specific Power (W/kg) Cycle Life (cycles 80% DOD) Projected Cost

  20. Oak Ridge Project Opens Possibilities for Future Mission Work, Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUse | Department ofFCTO| Department of

  1. Perspective on the Future Development of Diesel Emission Standards in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 TermoelectricaPavingPerry Luksin About Us PerrySecretary

  2. The Brief History and Future Development of Earth System Models:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5, 2015 IndependentThe BleedingTheBrief

  3. Experimental Tests of Cooling: Expectations and Additional Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the prospects for a future 6D muon cooling experiment andFuture Activities By the time MICE has successfully concluded, we will have demonstrated an understanding of the 4D (transverse) cooling

  4. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  5. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  7. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development

  8. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future January 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  10. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - November – December 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  11. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - September – October 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  12. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future July 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of ACRF instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  13. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - February 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  14. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future May 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  15. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JC Liljegren

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  16. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Actionable Visualization Tools for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Actionable Visualization Tools for Power Grid Situation Awareness the fundamental need for greater SA through actionable visualization tools that: » increase the effectiveness to incorrect assumptions about events and even disastrous consequences. The tools developed in this project

  17. ETSF5 -INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ETSF5 - INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE Energy and Large Research Facilities: The role of large research facilities in the development of sustainable energy systems, Roskilde, Denmark. Günther G Scherer and Selmiye A Gursel, General Energy Research, Paul Scherrer Institute

  18. Cosmology as Science: From Inflation to the Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lawrence Krauss

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments in cosmology bring to the forefront fundamental questions about our ability to falsify various fundamental assumptions about the universe.  I will discuss three issues that reflect different aspects of these questions:  (1) "Proving" Inflation (2) Anthropic "Explanations" (3) Cosmology of the far future.

  19. A Healthy Heritage Collecting for the Future of Medical History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    policies of medical libraries today 42 Iain Milne Mapping the future of research libraries 49 Derek Law of the Library which bears his name. Successive generations of librarians and archivists have nurtured and developed his legacy, sustaining his vision of the importance of preserving the medical record of the past

  20. How ARPA-e is "Winning the Future"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Obama, Barack; Chu, Steven; Majumdar, Arun;

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) is answering the President's call to "Win the Future". By directly funding some of the most groundbreaking discoveries in science and technology, we're encouraging the development of the most advanced clean tech innovations out there today.

  1. ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future - October – November 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) SBIR instrument development.

  2. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviationan overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

  3. Redox shuttle additives for overcharge protection in lithium batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Thomas J.; Ross Jr., P.N.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. 5,763,119. “Redox Shuttle Additives for Overchargeprotection, electrolytes, additives, redox shuttleREDOX SHUTTLE ADDITIVES FOR OVERCHARGE PROTECTION IN LITHIUM

  4. Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDERSON, Eric

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulletin Analysis May 2013 Additive Manufacturing in China:an overview of China’s additive manufacturing industry wasmilitary achievements in additive manufacturing. 2 Initial

  5. Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related LinksATHENA AccountManagement |ARQOfficeNationalAdditive

  6. Additive Manufacturing: Going Mainstream | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISO 50001 Energy26.1U.S.-BrazilAdditive Manufacturing: Going

  7. Mass spectral characterization of petroleum dyes, tracers, and additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngless, T.L.; Swansiger, J.T.; Danner, D.A.; Greco, M.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum dyes, additives, and tracers are important for identifying gasolines in spill and contamination problems. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used for the characterization of 21 commercial petroleum dyes. Many contained common chromophores, typically azo or anthraquinone groups, and often differed only in their degree of alkyl substitution. Few dyes were pure and typically contained several chromogens with homologous series of substituents. A separation method was developed to concentrate the polar fractions containing the additives. Subsequent characterization of the polar fraction by GC/MS showed distinct differences between different gasolines. Various colorless tracers were evaluated in terms of detectability, soil adsorption, and cost. Many tracers exhibited soil adsorption and interferences which limited their detectability. Alcohols in the C8-C10 range were found to be the most suitable tracers with GC/MS detection limits of 1 ppm. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  8. A new DFM approach to combine machining and additive manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerbrat, Olivier; Hascoët, Jean-Yves; 10.1016/j.compind.2011.04.003

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design For Manufacturing (DFM) approaches aim to integrate manufacturability aspects during the design stage. Most of DFM approaches usually consider only one manufacturing process, but products competitiveness may be improved by designing hybrid modular products, in which products are seen as 3-D puzzles with modules realized aside by the best manufacturing process and further gathered. A new DFM system is created in order to give quantitative information during the product design stage of which modules will benefit in being machined and which ones will advantageously be realized by an additive process (such as Selective Laser Sintering or laser deposition). A methodology for a manufacturability evaluation in case of a subtractive or an additive manufacturing process is developed and implemented in a CAD software. Tests are carried out on industrial products from automotive industry.

  9. New additives for minimizing cement body permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talabani, S. [Western Atlas International, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Hareland, G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering; Islam, M.R. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was carried out with a new array of cement additives, replacing some of the currently used ones. In this study, the cement slurry pressure was monitored during the setting of the element. To obtain the optimum tightness of the cement, final contraction in the cycle is crucial for blockage of gas migration. Concentrations of the additives were obtained experimentally in this study for which the cyclic pressure behavior of the cement was optimized and the permeability reduced for the best final cement results. The parameters investigated in this study were as follows: pressure applied on the slurry with time, compressive strength, and permeability of the set cement. The major causes of the early microfractures are the incomplete cement-water reaction, low compressive strength of the set cement, and the sudden change in the hydrostatic pressure as the cement changes its phase from a liquid to a solid state. This paper reports the appropriate amounts of X-C polymer, Anchorage clay, Ironite Sponge, and synthetic rubber needed to optimize the compressive strength and eliminate both microfracture and microannulus. There are certain limits to the amount and type of synthetic rubber powder for which microfractures are eliminated. The article reports an experimental approach that can be used to eliminate gas migration through a cement design that is environmentally safe and inexpensive, using recyclable materials.

  10. ACRF Ingest Software Status: New, Current, and Future - March 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AS Koontz; S Choudhury; BD Ermold; NN Keck; KL Gaustad; RC Perez

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide status of the ingest software used to process instrument data for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF). The report is divided into four sections: (1) news about ingests currently under development, (2) current production ingests, (3) future ingest development plans, and (4) information on retired ingests. Please note that datastreams beginning in “xxx” indicate cases where ingests run at multiple ACRF sites, which results in a datastream(s) for each location.

  11. A Holistic Approach to the Sustainable Workplace of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, S. E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and environment impact as criteria to achieve sustainable development. However, these criteria alone cannot guarantee a good sustainable workplace. Buildings and People: The Integrated Workplace - many new workplace design projects are being designed... for the sustainable workplace of the future. In his presentation, Mr. Andersen will be focusing on: Buildings and the Environment: Sustainable Development - many new sustainable building are being designed and built with a focus only on their physical...

  12. Future Heating | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms A S JumpWindfarmFundicion Nodular del NorteFuture

  13. The Future of Home Heating

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest for PumpingThe Facts on Gas Prices:The FirstThe Future

  14. Market characteristics of future oil tanker operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willemann, Simmy Dhawan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work analyzes the market characteristics of future oil tanker operations with a particular emphasis on those aspects which will have a potential impact on the design of future vessels. The market analysis model used ...

  15. Hedging Milk with BFP Futures and Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, David P.; McCorkle, Dean; Schwart Jr., Robert B.; Jones, Rodney

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic Formula Price (BFP) milk futures and options can be used to hedge, or lock in, milk prices in order to manage milk price fluctuations. This publication offers information on futures contracts, basis, cash settlement and margin call. There also...

  16. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

  17. National Engineers Week: Future City Competition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011 Future Cities Competition inspires students all across South Carolina to pursue careers in environmental protection and engineering.

  18. European Strategy for Future Neutrino Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop to discuss the possibilities for future neutrino investigations in Europe and the links to CERN.

  19. National Engineers Week: Future City Competition

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    2011 Future Cities Competition inspires students all across South Carolina to pursue careers in environmental protection and engineering.

  20. Report on Workshop on Future Directions for Accelerator R&D at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; Church, M.; Spentzouris, P.; Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerator R&D has played a crucial role in enabling scientific discovery in the past century and will continue to play this role in the years to come. In the U.S., the Office of High Energy Physics of DOE's Office of Science is developing a plan for national accelerator R&D stewardship. Fermilab undertakes accelerator research, design, and development focused on superconducting radio-frequency (RF), superconducting magnet, beam cooling, and high intensity proton technologies. In addition, the Lab pursues comprehensive integrated theoretical concepts and simulations of complete future facilities on both the energy and intensity frontiers. At present, Fermilab (1) supplies integrated design concept and technology development for a multi-MW proton source (Project X) to support world-leading programs in long baseline neutrino and rare processes experiments; (2) plays a leading role in the development of ionization cooling technologies required for muon storage ring facilities at the energy (multi-TeV Muon Collider) and intensity (Neutrino Factory) frontiers, and supplies integrated design concepts for these facilities; and (3) carries out a program of advanced accelerator R&D (AARD) in the field of high quality beam sources, and novel beam manipulation techniques.

  1. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Modal Shares: Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, J. J.; Aeppli, A. E.; Beagan, D. F.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Grenzeback, L. R.; McKenzie, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Witzke, E.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Truck, rail, water, air, and pipeline modes each serve a distinct share of the freight transportation market. The current allocation of freight by mode is the product of technologic, economic, and regulatory frameworks, and a variety of factors -- price, speed, reliability, accessibility, visibility, security, and safety -- influence mode. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this report considers how analytical methods can be used to project future modal shares and offers insights on federal policy decisions with the potential to prompt shifts to energy-efficient, low-emission modes. There are substantial opportunities to reduce the energy used for freight transportation, but it will be difficult to shift large volumes from one mode to another without imposing considerable additional costs on businesses and consumers. This report explores federal government actions that could help trigger the shifts in modal shares needed to reduce energy consumption and emissions. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  2. $?$-Deformed Statistics and Classical Fourmomentum Addition Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Daszkiewicz; J. Lukierski; M. Woronowicz

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider $\\kappa$-deformed relativistic symmetries described algebraically by modified Majid-Ruegg bicrossproduct basis and investigate the quantization of field oscillators for the $\\kappa$-deformed free scalar fields on $\\kappa$-Minkowski space. By modification of standard multiplication rule, we postulate the $\\kappa$-deformed algebra of bosonic creation and annihilation operators. Our algebra permits to define the n-particle states with classical addition law for the fourmomenta in a way which is not in contradiction with the nonsymmetric quantum fourmomentum coproduct. We introduce $\\kappa$-deformed Fock space generated by our $\\kappa$-deformed oscillators which satisfy the standard algebraic relations with modified $\\kappa$-multiplication rule. We show that such a $\\kappa$-deformed bosonic Fock space is endowed with the conventional bosonic symmetry properties. Finally we discuss the role of $\\kappa$-deformed algebra of oscillators in field-theoretic noncommutative framework.

  3. People Strategy Fit for Our Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    People Strategy Fit for Our Future People Strategy 2011-2016 #12;#12;Fit for Our Future Tim. The implications of the Comprehensive Spending Review settlements in each country will mean big changes for many of our people. Fit for Our Future: People Strategy 2011-2016 | 1 The Executive Board and the rest of my

  4. Control and Protection Paradigms of the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a strong foundation of practice in system regulation and protective relaying on which to build; howeverControl and Protection Paradigms of the Future Future Grid Thrust Area 2 White Paper Power Systems White Paper Control and Protection Paradigms of the Future Project Team C.L. DeMarco, C.A. Baone, B

  5. ENERGY WHITE PAPER Our energy future -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY WHITE PAPER Our energy future - creating a low carbon economy and consumers. And we stand up for fair and open markets in the UK, Europe and the world. #12;Our energy future ENERGY WHITE PAPER Our energy future - creating a low carbon economy 1 Foreword

  6. Non-additive entropy: Reason and conclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miriam Lemanska

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the non-additive entropy is examined. It appears in isolated particle systems composed of few components. Therefore, the mixing of isolated particle systems S=S1+S2 has been studied. Two cases are considered T1=T2 and T1\\leqT2, where T1,T2 are the initial temperatures of the system S1 and S2 respectively. The concept of similar systems containing interacting particles is introduced. These systems are defined by a common temperature and an identical time evolution process, i.e. the approach to the same thermodynamic equilibrium. The main results are: 1) The properties of the similar particle systems yield the non-additive entropy and free energy. The Gibbs Paradox is not a paradox. 2) The relation between the initial temperatures T1 and T2 governs the mixing process. 3) In the two cases T1=T2, T1\\leqT2 mixing of the systems S1, S2 results in a uniform union system S=S1+S2. The systems S, S1, S2 are similar one to the other. 4) The mixing process is independent of the extensive quantities (volume, particle number, energy) and of the particle type. Only the mean energy plays an important role in the mixing of the systems S1, S2. 5) Mixing in the case T1\\leqT2 is in essence a thermalization process, but mixing in the case T1=T2 is not a thermodynamic process. 6)Mixing is an irreversible process. Keywords: Entropy; Similar systems of interacting particles; Mixing of systems; Thermal equilibrium

  7. Western Europe's future gas supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardaun, G.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decline in indigenous natural gas production by 2000 will be compensated by imported natural gas and LNG and gas from unconventional sources. Coal gas will furnish about 10 percent of the demand, more natural gas imports will come from North Africa and the USSR and additional LNG will come from West Africa, the Middle East and the Western Hemisphere.

  8. The Development of A Human Systems Simulation Laboratory: Strategic Direction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques Hugo; Katya le Blanc; David Gertman

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Human System Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) at the Idaho National Laboratory is one of few facilities of its kind that allows human factors researchers to evaluate various aspects of human performance and human system interaction for proposed reactor designs and upgrades. A basic system architecture, physical configuration and simulation capability were established to enable human factors researchers to support multiple, simultaneous simulations and also different power plant technologies. Although still evolving in terms of its technical and functional architecture, the HSSL is already proving its worth in supporting current and future nuclear industry needs for light water reactor sustainability and small modular reactors. The evolution of the HSSL is focused on continual physical and functional refinement to make it a fully equipped, reconfigurable facility where advanced research, testing and validation studies can be conducted on a wider range of reactor technologies. This requires the implementation of additional plant models to produce empirical research data on human performance with emerging human-system interaction technologies. Additional beneficiaries of this information include system designers and HRA practitioners. To ensure that results of control room crew studies will be generalizable to the existing and evolving fleet of US reactors, future expansion of the HSSL may also include other SMR plant models, plant-specific simulators and a generic plant model aligned to the current generation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and future advanced reactor designs. Collaboration with industry partners is also proving to be a vital component of the facility as this helps to establish a formal basis for current and future human performance experiments to support nuclear industry objectives. A long-range Program Plan has been developed for the HSSL to ensure that the facility will support not only the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, but also to provide human factors guidance for all future developments of the nuclear industry.

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hein, J.; Schneider, T.; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, P.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  12. Blue Ribbon Commission, Yucca Mountain Closure, Court Actions - Future of Decommissioned Reactors, Operating Reactors and Nuclear Power - 13249

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, Jas S. [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC1, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Nuclear Power Technologies, Sargent and Lundy LLC1, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues related to back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle continue to be difficult for the commercial nuclear power industry and for the decision makers at the national and international level. In the US, the 1982 NWPA required DOE to develop geological repositories for SNF and HLW but in spite of extensive site characterization efforts and over ten billion dollars spent, a repository opening is nowhere in sight. There has been constant litigation against the DOE by the nuclear utilities for breach of the 'standard contract' they signed with the DOE under the NWPA. The SNF inventory continues to rise both in the US and globally and the nuclear industry has turned to dry storage facilities at reactor locations. In US, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future issued its report in January 2012 and among other items, it recommends a new, consent-based approach to siting of facilities, prompt efforts to develop one or more geologic disposal facilities, and prompt efforts to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities. In addition, the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi accident had a severe impact on the future growth of nuclear power. The nuclear industry is focusing on mitigation strategies for beyond design basis events and in the US, the industry is in the process of implementing the recommendations from NRC's Near Term Task Force. (authors)

  13. Impacts of aerosol-cloud interactions on past and future changes in tropospheric composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unger, N.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D. T.; Koch, D. M.

    2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of effective emissions control policies that are beneficial to both climate and air quality requires a detailed understanding of all the feedbacks in the atmospheric composition and climate system. We perform sensitivity studies with a global atmospheric composition-climate model to assess the impact of aerosols on tropospheric chemistry through their modification on clouds, aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI). The model includes coupling between both tropospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry and aerosols and liquid-phase clouds. We investigate past impacts from preindustrial (PI) to present day (PD) and future impacts from PD to 2050 (for the moderate IPCC A1B scenario) that embrace a wide spectrum of precursor emission changes and consequential ACI. The aerosol indirect effect (AIE) is estimated to be -2.0 Wm{sup -2} for PD-PI and -0.6 Wm{sup -2} for 2050-PD, at the high end of current estimates. Inclusion of ACI substantially impacts changes in global mean methane lifetime across both time periods, enhancing the past and future increases by 10% and 30%, respectively. In regions where pollution emissions increase, inclusion of ACI leads to 20% enhancements in in-cloud sulfate production and {approx}10% enhancements in sulfate wet deposition that is displaced away from the immediate source regions. The enhanced in-cloud sulfate formation leads to larger increases in surface sulfate across polluted regions ({approx}10-30%). Nitric acid wet deposition is dampened by 15-20% across the industrialized regions due to ACI allowing additional re-release of reactive nitrogen that contributes to 1-2 ppbv increases in surface ozone in outflow regions. Our model findings indicate that ACI must be considered in studies of methane trends and projections of future changes to particulate matter air quality.

  14. Recapitalizing EMSL: Meeting Future Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    need to be developed in microscale reactive transport, adding chemistry on top of microfluidics, to better understand geochemical and biogeochemical reactivity as well as to help...

  15. Pellet injector development at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Baylor, L.R. [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing pellet injection systems for plasma fueling experiments on magnetic fusion confinement devices for about 20 years. Recently, the development has focused on meeting the complex fueling needs of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and future reactors. The proposed ITER fueling system will use a combination of deuterium- tritium (D-T) gas puffing and pellet injection to achieve and maintain ignited plasmas. The pellet injection system will have to provide D-T fueling for much longer pulse lengths (up to {approx}1000 s) than present day applications (typically limited to less than several seconds). In this paper, we describe the ongoing pellet injector development activities at ORNL, including the following three in direct support of ITER: (1) an improved pellet feed system for the centrifuge injector, (2) a steady-state extruder feed system, and (3) tritium extruder technology. In addition to the major activities, a repeating two-stage light gas gun for high-speed pellet injection ({approx}2.5 km/s) has been developed in a collaboration with ENEA Frascati; also, the production of impurity pellets (Ne, Ar, and Kr) has been demonstrated using the DIII-D and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor pneumatic pellet injection system.

  16. Environmental geophysics - fad or future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romig, P.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For ten years, the oil industry has suffered cycles of downsizing, out-sourcing, and reorganization. As layoffs and early retirement have become widespread, an increasing number of geophysicists have seen the environmental business as an opportunity to stay in their chosen professions. There have been predictions that the use of geophysics for environmental mapping and characterization could spawn an industry larger than oil exploration. These predictions have come from serious financial analysts as well as from hopeful geophysicists, so they cannot be ignored. There also are reputable professionals who believe that environmentalism is a fad which will die out as soon as the next oil shortage occurs. They point to recent publicity about excessive expenditures for waste remediation as a signal of the beginning of the end. These conflicting views raise serious questions about the form and function of, and the future for, environmental geophysics. This paper reviews these views.

  17. Capacity additions ease tight methanol supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greek, B.F. (C and EN, Houston, TX (US))

    1988-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two menthanol plants now in operation - one in the U.S., the other in Chile - will boost global supplies of methanol more than 375 million gal annually. This large capacity addition and smaller expansions in other parts of the world will exceed demand growth during 1988 and 1989, easing the squeeze on supplies. As the result of increased supplies, methanol prices could slip slightly in the fourth quarter. They are more likely to decline next year, however. The two plants, which started up in August, are owned and operated by Tenneco Oil Co. Processing and Marketing and by Cape Horn Methanol (CHM). The Tenneco plant, located in Pasadena, Tex., was restarted after a shutdown in 1982 when prices for methanol were low. It now is running at full capacity of 125 million gal per year. The plant uses the low-pressure process technology of Lurgi, reportedly requiring for feedstock and energy between 100,000 and 125,000 cu ft of methane per gallon. Global trade in methanol smooths out the supply and demand inconsistencies. Surging methanol demand in the U.S. and in Western Europe has been met by imports from areas where methanol production is most economical - that is, where natural gas is readily available and has no other application as high in value. Canada, Chile, and Trinidad are examples of those areas.

  18. Overview progress and future planOverview progress and future plan EAST project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview progress and future planOverview progress and future plan ofof EAST project Yuanxi WanUnique CharacteristicCharacteristic III.III. Future planFuture plan Conten t #12;1997 The project approved by government;workshops with good quality; All magnets has been tested successfully by cooling and charging,All magnets has been

  19. While future changes in emission are the largest uncertainty on future climate change, another

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    specify concentrations and that lead to varying degrees of heating (or cooling) in the future and work outWhile future changes in emission are the largest uncertainty on future climate change, another. Above, the thick lines show different possible future scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways

  20. Saving for the future self: Neural measures of future self-continuity predict temporal discounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Brian

    Saving for the future self: Neural measures of future self-continuity predict temporal discounting not increased their rate of saving. In a phenomenon known as `temporal discounting', people value immediate and treat the future self differently from the present self, and so might fail to save for their future

  1. Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaffhauser, A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

  2. SUSTAINABLE A university for sustainable development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    THE SUSTAINABLE UNIVERSITY #12;A university for sustainable development The University. The University of Gothenburg believes the future is important. We want to ensure sustainable development universities in Europe for research and education in sustainable development. Sustainable education

  3. SUSTAINABLE A university for sustainable development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    THE SUSTAINABLE UNIVERSITY #12;A university for sustainable development The University contribution to a sustainable future. By systematically integrating sustainable development into research. The University of Gothenburg's Vision 2020 confirms that sustainable development is important; we always consider

  4. University of Wisconsin Madison Enterprise IT Decision Making Future State Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    1 of 3 University of Wisconsin ­ Madison Enterprise IT Decision Making ­ Future State Team Charter Document June 28, 2012 Approved June 28, 2012 (v6.1) Team Name Enterprise IT Decision Making ­ Future State business case for the implementation of a selected model. Team members will be responsible for developing

  5. Future Agriculture / Framtidens lantbruk Welcome to a lunch seminar June 11, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future Agriculture / Framtidens lantbruk Welcome to a lunch seminar June 11, 2013 "Zero Agriculture ­ livestock, crops and land use, is a research program- me developed at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU). In Future Agriculture researchers work together with industry, interest groups

  6. Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Geothermal Resource Assessment and Future Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph C. Armstrong; Robert P. Breckenridge; Dennis L. Nielson; John W. Shervais; Thomas R. Wood

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Air Force is facing a number of challenges as it moves into the future, one of the biggest being how to provide safe and secure energy to support base operations. A team of scientists and engineers met at Mountain Home Air Force Base in early 2011 near Boise, Idaho, to discuss the possibility of exploring for geothermal resources under the base. The team identified that there was a reasonable potential for geothermal resources based on data from an existing well. In addition, a regional gravity map helped identify several possible locations for drilling a new well. The team identified several possible sources of funding for this well—the most logical being to use U.S. Department of Energy funds to drill the upper half of the well and U.S. Air Force funds to drill the bottom half of the well. The well was designed as a slimhole well in accordance with State of Idaho Department of Water Resources rules and regulations. Drilling operations commenced at the Mountain Home site in July of 2011 and were completed in January of 2012. Temperatures increased gradually, especially below a depth of 2000 ft. Temperatures increased more rapidly below a depth of 5500 ft. The bottom of the well is at 5976 ft, where a temperature of about 140°C was recorded. The well flowed artesian from a depth below 5600 ft, until it was plugged off with drilling mud. Core samples were collected from the well and are being analyzed to help understand permeability at depth. Additional tests using a televiewer system will be run to evaluate orientation and directions at fractures, especially in the production zone. A final report on the well exploitation will be forthcoming later this year. The Air Force will use it to evaluate the geothermal resource potential for future private development options at Mountain Home Air Force Base. In conclusion, Recommendation for follow-up efforts include the following:

  7. Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 4–5, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric – Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by the refurbishment and restart of TREAT. •TREAT is an absolute necessity in the suite of reactor fuel test capabilities •TREAT yields valuable information on reactivity effects, margins to failure, fuel dispersal, and failure propagation •Most importantly, interpretation of TREAT experiment results is a stringent test of the integrated understanding of fuel performance.

  8. CREATION OF THE MODEL ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houck, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Wulf, N.

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991, the international nuclear nonproliferation community was dismayed to discover that the implementation of safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its NPT INFCIRC/153 safeguards agreement with Iraq had failed to detect Iraq's nuclear weapon program. It was now clear that ensuring that states were fulfilling their obligations under the NPT would require not just detecting diversion but also the ability to detect undeclared materials and activities. To achieve this, the IAEA initiated what would turn out to be a five-year effort to reappraise the NPT safeguards system. The effort engaged the IAEA and its Member States and led to agreement in 1997 on a new safeguards agreement, the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between States and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards. The Model Protocol makes explicit that one IAEA goal is to provide assurance of the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities. The Model Protocol requires an expanded declaration that identifies a State's nuclear potential, empowers the IAEA to raise questions about the correctness and completeness of the State's declaration, and, if needed, allows IAEA access to locations. The information required and the locations available for access are much broader than those provided for under INFCIRC/153. The negotiation was completed in quite a short time because it started with a relatively complete draft of an agreement prepared by the IAEA Secretariat. This paper describes how the Model Protocol was constructed and reviews key decisions that were made both during the five-year period and in the actual negotiation.

  9. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

  10. Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy An error occurred. Unable to execute Javascript. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a...

  11. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would future urban therefore Cooling and agricultural waterwater a higher than of future power cooling in 1975. WATERa larger portion the cooling of the future requirements.

  12. Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportation Energy Futures Study Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study - Lessons for the Transportation Energy...

  13. additional intraoperative sterility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are in agreement with global fits. The framework predicts the absence of neutrinoless double beta decay and one vanishing neutrino mass, and can therefore be tested in future...

  14. Heavy Duty Vehicle Futures Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askin, Amanda Christine; Barter, Garrett; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed for an Early Career Research and Development project. This project developed a heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) sector model to assess the factors influencing alternative fuel and efficiency technology adoption. This model builds on a Sandia light duty vehicle sector model and provides a platform for assessing potential impacts of technological advancements developed at the Combustion Research Facility. Alternative fuel and technology adoption modeling is typically developed around a small set of scenarios. This HDV sector model segments the HDV sector and parameterizes input values, such as fuel prices, efficiencies, and vehicle costs. This parameterization enables sensitivity and trade space analyses to identify the inputs that are most associated with outputs of interest, such as diesel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Thus this analysis tool enables identification of the most significant HDV sector drivers that can be used to support energy security and climate change goals.

  15. Actuarial science is the quantitative analysis of risk. In addition to mathematics and statistics courses, students in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Actuarial science is the quantitative analysis of risk. In addition to mathematics and statistics. Actuaries help individuals, businesses and society manage risk by evaluating the likelihood of future events's risk tolerance with various risk parameters such as age of the insured, health status, place

  16. The future of nuclear deterrence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quester, G.H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear deterrence has been in existence for almost four decades. Yet, analysts from the left and the right keep reemphasizing the dangers and problems with deterrence without always remembering its purpose-the prevention of nuclear war or the prevention of all war. In this book. George Quester analyzes the future of nuclear deterrence in light of its past, and discovers that the fundamental tenets of nuclear deterrence remain unchanged. George Quester considers the overwhelming tensions present in a society threatened by the prospect of a nuclear holocaust and a lingering nuclear winter. But he also acknowledges that nuclear deterrence has prevented a great deal of global and local warfare that otherwise would have occurred. He spotlights the basic military problems facing the world today, including the shadow cast on all levels of strategic planning by the threat of nuclear war. Quester warns against charging forth with radical new alternatives, such as the Strategic Defense Initiative and deep-cut disarmament. He argues that initiatives such as these reflect a return to traditional military thinking about waging and winning wars that pose serious possibilities for a breakdown in deterrence policy.

  17. Present and future nuclear power generation as a reflection of individual countries' resources and objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borg, I.Y.

    1987-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear reactor industry has been in a state of decline for more than a decade in most of the world. The reasons are numerous and often unique to the energy situation of individual countries. Two commonly cited issues influence decisions relating to construction of reactors: costs and the need, or lack thereof, for additional generating capacity. Public concern has ''politicized'' the nuclear industry in many non-communist countries, causing a profound effect on the economics of the option. The nuclear installations and future plans are reviewed on a country-by-country basis for 36 countries in the light of the resources and objectives of each. Because oil and gas for power production throughout the world are being phased out as much as possible, coal-fired generation currently tends to be the chosen alternative to nuclear power production. Exceptions occur in many of the less developed countries that collectively have a very limited operating experience with nuclear reactors. The Chernobyl accident in the USSR alarmed the public; however, national strategies and plans to build reactors have not changed markedly in the interim. Assuming that the next decade of nuclear power generation is uneventful, additional electrical demand would cause the nuclear power industry to experience a rejuvenation in Europe as well as in the US. 80 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. The Future of Injection Molding in Food Packaging for the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meissbach, Kenneth

    2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    threaten the future of injection molding. Continued development of materials, and processing equipment as well as the use of in mold labeling and integrated tamper evident packaging are opportunities for injection molding. The environmental issues...

  19. Scientific Needs for Future X-ray Sources in the U.S. -- A White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcone, Roger

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    probe. The development of CW SCRF technology, also used inCW superconducting RF (SCRF) linac provides high repetitionThe great attractions of CW SCRF for future FEL facilities

  20. Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Powertrain Systems Lowest Engine-Out Emissions as the Key to the Future of the Heavy Duty Diesel Engine - New Development Results Franz X. Moser Theodor Sams, Rolf Dreisbach AVL...