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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

View-Oriented Update Protocol with Integrated Diff for View-based Consistency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a traditional diff-based protocol and an existing home-based protocol. Experimen- tal results demonstrate the performance of the proposed protocol is significantly better than the diff-based protocol and the home-based

Werstein, Paul

2

DiffServ node with join minimum cost queue policy and multiclass traffic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DiffServ, the vehicle for providing relative QoS in the Internet is also easily amenable to simple and effective pricing mechanisms. By pricing access to a relative QoS, we can model a DiffServ node as a 'Join Minimum Cost Queue' in which an arriving ... Keywords: diffServ, finite buffer queues, join minimum cost queue, join shortest queue, network pricing, quasi-birth--death processes, queue control

Rahul Tandra; N. Hemachandra; D. Manjunath

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Consistent-degradation macroblock grouping for parallel video streams over DiffServ networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a consistent-degradation macroblock grouping scheme for improving loss resilience of parallel video streams over a two-class DiffServ network. By jointly exploiting the H.264 flexible macroblock ordering (FMO) tool, a multi-stream ... Keywords: DiffServ network, Flexible macroblock ordering, Loss resilience, Parallel video streams, Transmission distortion

Hao Liu; HaiQin Xu; ShuGuang Zhao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

diff -ruN oommf12a4pre-20100719/app/mmdisp/scripts ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -ruN oommf12a4pre-20100719/app/mmdisp/scripts/mmdisp.tcl oommf12a4pre-20100719bis/app/mmdisp/scripts/mmdisp.tcl --- oommf12a4pre ...

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

5

diff -crN oommf1.1b1/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -crN oommf1.1b1/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES. *** oommf1.1b1/ CHANGES Tue Oct 2 12:15:40 2001. --- oommf/CHANGES ...

6

diff -crN oommf-1.0b1/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -crN oommf-1.0b1/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES. *** oommf-1.0b1/ CHANGES Tue Jul 27 15:49:21 1999. --- oommf/CHANGES ...

7

xxxx xxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx x 1116 f xx xx xxxx tar diff trnhs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ee p2 205.1 220.3 gpfp hany 970127_3500_3398 a 3500 f xx 24 elec tar diff trnhs 59.43 20.59 608848klx ee p2 209.9 241.1 gbcb hany ...

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

8

diff -crN oommf11b2/app/mmdisp/scripts/avf2ppm.tcl oommf ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -crN oommf11b2/app/mmdisp/scripts/avf2ppm.tcl oommf/app/mmdisp/scripts/ avf2ppm.tcl *** oommf11b2/app/mmdisp/scripts/avf2ppm.tcl Wed ...

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

9

Thme Date Enseignant Thme Date Enseignant AKIN Tuna Suites 16-mai AD Equa diff 24-mai RL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Page 1 Thème Date Enseignant Thème Date Enseignant AKIN Tuna Suites 16-mai AD Equa diff 24 Probas 23-mai MAC Thème Date Enseignant Thème Date Enseignant AKIN Tuna Configurations 31-mai DT Arithm

Douai, Antoine

10

Photon Sciences Worksheet 05-02 Extreme Conditions Extreme Environments Diff.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-02 Extreme Conditions 5-02 Extreme Conditions Extreme Environments Diff. Resources Available - BE Mid 2012 Mid 2014 Mid 2016 Beamline X-ray Source Total Total Total NSLS 1.16 1.16 0 X17B2 Wiggler 0.33 0.33 0 X17B3 Wiggler 0.33 0.33 0 X17C Wiggler 0.5 0.5 0 APS 5.4 6.1 6.1 3-ID Bend 0 0 0 11-ID-B Undulator 0.1 0.1 0.1 11-ID-C Undulator 0.1 0.1 0.1 13-BM-D a Bend 0.4 0.4 0.4 CAT 13-ID-D a Undulator 0.3 1 1 CAT 16-BM-B b Bend 1 1 1 CAT 16-BM-D b Bend 1 1 1 CAT 16-ID-B b Undulator 1 1 1 CAT 16-ID-D Undulator 1 1 1 CAT 13-BM-C Bend 0.5 0.5 0.5 CAT ALS 1 1 1 12.2.2 Superbend 1 1 1 SSRL 0 0 0 NSLS-II 0 0 0.3 XPD c Dampingwiggler 0 0 0.3 Project Funded and under construction in NSLS-II Project - Available 2015 4DE Wiggler 0 0 0 TEC Undulator 0 0 0 Totals 7.56 8.26 7.4 Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) only Large Volume Press (LVP) only DAC & LVP BE - Beamline equivalent - 1 BE is a station running the full operating schedule of the facility. Typically 5000 Hrs/yr

11

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Before Getting There: Potential and Actual Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the concepts of Actual and Potential Collaboration Spaces. The former applies to the space where collaborative activities are performed, while the second relates to the initial space where opportunities for collaboration are ... Keywords: Doc2U, PIAS, casual and informal interactions, potential and actual collaboration spaces, potential collaboration awareness

Alberto L. Morn; Jess Favela; Ana Mara Martnez Enrquez; Dominique Decouchant

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Microsoft Word - summer.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U. S. 2829 89 Source: AGA Average High Temperature for Six Major Electricity Consuming Cities Actual Normal Diff 919 86 84 2 920 87 84 3 921 89 84 5 922 88 84 4 923 84 82 2 9...

14

Microsoft Word - summer.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U. S. 2544 80 Source: AGA Average High Temperature for Six Major Electricity Consuming Cities Actual Normal Diff 815 90 89 1 816 92 89 3 817 89 89 0 818 91 89 2 819 90 89 1 8...

15

Microsoft Word - summer.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U. S. 2323 73 Source: AGA Average High Temperature for Six Major Electricity Consuming Cities Actual Normal Diff 725 94 89 5 726 96 89 7 727 93 89 4 728 93 89 4 729 94 89 5 7...

16

EIA Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U. S. 2468 77 Source: AGA Average High Temperature for Six Major Electricity Consuming Cities Actual Normal Diff 808 95 87 8 809 96 88 8 810 94 89 5 811 95 88 7 812 94 88 6 8...

17

Microsoft Word - summer.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U. S. 2393 75 Source: AGA Average High Temperature for Six Major Electricity Consuming Cities Actual Normal Diff 801 95 89 6 802 97 89 8 803 95 89 6 804 93 89 4 805 90 89 1 8...

18

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

19

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

20

Improving Industrial Refrigeration System Efficiency - Actual Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses actual design and modifications for increased system efficiency and includes reduced chilled liquid flow during part load operation, reduced condensing and increased evaporator temperatures for reduced system head, thermosiphon cycle cooling during winter operation, compressor intercooling, direct refrigeration vs. brine cooling, insulation of cold piping to reduce heat gain, multiple screw compressors for improved part load operation, evaporative condensers for reduced system head and pumping energy, and using high efficiency motors.

White, T. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...

22

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

23

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

24

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)"...

25

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

26

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 999...

27

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002...

28

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,200...

29

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011...

30

Predicted vs. Actual Energy Savings of Retrofitted House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of actual energy savings and the predicted energy savings of retrofitted one-story house located in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The process started with modeling the house prior to retrofitting and after retrofitting. The monthly metered energy consumption is acquired from the electric company archives for seven years prior to retrofitting and recording the actual monthly energy consumption of the post retrofitting. The house model is established on DOE 2.1. Actual monthly energy consumption is used to calibrate and fine-tuning the model until the gap between actual and predicted consumption was narrowed. Then the Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) are entered into the modeled house according to the changes in thermo-physical properties of the envelope and the changes in schedules and number of users. In order to account for those differences, electrical consumption attributed to A/C in summer was isolated and compared. The study followed the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP) in assessing the impact of energy conservation measures on actual, metered, building energy consumption. The study aimed to show the predicted savings by the simulated building model and the actual utility bills' analysis in air conditioning consumption and peak at monthly load due to building envelope.

Al-Mofeez, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level

32

Climatic Temperature Normals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The published 195180 daily normals of maximum and minimum temperatures were prepared by interpolating between average monthly values. This study compares the published normal and 30-yr average daily temperatures in the eastern half of the United ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; Marc S. Plantico

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft July 9, 2009 Draft July 9, 2009 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2009 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

34

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

35

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884 7924 AEO 1998 6895 6906 7066 7161 7278 7400 7488 7597 7719 7859 7959 8074 8190 8286 8361 AEO 1999 6884 7007 7269 7383 7472 7539 7620 7725 7841 7949 8069 8174 8283 8351 AEO 2000 7056 7141 7266 7363 7452 7578 7694 7815 7926 8028 8113 8217 8288

36

Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2935 3201 3362 3504 3657 3738 3880 3993 4099 4212 4303 4398 4475 4541 4584 4639 4668 4672 AEO 1995 2953 3157 3281 3489 3610 3741 3818 3920 4000 4103 4208 4303 4362 4420 4442 4460 4460 AEO 1996 3011 3106 3219 3398 3519 3679 3807 3891 3979 4070 4165 4212 4260 4289 4303 4322 4325 AEO 1997 3099 3245 3497 3665 3825 3975 4084 4190 4285 4380 4464 4552 4617 4654 4709 4760 AEO 1998 3303 3391 3654 3713 3876 4053 4137 4298 4415 4556 4639 4750 4910 4992 5087 AEO 1999 3380 3442 3888 4022 4153 4238 4336 4441 4545 4652 4780 4888 4999 5073 AEO 2000 3599 3847 4036 4187 4320 4465 4579 4690 4780 4882 4968 5055 5113

37

Tropical Africa: Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Closed Forests (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Land Use Maximum Potential Biomass Density Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By Country) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1960 (By Administrative Unit)

38

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.983258692,2.124739238,2.26534793,2.409252566,2.585728477,2.727400662,2.854942053,2.980927152,3.13861755,3.345819536,3.591100993,3.849544702,4.184279801,4.510016556,4.915074503,5.29147351,5.56022351,5.960471854 "AEO 1995",,1.891706924,1.998384058,1.952818035,2.064227053,2.152302174,2.400016103,2.569033816,2.897681159,3.160088567,3.556344605,3.869033816,4.267391304,4.561932367,4.848599034,5.157246377,5.413405797,5.660917874 "AEO 1996",,,1.630674532,1.740334763,1.862956911,1.9915856,2.10351261,2.194934146,2.287655669,2.378991658,2.476043002,2.589847464,2.717610782,2.836870306,2.967124845,3.117719429,3.294003735,3.485657428,3.728419409

39

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final July 01, 2010 Final July 01, 2010 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2010 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

40

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rising steam costs and a high failure rate on the Joliet Plants standard steam trap, a testing and evaluation program was begun to find a steam trap that would work at Olin-Joliet. The basis was to conduct the test on the actual process equipment and that a minimum life be achieved. This paper deals with the history of the steam system/condensate systems, the setting up of the testing procedure, which traps were and were not tested and the results of the testing program to date.

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

43

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO Dollar Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1992,1.9399,2.029,2.1099,2.1899,2.29,2.35,2.39,2.42,2.47,2.55,2.65,2.75,2.89,3.01,3.17,3.3,3.35,3.47 "AEO 1995",1993,,1.85,1.899,1.81,1.87,1.8999,2.06,2.14,2.34,2.47,2.69,2.83,3.02,3.12,3.21,3.3,3.35,3.39 "AEO 1996",1994,,,1.597672343,1.665446997,1.74129355,1.815978527,1.866241336,1.892736554,1.913619637,1.928664207,1.943216205,1.964540124,1.988652706,2.003382921,2.024799585,2.056392431,2.099974155,2.14731431,2.218094587

44

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 AEO 1996 1994 7.09 6.99 6.94 6.93 6.96 6.96 6.96 6.97 6.98 6.97 6.98 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.96 6.95 6.91 AEO 1997 1995 6.94 6.89 6.90 6.91 6.86 6.84 6.78 6.73 6.66 6.60 6.58 6.54 6.49 6.48 6.45 6.36

45

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO 1995",,6398.45,6544.45,6555.4,6675.85,6745.2,6821.85,6887.55,6964.2,7048.15,7146.7,7245.25,7336.5,7405.85,7471.55,7537.25,7581.05,7621.2 "AEO 1996",,,6489.7,6526.2,6606.5,6708.7,6781.7,6854.7,6942.3,7008,7084.65,7175.9,7259.85,7329.2,7383.95,7449.65,7500.75,7544.55,7581.05 "AEO 1997",,,,6635.7,6694.1,6825.5,6953.25,7073.7,7183.2,7267.15,7369.35,7460.6,7548.2,7643.1,7730.7,7792.75,7832.9,7884,7924.15

46

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",17.71,17.68,17.84,18.12,18.25,18.43,18.58,18.93,19.28,19.51,19.8,19.92,20.13,20.18,20.38,20.35,20.16,20.19 "AEO 1995",,18.28,17.98,17.92,18.21,18.63,18.92,19.08,19.2,19.36,19.52,19.75,19.94,20.17,20.28,20.6,20.59,20.88 "AEO 1996",,,18.9,19.15,19.52,19.59,19.59,19.65,19.73,19.97,20.36,20.82,21.25,21.37,21.68,22.11,22.47,22.83,23.36 "AEO 1997",,,,19.1,19.7,20.17,20.32,20.54,20.77,21.26,21.9,22.31,22.66,22.93,23.38,23.68,23.99,24.25,24.65 "AEO 1998",,,,,18.85,19.06,20.34936142,20.27427673,20.60257721,20.94442177,21.44076347,21.80969238,22.25416183,22.65365219,23.176651,23.74545097,24.22989273,24.70069313,24.96691322

47

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.94 2.03 2.11 2.19 2.29 2.35 2.39 2.42 2.47 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.89 3.01 3.17 3.30 3.35 3.47 AEO 1995 1993 1.85 1.90 1.81 1.87 1.90 2.06 2.14 2.34 2.47 2.69 2.83 3.02 3.12 3.21 3.30 3.35 3.39 AEO 1996 1994 1.60 1.67 1.74 1.82 1.87 1.89 1.91 1.93 1.94 1.96 1.99 2.00 2.02 2.06 2.10 2.15 2.22

48

Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2.02,2.4,2.66,2.74,2.81,2.85,2.89,2.93,2.95,2.97,3,3.16,3.31,3.5,3.57,3.63,3.74,3.85 "AEO 1995",,2.46,2.54,2.8,2.87,2.87,2.89,2.9,2.9,2.92,2.95,2.97,3,3.03,3.19,3.35,3.51,3.6 "AEO 1996",,,2.56,2.75,2.85,2.88,2.93,2.98,3.02,3.06,3.07,3.09,3.12,3.17,3.23,3.29,3.37,3.46,3.56 "AEO 1997",,,,2.82,2.96,3.16,3.43,3.46,3.5,3.53,3.58,3.64,3.69,3.74,3.78,3.83,3.87,3.92,3.97 "AEO 1998",,,,,2.95,3.19,3.531808376,3.842532873,3.869043112,3.894513845,3.935930967,3.976293564,4.021911621,4.062207222,4.107616425,4.164502144,4.221304417,4.277039051,4.339964867

49

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099 1104 AEO 1998 1009 1051 1044 1058 1087 1084 1090 1097 1112 1130 1142 1148 1160 1162 1180 AEO 1999 1040 1075 1092 1109 1113 1118 1120 1120 1133 1139 1150 1155 1156 1173 AEO 2000 1053 1086 1103 1124 1142 1164 1175 1184 1189 1194 1199 1195 1200 AEO 2001 1078 1112 1135 1153 1165 1183 1191 1220 1228 1228 1235 1240

50

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

51

Table 16. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual (billion kilowatt-hours) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2364 2454 2534 2626 2708 2811 AEO 1983 2318 2395 2476 2565 2650 2739 3153 AEO 1984 2321 2376 2461 2551 2637 2738 3182 AEO 1985 2317 2360 2427 2491 2570 2651 2730 2808 2879 2949 3026 AEO 1986 2363 2416 2479 2533 2608 2706 2798 2883 2966 3048 3116 3185 3255 3324 3397 AEO 1987 2460 2494 2555 2622 2683 2748 2823 2902 2977 3363 AEO 1989* 2556 2619 2689 2760 2835 2917 2994 3072 3156 3236 3313 3394 3473 AEO 1990 2612 2689 3083 3488.0 3870.0 AEO 1991 2700 2762 2806 2855 2904 2959 3022 3088 3151 3214 3282 3355 3427 3496 3563 3632 3704 3776 3846 3916 AEO 1992 2746 2845 2858 2913 2975 3030 3087 3146 3209 3276 3345 3415 3483 3552 3625 3699 3774 3847 3921 AEO 1993 2803 2840 2893 2946 2998 3052 3104 3157 3214 3271 3327

52

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

53

Direct quantum communication without actual transmission of the message qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently an orthogonal state based protocol of direct quantum communication without actual transmission of particles is proposed by Salih \\emph{et al.}{[}Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{110} (2013) 170502{]} using chained quantum Zeno effect. As the no-transmission of particle claim is criticized by Vaidman {[}arXiv:1304.6689 (2013){]}, the condition (claim) of Salih \\emph{et al.} is weaken here to the extent that transmission of particles is allowed, but transmission of the message qubits (the qubits on which the secret information is encoded) is not allowed. Remaining within this weaker condition it is shown that there exists a large class of quantum states, that can be used to implement an orthogonal state based protocol of secure direct quantum communication using entanglement swapping, where actual transmission of the message qubits is not required. The security of the protocol originates from monogamy of entanglement. As the protocol can be implemented without using conjugate coding its security is independent of non-commutativity.

Chitra Shukla; Anirban Pathak

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nonlinear excitations in DNA: Aperiodic models vs actual genome sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of the sequence on the propagation of nonlinear excitations in simple models of DNA in which we incorporate actual DNA sequences obtained from human genome data. We show that kink propagation requires forces over a certain threshold, a phenomenon already found for aperiodic sequences [F. Dom\\'\\i nguez-Adame {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 52}, 2183 (1995)]. For forces below threshold, the final stop positions are highly dependent on the specific sequence. The results of our model are consistent with the stick-slip dynamics of the unzipping process observed in experiments. We also show that the effective potential, a collective coordinate formalism introduced by Salerno and Kivshar [Phys. Lett. A {\\bf 193}, 263 (1994)] is a useful tool to identify key regions in DNA that control the dynamical behavior of large segments. Additionally, our results lead to further insights in the phenomenology observed in aperiodic systems.

Sara Cuenda; Angel Sanchez

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Actual versus design performance of solar systems in the National Solar Data Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report relates field measured performance to the designer predicted performance. The field measured data was collected by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) over a period of six years. Data from 25 solar systems was selected from a data pool of some 170 solar systems. The scope of the project extends beyond merely presenting comparisons of data. There is an attempt to provide answers which will move the solar industry forward. As a result of some industry and research workshops, several concerns arose which can be partially allayed by careful study of the NSDN data. These are: What types of failures occurred and why. How good was the design versus actual performance. Why was predicted performance not achieved in the field. Which components should be integrated with a system type for good performance. Since the designs span several years and since design philosophies are quite variable, the measured results were also compared to f-Chart 5.1 results. This comparison is a type of normalization in that all systems are modeled with the same process. An added benefit of this normalization is a further validation of the f-Chart model on a fairly large scale. The systems were modeled using equipment design parameters, measured loads, and f-Chart weather data from nearby cities.

Logee, T.L.; Kendall, P.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

57

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

58

Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 7.58 7.45 7.12 6.82 6.66 7.09 AEO 1983 5.15 5.44 5.73 5.79 5.72 5.95 6.96 AEO 1984 4.85 5.11 5.53 5.95 6.31 6.59 8.65 AEO 1985 4.17 4.38 4.73 4.93 5.36 5.72 6.23 6.66 7.14 7.39 7.74 AEO 1986 5.15 5.38 5.46 5.92 6.46 7.09 7.50 7.78 7.96 8.20 8.47 8.74 9.04 9.57 9.76 AEO 1987 5.81 6.04 6.81 7.28 7.82 8.34 8.71 8.94 8.98 10.01 AEO 1989* 6.28 6.84 7.49 7.96 8.53 8.83 9.04 9.28 9.60 9.64 9.75 10.02 10.20 AEO 1990 7.20 7.61 9.13 9.95 11.02 AEO 1991 7.28 7.25 7.34 7.48 7.72 8.10 8.57 9.09 9.61 10.07 10.51 11.00 11.44 11.72 11.86 12.11 12.30 12.49 12.71 12.91 AEO 1992 6.86 7.42 7.88 8.16 8.55 8.80 9.06 9.32 9.50 9.80 10.17 10.35 10.56 10.61 10.85 11.00 11.15 11.29 11.50 AEO 1993 7.25 8.01 8.49 9.06

59

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1.98 2.12 2.27 2.41 2.59 2.73 2.85 2.98 3.14 3.35 3.59 3.85 4.18 4.51 4.92 5.29 5.56 5.96 AEO 1995 1.89 2.00 1.95 2.06 2.15 2.40 2.57 2.90 3.16 3.56 3.87 4.27 4.56 4.85 5.16 5.41 5.66 AEO 1996 1.63 1.74 1.86 1.99 2.10 2.19 2.29 2.38 2.48 2.59 2.72 2.84 2.97 3.12 3.29 3.49 3.73 AEO 1997 2.03 1.82 1.90 1.99 2.06 2.13 2.21 2.32 2.43 2.54 2.65 2.77 2.88 3.00 3.11 3.24 AEO 1998 2.30 2.20 2.26 2.31 2.38 2.44 2.52 2.60 2.69 2.79 2.93 3.06 3.20 3.35 3.48 AEO 1999 1.98 2.15 2.20 2.32 2.43 2.53 2.63 2.76 2.90 3.02 3.12 3.23 3.35 3.47

60

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

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61

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

62

Table 15. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual (nominal cents per kilowatt-hour) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.38 6.96 7.63 8.23 8.83 9.49 AEO 1983 6.85 7.28 7.74 8.22 8.68 9.18 13.12 AEO 1984 6.67 7.05 7.48 7.89 8.25 8.65 11.53 AEO 1985 6.62 6.94 7.32 7.63 7.89 8.15 8.46 8.85 9.20 9.61 10.04 AEO 1986 6.67 6.88 7.05 7.18 7.35 7.52 7.65 7.87 8.31 8.83 9.41 10.01 10.61 11.33 12.02 AEO 1987 6.63 6.65 6.92 7.12 7.38 7.62 7.94 8.36 8.86 11.99 AEO 1989* 6.50 6.75 7.14 7.48 7.82 8.11 8.50 8.91 9.39 9.91 10.49 11.05 11.61 AEO 1990 6.49 6.72 8.40 10.99 14.5 AEO 1991 6.94 7.31 7.59 7.82 8.18 8.38 8.54 8.73 8.99 9.38 9.83 10.29 10.83 11.36 11.94 12.58 13.21 13.88 14.58 15.21 AEO 1992 6.97 7.16 7.32 7.56 7.78 8.04 8.29 8.57 8.93 9.38 9.82 10.26 10.73 11.25 11.83 12.37 12.96 13.58 14.23 AEO 1993

63

Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 AEO 1983 1.08 1.16 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 AEO 1984 0.99 1.05 1.16 1.27 1.43 1.57 2.11 AEO 1985 0.94 1.00 1.19 1.45 1.58 1.86 1.94 2.06 2.17 2.32 2.44 AEO 1986 0.74 0.88 0.62 1.03 1.05 1.27 1.39 1.47 1.66 1.79 1.96 2.17 2.38 2.42 2.43 AEO 1987 0.84 0.89 1.07 1.16 1.26 1.36 1.46 1.65 1.75 2.50 AEO 1989* 1.15 1.32 1.44 1.52 1.61 1.70 1.79 1.87 1.98 2.06 2.15 2.23 2.31 AEO 1990 1.26 1.43 2.07 2.68 2.95 AEO 1991 1.36 1.53 1.70 1.82 2.11 2.30 2.33 2.36 2.42 2.49 2.56 2.70 2.75 2.83 2.90 2.95 3.02 3.09 3.17 3.19 AEO 1992 1.48 1.62 1.88 2.08 2.25 2.41 2.56 2.68 2.70 2.72 2.76 2.84 2.92 3.05 3.10 3.20 3.25 3.30 3.30 AEO 1993 1.79 2.08 2.35 2.49 2.61 2.74 2.89 2.95 3.00 3.05 3.10

64

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00 26.63 AEO 1997 22.15 22.75 23.24 23.64 23.86 24.13 24.65 25.34 25.82 26.22 26.52 27.00 27.35 27.70 28.01 28.47 AEO 1998 21.84 23.03 23.84 24.08 24.44 24.81 25.33 25.72 26.22 26.65 27.22 27.84 28.35 28.84 29.17 AEO 1999 21.35 22.36 22.54 23.18 23.65 24.17 24.57 25.19 25.77 26.41 26.92 27.42 28.02 28.50

65

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

66

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

67

Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production, Projected vs. Actual Production, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 14.74 14.26 14.33 14.89 15.39 15.88 AEO 1983 16.48 16.27 16.20 16.31 16.27 16.29 14.89 AEO 1984 17.48 17.10 17.44 17.58 17.52 17.32 16.39 AEO 1985 16.95 17.08 17.11 17.29 17.40 17.33 17.32 17.27 17.05 16.80 16.50 AEO 1986 16.30 16.27 17.15 16.68 16.90 16.97 16.87 16.93 16.86 16.62 16.40 16.33 16.57 16.23 16.12 AEO 1987 16.21 16.09 16.38 16.32 16.30 16.30 16.44 16.62 16.81 17.39 AEO 1989* 16.71 16.71 16.94 17.01 16.83 17.09 17.35 17.54 17.67 17.98 18.20 18.25 18.49 AEO 1990 16.91 17.25 18.84 20.58 20.24 AEO 1991 17.40 17.48 18.11 18.22 18.15 18.22 18.39 18.82 19.03 19.28 19.62 19.89 20.13 20.07 19.95 19.82 19.64 19.50 19.30 19.08 AEO 1992 17.43 17.69 17.95 18.00 18.29 18.27 18.51 18.75 18.97

68

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

69

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

70

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

71

Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 9.2 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 7.29 8.09 8.94 9.62 10.27 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 6.37 6.89 7.50 8.15 9.05 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30

72

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

73

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 23.36 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25 24.65 AEO 1998 18.85 19.06 20.35 20.27 20.60 20.94 21.44 21.81 22.25 22.65 23.18 23.75 24.23 24.70 24.97 AEO 1999 18.80 19.13 19.28 19.82 20.23 20.77 21.05 21.57 21.98 22.47 22.85 23.26 23.77 24.15

74

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

75

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

76

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

77

Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

79

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Feb-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Mar-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1

Johns, Russell Taylor

80

Pu speciation in actual and simulated aged wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Pu L{sub II/III} edge was used to determine the speciation of this element in (1) Hanford Z-9 Pu crib samples, (2) deteriorated waste resins from a chloride process ion-exchange purification line, and (3) the sediments from two Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Liter Scale simulant brine systems. The Pu speciation in all of these samples except one is within the range previously displayed by PuO{sub 2+x-2y}(OH){sub y}{center_dot}zH{sub 2}O compounds, which is expected based on the putative thermodynamic stability of this system for Pu equilibrated with excess H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} under environmental conditions. The primary exception was a near neutral brine experiment that displayed evidence for partial substitution of the normal O-based ligands with Cl{sup -} and a concomitant expansion of the Pu-Pu distance relative to the much more highly ordered Pu near neighbor shell in PuO{sub 2}. However, although the Pu speciation was not necessarily unusual, the Pu chemistry identified via the history of these samples did exhibit unexpected patterns, the most significant of which may be that the presence of the Pu(V)-oxo species may decrease rather than increase the overall solubility of these compounds. Several additional aspects of the Pu speciation have also not been previously observed in laboratory-based samples. The molecular environmental chemistry of Pu is therefore likely to be more complicated than would be predicted based solely on the behavior of PuO{sub 2} under laboratory conditions.

Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time News Featured Articles 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony...

82

The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Actual Production History insurance plan protects against crop losses from a number of causes. All aspects of this insurance are described, including reporting requirements for the producer.

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Assessing Climate Information Use in Agribusiness. Part I: Actual and Potential Use and Impediments to Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project for the development of methodology to enable agribusiness decision makers to utilize more effectively climate information involved investigation of three agribusiness firms, as well as measurement of their actual and potential use. The ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Steven T. Sonka; Steven Hofing

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Trends of Calculated and Simulated Actual Evaporation in the Yangtze River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actual evaporation in the Yangtze River basin is calculated by the complementary relationship approachthat is, the advectionaridity (AA) model with parameter validation from 1961 to 2007and simulated by the general circulation model (GCM) ...

Yanjun Wang; Bo Liu; Buda Su; Jianqing Zhai; Marco Gemmer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Use of Remotely Sensed Actual Evapotranspiration to Improve RainfallRunoff Modeling in Southeast Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), mounted on the polar-orbiting Terra satellite, to determine leaf area index (LAI), and use actual evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS LAI data combined ...

Yongqiang Zhang; Francis H. S. Chiew; Lu Zhang; Hongxia Li

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration from Satellite and Meteorological Data in Central Bolivia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial estimates of actual evapotranspiration are useful for calculating the water balance of river basins, quantifying hydrological services provided by ecosystems, and assessing the hydrological impacts of land-use practices. To provide this ...

Christian Seiler; Arnold F. Moene

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Normal matter storage of antiprotons  

SciTech Connect

Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

Campbell, L.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Date Published 05/2013 Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Traditional energy performance calculated using building simulation with the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data represents the energy performance in a typical year but not necessarily the average or typical energy performance of a building in long term. Furthermore, the simulated results do not provide the range of variations due to the change of weather, which is important in building energy management and risk assessment of energy efficiency investment. This study analyzes the weather impact on peak electric demand and energy use by building simulation using 30-year actual meteorological year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels across all 17 climate zones. The simulated results from the AMY are compared to those from TMY3 to determine and analyze the differences. It was found that yearly weather variation has significant impact on building performance especially peak electric demand. Energy savings of building technologies should be evaluated using simulations with multi-decade actual weather data to fully consider investment risk and the long term performance.

89

normal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4202010 Cushman & Wakefield Marks 40 th Earth Day Celebrating New Milestones in Sustainability NEW YORK, April 22, 2010 -- Global real estate services firm Cushman & Wakefield...

90

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

direct normal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

normal normal Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A map depicting model estimates of monthly average daily total radiation using inputs derived from satellite and surface observations of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, albedo, atmospheric pressure and ozone sampled at a 40km resolution. (Purpose): A visual depiction of solar energy resource for concentrating solar power systems. Source NREL Date Released December 11th, 2003 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Central America direct normal DNI map NREL solar SWERA UNEP Data application/pdf icon Download Map (pdf, 67.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

92

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.7% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

93

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.3% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas) #/Month

Johns, Russell Taylor

94

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 1.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

95

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1. 8.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

96

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 2.2% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

97

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.1% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas

Johns, Russell Taylor

98

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance. 1/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

99

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET

Johns, Russell Taylor

100

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance Shops Offices 6 OF REPORT DP Form #31 - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES

Johns, Russell Taylor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Theft Total $280 $280 Total % Rcvd 0.4% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List

Johns, Russell Taylor

102

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared.1% DP Form #31 Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY Form #31 Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY

Johns, Russell Taylor

103

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran, Davis Introduction · The Iran Oil Project, initiated in 2007, aims to find the inefficiencies and their possible sources in Iranian oil and gas policies. Background Information Assumptions · Perfect Competition

California at Davis, University of

104

Satellite-Based Actual Evapotranspiration over Drying Semiarid Terrain in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple satellite-based algorithm for estimating actual evaporation based on Makkinks equation is applied to a seasonal cycle in 2002 at three test sites in Ghana, West Africa: at a location in the humid tropical southern region and two in the ...

D. Schttemeyer; Ch Schillings; A. F. Moene; H. A. R. de Bruin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Crude Market Impacts on Diff - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Market Factors . If light crude supply is increasing relative to heavy crude supply, it tends to contract the differential. On the other hand, if heavy crude ...

106

Weather Normalization of Reliability Indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather significantly increases variability of reliability indices. This project focuses on exploring statistical correlations between weather parameters and system performance indices using historical utility reliability data and weather data. Using this information, various approaches for normalizing utility performance indices for variability in weather can be developed.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

107

Normalization method for video images  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for automatically and adaptively normalizing analog signals representative of video images in object detection systems. Such normalization maximizes the average information content of the video images and, thereby, provides optimal digitized images for object detection and identification. The present invention manipulates two system control signals -- gain control signal and offset control signal -- to convert an analog image signal into a transformed analog image signal, such that the corresponding digitized image contains the maximum amount of information achievable with a conventional object detection system. In some embodiments of the present invention, information content is measured using parameters selected from image entropy, image mean, and image variance.

Donohoe, G.W.; Hush, D.R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Normalized information-based divergences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the mathematical study of some divergences based on the mutual information well-suited to categorical random vectors. These divergences are generalizations of theentropy distanceandinformation distance. Their main characteristic is that they combine a complexity term and the mutual information. We then introduce the notion of (normalized) informationbased divergence, propose several examples and discuss their mathematical properties.

J. -f. Coeurjolly; R. Drouilhet; J. -f. Robineau

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

110

Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Definition: Direct normal irradiance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Direct normal irradiance the amount of solar radiation received per unit area by a surface perpendicular (normal) to the rays...

112

The Actual Impact of the International Tribunal for former Yugoslavia on the Reconciliation Process in Bosnia-Herzegovina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the actual impact of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on the reconciliation process in Bosnia-Herzegovina and analyses possible (more)

Johansen, Kristine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment, behaviour, energy price, consumers Abstract suggest that raising energy pricessuch as in the form ofconsumers actually see energy prices and are therefore

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Actual versus predicted impacts of three ethanol plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help reduce US dependence on imported petroleum, Congress passed the Energy Security Act of 1980 (public Law 96-294). This legislation authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to promote expansion of the fuel alcohol industry through, among other measures, its Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program. Under this program, selected proposals for the conversion of plant biomass into fuel-grade ethanol would be granted loan guarantees. of 57 applications submitted for loan guarantees to build and operate ethanol fuel projects under this program, 11 were considered by DOE to have the greatest potential for satisfying DOE`s requirements and goals. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE evaluated the potential impacts of proceeding with the Loan Guarantee Program in a programmatic environmental assessment (DOE 1981) that resulted in a finding of no significant impact (FANCY) (47 Federal Register 34, p. 7483). The following year, DOE conducted site-specific environmental assessments (EAs) for 10 of the proposed projects. These F-As predicted no significant environmental impacts from these projects. Eventually, three ethanol fuel projects received loan guarantees and were actually built: the Tennol Energy Company (Tennol; DOE 1982a) facility near Jasper in southeastern Tennessee; the Agrifuels Refining Corporation (Agrifuels; DOE 1985) facility near New Liberia in southern Louisiana; and the New Energy Company of Indiana (NECI; DOE 1982b) facility in South Bend, Indiana. As part of a larger retrospective examination of a wide range of environmental effects of ethanol fuel plants, we compared the actual effects of the three completed plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources with the effects predicted in the NEPA EAs several years earlier. A secondary purpose was to determine: Why were there differences, if any, between actual effects and predictions? How can assessments be improved and impacts reduced?

Eddlemon, G.K.; Webb, J.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Miller, R.L.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Normalized Compression Distance of Multiples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normalized compression distance (NCD) is a parameter-free similarity measure based on compression. The NCD between pairs of objects is not sufficient for all applications. We propose an NCD of finite multisets (multiples) of objacts that is metric and is better for many applications. Previously, attempts to obtain such an NCD failed. We use the theoretical notion of Kolmogorov complexity that for practical purposes is approximated from above by the length of the compressed version of the file involved, using a real-world compression program. We applied the new NCD for multiples to retinal progenitor cell questions that were earlier treated with the pairwise NCD. Here we get significantly better results. We also applied the NCD for multiples to synthetic time sequence data. The preliminary results are as good as nearest neighbor Euclidean classifier.

Cohen, Andrew R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Method and apparatus for distinguishing actual sparse events from sparse event false alarms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Remote sensing method and apparatus wherein sparse optical events are distinguished from false events. "Ghost" images of actual optical phenomena are generated using an optical beam splitter and optics configured to direct split beams to a single sensor or segmented sensor. True optical signals are distinguished from false signals or noise based on whether the ghost image is presence or absent. The invention obviates the need for dual sensor systems to effect a false target detection capability, thus significantly reducing system complexity and cost.

Spalding, Richard E. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Major Normal Fault | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Major Normal Fault Major Normal Fault Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Major Normal Fault Dictionary.png Major Normal Fault: Normal faults are structures in which the hanging wall is down dropped along the fault plane relative to the foot wall. They are the predominant type of structure in extensional tectonic environments, but are commonly encountered in a number of geologic settings. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone

118

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

119

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

120

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:33, 3 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 09:33, 3 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (257 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools High School Curricula

122

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

123

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

124

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

125

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

126

Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan Characterizing the homogenized sample groups Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

127

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included caustic leaching for Al removal solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr solids filtration with the CUF follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF ion exchange processing for Cs removal evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Comparison of Projections to Actual Performance in the DOE-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), Global Energy Concepts (GEC) worked with participating utilities to develop a set of performance projections for their projects based on historical site atmospheric conditions, turbine performance data, operation and maintenance (O and M) strategies, and assumptions about various energy losses. After a preliminary operation period at each project, GEC compared the actual performance to projections and evaluated the accuracy of the data and assumptions that formed the performance projections. This paper presents a comparison of 1999 power output, turbine availability, and other performance characteristics to the projections for TVP projects in Texas, Vermont, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Alaska. Factors that were overestimated or underestimated are quantified. Actual wind speeds are compared to projections based on long-term historical measurements. Turbine power curve measurements are compared with data provided by the manufacturers, and loss assumptions are evaluated for accuracy. Overall, the projects performed well, particularly new commercial turbines in the first few years of operation. However, some sites experienced below average wind resources and greater than expected losses. The TVP project owners successfully developed and constructed wind power plants that are now in full commercial operation, serving a total of approximately 12,000 households.

Rhoads, H.; VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Compton, A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

129

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A simple proof of Jordan normal form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note, a simple proof Jordan normal form and rational form of matrices over a field is given.

Chen, Yuqun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

132

Building a Model Patient Room to Test Design Innovations With Actual Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfortable hospital environment SUMMARY Designing and constructing a new hospital is a complex and costly undertaking that involves experts from many disciplines both inside and outside the health care arena. But despite expending funds and time, hospital leaders often discover significant flaws once a hospital opens that can undermine the quality of patient care and staff effectiveness and efficiency. From 2010 to 2012, a team at the Princeton HealthCare System worked to devise an optimal design for inpatient rooms at a new hospital: the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The project entailed building a functional model patient room. This was a unique and innovative method to allow the team to test design innovations with actual patients, according to project director Susan Lorenz, DrNP, RN, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer for the Princeton HealthCare System. The project helped support the emerging field of evidence-based hospital design.

A Princeton; More Efficient; Key Results

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by Homogenized Monthly Temperature Normals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOAA released the new 19812010 climate normals in July 2011. These included monthly and daily normals of minimum and maximum temperature. Monthly normals were computed from monthly temperature values that were corrected for biases (i.e., ...

Anthony Arguez; Scott Applequist

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

136

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

137

Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

Han Chunhui [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution.

Peterson, Reid A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rapko, Brian M.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

139

Actinide partitioning from actual Idaho chemical processing plant acidic tank waste using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Iron was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Mercury was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (76%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} wash section.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

Making Forecasts and Weather Normalization Work Together  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utility industry restructuring has changed the consistency between weather-normalized sales and energy forecasts. This Technology Review discusses the feasibility of integrating weather normalization and forecasting processes, and addresses whether the conflicting goal of obtaining greater consistency and accuracy with fewer staff resources can be met with more integrated approaches.

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

144

Asymptotically almost all -terms are strongly normalizing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymptotically almost all -terms are strongly normalizing Ren´e David, Christophe Raffalli) properties of random -terms. Our main results show that asymptotically, almost all terms are strongly normalizing and that any fixed closed term almost never appears in a random term. Surprisingly, in combinatory

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

145

Asymptotically almost all -terms are strongly normalizing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asymptotically almost all -terms are strongly normalizing Ren´e David, Christophe Raffalli) properties of random -terms. Our main results are that asymptotically all the terms are strongly normalizing and that any fixed closed term almost never appears in a random term. Surprisingly, in combinatory logic (the

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

Definition: Direct normal irradiance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

normal irradiance normal irradiance (Redirected from Definition:DNI) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Direct normal irradiance the amount of solar radiation received per unit area by a surface perpendicular (normal) to the rays that come in a straight line from the direction of the sun at its current position in the sky.[1] Also Known As DNI Related Terms Solar radiation, Irradiance, Concentrating solar power, Global horizontal irradiance References ↑ http://www.3tier.com/en/support/glossary/#dni Retrie LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Direct_normal_irradiance&oldid=423379" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

148

DEMONSTRATION OF THE GLYCOLIC-FORMIC FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ACTUAL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Glycolic acid was effective at dissolving many metals, including iron, during processing with simulants. Criticality constraints take credit for the insolubility of iron during processing to prevent criticality of fissile materials. Testing with actual waste was needed to determine the extent of iron and fissile isotope dissolution during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The Alternate Reductant Project was initiated by the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Company to explore options for the replacement of the nitric-formic flowsheet used for the CPC at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The goals of the Alternate Reductant Project are to reduce CPC cycle time, increase mass throughput of the facility, and reduce operational hazards. In order to achieve these goals, several different reductants were considered during initial evaluations conducted by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). After review of the reductants by SRR, SRNL, and Energy Solutions (ES) Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL), two flowsheets were further developed in parallel. The two flowsheet options included a nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet, and a nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet. As of July 2011, SRNL and ES/VSL have completed the initial flowsheet development work for the nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet and nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet, respectively. On July 12th and July 13th, SRR conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to down select the alternate reductant flowsheet. The SEE team selected the Formic-Glycolic Flowsheet for further development. Two risks were identified in SEE for expedited research. The first risk is related to iron and plutonium solubility during the CPC process with respect to criticality. Currently, DWPF credits iron as a poison for the fissile components of the sludge. Due to the high iron solubility observed during the flowsheet demonstrations with simulants, it was necessary to determine if the plutonium in the radioactive sludge slurry demonstrated the same behavior. The second risk is related to potential downstream impacts of glycolate on Tank Farm processes. The downstream impacts will be evaluated by a separate research team. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested a radioactive demonstration of the Glycolic-Formic Flowsheet with radioactive sludge slurry be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the SRNL. The Shielded Cells demonstration only included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, and not a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle or the co-processing of salt products. Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) slurry was used for the demonstration since it was readily available, had been previously characterized, and was generally representative of sludges being processing in DWPF. This sample was never used in the planned Shielded Cells Run 7 (SC-7).

Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

The influence of indoor temperature on the difference between actual and theoretical energy consumption for space heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Advice procedure (EAP) is developed to evaluate the energetic performance of "existing" dwellings to generate a useful advice for the occupants of the dwelling to invest in rational energy measures. The EAP is based on a theoretical calculation ... Keywords: actual energy consumption, consumer behaviour, indoor temperature, space heating, theoretical energy consumption

Amaryllis Audenaert; Katleen Briffaerts; Dries De Boeck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Normal Mode Initialization with Elementary Surface Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various normal-mode initialization techniques are applied to a simple 12-level linear model with boundary layer friction, and results are compared to exact solutions of the model. It is found that Machenhauer's initialization scheme gives an ...

Bradley A. Ballish; Ferdinand Baer

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

NORMAL EMISSION PHOTOELECTRON DIFFRACTION STUDIES AT SSRL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIFFRACTION STUDIES AT SSRL S. D. Kevan June 1980 TWO-WEEKDIFFRACTION STUDIES AT SSRL S.D. Kevan Materials andOur group has worked at SSRL using the normal emission

Kevan, S.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Perfect Implementation of Normal-Form Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Privacy and trust affect our strategic thinking, yet they have not been precisely modeled in mechanism design. In settings of incomplete information, traditional implementations of a normal-form mechanism ---by disregarding ...

Izmalkov, Sergei

153

Nonlinear Normal Mode Initialization with Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nonlinear normal mode initialization with physics was applied for analyses in FGGE IIIb data of the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). A convergence of the iteration in the initialization was attained by modifying ...

Takeo Kitade

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Vertical Normal Mode Transforms: Theory and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The separation of the vertical structure of the, solutions of the primitive (hydrostatic) meteorological equations is formalized as a vertical normal-mode transform. The transform is implemented for arbitrary static stability profiles by the ...

Scott R. Fulton; Wayne H. Schubert

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

normal irradiance normal irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance The rate at which radiant energy in broad bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4{mu}m, that comes directly from the Sun without being scattered or absorbed in the atmosphere, passes through a unit area perpendicular to the direction from the Sun. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments

156

direct normal irradiance | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

normal irradiance normal irradiance Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for horizontal and tilted flat-plates, and 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to solar collectors. Source NREL Date Released July 31st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords direct normal irradiance DNI GEF GHI GIS global horizontal irradiance insolation latitutde tilt irradiance NASA NREL South America SWERA TILT UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile and Cell Maps (zip, 13.9 MiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 3.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

157

Handbook of normal frames and coordinates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main subject of the book is an up-to-date and in-depth survey of the theory of normal frames and coordinates in differential geometry. The book can be used as a reference manual, review of the existing results and introduction to some new ideas and developments. In the book can be found practically all existing essential results and methods concerning normal frames and coordinates. Most of the results are represented in full detail with full, in some cases new, proofs. All classical results are expanded and generalized in various directions. Theorems of existence, uniqueness and, possibly, holonomicity of the normal frames and coordinates are proved; mostly, the proofs are constructive and some their parts can be used independently for other tasks. Besides published results, their extensions and generalizations, the book contains completely new results which appear for the first time.

Bozhidar Z. Iliev

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wind Plant Capacity Credit Variations: A Comparison of Results Using Multiyear Actual and Simulated Wind-Speed Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter- annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

Milligan, Michael

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Projecting Normals in a Nonstationary Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate normals are statistical estimates of present and/or near-future climate means for such quantities as seasonal temperature or precipitation. In a changing climate, simply averaging a large number of previous years of data may not be the ...

D. S. Wilks

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Target Dependent Score Normalization Techniques and . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Score normalization methods in biometric verification, which encompass the more traditional user-dependent decision thresholding techniques, are reviewed from a test hypotheses point of view. These are classified into test dependent and target dependent methods. The focus of the paper is on target dependent methods, which are further classified into impostor-centric, target-centric and target-impostor. These are applied to an on-line signature verification system on signature data from SVC 2004. In particular, a target-centric technique based on a variant of the cross-validation procedure provides the best relative performance improvement both for skilled (19%) and random forgeries (53%) as compared to the raw verification performance without score normalization (7.14% EER and 1.06% EER for skilled and random forgeries respectively).

J. Fierrez-Aguilar; J. Ortega-Garcia; J. Gonzalez-Rodriguez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Demonstration of a SREX flowsheet for the partitioning of strontium and lead from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning {sup 90}Sr and Pb from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Previous countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process with simulated waste resulted in 99.98% removal of Sr and 99.9% removal of Pb. Based on the results of these studies, a demonstration of the SREX flowsheet was performed. The demonstration consisted of (1) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using simulated sodium-bearing waste spiked with {sup 85}Sr and (2) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using actual waste from tank WM-183. All testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0. 15 M 4`,4`(5)-di-(tert-butyldicyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L{reg_sign}), a 2.0 MHNO{sub 3} scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.1 M ammonium citrate strip section for the removal of Pb from the SREX solvent, and a 3.0 M HNO{sub 3} equilibration section. The behavior of {sup 90}Sr, Pb, Na, K, Hg, H{sup +}, the actinides, and numerous other non-radioactive elements was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted and selectively stripped Sr and Ph from the SBW simulant and the actual tank waste. For the testing with actual tank waste (WM - 183), removal efficiencies of 99.995 % and >94% were obtained for {sup 90}Sr and Pb, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Olson, L.G.; Todd, T.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

What Is the New Normal Unemployment Rate?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent labor markets developments, including mismatches in the skills of workers and jobs, extended unemployment benefits, and very high rates of long-term joblessness, may be impeding the return to normal unemployment rates of around 5%. An examination of alternative measures of labor market conditions suggests that the normal unemployment rate may have risen as much as 1.7 percentage points to about 6.7%, although much of this increase is likely to prove temporary. Even with such an increase, sizable labor market slack is expected to persist for years. In the past, the U.S. labor market has proven to be very flexible and recessions have not usually been followed by long-lasting increases in the unemployment rate. But, in the wake of the most recent recession, many economists are concerned that developments such as mismatches in the skills of workers and jobs, extended unemployment benefits, and a rise in long-term joblessness may have raised the normal or natural rate of unemployment above the 5 % level that was thought to be typical before the downturn. Indeed, a few economists have gone so far as to argue that the rise in the unemployment rate to its current level of 9 % primarily reflects an increase in the natural rate, implying there is little slack in labor markets and therefore little downward pressure on inflation. This Economic Letter

Weidner; John C. Williams

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

West Coast (PADD 5) Exports of Normal Butane-Butylene ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Normal Butane/Butylene Exports; Normal Butane/Butylene Supply and Disposition; West Coast (PADD 5) Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

164

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Product Supplied of Normal Butane ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Normal Butane/Butylene Supply and Disposition; Product Supplied for Normal Butane/Butylene ; Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Product Supplied for Crude Oil ...

165

Normal Modes of Black Hole Accretion Disks  

SciTech Connect

This paper studies the hydrodynamical problem of normal modes of small adiabatic oscillations of relativistic barotropic thin accretion disks around black holes (and compact weakly magnetic neutron stars). Employing WKB techniques, we obtain the eigen frequencies and eigenfunctions of the modes for different values of the mass and angular momentum of the central black hole. We discuss the properties of the various types of modes and examine the role of viscosity, as it appears to render some of the modes unstable to rapid growth.

Ortega-Rodriguez, Manuel; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Costa Rica U.; Silbergleit, Alexander S.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Wagoner, Robert V.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

166

Is interactivity actually important?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It appears that it is a well-accepted assumption that interactivity will improve the entertainment and/or learning value of a media. This paper reviews various studies exploring the role of interactivity and reports on a study conducted to see whether ... Keywords: game engine, interactivity, learning, simulation, training

Debbie Richards

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A signal-to-noise approach to score normalization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Score normalization is indispensable in distributed retrieval and fusion or meta-search where merging of result-lists is required. Distributional approaches to score normalization with reference to relevance, such as binary mixture models like the normal-exponential, ... Keywords: Zipf's law, distributed retrieval, filtering, fusion, meta-search, power-law, query length distribution, query model, resource selection, score distribution, score normalization

Avi Arampatzis; Jaap Kamps

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Apex or Salient of Normal Fault | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Dictionary.png Apex or Salient of Normal Fault: Normal faults may intersect in the subsurface to form a fault apex or salient. Apices or salients of normal faults account for 3% of structural controls in the Great Basin. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Controlling Structures List of controlling structures typically associated with geothermal systems: Major Normal Fault Termination of a Major Normal Fault Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Fault Intersection Accommodation Zone Displacement Transfer Zone Pull-Apart in Strike-Slip Fault Zone Intrusion Margins and Associated Fractures Stratigraphic Boundaries

169

An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large scale water test facility and a commercial CFD computer program were used to investigate labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape found in aircraft engines. The 2-D test rig cases focused on the effect of tooth position and operating condition for the standard geometry. The computed cases considered tooth axial and radial position, different operating conditions, and several geometric dimensions. This investigation also compares the leakage of the standard geometry to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers and at nine different tooth positions. The discharge coefficient and a dimensionless pressure drop number were used to plot the leakage data to make it easier for seal designers to predict the leakage of labyrinth seals. The experimental visualization results show for a given Reynolds number that the closer the labryinth tooth gets to the step the deeper the throughflow jet penetrated into the seal cavity. The decrease of the tooth tip clearance also has a similar effect. Specifically the smaller the tooth tip clearance the deeper the flow path penetrated into the seal cavity. The experimental measurements show that the tooth tip axial position, as well as the minimum-tooth clearance, affect the leakage. A significant improvement in leakage was generally observed when the minimum-distance tooth clearance occurs across the entire tip of the tooth. This occurs only at the most upstream tooth position tested. Similarly, the computed results show that the tooth axial position affects the seal leakage. It was also found that the leakage of the modified convex wall geometry was significantly less than that of the standard geometry.

Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Overview Report: Normal and Emergency Operation Visualization  

SciTech Connect

This is an overview report to document and illustrate methods used in a project entitled Normal and Emergency Operations Visualization for a utility company, conducted in 2009-2010 timeframe with funding from the utility company and the U.S. Department of Energy. The original final report (about 180 pages) for the project is not available for distribution because it alludes to findings that assessed the design of an operational system that contained proprietary information; this abridged version contains descriptions of methods and some findings to illustrate the approach used, while avoiding discussion of sensitive or proprietary information. The client has approved this abridged version of the report for unlimited distribution to give researchers and collaborators the benefit of reviewing the research concepts and methods that were applied in this study.

Greitzer, Frank L.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Asymptotic normalization coefficients from ab initio calculations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present calculations of asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for one-nucleon removals from nuclear states of mass numbers 3 {le} A {le} 9. Our ANCs were computed from variational Monte Carlo solutions to the many-body Schroedinger equation with the combined Argonne v{sub 18} two-nucleon and Urbana IX three-nucleon potentials. Instead of computing explicit overlap integrals, we applied a Green function method that is insensitive to the difficulties of constructing and Monte Carlo sampling the long-range tails of the variational wave functions. This method also allows computation of the ANC at the physical separation energy, even when it differs from the separation energy for the Hamiltonian. We compare our results, which for most nuclei are the first ab initio calculations of ANCs, with existing experimental and theoretical results and discuss further possible applications of the technique.

Nollett, K. M.; Wiringa, R. B. (Physics)

2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

172

Rainfall-Induced Changes in Actual Surface Backscattering Cross Sections and Effects on Rain-Rate Estimates by Spaceborne Precipitation Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors used Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar (TRMM PR) data to investigate changes in the actual (attenuation corrected) surface backscattering cross section (?0e) due to changes in surface conditions ...

Shinta Seto; Toshio Iguchi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Estimation of daily actual evapotranspiration from remotely sensed data under complex terrain over the upper Chao river basin in North China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily actual evapotranspiration over the upper Chao river basin in North China on 23 June 2005 was estimated based on the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), in which the parameterization schemes for calculating the instantaneous solar ...

Yanchun Gao; Di Long; Zhao-Liang Li

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fractal Fluctuations and Statistical Normal Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamical systems in nature exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations and the corresponding power spectra follow inverse power law form signifying long-range space-time correlations identified as self-organized criticality. The physics of self-organized criticality is not yet identified. The Gaussian probability distribution used widely for analysis and description of large data sets underestimates the probabilities of occurrence of extreme events such as stock market crashes, earthquakes, heavy rainfall, etc. The assumptions underlying the normal distribution such as fixed mean and standard deviation, independence of data, are not valid for real world fractal data sets exhibiting a scale-free power law distribution with fat tails. A general systems theory for fractals visualizes the emergence of successively larger scale fluctuations to result from the space-time integration of enclosed smaller scale fluctuations. The model predicts a universal inverse power law incorporating the golden mean for fractal fluctuations and for the corresponding power spectra, i.e., the variance spectrum represents the probabilities, a signature of quantum systems. Fractal fluctuations therefore exhibit quantum-like chaos. The model predicted inverse power law is very close to the Gaussian distribution for small-scale fluctuations, but exhibits a fat long tail for large-scale fluctuations. Extensive data sets of Dow Jones index, Human DNA, Takifugu rubripes (Puffer fish) DNA are analysed to show that the space/time data sets are close to the model predicted power law distribution.

A. M. Selvam

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

175

Empirical Normal Modes versus Empirical Orthogonal Functions for Statistical Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of empirical normal modes (ENMs) for a shallow water fluid is developed. ENMs are basis functions that both have the statistical properties of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) and the dynamical properties of normal modes. In fact, ...

Gilbert Brunet; Robert Vautard

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Optimizing Input Data for Gridding Climate Normals for Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial models of 19712000 monthly climate normals for daily maximum and minimum temperature and total precipitation are required for many applications. The World Meteorological Organizations recommended standard for the calculation of a normal ...

Ron F. Hopkinson; Michael F. Hutchinson; Daniel W. McKenney; Ewa J. Milewska; Pia Papadopol

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirement s. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A. (INEEL); Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N. (V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute); Logunov, M.V. (MAYAK Production Association)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Demonstration of the SREX process for the removal of {sup 90}Sr from actual highly radioactive solutions in centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SREX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of {sup 90}Sr from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the SREX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.995% was obtained for {sup 90}Sr. As a result, the activity of {sup 90}Sr was reduced from 201 Ci/m{sup 3} in the feed solution of 0.0089 Ci/m{sup 3} in the aqueous raffinate, which is below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW limit of 0.04 Ci/m{sup 3} for {sup 90}Sr. Lead was extracted by the SREX solvent and successfully partitioned from the {sup 90}Sr using an ammonium citrate strip solution. Additionally, 94% of the total alpha activity, 1.9% of the {sup 241}Am, 99.94% of the {sup 238}Pu, 99.97% of the {sup 239}Pu, 36.4% of the K, 64% of the Ba, and >83% of the Zr were extracted by the SREX solvent. Cs, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Na were essentially inextractable. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Exports of Normal Butane-Butylene ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Normal Butane/Butylene Supply and Disposition; Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

180

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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181

diff -crN oommf-1.0b2/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Expanded Tcl/Tk support. ... agrees with Tcl/Tk 8.0.3 and later. + - optional optimization flags in config/cache/*.tcl comments. +. + * Bug fixes. ...

182

diff -crN oommf-1.2a2/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... renamed the port.h header file to ocport.h. + - support for Tcl/Tk up through release 8.4.1. +. ... support for Tcl/Tk up through release 8.4.1. +. ...

183

diff -crN oommf-1.2a0/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 31,37 ****. with pre-compiled executables compatible with Tcl/Tk 8.3.x. Type. ... tclsh83 oommf.tcl pimake upgrade. tclsh83 oommf.tcl. ...

184

diff -crN oommf1.1a1/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... User manual in PDF format. + - BIBTeX used to generate references in user manual. + - Index added to user manual. ...

185

diff -crN oommf-1.0b0/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... newcommand{\\pipe}{{\\tt|}} % "Pipe" symbol. % Codelisting environment. \\latex{. ... This manual documents release 1.0b0. \\end{center}. ...

186

diff -crN oommf-1.1b0/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The. \\btn{File\\pipe Open\\ldots} dialog box is used to select an input file. ****. ... {\\today}. {}\\\\2ex]. ! This manual documents release 1.1b0.\\\\[1ex]. ...

187

diff -crN oommf-1.1a2/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... General cleanup/improvements. - User manual in PDF format. ... General cleanup/improvements. - - User manual in PDF format. ...

188

diff -crN oommf-1.1a0/CHANGES oommf/CHANGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... below). This field is optional; Default is fast. # (FFT) pipe model. ... below). This field is optional; Default is fast. # (FFT) pipe model. ...

189

A new pricing mechanism for a high-priority DiffServ-based service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the maximum number of hops within the TD that a customer's EF traffic can traverse. Also, the prerequisite among all EF customers as explained in section 3. In the case of a TD with D tot 05.0=a , maximum number to all customers can be distributed according to totb = k b b tot i (12) where is the total number

Bouras, Christos

190

DREAM: DiffeRentially privatE smArt Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new privacy-preserving smart metering system. Our scheme is private under the differential privacy model and therefore provides strong and provable guarantees. With our scheme, an (electricity) supplier can periodically collect data from smart meters and derive aggregated statistics while learning only limited information about the activities of individual households. For example, a supplier cannot tell from a user's trace when he watched TV or turned on heating. Our scheme is simple, efficient and practical. Processing cost is very limited: smart meters only have to add noise to their data and encrypt the results with an efficient stream cipher.

Acs, Gergely

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Neural Effects of Beta Amyloid in Normal Aging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

age categories. Neurobiol Aging 1997; 18: 351-?7. JK, McIntosh AR. Aging gracefully: compensatory B. The effect of normal aging on the coupling of

Mormino, Elizabeth Charlotte

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading...

193

Enhanced Methods for Normalizing Data for Analysis of Search Results  

Enhanced Methods for Normalizing Data for Analysis of Search Results Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

194

System and method for normalizing data for analysis of search ...  

System and method for normalizing data for analysis of search results. Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing ...

195

Predictability of normal heart rhythms and deterministic chaos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evidence for deterministic chaos in normal heart rhythms is examined. Electrocardiograms were recorded of 29 subjects falling into four groupsa young healthy group

J. H. Lefebvre; D. A. Goodings; M. V. Kamath; E. L. Fallen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Convergence of normal form transformations: The role of symmetries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the convergence problem for coordinate transformations which take a given vector field into Poincar\\'e-Dulac normal form. We show that the presence of linear or nonlinear Lie point symmetries can guaranteee convergence of these normalizing transformations, in a number of scenarios. As an application, we consider a class of bifurcation problems.

G. Cicogna; S. Walcher

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

197

Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen;Abstract The normal curve has been used to fit the rate of both world and U.S.A. oil production. In this paper we give the first theoretical basis for these curve fittings. It is well known that oil field

Stark, Dudley

198

Shape mixtures of multivariate skew-normal distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classes of shape mixtures of independent and dependent multivariate skew-normal distributions are considered and some of their main properties are studied. If interpreted from a Bayesian point of view, the results obtained in this paper bring tractability ... Keywords: 62E15, 62H05, Bayes, Conjugacy, Regression model, Robustness, Shape parameter, Skew-normal distribution, Skewness

Reinaldo B. Arellano-Valle; Marc G. Genton; Rosangela H. Loschi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Demonstration of Approach and Results of Used Fuel Performance Characterization This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies, and discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this

200

Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Advanced Pipe Replacement Procedure for a Defective CRDM Housing Nozzle Enables Continued Normal Operation of a Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

During the 2003 outage at the Ringhals Nuclear Plant in Sweden, a leak was found in the vicinity of a Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) housing nozzle at Unit 1. Based on the ALARA principle for radioactive contamination, a unique repair process was developed. The repair system includes utilization of custom, remotely controlled GTAW-robots, a CNC cutting and finishing machine, snake-arm robots and NDE equipment. The success of the repair solution was based on performing the machining and welding operations from the inside of the SCRAM pipe through the CRDM housing since accessibility from the outside was extremely limited. Before the actual pipe replacement procedure was performed, comprehensive training programs were conducted. Training was followed by certification of equipment, staff and procedures during qualification tests in a full scale mock-up of the housing nozzle. Due to the ingenuity of the overall repair solution and training programs, the actual pipe replacement procedure was completed in less than half the anticipated time. As a result of the successful pipe replacement, the nuclear power plant was returned to normal operation. (authors)

Gilmore, Geoff; Becker, Andrew [Climax Portable Machine Tools, Inc., 2712 East Second Street, Newberg, OR 97132 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groupsbismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group2)are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: non-normal innovations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from the sixth stage of a project to build a statistical hurricane model. Previous papers have described our modelling of the tracks, genesis, and lysis of hurricanes. In our track model we have so far employed a normal distribution for the residuals when computing innovations, even though we have demonstrated that their distribution is not normal. Here, we test to see if the track model can be improved by including more realistic non-normal innovations. The results are mixed. Some features of the model improve, but others slightly worsen.

Hall, T; Hall, Tim; Jewson, Stephen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groupsplutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

205

Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm Springs Associated With Normal Faults In Utah Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Thermal springs associated with normal faults in Utah have been analyzed for major cations and anions, and oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. Springs with measured temperatures averaging greater than 40°C are characterized by Na + K- and SO4 + Cl-rich waters containing 103 to 104 mg/l of dissolved solids. Lower temperature springs, averaging less than 40°C, are more enriched in Ca + Mg relative to Na + K. Chemical variations monitored through time in selected thermal springs are probably produced by

206

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Dating of major normal fault systems using thermochronology- An example from the Raft River detachment, Basin and Range, western United States Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Application of thermochronological techniques to major normal fault systems can resolve the timing of initiation and duration of extension, rates of motion on detachment faults, timing of ductile mylonite formation and passage of rocks through the crystal-plastic to brittle transition, and multiple events of extensional unroofing. Here we determine

207

Definition: Apex or Salient of Normal Fault | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Apex or Salient of Normal Fault Normal faults may intersect in the subsurface to form a fault apex or salient. Apices or salients of normal faults account for 3% of structural controls in the Great Basin.[2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ James E. Faulds,Nicholas H. Hinz,Mark F. Coolbaugh,Patricia H. Cashman,Christopher Kratt,Gregory Dering,Joel Edwards,Brett Mayhew,Holly McLachlan. 2011. Assessment of Favorable Structural Settings of Geothermal Systems in the Great Basin, Western USA. In: Transactions. GRC Anual Meeting; 2011/10/23; San Diego, CA. Davis, CA: Geothermal Resources Council; p. 777-783

208

Long-Lead Seasonal Temperature Prediction Using Optimal Climate Normals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is intended to determine the spatially varying optimal time periods for calculating seasonal climate normals over the entire United States based on temperature data at 344 United States climate divisions during the period of 19311993. ...

Jin Huang; Huug M. van den Dool; Anthony G. Barnston

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Production and Handling Slide 27: Feed Cylinder with Normal Assay...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Normal Assay (0.711%U) Arriving at Plant Refer to caption below for image description The enrichment process begins with "feed material," natural uranium that contains 0.711%...

210

Size, shape, and appearance of the normal female pituitary gland  

SciTech Connect

One hundred seven women 18-65 years old were studied who were referred for suspected central nervous system disease not related to the pituitary gland or hypothalamus. High-resolution, direct, coronal, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) was used to examine the size; shape, and density of the normal pituitary gland. There were three major conclusions: (1) the height of the normal gland can be as much as 9 mm; (2) the superior margin of the gland may bulge in normal patients; and (3) both large size and convex contour appear to be associated with younger age. It was also found that serum prolactin levels do not appear to correlate with the CT appearances. Noise artifacts inherent in high-detail, thin-section, soft-tissue scanning may be a limiting factor in defining reproducible patterns in different parts of the normal pituitary gland.

Wolpert, S.M.; Molitch, M.E.; Goldman, J.A.; Wood, J.B.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A phrase-based statistical model for SMS text normalization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Short Messaging Service (SMS) texts behave quite differently from normal written texts and have some very special phenomena. To translate SMS texts, traditional approaches model such irregularities directly in Machine Translation (MT). However, such ...

AiTi Aw; Min Zhang; Juan Xiao; Jian Su

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Characteristics of Wind Turbines Under Normal and Fault Conditions: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the characteristics of a variable-speed wind turbine connected to a stiff or weak grid under normal and fault conditions and the role of reactive power compensation.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Parsons, B.; Ellis, A.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Champernowne's Number, Strong Normality, and the X ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number ? is simply normal in the base r if every 1-string in its .... The results for [ 0, 1) are extended to R in the same way. 5. .... Science and Applications), 1988.

214

Normal-Mode Decomposition of Small-Scale Oceanic Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale oceanic motions consist of vortical motion and internal waves. In a linear or weakly nonlinear system these two types of motions can be unambiguously separated using normal-mode decomposition in which the vortical mode carries the ...

Ren-Chieh Lien; Peter Mller

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Normalized Maximum-Likelihood Estimators of the Directional Wave Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new family of data-adaptative directional wave spectrum estimators is proposed. These estimators may be considered as an improvement over the well-known extended maximum-likelihood method (EMLM). The normalization is based on the idea of ...

M. A. Arribas; J. J. Egozcue

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

On the Best Temperature and Precipitation Normals: The Illinois Situation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical (190179) temperature and precipitation data for four Illinois stations were used to determine the frequency with which summer and winter averages for periods of various length (i.e., different climatic normals) are closest to the ...

Peter J. Lamb; Stanley A. Changnon Jr.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal irradiance GIS...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

>
Direct Normal Irradiance (kWhm2day)
NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Jan 2008)
22-year Monthly & Annual Average...

218

East Coast (PADD 1) Normal Butane-Butylene Stock Change ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Normal Butane-Butylene Stock Change (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 4-3: 1: ...

219

East Coast (PADD 1) Gas Plant Production of Normal Butane ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Gas Plant Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

220

Midwest (PADD 2) Exports of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) Exports of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 0: 0: 0: 0: ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Midwest (PADD 2) Normal Butane-Butylene Stock Change (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) Normal Butane-Butylene Stock Change (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981-4-34-7: 14: ...

222

West Coast (PADD 5) Imports of Normal Butane-Butylene ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Coast (PADD 5) Imports of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 9: 18: ...

223

Why Do Forecasts for Near Normal Often Fail?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been observed by many that skill of categorical forecasts, when decomposed into the contributions from each category separately, tends to be low, if not absent or negative, in the near normal (N) category. We have witnessed many ...

Huug M. Van Den Dool; Zoltan Toth

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Time-Extrapolated Rainfall Normals for Central Equatorial Pacific Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Normal annual rainfalls (means and medians) for the period 191075 are estimated for islands in the central equatorial Pacific. Ridge regression, with an empirically determined bias constant, is used to establish the relationships among the ...

Bernard N. Meisner

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Performance evaluation of 24 ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated N-Reactor storage basin water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of 24 organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated waters from the 100 Area 105 N-Reactor fuel storage basin. The data described in this report can be applied for developing and evaluating ion exchange pre-treatment process flowsheets. Cesium and strontium batch distribution ratios (K{sub d}`s), decontamination factors (DF), and material loadings (mmol g{sup -1}) are compared as a function of ion exchange material and initial cesium concentration. The actual and simulated N-Basin waters contain relatively low levels of aluminum, barium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (ranging from 8.33E-04 to 6.40E-05 M), with slightly higher levels of boron (6.63E-03 M) and sodium (1.62E-03 M). The {sup 137}Cs level is 1.74E-06 Ci L-{sup 1} which corresponds to approximately 4.87E-10 M Cs. The initial Na/Cs ratio was 3.33E+06. The concentration of total strontium is 4.45E-06 M, while the {sup 90}Sr radioactive component was measured to be 6.13E-06 Ci L{sup -1}. Simulant tests were conducted by contacting 0.067 g or each ion exchange material with approximately 100 mL of either the actual or simulated N-Basin water. The simulants contained variable initial cesium concentrations ranging from 1.00E-04 to 2.57E- 10 M Cs while all other components were held constant. For all materials, the average cesium K{sub d} was independent of cesium concentration below approximately 1.0E-06 M. Above this level, the average cesium K{sub d} values decreased significantly. Cesium K{sub d} values exceeding 1.0E+07 mL g{sup -1} were measured in the simulated N-Basin water. However, when measured in the actual N-Basin water the values were several orders of magnitude lower, with a maximum of 1.24E+05 mL g{sup -1} observed.

Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used nuclear fuel (UNF) must maintain its integrity during the storage period in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and transporting it to treatment or recycling facilities, or to a geologic repository. This RD&D plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. The plan objective is to

227

A complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name A complete and normalized 61850 substation Country Spain Headquarters Location Madrid, Spain Coordinates 40.488735°, -3.284912° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.488735,"lon":-3.284912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used nuclear fuel (UNF) must maintain its integrity during the storage period in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and transporting it to treatment or recycling facilities, or to a geologic repository. This RD&D plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. The plan objective is to

229

Gradually Truncated Log-normal distribution- Size distribution of firms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many natural and economical phenomena are described through power law or log-normal distributions. In these cases, probability decreases very slowly with step size compared to normal distribution. Thus it is essential to cut-off these distributions for larger step size. Recently we introduce the gradually truncated power law distribution to successfully describe variation of financial, educational, physical and citation index. In the present work, we introduce gradually truncated log-normal distribution in which we gradually cut-off larger steps due to physical limitation of the system. We applied this distribution successfully to size distribution of USAs manufactoring firms which is measured through their annual sell. The physical limitation are due to limited market size or shortage of highly competent executives. I.

Hari M. Gupta; Jos R. Campanha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Defining the normal turbine inflow within a wind park environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brief paper discusses factors that must be considered when defining the [open quotes]normal[close quotes] (as opposed to [open quotes]extreme[close quotes]) loading conditions seen in wind turbines operating within a wind park environment. The author defines the [open quotes]normal[close quotes] conditions to include fatigue damage accumulation as a result of: (1) start/stop cycles, (2) emergency shutdowns, and (3) the turbulence environment associated with site and turbine location. He also interprets [open quotes]extreme[close quotes] loading conditions to include those events that can challenge the survivability of the turbine.

Kelley, N.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Defining the normal turbine inflow within a wind park environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brief paper discusses factors that must be considered when defining the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} (as opposed to {open_quotes}extreme{close_quotes}) loading conditions seen in wind turbines operating within a wind park environment. The author defines the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} conditions to include fatigue damage accumulation as a result of: (1) start/stop cycles, (2) emergency shutdowns, and (3) the turbulence environment associated with site and turbine location. He also interprets {open_quotes}extreme{close_quotes} loading conditions to include those events that can challenge the survivability of the turbine.

Kelley, N.D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form. The method comprises: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

233

Automated geometric features evaluation method for normal foot skeleton model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Normal foot model" is a geometric model of a healthy human foot. As the comparison of the processed feet requires a reference ideal healthy foot parameterization it was necessary to create such a model by defining skeleton geometric features and generating ...

Bartosz Borucki; Krzysztof Nowi?Ski; Micha? Chlebiej; Andrzej Rutkowski; Pawe? Adamczyk; Jacek Laskowski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Normal accidents: Data quality problems in ERP-enabled manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficient operation of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems largely depends on data quality. ERP can improve data quality and information sharing within an organization. It can also pose challenges to data quality. While it is well known that ... Keywords: Data quality, ERP, complexity, enterprise resource planning, normal accident, tight coupling

Lan Cao, Hongwei Zhu

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Nonlinear Normal-Mode Balancing and the Ellipticity Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a low-order, spectral, shallow-water model on an f-plane, the conditions under which height-constrained nonlinear normal mode initialization fails and the existence of realizable balancing wind fields are examined. The relationship of this ...

Joseph J. Tribbia

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Strong Normality of Numbers - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dence of the patterning and review some relevant results in normality. We propose ... outstanding historical results. .... will work in R/Z by discarding all digits to the left of the decimal point in. 5 ..... puting 88 (II, Science and Applications), 1988.

237

Recent Studies of RF Breakdown Physics in Normal Conducting Cavities  

SciTech Connect

The operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The behavior of the rf breakdown depends on multiple parameters, including the input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Here we discuss recent experimental data and theoretical studies of rf breakdown physics.

Dolgashev, Valery; /SLAC

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

238

DYNAMICS OF DISTANT NORMAL GALAXIES David C. Koo 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a new and very powerful dimension has been added to the suite of tools to explore distant galaxiesDYNAMICS OF DISTANT NORMAL GALAXIES David C. Koo 1 1 UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy of techniques for measuring total dynamical masses are being explored and found practical. I highlight three

239

Projecting diffusion along the normal bundle of a plane curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to provide new formulas for the estimation of the effective diffusion coefficient of an equation of Fick-Jacob's type obtained by projecting the two-dimensional diffusion equation along the normal direction of an arbitrary plane curve.

Carlos Valero Valdes; Rafael Herrera Guzman

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Boehmite Actual Waste Dissolutions Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite, sodium aluminate and boehmite. Gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic. Boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Samples were taken from four Hanford tanks and homogenized in order to give a sample that is representative of REDOX (Reduction Oxidation process for Pu recovery) sludge solids. Bench scale testing was performed on the homogenized waste to study the dissolution of boehmite. Dissolution was studied at three different hydroxide concentrations, with each concentration being run at three different temperatures. Samples were taken periodically over the 170 hour runs in order to determine leaching kinetics. Results of the dissolution studies and implications for the proposed processing of these wastes will be discussed.

Snow, Lanee A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Peterson, Reid A.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Spectral asymptotics via the semiclassical Birkhoff normal form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article gives a simple treatment of the quantum Birkhoff normal form for semiclassical pseudo-differential operators with smooth coefficients. The normal form is applied to describe the discrete spectrum in a generalised non-degenerate potential well, yielding uniform estimates in the energy $E$. This permits a detailed study of the spectrum in various asymptotic regions of the parameters $(E,\\h)$, and gives improvements and new proofs for many of the results in the field. In the completely resonant case we show that the pseudo-differential operator can be reduced to a Toeplitz operator on a reduced symplectic orbifold. Using this quantum reduction, new spectral asymptotics concerning the fine structure of eigenvalue clusters are proved. In the case of polynomial differential operators, a combinatorial trace formula is obtained.

Laurent Charles; San Vu Ngoc

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

243

Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 1 fig.

Bonaldo, M.D.; Soares, M.B.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Efficient Software Implementation for Finite Field Multiplication in Normal Basis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Finite field arithmetic is becoming increasingly important in today's computer systems, particularly for implementing cryptographic operations. Among various arithmetic operations, finite field multiplication is of particular interest since it is a major building block for elliptic curve cryptosystems. In this paper, we present new techniques for efficient software implementation of binary field multiplication in normal basis. Our techniques are more efficient in terms of both speed and memory compared with alternative approaches. 1 Introduction Finite field arithmetic is becoming increasingly important in today's computer systems, particularly for implementing cryptographic operations. Among the more common finite fields in cryptography are odd-characteristic finite fields of degree 1 and even-characteristic finite fields of degree greater than 1. The latter is conventionally known as GF (2m) arithmetic or binary field arithmetic. GF (2m) arithmetic is further classified according to the choice of basis for representing elements of the finite field; two common choices are polynomial basis and normal basis. Fast implementation techniques for GF (2m) arithmetic have been studied intensively in the past twenty years. Among various arithmetic operations, GF (2m) multiplication has attracted most of the attention since it is a major building block for implementing elliptic curve cryptosystems. Depending on the choice of basis, the mathematical formula for a GF (2m) multiplication can be quite different, thus making major differences in practical implementation. Currently, it seems that normal basis representation (especially optimal normal basis) offers the best performance in hardware [9-11], while in software polynomial basis representation is more efficient [2, 3, 8].

Peng Ning; Yiqun Lisa Yin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Late Light Curves of Normally-Luminous Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological tools has reinforced the need to better understand these objects and their light curves. The light curves of Type Ia supernovae are powered by the nuclear decay of $^{56}Ni \\to ^{56}Co \\to ^{56}Fe$. The late time light curves can provide insight into the behavior of the decay products and their effect of the shape of the curves. We present the optical light curves of six "normal" Type Ia supernovae, obtained at late times with template image subtraction, and the fits of these light curves to supernova energy deposition models.

J. C. Lair; M. D. Leising; P. A. Milne; G. G. Williams

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

Overview of the BlockNormal Event Trigger Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the search for unmodeled gravitational wave bursts, there are a variety of methods that have been proposed to generate candidate events from time series data. Block Normal is a method of identifying candidate events by searching for places in the data stream where the characteristic statistics of the data change. These change-points divide the data into blocks in which the characteristics of the block are stationary. Blocks in which these characteristics are inconsistent with the long term characteristic statistics are marked as Event-Triggers which can then be investigated by a more computationally demanding multi-detector analysis.

J W C McNabb; M Ashley; L S Finn; E Rotthoff; A Stuver; T Summerscales; P Sutton; M Tibbits; K Thorne; K Zaleski

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

247

A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes  

SciTech Connect

An examination of the effect of a realistic (though conservative) hot day environment on the thermal transient behavior of spent fuel shipping casks is made. These results are compared to those that develop under the prescribed normal thermal condition of 10 CFR 71. Of specific concern are the characteristics of propagating thermal waves, which are set up by diurnal variations of temperature and insolation in the outdoor environment. In order to arrive at a realistic approximation of these variations on a conservative hot day, actual temperature and insolation measurements have been obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for representatively hot and high heat flux days. Thus, the use of authentic meteorological data ensures the realistic approach sought. Further supporting the desired realism of the modeling effort is the use of realistic cask configurations in which multiple laminations of structural, shielding, and other materials are expected to attenuate the propagating thermal waves. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by enforcement of the regulatory environmental conditions of 10 CFR 71. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the prescribed regulatory conditions. However, the temperature differences are small enough that the normal conservative assumptions that are made in the course of typical cask evaluations should correct for any potential violations. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations that penetrate the cask wall all have maxima substantially less than the corresponding regulatory solutions. Therefore it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the conditions of 10 CFR 71.

Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation Systems Development Dept.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V.; Smirnov, I.; Babain, V.; Zaitsev, B.; Esimantovskiy, V.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Universal Solvent Exchange (UNEX) Process II: Flowsheet Development & Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Actual Acidic Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel solvent extraction process, the Universal Extraction (UNEX) process, has been developed for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from acidic waste solutions. The UNEX process solvent consists of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide for the extraction of 137Cs, polyethylene glycol for the extraction of 90Sr, and diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide for the extraction of the actinides and lanthanides. A nonnitroaromatic polar diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone has been developed for this process. A UNEX flowsheet consisting of a single solvent extraction cycle has been developed as a part of a collaborative effort between the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This flowsheet has been demonstrated with actual acidic radioactive tank waste at the INEEL using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded cell facility. The activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and the actinides were reduced to levels at which a grout waste form would meet NRC Class A LLW requirements. The extraction of 99Tc and several nonradioactive metals by the UNEX solvent has also been evaluated.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V. N.; Smirnov, I. V.; Esimantovskiy, V. M.; Zaitsev. B. N.; Babain, V. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Using a Family of Dividing Surfaces Normal to the Minimum EnergyPath for Quantum Instanton Rate Constants  

SciTech Connect

One of the outstanding issues in the quantum instanton (QI) theory (or any transition state-type theory) for thermal rate constants of chemical reactions is the choice of an appropriate ''dividing surface'' (DS) that separates reactants and products. (In the general version of the QI theory, there are actually two dividing surfaces involved.) This paper shows one simple and general way for choosing DS's for use in QI Theory, namely using the family of (hyper) planes normal to the minimum energy path (MEP) on the potential energy surface at various distances s along it. Here the reaction coordinate is not one of the dynamical coordinates of the system (which will in general be the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms), but rather simply a parameter which specifies the DS. It is also shown how this idea can be implemented for an N-atom system in 3d space in a way that preserves overall translational and rotational invariance. Numerical application to a simple system (the colliner H + H{sub 2} reaction) is presented to illustrate the procedure.

Li, Yimin; Miller, Wlliam H.

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

251

A Symplectic Method to Generate Multivariate Normal Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AMAS group at the Paul Scherrer Institute developed an object oriented library for high performance simulation of high intensity ion beam transport with space charge. Such particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations require a method to generate multivariate particle distributions as starting conditions. In a preceeding publications it has been shown that the generators of symplectic transformations in two dimensions are a subset of the real Dirac matrices (RDMs) and that few symplectic transformations are required to transform a quadratic Hamiltonian into diagonal form. Here we argue that the use of RDMs is well suited for the generation of multivariate normal distributions with arbitrary covariances. A direct and simple argument supporting this claim is that this is the "natural" way how such distributions are formed. The transport of charged particle beams may serve as an example: An uncorrelated gaussian distribution of particles starting at some initial position of the accelerator is subject to linear deformat...

Baumgarten, Christian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hard Sphere Dynamics for Normal and Granular Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fluid of N smooth, hard spheres is considered as a model for normal (elastic collisions) and granular (inelastic collisions) fluids. The potential energy is discontinuous for hard spheres so the pairwise forces are singular and the usual forms of Newtonian and Hamiltonian mechanics do not apply. Nevertheless, particle trajectories in the N particle phase space are well defined and the generators for these trajectories can be identified. The first part of this presentation is a review of the generators for the dynamics of observables and probability densities. The new results presented in the second part refer to applications of these generators to the Liouville dynamics for granular fluids. A set of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the generator for this Liouville dynamics is identified in a special "stationary representation". This provides a class of exact solutions to the Liouville equation that are closely related to hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

James W. Dufty; Aparna Baskaran

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

253

The theory of normal zone propagation in superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains a study of properties of stable normal (N) regions of finite size-resistive domains (R.D.), in superconductors (S) with transport current I. It is demonstra-ted that in homogeneous superconductors R.D. are moving due to thermoelectric effect (Thom-son heat) while the rate of R.D., vdi for dif-ferent materials ranges from 1 to 10 cm/s. It is also shown that the thermoelectric effect leads to asymmetry i n the rate of the N-S boundary av, relative to the direction of I, with AV N vd. The conditions for localizing R.D. in an inhomogeneous superconductor have been obtained, as well as the I-V characteric-tics of a sample with R.D. Hysteresis effects are discussed associated with the localization of R.D and the thermoelectric effect. 1.

A. V. Gurevich; R. G. Mints

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Insolation data manual and direct normal solar radiation data manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24--25 years of data, generally from 1952--1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/m{sup 2} per day, Btu/ft{sup 2} per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global {bar K}{sub T} (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global {bar K}{sub T} is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

none,

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With this testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137 Cs and 90 Sr to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Brewer, Ken Neal; Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP tank waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRUEX is being evaluated at Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for separating actinides from acidic radioactive waste stored at ICPP; efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration with actual tank waste. A continuous countercurrent flowsheet test was successfully completed at ICPP using waste from tank WM-183. This demonstration was performed using 24 states of 2-cm dia centrifugal contactors in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet had 8 extraction stages, 5 scrub stages, 6 strip stages, 3 solvent wash stages, and 2 acid rinse stages. A centrifugal contactor stage in the scrub section was not working during testing, and the scrub feed (aqueous) solution followed the solvent into the strip section, eliminating the scrub section in the flowsheet. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides, reducing the activity from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste.The 0.04 M HEDPA strip section back-extracted 99.9998% of the actinide from the TRUEX solvent. Removal efficiencies of >99. 90, 99.96, 99.98, >98.89, 93.3, and 89% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 99}Tc. Fe was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Hg was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (73%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na2CO3 wash section. Only 1.4% of the Hg exited with the high activity waste strip product.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Demonstration of an optimized TRUEX flowsheet for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in recent demonstrations of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. The first demonstration was performed in 1996 using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. Based on the results of this flowsheet demonstration, the flowsheet was optimized and a second flowsheet demonstration was performed. This test also was performed using 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. However, the total number of contactor stages was reduced from 24 to 20. Also, the concentration of HEDPA in the strip solution was reduced from 0.04 M to 0.01 M in order to minimize the amount of phosphate in the HLW fraction, which would be immobilized into a glass waste form. This flowsheet demonstration was performed using centrifugal contactors installed in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet tested consisted of six extraction stages, four scrub stages, six strip stages, two solvent was stages, and two acid rinse stages. An overall removal efficiency of 99.79% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 540 nCi/g in the feed to 0.90 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Removal efficiencies of 99.84%, 99.97%, 99.97%, 99.85%, and 99.76% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm-diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With the testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for Cs-137, Sr-90, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of Cs-137 and Sr-90 to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent with actinides and metals (Zr, Fe, and Mo). Also, the carryover of aqueous solution (flooding) with the solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (>6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

B. N. Zaitsev (Khlopin Radium Institute); D. J. Wood (INEEL); I. V. Smirnov; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst; T. A. Todd; V. A. Babain; V. M. Esimantovskiy; V. N. Romanovskiy

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Investigations of the Absorption Properties of Near-Ground Aerosol by the Methods of Optical-Acoustic Spectrometry and Diff...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations of the Absorption Properties of Investigations of the Absorption Properties of Near-Ground Aerosol by the Methods of Optical-Acoustic Spectrometry and Diffuse Extinction V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, A. B. Tikhomirov, and B. A. Tikhomirov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol absorption is an important factor in the formation of non-selective radiation extinction in the visible wavelength range, and plays a great role in solving many radiative and climatic problems. The principal absorbing substance in atmospheric aerosol is soot (crystal carbon), which strongly affects the atmospheric transparency, albedo of clouds, and snow cover. The non-selective absorption by finely dispersed soot aerosol is considered to be one of the most plausible reasons for the appearance of

260

Distributed fault management in WBEM-Based Inter-AS TE for qos guaranteed DiffServ-overMPLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed fault management and event notification are essential in Inter-AS Traffic Engineering (TE). In this paper we design and implement distributed fault management for WBEM based inter-AS TE. We designed DMTF Managed Object Format (MOF) based ...

Abdurakhmon Abdurakhmanov; Shahnaza Tursunova; Shanmugham Sundaram; Young-Tak Kim

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

diff -crN oommf12a3/app/mmdisp/scripts/avf2ovf.tcl oommf ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... REAL8m>(step_count); Happ.push_back(((1-t)*h0) + (t*h1)); } + if(step_count> 0) Happ.push_back(h1); + } + vector::iterator it = Happ ...

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

262

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum View topic -Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553d  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12 Dark Energy may not actually exist Moderators: arc - On With the New #12;9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 2

Temple, Blake

263

Sampling Plan for Assaying Plates Containing Depleted or Normal Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the rationale behind the proposed method for selecting a 'representative' sample of uranium metal plates, portions of which will be destructively assayed at the Y-12 Security Complex. The total inventory of plates is segregated into two populations, one for Material Type 10 (depleted uranium (DU)) and one for Material Type 81 (normal [or natural] uranium (NU)). The plates within each population are further stratified by common dimensions. A spreadsheet gives the collective mass of uranium element (and isotope for DU) and the piece count of all plates within each stratum. These data are summarized in Table 1. All plates are 100% uranium metal, and all but approximately 60% of the NU plates have Kel-F{reg_sign} coating. The book inventory gives an overall U-235 isotopic percentage of 0.22% for the DU plates, ranging from 0.19% to 0.22%. The U-235 ratio of the NU plates is assumed to be 0.71%. As shown in Table 1, the vast majority of the plates are comprised of depleted uranium, so most of the plates will be sampled from the DU population.

Ivan R. Thomas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Standard Test Method for Normal Spectral Emittance at Elevated Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method describes a highly accurate technique for measuring the normal spectral emittance of electrically conducting materials or materials with electrically conducting substrates, in the temperature range from 600 to 1400 K, and at wavelengths from 1 to 35 ?m. 1.2 The test method requires expensive equipment and rather elaborate precautions, but produces data that are accurate to within a few percent. It is suitable for research laboratories where the highest precision and accuracy are desired, but is not recommended for routine production or acceptance testing. However, because of its high accuracy this test method can be used as a referee method to be applied to production and acceptance testing in cases of dispute. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this stan...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Extraction of erythropoietin from normal kidneys. [Rats, dogs  

SciTech Connect

Significant amounts of active erythropoietin were extracted from the kidneys of normal rats, cattle, dogs, and rabbits by homogenization of the organs in 0.1 M phosphate buffer. The mean erythropoietin activities of the extracts, as determined by the starved-rat assay, were 0.26 U/g beef kidney, 0.41 U/g dog kidney, and 0.11 U/g rat kidney. The dog kidney extracts had a mean activity of 0.35 U/g, as measured by stimulation of hemoglobin synthesis in cultured bone marrow cells (in vitro assay) and produced a dose-dependent stimulation of /sup 59/Fe incorporation into circulating red cells when assayed in polycythemic mice. Extracts of rabbit kidney cortices had a mean activity of 2.12 U/g, as measured by stimulation of hemoglobin synthesis in cultured bone marrow cells. When the dog kidney homogenate was fractionated on DEAE-cellulose, all of the erythropoietin activity was adsorbed to the exchanger in the presence of 0.01 M acetate buffer, pH 4.5, and was completely eluted by 0.1 M Na/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/-0.5 M NaCl, pH 8. An antibody made aganist human urinary erythropoietin completely inactivated the erythropoietic factor in the dog kidney extract. Serum from a donor dog had no erythropoietin activity when assayed in the starved rat, suggesting that the factor in the extracts is intracellular erythropoietin rather than that contained in plasma trapped in the renal vasculature. The complete inactivation of the erythropoietic factor in these kidney homogenates by antierythropoietin and its behavior on DEAE-cellulose indicate that this factor is structurally similar to native plasma erythropoietin. The extracts are completely active without being incubated in the presence of serum.

Sherwood, J.B.; Goldwasser, E.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Stokes' Cradle: Normal Three-Body Collisions between Wetted Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a combination of experiments and theory is used to investigate three-body, normal collisions between solid particles with a liquid coating (i.e., "wetted" particles). Experiments are carried out using a Stokes' cradle, an apparatus inspired by the Newton's cradle desktop toy except with wetted particles. Unlike previous work on two-body systems, which may either agglomerate or rebound upon collision, four outcomes are possible in three-body systems: fully agglomerated, Newton's cradle (striker and target particle it strikes agglomerate), reverse Newton's cradle (targets agglomerate while striker separates), and fully separated. Post-collisional velocities are measured over a range of parameters. For all experiments, as the impact velocity increases, the progression of outcomes observed is fully agglomerated, reverse Newton's cradle, and fully separated. Notably, as the viscosity of the oil increases, experiments reveal a decrease in the critical Stokes number (the Stokes number that demarcates a transition from agglomeration to separation) for both sets of adjacent particles. A scaling theory is developed based on lubrication forces and particle deformation and elasticity. Unlike previous work for two-particle systems, two pieces of physics are found to be critical in the prediction of a regime map that is consistent with experiments: (i) an additional resistance upon rebound of the target particles due to the pre-existing liquid bridge between them (which has no counterpart in two-particle collisions), and (ii) the addition of a rebound criterion due to glass transition of the liquid layer at high pressure between colliding particles.

C. M. Donahue; C. M. Hrenya; R. H. Davis; K. J. Nakagawa; A. P. Zelinskaya; G. G. Joseph

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

Individualized 3D Reconstruction of Normal Tissue Dose for Patients With Long-term Follow-up: A Step Toward Understanding Dose Risk for Late Toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Understanding the relationship between normal tissue dose and delayed radiation toxicity is an important component of developing more effective radiation therapy. Late outcome data are generally available only for patients who have undergone 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3D normal tissue dosimetry derived from reconstructed 2D treatment plans in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional lung, heart, and breast volumes were reconstructed from 2D planning radiographs for HL patients who received mediastinal radiation therapy. For each organ, a reference 3D organ was modified with patient-specific structural information, using deformable image processing software. Radiation therapy plans were reconstructed by applying treatment parameters obtained from patient records to the reconstructed 3D volumes. For each reconstructed organ mean dose (D{sub mean}) and volumes covered by at least 5 Gy (V{sub 5}) and 20Gy (V{sub 20}) were calculated. This process was performed for 15 patients who had both 2D and 3D planning data available to compare the reconstructed normal tissue doses with those derived from the primary CT planning data and also for 10 historically treated patients with only 2D imaging available. Results: For patients with 3D planning data, the normal tissue doses could be reconstructed accurately using 2D planning data. Median differences in D{sub mean} between reconstructed and actual plans were 0.18 Gy (lungs), -0.15 Gy (heart), and 0.30 Gy (breasts). Median difference in V{sub 5} and V{sub 20} were less than 2% for each organ. Reconstructed 3D dosimetry was substantially higher in historical mantle-field treatments than contemporary involved-field mediastinal treatments: average D{sub mean} values were 15.2 Gy vs 10.6 Gy (lungs), 27.0 Gy vs 14.3 Gy (heart), and 8.0 Gy vs 3.2 Gy (breasts). Conclusions: Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorbed dose to organs at risk can be estimated accurately many years after exposure by using limited 2D data. Compared to contemporary involved-field treatments, normal tissue doses were significantly higher in historical mantle-field treatments. These methods build capacity to quantify the relationship between 3D normal tissue dose and observed late effects.

Ng, Angela [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K.; Sharpe, Michael B. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moseley, Joanne L. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Craig, Tim [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada) [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hodgson, David C., E-mail: David.Hodgson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

A novel method for testing normality in a mixed model of a nested classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Normality is one of the most common assumptions made in the development of statistical models such as the fixed effect model and the random effect model. White and MacDonald [1980. Some large-sample tests for normality in the linear regression model. ... Keywords: Normality test, Random effect model, Shapiro-Wilk test, Simulations, Skewness test, Transformation

Yi-Ting Hwang; Peir Feng Wei

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

TRENDS IN DIRECT NORMAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE IN OREGON FROM 1979-2003 Laura Riihimaki  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRENDS IN DIRECT NORMAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE IN OREGON FROM 1979-2003 Laura Riihimaki Frank Vignola of trends in direct normal irradiance from three sites around Oregon over a period of 25 years. An overall. Changes in clear noon values are also examined. This article analyzes direct normal data unlike other

Oregon, University of

271

Parabolic geometries and normal Weyl structures First BGG operators and special solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic geometries and normal Weyl structures First BGG operators and special solutions structures & BGG solutions #12;Parabolic geometries and normal Weyl structures First BGG operators the machinery of BGG sequences. Andreas Cap Weyl structures & BGG solutions #12;Parabolic geometries and normal

Drmota, Michael

272

User's manual for TEDPED, an interactive code for testing the hypothesis of log-normally or normally distributed data. [In FORTRAN IV for PDP-10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TEDPED is an interactive computer code that produces both graphical and numerical descriptions of a set of data based on the user's assumption of either a normal or a log-normal distribution. Numerical statistics calculated by TEDPED at the user's option are the chi-square, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, and Pearson's. The linearized cumulative-probability distribution of the data may be plotted, together with a least-squares fit, consistent with either the normal or log-normal assumption. Data input may be by named data file or via the user's terminal keyboard. The code is written in FORTRAN and runs on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 computer; typical central-processor-unit execution time is about 0.32 s. 50 figures, 1 table.

Fields, D.E.; Little, C.A.; Shaeffer, D.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Pentose fermentation of normally toxic lignocellulose prehydrolysate with strain of Pichia stipitis yeast using air  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis NPw9 (ATCC PTA-3717) useful for the production of ethanol using oxygen for growth while fermenting normally toxic lignocellulosic prehydrolysates.

Keller, Jr., Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Ruano, Prediction of the solar radiation evolution usingComputation of beam solar radiation at normal incidencein estimating global solar radiation, Solar Energy, vol.

Queener, Benjamin Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Physical Properties of Normal Grade Biodiesel and Winter Grade Biodiesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In this study, optical and thermal properties of normal grade and winter grade palm oil biodiesel were investigated. Surface Plasmon Resonance and Photopyroelectric technique were used to evaluate the samples. The dispersion curve and thermal diffusivity were obtained. Consequently, the variation of refractive index, as a function of wavelength in normal grade biodiesel is faster than winter grade palm oil biodiesel, and the thermal diffusivity of winter grade biodiesel is higher than the thermal diffusivity of normal grade biodiesel. This is attributed to the higher palmitic acid C16:0 content in normal grade than in winter grade palm oil biodiesel.

Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini; Mohd Maarof Moksin; Harrison Lau; Lik Nang; Monir Norozi; W. Mahmood; Mat Yunus; Azmi Zakaria

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

West Coast (PADD 5) Product Supplied of Normal Butane-Butylene ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Coast (PADD 5) Product Supplied of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

277

Solar: monthly direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km resolution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

visible irradiance, atmospheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the monthly average daily total of the normal or beam...

278

Solar: annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km resolution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

visible irradiance, atmospheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the monthly average daily total of the normal or beam...

279

Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Intra-hour Direct NormalChair University of California, San Diego iii TABLE OFRPS, Technical report, California Independent System

Queener, Benjamin Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Optimizing Normal Tissue Sparing in Ion Therapy Using Calculated Isoeffective Dose for Ion Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate how the selection of ion type affects the calculated isoeffective dose to the surrounding normal tissue as a function of both normal tissue and target tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratios. Methods and Materials: A microdosimetric biologic dose model was incorporated into a Geant4 simulation of parallel opposed beams of protons, helium, lithium, beryllium, carbon, and neon ions. The beams were constructed to give a homogeneous isoeffective dose to a volume in the center of a water phantom for target tissues covering a range of cobalt equivalent {alpha}/{beta} ratios of 1-20 Gy. Concomitant normal tissue isoeffective doses in the plateau of the ion beam were then compared for different ions across the range of normal tissue and target tissue radiosensitivities for a fixed isoeffective dose to the target tissue. Results: The ion type yielding the optimal normal tissue sparing was highly dependent on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of both the normal and the target tissue. For carbon ions, the calculated isoeffective dose to normal tissue at a 5-cm depth varied by almost a factor of 5, depending on the {alpha}/{beta} ratios of the normal and target tissue. This ranges from a factor of 2 less than the isoeffective dose of a similar proton treatment to a factor of 2 greater. Conclusions: No single ion is optimal for all treatment scenarios. The heavier ions are superior in cases in which the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of the target tissue is low and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of normal tissue is high, and protons are superior in the opposite circumstances. Lithium and beryllium appear to offer dose advantages similar to carbon, with a considerably lower normal tissue dose when the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the target tissue is high and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the normal tissue is low.

Remmes, Nicholas B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Herman, Michael G., E-mail: Herman.Michael@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Kruse, Jon J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Normal Inverse Gaussian Error Distributions Applied for the Positioning of Petroleum Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normal Inverse Gaussian Error Distributions Applied for the Positioning of Petroleum Wells Tony In this paper we present a new statistical model for the positioning of petroleum wells using magnetic of a well. The normal inverse Gaussian gives a more realistic fit to the magnetic observatory data than

Eidsvik, Jo

282

Normal Mode Initialization for a Multilevel Grid-Point Model. Part I: Linear Aspects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper we review initialization methods for numerical weather prediction models, leading up to the development of schemes based on the normal modes of the forecast model. We present the derivation of the normal modes of ECMWF's ...

Clive Temperton; David L. Williamson

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

May 28-29, 2008/ARR Thermal Effect of Off-Normal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 28-29, 2008/ARR 1 Thermal Effect of Off-Normal Energy Deposition on Bare Ferritic Steel First #12;May 28-29, 2008/ARR 2 Power Plant FW Under Energy Deposition from Off- Normal Conditions · Thermal Meeting) · Disruptions: ­ Parallel energy density for thermal quench = 28-45 MJ/m2 near X

Raffray, A. René

284

Parabolic geometries and normal Weyl structures First BGG operators and special solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic geometries and normal Weyl structures First BGG operators and special solutions structures & BGG solutions #12;Parabolic geometries and normal Weyl structures First BGG operators to a parabolic geometry. The first operator in each BGG sequence defines a geometric overdetermined system

Drmota, Michael

285

Recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from net excess hydrogen in a catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products. An improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from the net excess hydrogen is realized by chilling and contacting said hydrogen with a normally liquid hydrocarbon stream in a plural stage absorption zone at an elevated pressure.

Scheifele, C.A.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Asymptotic normality and Berry-Esseen results for conditional density estimator with censored and dependent data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we derive the asymptotic normality and a Berry-Esseen type bound for the kernel conditional density estimator proposed in Ould-Said and Cai (2005) [26] when the censored observations with multivariate covariates form a stationary @a-mixing ... Keywords: ?-mixing, 62G07, 62G20, Asymptotic normality, Berry-Esseen type bound, Censored data, Conditional density

Han-Ying Liang; Liang Peng

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Unsupervised gene/protein named entity normalization using automatically extracted dictionaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gene and protein named-entity recognition (NER) and normalization is often treated as a two-step process. While the first step, NER, has received considerable attention over the last few years, normalization has received much less attention. We have ...

Aaron M. Cohen

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

On the Self-Interaction of a Geostrophic Current and its Inertia-Gravity Normal Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A shallow-water channel model on an f plane is used to study the interaction of barotropic inertia-gravity normal modes and geostrophic currents. Computed numerically are 1) the normal modes associated with a, zonal current, 2) the nonlinear wave ...

Richard A. Hyde

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Species and community response to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought in the northern Mojave Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Little information is available on how desert plant communities that are dominated by perennial species respond to normal and above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. Intuitively, one would expect total canopy cover to increase. Whether a concomitant increase in the density of perennial species also occurs is unknown. Even less is known about how individual species respond to above normal precipitation following drought. From 1987 through 1991 a prolonged drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the northern Mojave Desert. In March 1991 the northern Mojave Desert received well above normal precipitation. The following two winters (December--March) also had above normal precipitation (150 to 200 % of normal, unpublished data). Ongoing vegetation characterization studies by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG&G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both vegetation associations and individual species respond to above normal precipitation following prolonged drought. This paper reports the preliminary results.

Schultz, B.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.; Ostler, W.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Fuel cell system logic for differentiating between rapid and normal shutdown commands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method of controlling the operation of a fuel cell system wherein each shutdown command for the system is subjected to decision logic which determines whether the command should be a normal shutdown command or rapid shutdown command. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a normal shutdown command, then the system is shutdown in a normal step-by-step process in which the hydrogen stream is consumed within the system. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a rapid shutdown command, the hydrogen stream is removed from the system either by dumping to atmosphere or routing to storage.

Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mapping local hippocampal changes in Alzheimer's disease and normal ageing with MRI at 3 Tesla and Alzheimer's disease based on high resolution MRI at 3 Tesla. T1-weighted images were acquired from 19

Thompson, Paul

292

Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC Subject: The use of estimated energy rates 1 and normalized weather 2 data in determining contractor (ESCO) payments under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Summary: As explained below, the use of estimated energy rates and normalized weather data is permitted when determining ESCO payments under an ESPC. Authority: The authority for ESPCs is established in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA), as amended. (42 U.S.C. 8287 et seq.) Implementing regulations for ESPCs are at 10 CFR Part 436 subpart B. Guidance: Section 801(a)(2)(B) of NECPA requires that "[a]aggregate annual payments by an agency ... may not exceed the amount ... the agency would have paid (as estimated

293

Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC Guidance on Utility Rate Estimations and Weather Normalization in an ESPC Subject: The use of estimated energy rates 1 and normalized weather 2 data in determining contractor (ESCO) payments under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Summary: As explained below, the use of estimated energy rates and normalized weather data is permitted when determining ESCO payments under an ESPC. Authority: The authority for ESPCs is established in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA), as amended. (42 U.S.C. 8287 et seq.) Implementing regulations for ESPCs are at 10 CFR Part 436 subpart B. Guidance: Section 801(a)(2)(B) of NECPA requires that "[a]aggregate annual payments by an agency ... may not exceed the amount ... the agency would have paid (as estimated

294

Numerical Solution of the Vertical Structure Equation in the Normal Mode Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a diagnostic study by expanding global data in normal mode functions, Kasahara and Puri found that for zonal wavenumber one, even the seventh vertical mode (the highest mode they presented) contains about 50% of the energy of the external ...

Y. K. Sasaki; L. P. Chang

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

East Coast (PADD 1) Gas Plant Production of Normal Butane-Butylene ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast (PADD 1) Gas Plant Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 ...

296

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production of Normal Butane ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production of Normal Butane (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993-884: 268: 4,851: 6,387: 6,489 ...

297

Numerical Investigations with a Hybrid IsentropicSigma Model. Part I: Normal-Mode Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a validation experiment of a hybrid isentropicsigma coordinate primitive equation model developed at the University of Wisconsin (the UW ??? model), an initial value technique is used to investigate numerically the normal-mode characteristics ...

R. Bradley Pierce; Fred M. Reames; Tom H. Zapotocny; Donald R. Johnson; Bart J. Wolf

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Normalization and Calibration of Geostationary Satellite Radiances for the international Satellite Cloud Climatology Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Procedures are described for normalizing the radiometric calibration of image radiances obtained from the suite of geostationary weather satellites that contributed data to the international Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. The key step is ...

Yves Desormeaux; William B. Rossow; Christopher L. Brest; G. Garrett Campbell

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

On the Role of Ozone in the Stability of Rossby Normal Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of ozone in the linear stability of Rossby normal modes is examined in a continuously stratified, extratropical baroclinic atmosphere. The flow is described by coupled equations for the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity and ozone ...

Terrence R. Nathan

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

NOAA's 19812010 U.S. Climate Normals: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released the 19812010 U.S. Climate Normals in July 2011, representing the latest decadal installment of this long-standing product line. Climatic averages (and other statistics) of temperature, ...

Anthony Arguez; Imke Durre; Scott Applequist; Russell S. Vose; Michael F. Squires; Xungang Yin; Richard R. Heim Jr.; Timothy W. Owen

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Spectral Representation of Three-Dimensional Global Data by Expansion in Normal Mode Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To represent atmospheric data spectrally in three indices (zonal wavenumber, and meridional and vertical modal indices), we propose to use three-dimensional normal mode functions (NMF's) to express the wind and mass fields simultaneously. The NMF'...

Akira Kasahara; Kamal Puri

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Synoptic Evaluation of Normal Mode Initialization Experiments with the NMC Nested Grid Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Regional Analysis and Forecast System at the National Meteorological Center consists of an optimum interpolation objective analysis scheme, an adiabatic nonlinear normal model initialization (NNMI) and a hemispheric Nested Grid Model (NGM) to ...

Frederick H. Carr; Richard L. Wobus; Ralph A. Petersen

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Lagrangian Drifter Dispersion in the Surf Zone: Directionally Spread, Normally Incident Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian drifter statistics in a surf zone wave and circulation model are examined and compared to single- and two-particle dispersion statistics observed on an alongshore uniform natural beach with small, normally incident, directionally ...

Matthew Spydell; Falk Feddersen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A G{sub 1} phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G{sub 1} phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G{sub 1} cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G{sub 1} phase, suggesting that such G{sub 1} phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

Crissman, H.A.; Gadbois, D.M.; Tobey, R.A.; Bradbury, E.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

An Attempt to Normalize the Hailstorm Variability for the Evaluation of Cloud Seeding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Procedures have been developed from relationships between parameters of hailstone size distributions and storm thermodynamics to normalize the effects of storm thermodynamics of integral hail parameters observed at the ground. Hail parameters ...

Lawrence Cheng

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G.sub.1 cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G.sub.1 phase, suggesting that such G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

Crissman, Harry A. (Los Alamos, NM); Gadbois, Donna M. (Los Alamos, NM); Tobey, Robert A. (Los Alamos, NM); Bradbury, E. Morton (Santa Fe, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G[sub 1] cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G[sub 1] phase, suggesting that such G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

Crissman, H.A.; Gadbois, D.M.; Tobey, R.A.; Bradbury, E.M.

1993-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

309

Global Normal-Mode Rossby Waves Observed in Stratospheric Ozone Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Westward-propagating Rossby normal-mode planetary waves are documented in stratospheric ozone data using Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) satellite measurements. These modes are evidenced by enhanced spectral power and near-global coherence ...

William J. Randel

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

EA-1123: Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium to the United...

311

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 7,016: 5,987: ...

312

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Gas Plant Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; ...

313

U.S. Normal Butane-Butylene Stocks at Natural Gas Processing ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Normal Butane-Butylene Stocks at Natural Gas Processing Plants (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: ...

314

U.S. Refinery Normal Butane/Butylene Shell Storage Capacity as ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Normal Butane/Butylene Shell Storage Capacity as of January 1 (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

315

U.S. Ending Stocks of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Ending Stocks of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 26,098: 24,979: 24,689: ...

316

The Fueling of Nuclear Activity: II. The Bar Properties of Seyfert and Normal Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a recent near-infrared imaging survey of samples of Seyfert and normal galaxies to study the role of bars in the fueling of nuclear activity. The active galaxy sample includes Seyfert galaxies in the Revised Shapely-Ames (RSA) and Sandage & Tammann's (1987) extension to this catalog. The normal galaxies were selected to match the Seyfert sample in Hubble type, redshift, inclination and blue luminosity. All the galaxies in both samples classified as barred in the RSA catalog are also barred in the near-infrared. In addition, ~55% of the galaxies classified as non-barred in the RSA show evidence for bars at 2.1 microns. Overall, ~70% of the galaxies observed show evidence for bar structures. The incidence of bars in the Seyfert and normal galaxies is similar, suggesting Seyfert nuclei do not occur preferentially in barred systems. Furthermore, a slightly higher percentage of normal galaxies have multiple-bar structures.

John S. Mulchaey; Michael W. Regan

1997-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

Asymptotic normality and efficiency of the maximum likelihood estimator for the parameter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a distant site. We prove an asymptotic normality result for this consistent estimator as the distant site tends to infinity and establish that it achieves the Cramér-Rao bound. We also explore in a simulation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

CRITICAL FIELD FOR SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOW-TEMPERATURE NORMAL-STATE HEAT CAPACITY OF TUNGSTEN B. B.Temperature Nonnal-State Heat Capacity of Tungsten* B. n.single crystal This work, heat capacity 57,000a 4 d' 1&11.

Triplett, B.B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Normal Mode Initialization and the Generation of Gravity Waves by Quasi-Geostrophic Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several numerical weather prediction models now use nonlinear normal-mode initialization schemes. These schemes describe balanced states which act to limit the initial presence of high-frequency gravity waves and their subsequent growth by ...

Ronald M. Errico

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Binormal Distribution: A Distribution for Representing Asymmetrical but Normal-like Weather Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new probability distribution, which has some of the advantages of the normal distribution but avoids the constraint of symmetry undesired in many applications, is presented. The distribution, called binormal, has three parameters, as the ...

Zoltan Toth; Tamas Szentimrey

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Scaling Exponent Distinguishes the Injured Sick Hearts Against Normal Healthy Hearts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyzed heartbeat?intervals with our own program of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to quantify the irregularity of the heartbeat. The present analysis revealed that normal healthy subjects have the scaling exponent of 1.0

Toru Yazawa; Katsunori Tanaka

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A Review of Radionuclide Release From HTGR Cores During Normal Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The release of radionuclides from the core of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) -- especially direct-cycle HTGRs -- during normal plant operation has significant design, O&M, and safety implications. A hallmark philosophy of all modern HTGRs is to design the plant so that radionuclides are retained in the core during normal operation and postulated accidents. The key to achieving this safety goal is twofold: (1) a reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles for primary fission product containmen...

2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Inverse measurement of stiffness by the normalization technique for J-integral fracture toughness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The single specimen normalization technique for J-integral fracture toughness has been successfully employed by several researchers to study the strongly non-linear fracture response of ductile semicrystalline polymers. As part of the normalization technique the load and the plastic component of displacement are normalized. The normalized data is then fit with a normalization function that approximates a power law for small displacements that are dominated by blunting and smoothly transitions to a linear relationship for large displacements that are dominated by stable crack extension. Particularly for very ductile polymers the compliance term used to determine the plastic displacement can dominate the solution and small errors in determining the elastic modulus can lead to large errors in the normalization or even make it ill-posed. This can be further complicated for polymers where the elastic modulus is strong strain rate dependent and simply using a 'quasistatic' modulus from a dogbone measurement may not equate to the dominant strain rate in the compact tension specimen. The current work proposes directly measuring the compliance of the compact tension specimen in the solution of J-integral fracture toughness and then solving for the elastic modulus. By comparison with a range of strain rate data the dominant strain rate can then be determined.

Brown, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Actual Date of Delivery Deliverable Security Class  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of all NoAH components, defines their requirements and describes the interface between them. The NoAH architecture, as described so far, is a set of individual components that cooperate to form a farm of distributed honeypots. Although the main NoAH components low- and highinteraction honeypots, signature generation,

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The Actual Cost of Food Systems on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs ...................................................................................................................16 Table 14: Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Rate Per Capita from County Survey

Beresnev, Igor

326

Design Parameters Derived from Actual Forgings*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Minimum R f : R c ratio is 1.0 to 1. Maximum R f : R c ratio is 6.8 to 1. Average R f : R c ratio is 2.8 to 1....

327

Definition: Net Actual Interchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interchange, balancing authority, smart grid, Balancing Authority Area References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

328

Might Dark Matter be Actually Black?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been proposals that primordial black hole remnants (BHRs) are the dark matter, but the idea is somewhat vague. We argue here first that the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) may prevent black holes from evaporating completely, in a similar way that the standard uncertainty principle prevents the hydrogen atom from collapsing. Secondly we note that the hybrid inflation model provides a plausible mechanism for production of large numbers of small black holes. Combining these we suggest that the dark matter might be composed of Planck-size BHRs and discuss the possible constraints and signatures associated with this notion.

Chen, Pisin

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

329

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

maintenance costs should be reported from asset-level data collected in the Site's Maintenance Management and Financial Management Systems. b. Annual Required Maintenance...

330

Effects of burial history, rock ductility and recovery magnitude on inversion of normal faulted strata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inversion of normal faults at different burial depths is studied using physical models constructed with rock and deformed at confining pressure. Models consist of a 1 cm thick limestone layer above a fault dipping 70 in a rigid medium, and are subjected to a two-stage deformation path of layer-parallel extension followed by coaxial contraction. To investigate the effects of burial depth and relative ductility on kinematics of inversion, five model suites were run in which confining pressure and recovery magnitudes were varied. In all models, a normal fault forms in the limestone during extension. Subsequent inversion is accommodated in the limestone by reverse slip on the normal fault, creation and movement along new reverse faults, and distributed fracturing and folding. The relative contribution of these mechanisms depends on the relative ductility of the rock and magnitude of inversion. Reverse slip on the normal fault and distributed fracturing occur during early stages of inversion and new reverse faults form at intermediate stages. During late stage inversion, strata with low mean ductility shorten primarily by reverse slip on the pre-existing normal fault, whereas strata with high mean ductility shorten by continued slip on reverse faults. Evidence for inversion is provided by superposed fracture fabrics in the footwall at early stages (100% recovery). This change in fracture fabric during inversion could lead to an overpressured footwall in natural inversion structures. Reverse reactivation of the normal faults may occur during coaxial contraction even though such faults are unfavorably oriented assuming typical rock friction behavior and a homogeneous stress state. Localized reverse slip on normal faults is favored when strata display low ductility and less favored when strata work-harden during extension, however, the models show that the final inversion geometry is dependent on the ductility during both phases of deformation. Even a fault that is work-hardened during extension can reactivate if the ductility during contraction is low enough.

Kuhle, Nathan John

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A method for estimating direct normal solar irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment  

SciTech Connect

In order to investigate a potential use of concentrating solar power technologies and select an optimum site for these technologies, it is necessary to obtain information on the geographical distribution of direct normal solar irradiation over an area of interest. In this work, we have developed a method for estimating direct normal irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment. The method starts with the estimation of global irradiation on a horizontal surface from MTSAT-1R satellite data and other ground-based ancillary data. Then a satellite-based diffuse fraction model was developed and used to estimate the diffuse component of the satellite-derived global irradiation. Based on this estimated global and diffuse irradiation and the solar radiation incident angle, the direct normal irradiation was finally calculated. To evaluate its performance, the method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation at seven pyrheliometer stations in Thailand. It was found that values of monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation from the measurements and those estimated from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement, with a root mean square difference of 16% and a mean bias of -1.6%, with respect to mean measured values. After the validation, this method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation over Thailand by using MTSAT-1R satellite data for the period from June 2005 to December 2008. Results from the calculation were displayed as hourly and yearly irradiation maps. These maps reveal that the direct normal irradiation in Thailand was strongly affected by the tropical monsoons and local topography of the country. (author)

Janjai, Serm [Solar Energy Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Utilization of Normal Mode Initial Conditions for Detecting Errors in the Dynamics Part of Primitive Equation Global Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a global atmospheric basic state has constant angular velocity and its temperature varies with attitude only, there exist normal mode solutions to the linearized global primitive equations. The use of these normal modes, which have known ...

Winston C. Chao; Marvin A. Geller

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Nonlinear Normal Mode Initialization of a Limited-Area Model: Inclusion of All Beta Terms in the Linearized Model Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear normal mode initialization method with all of the beta terms included in the linearized model equations is formulated for a limited-area model. It is the extension of an earlier method examining the sensitivity of nonlinear normal ...

S. J. Bijlsma

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Global stability of the normal state of superconductors in the presence of a strong electric current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau model of superconductivity in the presence of an electric current flowing through a two-dimensional wire. We show that when the current is sufficiently strong the solution converges in the long-time limit to the normal state. We provide two types of upper bounds for the critical current where such global stability is achieved: by using the principal eigenvalue of the magnetic Laplacian associated with the normal magnetic field, and through the norm of the resolvent of the linearized steady-state operator. In the latter case we estimate the resolvent norm in large domains by the norms of approximate operators defined on the plane and the half-plane. We also obtain a lower bound, in large domains, for the above critical current by obtaining the current for which the normal state looses its local stability.

Yaniv Almog; Bernard Helffer

2013-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

Solar: annual and seasonal average direct normal (DNI) GIS data (contours)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

direct normal (DNI) GIS data (contours) direct normal (DNI) GIS data (contours) for Brazil from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Annual and seasonal mean of Direct Normal Solar Radiation in kWh/m2/day based on data from 1995 to 2002 (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The cross-calibration process worked with data from 3 ground stations: Caicó (located in the Northeast of Brazil), Florianópolis (located in the South) and Balbina (located in Amazonia). These data have been used for validation and comparison of radiation transfer models operated in SWERA to estimate the incidence of solar radiation on the surface of the country from satellite images obtained from 1995 to 2002

337

Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time on a unit area at the earth's surface perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the extinction - whether absorption or scattering. Here we report a set of closure experiments performed in north-central Oklahoma in April 1996, under cloud-free conditions, wherein measured atmospheric composition and aerosol optical thickness are input to a radiative transfer model, MODTRAN-3, to estimate DNSI, which is then compared with measured values obtained with normal incidence pyrheliometers and absolute cavity radiometers. Uncertainty in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) dominates the uncertainty in DNSI calculation. AOT measured by an independently calibrated sunphotometer and a rotating Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance - A Closure Experiment, Halthore et al. 2 shadow-band radiometer agree to within the uncerta...

Rangasayi Halthore; Schwartz; S. E.; Michalsky; J. J.; Anderson; G. P.; Gail P. Anderson; Ferrare R. A.; ten Brink H. M; Holben B. N.; Harry M. Ten Brink

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Comparing of Normal Stress Distribution in Static and Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is important to consider the vertical component of earthquake loading and inertia force in soil-structure interaction analyses. In most circumstances, design engineers are primarily concerned about the analysis of behavior of foundations subjected to earthquake-induced forces transmitted from the bedrock. In this research, a single rigid foundation with designated geometrical parameters located on sandy-clay soil has been modeled in FLAC software with Finite Different Method and subjected to three different vertical components of earthquake records. In these cases, it is important to evaluate effect of footing on underlying soil and to consider normal stress in soil with and without footing. The distribution of normal stress under the footing in static and dynamic states has been studied and compared. This Comparison indicated that, increasing in normal stress under the footing caused by vertical component of ground excitations, has decreased dynamic vertical settlement in comparison with static state.

Kholdebarin, Alireza; Massumi, Ali [Graduate School of Engineering, Tarbiat Moallem University of Tehran (Kharazmi), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Davoodi, Mohammad [Dept. of Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering, International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology, IIEES, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabatabaiefar, Hamid Reza

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

In lesion diagnostics, it is sometimes hard to choose which data normalization is the best among the other ones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract In lesion diagnostics, it is sometimes hard to choose which data normalization is the best part of the useful information can be lost. Different normalization techniques retrieve different information about the data classes. Sometimes it is quite hard to single out a normalization technique

Duin, Robert P.W.

340

Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Low-dose computed tomography image restoration using previous normal-dose scan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: In current computed tomography (CT) examinations, the associated x-ray radiation dose is of a significant concern to patients and operators. A simple and cost-effective means to perform the examinations is to lower the milliampere-seconds (mAs) or kVp parameter (or delivering less x-ray energy to the body) as low as reasonably achievable in data acquisition. However, lowering the mAs parameter will unavoidably increase data noise and the noise would propagate into the CT image if no adequate noise control is applied during image reconstruction. Since a normal-dose high diagnostic CT image scanned previously may be available in some clinical applications, such as CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography (CTA), this paper presents an innovative way to utilize the normal-dose scan as a priori information to induce signal restoration of the current low-dose CT image series. Methods: Unlike conventional local operations on neighboring image voxels, nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm utilizes the redundancy of information across the whole image. This paper adapts the NLM to utilize the redundancy of information in the previous normal-dose scan and further exploits ways to optimize the nonlocal weights for low-dose image restoration in the NLM framework. The resulting algorithm is called the previous normal-dose scan induced nonlocal means (ndiNLM). Because of the optimized nature of nonlocal weights calculation, the ndiNLM algorithm does not depend heavily on image registration between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose CT scans. Furthermore, the smoothing parameter involved in the ndiNLM algorithm can be adaptively estimated based on the image noise relationship between the current low-dose and the previous normal-dose scanning protocols. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations were carried out on a physical phantom as well as clinical abdominal and brain perfusion CT scans in terms of accuracy and resolution properties. The gain by the use of the previous normal-dose scan via the presented ndiNLM algorithm is noticeable as compared to a similar approach without using the previous normal-dose scan. Conclusions: For low-dose CT image restoration, the presented ndiNLM method is robust in preserving the spatial resolution and identifying the low-contrast structure. The authors can draw the conclusion that the presented ndiNLM algorithm may be useful for some clinical applications such as in perfusion imaging, radiotherapy, tumor surveillance, etc.

Ma, Jianhua; Huang, Jing; Feng, Qianjin; Zhang, Hua; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong; Chen, Wufan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515, China and Department of Radiology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'An, Shanxi 710032 (China); Department of Radiology, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Table 25  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

89 89 Table 25 Created on: 1/3/2014 3:10:33 PM Table 25. Natural gas home customer-weighted heating degree days, New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic Month/Year/Type of data CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT NJ, NY, PA IL, IN, MI, OH, WI IA, KS, MN, MO, ND, NE, SD DE, FL, GA, MD, DC, NC, SC, VA, WV November Normal 702 665 758 841 442 2012 751 738 772 748 527 2013 756 730 823 868 511 % Diff (normal to 2013) 7.7 9.8 8.6 3.2 15.6 % Diff (2012 to 2013) 0.7 -1.1 6.6 16.0 -3.0 November to November Normal 702 665 758 841 442 2012 751 738 772 748 527 2013 756 730 823 868 511 % Diff (normal to 2013) 7.7 9.8 8.6 3.2 15.6 % Diff (2012 to 2013) 0.7 -1.1 6.6 16.0 -3.0

343

PABS: A Computer Program to Normalize Emission Probabilities and Calculate Realistic Uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

The program PABS normalizes relative particle emission probabilities to an absolute scale and calculates the relevant uncertainties on this scale. The program is written in Java using the JDK 1.6 library. For additional information about system requirements, the code itself, and compiling from source, see the README file distributed with this program. The mathematical procedures used are given below.

Caron, D. S.; Browne, E.; Norman, E. B.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

Application of the normalization data analysis technique for single specimen R-curve determination  

SciTech Connect

The authors conclude that the normalization technique for single specimen R-curve and J{sub IC} determination can be very effective. Much like EPD, this technique requires some user interpretation/judgement during data analysis and may be difficult to standardize or fully automate even with strict analysis rules.

Porr, W.C.; Mills, W.J.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Comparison of the Bounded Derivative and the Normal-Mode Initialization Methods Using Real Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of the bounded-derivative and normal-mode methods to a simple linear barotropic model at a typical middle latitude shows that the two methods lead to identical constraints up to a certain degree of approximation. Beyond this accuracy ...

F. H. M. Semazzi; I. M. Navon

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

U.S. Normal Butane-Butylene Stocks in Pipelines (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Normal Butane-Butylene Stocks in Pipelines (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 1,901: 1,455: 1,356: 1,810: 2,062 ...

347

U.S. Refinery Net Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Net Production of Normal Butane-Butylene (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2005-4,241-2,244: 2,431: 7,319: 7,538 ...

348

A novel approach to determine normal variation in gene expression data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Animal models for human diseases are of crucial importance for studying gene expression and regulation. In the last decade the development of mouse models for cancer, diabetes, neuro-degenerative and many other diseases has been on steady rise. Microarray ... Keywords: gene expression, hypertension, immune response, mouse models, normal variance, principal component analysis, replicates

Vinay Nadimpally; Mohammed J. Zaki

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Unraveling the microenvironmental influences on the normal mammary gland and induction and progression of breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The normal mammary gland and invasive breast cancer are both complex 'organs' composed of multiple cell types as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) in three-dimensional (3D) space. Conventionally, both normal and malignant breast cells are studied in vitro as two-dimensional (2D) monolayers of epithelial cells, which results in the loss of structure and tissue function. Many laboratories are now investigating regulation of signaling function in normal mammary gland using 3D cultures. However, it is important also to assay malignant breast cells ex vivo in a physiologically relevant environment to more closely mimic tumor architecture, signal transduction regulation and tumor behavior in vivo. Here we present the potential of these 3D models for drug testing, target validation and guidance of patient selection for clinical trials. We argue also that in order to get full insight into the biology of the normal and malignant breast, and to create in vivo-like models for therapeutic approaches in humans, we need to continue to create more complex heterotypic models to approach the full context the cells encounter in the human body.

Weigelt, Britta; Bissell, Mina J.

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

350

Image segmentation using quadtree-based similarity graph and normalized cut  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The graph cuts in image segmentation have been widely used in recent years because it regards the problem of image partitioning as a graph partitioning issue, a well-known problem in graph theory. The normalized cut approach uses spectral graph properties ... Keywords: graph partitioning, image segmentation, quadtree, spectral graph

Marco Antonio Garcia De Carvalho; Anselmo Castelo Branco Ferreira; Andr Luis Costa

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Normalized cut segmentation of thyroid tumor image based on fractional derivatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the clinical diagnosis of thyroid tumor, ultrasound image may provide anatomical detail of the tumor, and radionuclide image may provide functional information about activity distribution of the tumor. Fusion of the two-modality medical image doesn't ... Keywords: fractional derivatives, image segmentation, normalized cut, thyroid tumor image

Jie Zhao; Li Zhang; Wei Zheng; Hua Tian; Dong-mei Hao; Song-hong Wu

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Non-Normal Mode Initialization: Formulation and Application to Inclusion of the ?-Terms in the Linearization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The non-normal mode initialization, i.e., an initialization scheme which does not require an explicit computation of the eigenmodes of the linearized equations, is reviewed. The formulation of such a scheme is given in abstract form, in the case ...

Rgis Juvanon Du Vachat

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A Cautionary Note on the Use of the KolmogorovSmirnov Test for Normality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The KolmogorovSmirnov goodness-of-fit test is used in many applications for testing normality in climate research. This note shows that the test usually leads to systematic and drastic errors. When the mean and the standard deviation are ...

Dag J. Steinskog; Dag B. Tjstheim; Nils G. Kvamst

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Normal Monthly Wind Stress Over the World Ocean with Error Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over 35 million surface observations covering the world ocean from 18701976 have been processed for the purpose of calculating monthly normals and standard errors of the eastward and northward components of the wind stress and work done by the ...

Sol Hellerman; Mel Rosenstein

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Physics 116C Fall 2012 The Normal Approximation to the Binomial Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics 116C Fall 2012 The Normal Approximation to the Binomial Distribution 1. Properties of the binomial distribution Consider a the binomial distribution, f(x) = C(n, x)px qn-x , where C(n, x) n! x of the binomial distribution can be computed using the follow- ing trick. Consider the binomial expansion (p + q

California at Santa Cruz, University of

356

Physics 116C Fall 2012 The Normal Approximation to the Binomial Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics 116C Fall 2012 The Normal Approximation to the Binomial Distribution 1. Properties of the binomial distribution Consider a the binomial distribution, f(x) = C(n, x)p x q n-x , where C(n, x) # n! x. The expectation value of the binomial distribution can be computed using the follow­ ing trick. Consider

California at Santa Cruz, University of

357

Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

Kawase, Takatsugu [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: kunieda-mi@umin.ac.jp; Deloar, Hossain M. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan); Oncology Service, Medical Physics and Bioengineering Department, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch (New Zealand); Tsunoo, Takanori [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan); Seki, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Oku, Yohei [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Saitoh, Hidetoshi [Division of Radiological Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Kimiaki [Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Eileen N. [Department of Anesthesiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ishizaka, Akitoshi [Department of Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kameyama, Kaori [Division of Diagnostic Pathology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kubo, Atsushi [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hepatoscintiangiography of normal liver and its alteration in hepatomas and liver abscess  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to establish normal hepatoscintiangiographic (HSA) pattern of hepatic blood flow and to investigate differential HSA findings of primary and metastatic carcinomas and abscess of the liver. HSA was carried out after intravenous bolus injection of l0 mCi of Tc-99m-phytate by obtaining sequential anterior images of 1-second exposure for 16 seconds. Observations included (1) baseline study of normal hepatic blood flow patterns by correlating with contrast angiogram, (2) time-sequence phasing of normal HSA, and (3) analysis of altered patterns in primary and metastatic carcinomas and abscess of the liver. Results were: (1) Normal HSA demonstrated 3 distinct phases of arterialization (AP), arterial hepatrogram (AHP), and portal venous hepatogram (PVHP). The means of each phase were 5.3, 6.3, and 8.3 seconds, respectively. Portal vein could be seen in all but one of 20 normal subjects. (2) Pattern changes in disease groups were early start of AP in carcinomas and very early start of AP in abscess. AP became prolonged in all disease groups. (3) Distinction between AHP and PVHP was sharp in metastasis and abscess but was unsharp in primary hepatoma. Cold area or areas became vascularized in primary hepatoma but not in abscess. Cold areas of metastasis were inhomogenously vascularized in late AP and throughout AHP and became relatively avascular as PVHP began. The cold area of abscess showed rim enhancement during AH and APH. These differences in HSA pattern were very useful in differential diagnosis of the diseases studied.

Bahk, Y.W.; Chung, S.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

High and Low LET Radiation Differentially Induce Normal Tissue Damage Signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiotherapy using high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is aimed at efficiently killing tumor cells while minimizing dose (biological effective) to normal tissues to prevent toxicity. It is well established that high LET radiation results in lower cell survival per absorbed dose than low LET radiation. However, whether various mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be regulated differentially is not known. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate whether two actions related to normal tissue toxicity, p53-induced apoptosis and expression of the profibrotic gene PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1), are differentially induced by high and low LET radiation. Methods and Materials: Cells were irradiated with high LET carbon ions or low LET photons. Cell survival assays were performed, profibrotic PAI-1 expression was monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and apoptosis was assayed by annexin V staining. Activation of p53 by phosphorylation at serine 315 and serine 37 was monitored by Western blotting. Transfections of plasmids expressing p53 mutated at serines 315 and 37 were used to test the requirement of these residues for apoptosis and expression of PAI-1. Results: As expected, cell survival was lower and induction of apoptosis was higher in high -LET irradiated cells. Interestingly, induction of the profibrotic PAI-1 gene was similar with high and low LET radiation. In agreement with this finding, phosphorylation of p53 at serine 315 involved in PAI-1 expression was similar with high and low LET radiation, whereas phosphorylation of p53 at serine 37, involved in apoptosis induction, was much higher after high LET irradiation. Conclusions: Our results indicate that diverse mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be differentially affected by high and low LET radiation. This may have consequences for the development and manifestation of normal tissue damage.

Niemantsverdriet, Maarten [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Goethem, Marc-Jan van [Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bron, Reinier; Hogewerf, Wytse [Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A.; Luijk, Peter van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P., E-mail: r.p.coppes@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

601 601 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142256601 Varnish cache server Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km resolution for Ethiopia from DLR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Data of high resolution (10kmx10km) Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) for Ethiopia for the years 2000, 2001 and 2002. The data are available for monthly and annual sums stored in a ESRI-Shapefile. Please read the country report for additional background information. (Purpose): The data are helpful for the assessment of the solar potential of the country and can give project developer a first impression of the solar resource of the country.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Calculation of two-phase dispersed droplet-in-vapor flows including normal shock waves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for calculating quasi-one-dimensional, steady-state, two-phase dispersed droplet-in-vapor flow has been developed. The technique is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic single component flow in which normal shock waves may occur, and is the basis for a two-dimensional model. The flow is assumed to be inviscid except for droplet drag. Temperature and pressure equilibrium between phases is assumed, although this is not a requirement of the technique. Example calculations of flow in one-dimensional nozzles with and without normal shocks are given and compared with experimentally measured pressure profiles for both low quality and high quality two-phase steam/water flow.

Comfort, W.J.; Alger, T.W.; Giedt, W.H.; Crowe, C.T.

1976-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Recent work on normal and superconducting inductive energy storage switching at the Efremov Institute, Leningrad, USSR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various forms of switches for both normal and superconducting inductive energy storage have been devised and developed at NIIEFA. At the present time, however, a major portion of the efforts of the Institute in these fields is being applied to the design and construction of coils for tokamak ''T-10M.'' The superconducting toroidal field coils (the design of which is still uncertain) will be switched by simple switches made of Nb-Ti ribbon. The normal coils for the poloidal field will be switched by a simple metal contactor breaker. As the ''T-10M'' project proceeds, perhaps some of the innovative inductive storage and switching work can continue and when ''T-10M'' is complete, the basic research can resume at full level.

Machalek, M.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Gamma Ray Bursts, The Principle of Relative Locality and Connection Normal Coordinates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The launch of the Fermi telescope in 2008 opened up the possibility of measuring the energy dependence of the speed of light by considering the time delay in the arrival of gamma ray bursts emitted simultaneously from very distant sources.The expected time delay between the arrival of gamma rays of significantly different energies as predicted by the framework of relative locality has already been calculated in Riemann normal coordinates. In the following, we calculate the time delay in more generality and then specialize to the connection normal coordinate system as a check that the results are coordinate independent. We also show that this result does not depend on the presence of torsion.

A. E. McCoy

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

Normal matrix models, dbar-problem, and orthogonal polynomials on the complex plane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a dbar-formulation of the orthogonal polynomials on the complex plane, and hence of the related normal matrix model, which is expected to play the same role as the Riemann-Hilbert formalism in the theory of orthogonal polynomials on the line and for the related Hermitian model. We propose an analog of Deift-Kriecherbauer-McLaughlin-Venakides-Zhou asymptotic method for the analysis of the relevant dbar-problem, and indicate how familiar steps for the Hermitian model, e.g. the g-function ``undressing'', might look like in the case of the normal model. We use the particular model considered recently by P. Elbau and G. Felder as a case study.

Alexander R. Its; Leon A. Takhtajan

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

Computed and conventional arthrotomography of the glenohumeral joint: normal anatomy and clinical experience  

SciTech Connect

The glenohumeral joint was studied in 25 cadavers and 136 patients using computed arthrotomography (CAT) and conventional arthrotomography (AT) to assess shoulder instability. Cadaver shoulders were injected with air or latex, sectioned with a band saw, and normal articular anatomy outlined. CAT was performed in 81 patients and characterized the glenoid labrum as normal, abnormal, or detached. Hill-Sachs defects were seen in 20 out of 29 patients with anterior labral abnormalities, while bicipital tendon abnormalities were evident on CAT in 6. Of 55 patients who had AT, the status of the labrum was clarified in 13 of the 16 patients who had surgery or arthroscopy. Both methods can characterize the labrum; however, CAT is more comprehensive and appears ideal for both detection of Hill-Sachs defects and imaging the bicipital tendon. CAT requires less technical expertise and radiation than AT and is tolerated better by patients in pain.

Deutsch, A.L.; Resnick, D.; Mink, J.H.; Berman, J.L.; Cone, R.O. III; Resnik, C.S.; Danzig, L.; Guerra, J. Jr.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Conformal Form of Pseudo-Riemannian Metrics by Normal Coordinate Transformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we extend the Cartan's approach of Riemannian normal coordinates and show that all n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian metrics are conformal to a flat manifold, when, in normal coordinates, they are well-behaved in the origin and in its neighborhood. We show that for this condition all n-dimensioanl pseudo-Riemannian metrics can be embedded in a hyper-cone of an n+2-dimensional flat manifold. Based on the above conditions we show that each n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian manifolds is conformal to an n-dimensional manifold of constant curvature. As a consequence of geometry, without postulates, we obtain the classical and the quantum angular momenta of a particle.

A. C. V. V. de Siqueira

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Electron-Cloud Effects in Transport Lines of a Normal Conducting Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

In the transport lines of a normal conducting linear collider, the long positron bunch train can generate an electron cloud which can then amplify intra-train offsets. This is a transient effect which is similar to the electron-cloud driven coupled bunch instabilities in a positron storage ring. In this paper, we study this phenomenon analytically. Some criteria on the critical cloud density with respect to given collider parameters are discussed.

Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Seryi, A.; /SLAC

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Alpha-Particle Condensate in Nuclear Matter at Normal Density and Statistics of Composite Bosons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proved that alpha-particle states are well described by the Elliott SU(3) model. This result is used to analyze the alpha-particle condensation effect. It is shown that these states possess the basic attributes of the alpha-condensate and, also, the normal nuclear density on frequent occasions. The statistics of alpha-particles (and of arbitrary composite bosons) turns out to be something other than the Bose-Einstein, Fermi-Dirac statistics, and parastatistics.

I. A. Gnilozub; S. D. Kurgalin; Yu. M. Tchuvil'sky

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

370

Doses delivered to normal brain under different treatment protocols at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

As of October 31, 1996, 23 glioblastoma multiforme patients underwent BNCT under several treatment protocols at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. For treatment planning and dosimetry purposes, these protocols may be divided into four groups. The first group comprises protocols that used an 8-cm collimator and allowed a peak normal brain dose of 10.5 Gy-Eq to avolume of 1 cm{sup 3} were the thermal neutron flux was maximal (even if it happened to be in the tumor volume). The second group differs from the first in that it allowed a peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq. The protocols of the third and fourth groups allowed the prescribed peak normal brain dose of 12.6 Gy-Eq to be outside of the tumor volume, used a 12-cm collimator and, respectively, uni- or bilateral irradiations. We describe the treatment planning procedures and report the doses delivered to various structures of the brain.

Capala, J.; Coderre, J.A.; Liu, H.B. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Normal-state Hall effect in YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3[minus][ital x  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have measured the normal-state Hall effect on single crystals of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3[minus][ital x

Lan, M.D.; Liu, J.Z.; Jia, Y.X.; Zhang, L.; Shelton, R.N. (Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Normalization of the scattered light from an isolated defect illuminated by a Gaussian beam  

SciTech Connect

The intensity distribution of the beam from a laser operated in the zero order configuration for the transverse electromagnetic field (TEM/sub 00/ mode) is Gaussian in a plane perpendicular to the axis of the beam. In some applications it is desirable to have a uniform intensity over a certain region in space. For example, when a Gaussian beam is incident on a smooth surface containing small isolated defects, the light scattered by a defect will depend on the position of the defect relative to the center of the beam. In the past, several techniques have been devised to convert a Gaussian intensity profile into a uniform intensity over a specified region in space. In the present work a different approach is taken. A method of normalization is described which makes direct use of the Gaussian intensity distribution of the TEM/sub 00/ mode. By this method the amount of light scattered by a defect can be normalized to the value which would be observed if the defect were located at the center of the beam, for a defect small in size compared with the 1/e/sup 2/ diameter of the Gaussian profile. The normalization requires that three measurements be made of the scattering by the defect for an arbitrary location of the defect relative to the center of the Gaussian beam, and that the 1/e/sup 2/ radius of the Gaussian beam and the interval between adjacent illuminated spots on the surface are known. Experimental data verifying the theory were obtained from isolated defects on a superfinished spherical surface.

Klingsporn, P.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous, and ATM{sup +/+}wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating gammaH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID{sup -/-} and ATM{sup -/-}homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal tissue responses in clinical radiotherapy.

Ruebe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.e [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Fricke, Andreas; Wendorf, Juliane; Stuetzel, Annika; Kuehne, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ong, Mei Fang [Institute of Medical Biometrics, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Lipp, Peter [Institute for Molecular Cell Biology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ruebe, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

On the Law of Distribution of Energy in the Normal Spectrum Annalen der Physik, vol. 4, p. 553 ff (1901)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Law of Distribution of Energy in the Normal Spectrum Max Planck Annalen der Physik, vol. 4 at Kyoto University (ando@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp). #12;On the Law of Distribution of Energy in the Normal confirmed an earlier result obtained by H. Beck- mann3 , show that the law of energy distribution

Moeck, Peter

375

PMC42, a breast progenitor cancer cell line, has normal-like mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

normal breast epithelium, and PMC42, a breast cancer cell line that retains progenitor pluripotency allowing in-culture differentiation to both secretory and myoepithelial fates. In contrast, only PMC42 exhibits a normal-like miRNA expression profile. We...

Git, Anna; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Blenkiron, Cherie; Dunning, Mark J; Pole, Jessica C M; Chin, Suet-Feung; Wang, Yanzhong; Smith, James C; Livesey, Frederick J; Caldas, Carlos

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

376

Multistage Gene Normalization and SVM-Based Ranking for Protein Interactor Extraction in Full-Text Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interactor normalization task (INT) is to identify genes that play the interactor role in protein-protein interactions (PPIs), to map these genes to unique IDs, and to rank them according to their normalized confidence. INT has two subtasks: gene ... Keywords: Data mining, feature evaluation and selection, mining methods and algorithms, text mining, scientific databases.

Hong-Jie Dai; Po-Ting Lai; Richard Tzong-Han Tsai

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Separation and recovery of hydrogen and normally gaseous hydrocarbons from net excess hydrogen from a catalytic reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons in the presence of hydrogen, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products. An improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from the net excess hydrogen is realized by chilling and contacting said hydrogen with a normally liquid hydrocarbon stream in a plural stage absorption zone at an elevated pressure.

Scheifele, C.A.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fuel damage during off-normal transients in metal-fueled fast reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fuel damage during off-normal transients is a key issue in the safety of fast reactors because the fuel pin cladding provides the primary barrier to the release of radioactive materials. Part of the Safety Task of the Integral Fast Reactor Program is to provide assessments of the damage and margins to failure for metallic fuels over the wide range of transients that must be considered in safety analyses. This paper reviews the current status of the analytical and experimental programs that are providing the bases for these assessments. 13 refs., 2 figs.

Kramer, J.M.; Bauer, T.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Initial RF measurements of the CW normal-conducting RF injector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LANL 2.5-cell, normal-conducting radio-frequency (NCRF) injector has been fabricated. We present initial results of low-power RF measurements (cavity Q, cavity field map, coupling beta, etc.) of the NCRF injector. The measured cavity Q and relative fields are found to be in good agreement with the design calculations and earlier measurements of Glidcop properties. However, the coupling beta of the ridge-loaded waveguides is found to be significantly higher than the design point. The impact of these low-power measurement results on the planned high-power RF and electron beam tests will be discussed.

Krawcyk, Frank L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moody, Nathan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Felix A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nguyen, Dinh C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Karen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toung, Lloyd [AES

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Separation of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from a catalytic reforming effluent and recovery of purified hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products, is disclosed. Relatively impure hydrogen is separated from the reforming zone effluent, compressed, and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide relatively pure hydrogen, a portion of which is recycled to the reforming zone. The balance is further compressed and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide an improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons as well as an improved recovery of purified hydrogen at a pressure suitable for use in the relatively high pressure hydrotreating of sulfur-containing feedstocks.

Coste, A.C.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal irradiance GIS data at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

irradiance GIS data at irradiance GIS data at one-degree resolution of the World from NASA/SSE Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Direct Normal Irradiance (kWh/m^2/day)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Jan 2008)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005) Parameter: Direct Normal Radiation (kWh/m^2/day) Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/ Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections online Note 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region are -90 to -89 (south) and -180 to -179 (west). The last region, 89/180, is bounded by 89 to 90 (north) and 179 to 180 (east). The mid-point of the region is +0.5 added to the the Lat/Lon value. These data are

382

Normal zone propagation in superconducting focusing solenoids and related quench protection issues  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting solenoids are increasingly used as focusing lenses in transport channels of proton linear RF accelerators. If these accelerators employ superconducting RF cavities, each focusing lens is usually comprised of three coils connected in series: a main coil, which provides the needed focusing strength, and two bucking coils, that help to reduce magnetic field outside the lens. When a normal zone develops in any of the coils in a focusing lens, it propagates with a direction and a rate which depends on the coil and the specific part of the coil in which the quench first occurred. As a result of this propagation process (quenching), the temperature and/or voltage of parts of the lens can exceed safe limits, thus compromising lens reliability. On the other hand, the negative impact of quench events can be significantly mitigated if an external resistor is used to absorb a part of the energy stored in the magnetic field. This paper presents the main results of a solenoid quench protection study based on computational modeling of normal zone propagation in solenoid lenses being built for a superconducting linear RF accelerator under development at Fermilab.

Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Nonlinear normal modes of a two degree of freedom oscillator with a bilateral elastic stop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the non linear modes of a two degree of freedom mechanical system with bilateral elastic stop is considered. The issue related to the non-smoothness of the impact force is handled through a regularization technique. In order to obtain the Nonlinear Normal Mode (NNM), the harmonic balance method with a large number of harmonics, combined with the asymptotic numerical method, is used to solve the regularized problem. These methods are present in the software "package" MANLAB. The results are validated from periodic orbits obtained analytically in the time domain by direct integration of the non regular problem. The two NNMs starting respectively from the two linear normal modes of the associated underlying linear system are discussed. The energy-frequency plot is used to present a global vision of the behavior of the modes. The dynamics of the modes are also analyzed comparing each periodic orbits and modal lines. The first NNM shows an elaborate dynamics with the occurrence of multiple impacts per period. On the other hand, the second NNM presents a more simple dynamics with a localization of the displacement on the first mass.

El Hadi Moussi; Sergio Bellizzi; Bruno Cochelin; I. Nistor

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

384

Ultimate capacity of suction caisson in normally and lightly overconsolidated clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum exploration and production in recent years have moved into increasingly deeper water off the continental shelf. Some of these facilities are anchored in water depths in excess of 1000 meters. Exploration and production in deep water present new technological challenges where traditional fixed platforms have given way to floating structures. Today suction caissons are the most commonly used anchorage system for permanent offshore oil production facility. The objective of this study is to numerically predict the ultimate capacity of suction caissons in normally consolidated and lightly overconsolidated clays. Representative soil profile from the Gulf of Mexico and the North Sea are taken and analyzed for suction caissons with length over diameter ratios of 2, 4, 6 & 8. Normalized failure load interaction diagrams are generated for each of the cases. The location of optimum attachment point is also reported for each of the cases. General purpose finite element computer program ABAQUS is used for the numerical prediction. The finite element study is carried out with three-dimensional models using hybrid elements. A simplified elastic perfectly plastic model with von-Mises yield criterion is used for the study. The saturated clay is treated as an incompressible material. Results of the study compares well with existing simplified method for estimating load capacity of suction caisson anchors.

Sharma, Partha Pratim

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Standard Test Method for Normal Spectral Emittance at Elevated Temperatures of Nonconducting Specimens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method describes an accurate technique for measuring the normal spectral emittance of electrically nonconducting materials in the temperature range from 1000 to 1800 K, and at wavelengths from 1 to 35 ?m. It is particularly suitable for measuring the normal spectral emittance of materials such as ceramic oxides, which have relatively low thermal conductivity and are translucent to appreciable depths (several millimetres) below the surface, but which become essentially opaque at thicknesses of 10 mm or less. 1.2 This test method requires expensive equipment and rather elaborate precautions, but produces data that are accurate to within a few percent. It is particularly suitable for research laboratories, where the highest precision and accuracy are desired, and is not recommended for routine production or acceptance testing. Because of its high accuracy, this test method may be used as a reference method to be applied to production and acceptance testing in case of dispute. 1.3 This test metho...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Optimization of accelerator parameters using normal form methods on high-order transfer maps  

SciTech Connect

Methods of analysis of the dynamics of ensembles of charged particles in collider rings are developed. The following problems are posed and solved using normal form transformations and other methods of perturbative nonlinear dynamics: (1) Optimization of the Tevatron dynamics: (a) Skew quadrupole correction of the dynamics of particles in the Tevatron in the presence of the systematic skew quadrupole errors in dipoles; (b) Calculation of the nonlinear tune shift with amplitude based on the results of measurements and the linear lattice information; (2) Optimization of the Muon Collider storage ring: (a) Computation and optimization of the dynamic aperture of the Muon Collider 50 x 50 GeV storage ring using higher order correctors; (b) 750 x 750 GeV Muon Collider storage ring lattice design matching the Tevatron footprint. The normal form coordinates have a very important advantage over the particle optical coordinates: if the transformation can be carried out successfully (general restrictions for that are not much stronger than the typical restrictions imposed on the behavior of the particles in the accelerator) then the motion in the new coordinates has a very clean representation allowing to extract more information about the dynamics of particles, and they are very convenient for the purposes of visualization. All the problem formulations include the derivation of the objective functions, which are later used in the optimization process using various optimization algorithms. Algorithms used to solve the problems are specific to collider rings, and applicable to similar problems arising on other machines of the same type. The details of the long-term behavior of the systems are studied to ensure the their stability for the desired number of turns. The algorithm of the normal form transformation is of great value for such problems as it gives much extra information about the disturbing factors. In addition to the fact that the dynamics of particles is represented in a way that is easy to understand, such important characteristics as the strengths of the resonances and the tune shifts with amplitude and various parameters of the system are calculated. Each major section is supplied with the results of applying various numerical optimization methods to the problems stated. The emphasis is made on the efficiency comparison of various approaches and methods. The main simulation tool is the arbitrary order code COSY INFINITY written by M. Berz, K. Makino, et al. at Michigan State University. Also, the code MAD is utilized to design the 750 x 750 GeV Muon Collider storage ring baseline lattice.

Snopok, Pavel; /Michigan State U.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

D. W. Nigg

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China from DLR China from DLR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Data of high resolution (10kmx10km) Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) for China for the years 2000, 2002 and 2003. The data are available for monthly and annual sums stored in a ESRI-Shapefile. Please read the country report for additional background information. (Purpose): The data are helpful for the assessment of the solar potential of the country and can give project developer a first impression of the solar resource of the country. Source DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Date Released October 31st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords China CRED CREIA DLR DNI GEF GIS solar SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 8.8 MiB) application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 4.4 MiB)

389

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka from DLR Sri Lanka from DLR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Data of high resolution (10kmx10km) Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) for Sri Lanka for the years 2000, 2002 and 2003. The data are available for monthly and annual sums stored in a ESRI-Shapefile. Please read the country report for additional background information. (Purpose): The data are helpful for the assessment of the solar potential of the country and can give project developer a first impression of the solar resource of the country. Source DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Date Released October 31st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords DLR DNI GEF GIS solar Sri Lanka SWERA UNEP Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 155.1 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 295.7 KiB)

390

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

22 22 Varnish cache server Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km resolution for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is

391

Solar: monthly direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km resolution for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for for Bangladesh from DLR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Data of high resolution (10kmx10km) Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) for Bangladesh for the years 2000, 2002 and 2003. The data are available for monthly and annual sums stored in a ESRI-Shapefile. Please read the country report for additional background information. (Purpose): The data are helpful for the assessment of the solar potential of the country and can give project developer a first impression of the solar resource of the country. Source DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Date Released October 31st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Bangladesh DLR DNI GEF solar SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 915.2 KiB) application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 488 KiB)

392

Solar: annual average direct normal (DNI) map at 40km resolution for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

map at 40km resolution for map at 40km resolution for Central America from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): A map depicting model estimates of monthly average daily total radiation using inputs derived from satellite and surface observations of cloud cover, aerosol optical depth, precipitable water vapor, albedo, atmospheric pressure and ozone sampled at a 40km resolution. (Purpose): A visual depiction of solar energy resource for concentrating solar power systems. Source NREL Date Released December 11th, 2003 (11 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Central America direct normal DNI map NREL solar SWERA UNEP Data application/pdf icon Download Map (pdf, 67.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency

393

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya from DLR Kenya from DLR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Data of high resolution (10kmx10km) Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) for Kenya for the years 2000, 2001 and 2002. The data are available for monthly and annual sums stored in a ESRI-Shapefile. Please read the country report for additional background information. (Purpose): The data are helpful for the assessment of the solar potential of the country and can give project developer a first impression of the solar resource of the country. Source DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Date Released October 31st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords DLR DNI GEF GIS Kenya solar SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 2.5 MiB) application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 1.3 MiB)

394

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ghana from DLR Ghana from DLR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Data of high resolution (10kmx10km) Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) for Ghana for the years 2000, 2001 and 2002. The data are available for monthly and annual sums stored in a ESRI-Shapefile. Please read the country report for additional background information. (Purpose): The data are helpful for the assessment of the solar potential of the country and can give project developer a first impression of the solar resource of the country. Source DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Date Released October 31st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords DLR DNI Ghana solar SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 1 MiB) application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 519.6 KiB)

395

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal from DLR Nepal from DLR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Data of high resolution (10kmx10km) Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) for Nepal for the years 2000, 2002 and 2003. The data are available for monthly and annual sums stored in a ESRI-Shapefile. Please read the country report for additional background information. (Purpose): The data are helpful for the assessment of the solar potential of the country and can give project developer a first impression of the solar resource of the country. Source DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Date Released October 31st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords DLR DNI GIS Nepal solar SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 1.2 MiB) application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 600.4 KiB)

396

Autonomous monitoring of control hardware to predict off-normal conditions using NIF automatic Alignment Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high power laser system capable of supporting high-energy-density experimentation as a user facility for the next 30 years. In order to maximize the facility availability, preventive maintenance enhancements are being introduced into the system. An example of such an enhancement is a camera-based health monitoring system, integrated into the automated alignment system, which provides an opportunity to monitor trends in measurements such as average beam intensity, size of the beam, and pixel saturation. The monitoring system will generate alerts based on observed trends in measurements to allow scheduled pro-active maintenance before routine off-normal detection stops system operations requiring unscheduled intervention.

Awwal, A; Wilhelmsen, K; Leach, R; Kamm, V M; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Cohen, S

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

Comparison of Direct Normal Irradiance Derived from Silicon and Thermopile Global Hemispherical Radiation Detectors: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating solar applications utilize direct normal irradiance (DNI) radiation, a measurement rarely available. The solar concentrator industry has begun to deploy numerous measurement stations to prospect for suitable system deployment sites. Rotating shadowband radiometers (RSR) using silicon photodiodes as detectors are typically deployed. This paper compares direct beam estimates from RSR to a total hemispherical measuring radiometer (SPN1) multiple fast thermopiles. These detectors simultaneously measure total and diffuse radiation from which DNI can be computed. Both the SPN1 and RSR-derived DNI are compared to DNI measured with thermopile pyrheliometers. Our comparison shows that the SPN1 radiometer DNI estimated uncertainty is somewhat greater than, and on the same order as, the RSR DNI estimates for DNI magnitudes useful to concentrator technologies.

Myers, D. R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Coexistence and efficiency of normal and anomalous transport by molecular motors in living cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experiments reveal both passive subdiffusion of various nanoparticles and anomalous active transport of such particles by molecular motors in the molecularly crowded environment of living biological cells. Passive and active microrheology reveals that the origin of this anomalous dynamics is due to the viscoelasticity of the intracellular fluid. How do molecular motors perform in such a highly viscous, dissipative environment? Can we explain the observed co-existence of the anomalous transport of relatively large particles of 100 to 500 nm in size by kinesin motors with the normal transport of smaller particles by the same molecular motors? What is the efficiency of molecular motors in the anomalous transport regime? Here we answer these seemingly conflicting questions and consistently explain experimental findings in a generalization of the well-known continuous diffusion model for molecular motors with two conformational states in which viscoelastic effects are included.

Igor Goychuk; Vasyl O. Kharchenko; R. Metzler

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Twisted-light-induced intersubband transitions in quantum wells at normal incidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine theoretically the intersubband transitions induced by laser beams of light with orbital angular momentum (twisted light) in semiconductor quantum wells at normal incidence. These transitions become possible in the absence of gratings thanks to the fact that collimated laser beams present a component of the light's electric field in the propagation direction. We derive the matrix elements of the light-matter interaction for a Bessel-type twisted-light beam represented by its vector potential in the paraxial approximation. Then, we consider the dynamics of photo-excited electrons making intersubband transitions between the first and second subbands of a standard semiconductor quantum well. Finally, we analyze the light-matter matrix elements in order to evaluate which transitions are more favorable for given orbital angular momentum of the light beam in the case of small semiconductor structures.

Sbierski, B; Tamborenea, P I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Strong Evidence of Normal Heat Conduction in a one-Dimensional Quantum System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how the normal energy transport is realized in one-dimensional quantum systems using a quantum spin system. The direct investigation of local energy distribution under thermal gradient is made using the quantum master equation, and the mixing properties and the convergence of the Green-Kubo formula are investigated when the number of spin increases. We find that the autocorrelation function in the Green-Kubo formula decays as $\\sim t^{-1.5}$ to a finite value which vanishes rapidly with the increase of the system size. As a result, the Green-Kubo formula converges to a finite value in the thermodynamic limit. These facts strongly support the realization of Fourier heat law in a quantum system.

Keiji Saito

2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Separation of normally gaseous hydrocarbons from a catalytic reforming effluent and recovery of purified hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock, preferably to produce high quality gasoline boiling range products, is disclosed. Relatively impure hydrogen is separated from the reforming zone effluent, compressed, and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product to provide relatively pure hydrogen, a portion of which is recycled to the reforming zone. The balance is further compressed and recontacted with at least a portion of the liquid reformate product in a plural stage absorption zone to provide an improved recovery of normally gaseous hydrocarbons as well as an improved recovery of purified hydrogen at a pressure suitable, for example, the relatively high pressure hydrotreating of sulfur-containing feedstocks.

O'brien, D.E.

1982-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

402

Shock and vibration environments encountered during normal rail transportation of heavy cargo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was conducted to obtain vibration and superimposed shock data during normal rail shipment of heavy cargo. The data were obtained during a regularly scheduled rail shipment of a 45-tonne (50-ton) cargo which consisted of an empty spent-fuel container, its supporting structure, and associated hoisting devices. The shipment was made over rail lines which are operated by the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company between Denver, Colorado and Albuquerque, New Mexico. The instrumented rail car was equipped with 0.38-m (15-in.) hydraulic end-of-car coupling devices. The 99 percentile levels of vibration acceleration amplitudes and single degree-of-freedom superimposed shock response spectra for the longitudinal, transverse, and vertical axes are presented.

Magnuson, C.F.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Hydrogen bonding and coordination in normal and supercritical water from X-ray inelastic scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A direct measure of hydrogen bonding in water under conditions ranging from the normal state to the supercritical regime is derived from the Compton scattering of inelastically-scattered X-rays. First, we show that a measure of the number of electrons $n_e$ involved in hydrogen bonding at varying thermodynamic conditions can be directly obtained from Compton profile differences. Then, we use first-principles simulations to provide a connection between $n_e$ and the number of hydrogen bonds $n_{HB}$. Our study shows that over the broad range studied the relationship between $n_e$ and $n_{HB}$ is linear, allowing for a direct experimental measure of bonding and coordination in water. In particular, the transition to supercritical state is characterized by a sharp increase in the number of water monomers, but also displays a significant number of residual dimers and trimers.

Patrick H. -L. Sit; Christophe Bellin; Bernardo Barbiellini; D. Testemale; J. -L. Hazemann; T. Buslaps; Nicola Marzari; Abhay Shukla

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Three-dimensional numerical investigation of a droplet impinging normally onto a wall film  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents a three-dimensional numerical investigation of a droplet impinging normally onto a wall film. The numerical method is based on the finite volume solution of the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the volume of fluid method (VOF) and utilizing an adaptive local grid refinement technique for tracking more accurately the liquid-gas interface. The results are compared with available experimental data for integral quantities such as the lamella temporal development. Two mechanisms are identified leading to secondary droplet formation; in the initial and intermediate stages of splashing secondary droplet formation is according to Rayleigh instability while at later times surface tension effects contribute further to secondary atomization. Moreover, the influence of Weber number on the impingement process is investigated and correlations for the diameter and number of secondary droplets are proposed.

Nikolopoulos, N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nat. Technical University of Athens, 15740 Zografos (Greece)]. E-mail: niknik@fluid.mech.ntua.gr; Theodorakakos, A. [Fluid Research Co., H. Trikoupi 25, Athens, 10681 (Greece)]. E-mail: andreas@fluid-research.com; Bergeles, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nat. Technical University of Athens, 15740 Zografos (Greece)]. E-mail: bergeles@fluid.mech.ntua.gr

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

POWER COST NORMALIZATION STUDIES CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM--Sept. 1, 1959  

SciTech Connect

In connection with the development of a comprehensive plan for a ten- year civilian power reactor program, the AEC has had a series of status reports prepared to present a comprehensive review of the technical and economic status of various nuclear power reactor concepts. In as much as the economic data reported by the various contractors reflected different design philosophies, different estimating policies, and in some cases a technology not verified by the AEC definition of current status, Sargent and Lundy was requested to review the aforementioned status reports and to prepare normalized cost estimates of each of eight reactor concepts. The reactors were studied in three plant sizes: 75, 200, and 300 Mw(e). The reactor concepts considered were pressurized water, boiling water, organic cooled, sodium graphite, liquid metal cooled, fluid fuel (aqueous homogeneous), heavy water moderated, and gas cooled. (W.D.M.)

1960-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

Comparison of model estimated and measured direct-normal solar irradiance  

SciTech Connect

Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time at the Earth{close_quote}s surface on a unit area perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the extinction, whether absorption or scattering. Here we report a set of closure experiments performed in north central Oklahoma in April 1996 under cloud-free conditions, wherein measured atmospheric composition and aerosol optical thickness are input to a radiative transfer model, MODTRAN 3, to estimate DNSI, which is then compared with measured values obtained with normal incidence pyrheliometers and absolute cavity radiometers. Uncertainty in aerosol optical thickness (AOT) dominates the uncertainty in DNSI calculation. AOT measured by an independently calibrated Sun photometer and a rotating shadow-band radiometer agree to within the uncertainties of each measurement. For 36 independent comparisons the agreement between measured and model-estimated values of DNSI falls within the combined uncertainties in the measurement (0.3{endash}0.7{percent}) and model calculation (1.8{percent}), albeit with a slight average model underestimate ({minus}0.18{plus_minus}0.94){percent}; for a DNSI of 839Wm{sup {minus}2} this corresponds to {minus}1.5{plus_minus}7.9Wm{sup {minus}2}. The agreement is nearly independent of air mass and water-vapor path abundance. These results thus establish the accuracy of the current knowledge of the solar spectrum, its integrated power, and the atmospheric extinction as a function of wavelength as represented in MODTRAN 3. An important consequence is that atmospheric absorption of short-wave energy is accurately parametrized in the model to within the above uncertainties. {copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

Halthore, R.N.; Schwartz, S.E. [Department of Applied Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States)] [Department of Applied Science, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States); Michalsky, J.J. [Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Albany (United States)] [Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, State University of New York at Albany (United States); Anderson, G.P. [Phillips Laboratory/Geophysics Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts (United States)] [Phillips Laboratory/Geophysics Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts (United States); Ferrare, R.A. [Hughes STX Corporation, Lanham, Maryland (United States)] [Hughes STX Corporation, Lanham, Maryland (United States); Holben, B.N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Ten Brink, H.M. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, ECN, Petten (Netherlands)] [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, ECN, Petten (Netherlands)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Developments in Normal Mode Initialization. Part II: A New Method and its Comparison with Currently Used Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of Part I suggested that the temporal characteristics of the nonlinear terms in the equations of motion could introduce convergence problems in currently used schemes for normal mode initialization (NMI). In Part II we 1) introduce a ...

Philip J. Rasch

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Timing and patterns of ENSO signal in Africa over the last 30 years: insights from Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A more complete picture of the timing and patterns of ENSO signal during the seasonal cycle for the whole of Africa over the three last decades is provided using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index. Indeed, NDVI has a higher spatial ...

N Philippon; N Martiny; P Camberlin; M. T Hoffman; V Gond

409

Initialization of a Limited Area Model: A Comparison between the Nonlinear Normal Mode and Bounded Derivative Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear normal mode initialization method is applied to a baroclinic limited arm forecast model. This method is very effective in reducing the amplitude of the rapid oscillations during the first hours of the forecast. The results are ...

S. J. Bijlsma; L. M. Hafkenscheid

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

NOAAs 19812010 U.S. Climate Normals: Monthly Precipitation, Snowfall, and Snow Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 19812010 U.S. Climate Normals released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations (NOAA) National Climatic Data Center include a suite of monthly, seasonal, and annual statistics that are based on precipitation, snowfall, and ...

Imke Durre; Michael F. Squires; Russell S. Vose; Xungang Yin; Anthony Arguez; Scott Applequist

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Aging Brain: Are two pathologies worse than one? White matter hyperintensities, beta-amyloid, and cognition in normal elderly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related with cognition in aging and early Alzheimer disease,is normal, Neurobiology of Aging, 26.4, 9. Jeerakathil, T. ,related with cognition in aging and early Alzheimer disease,

Onami, Susan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

EA-1123: Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium to the United Kingdom; thus,...

413

Improved Normalization of the Size Distribution of Atmospheric Particles Retrieved from Aureole Measurements Using the Diffraction Approximation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an improvement in the diffraction approximation used to retrieve the size distribution of atmospheric particles from solar aureole radiance measurements. Normalization using total optical thickness based on measurement of the ...

J. G. DeVore

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

NOAAs 1981-2010 U.S. Climate Normals: Monthly Precipitation, Snowfall, and Snow Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1981-2010 United States Climate Normals released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations (NOAAs) National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) include a suite of monthly, seasonal, and annual statistics based on precipitation, ...

Imke Durre; Michael F. Squires; Russell S. Vose; Xungang Yin; Anthony Arguez; Scott Applequist

415

Testing the normality of the gravitational wave data with a low cost recursive estimate of the kurtosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a monitoring indicator of the normality of the output of a gravitational wave detector. This indicator is based on the estimation of the kurtosis (i.e., the 4th order statistical moment normalized by the variance squared) of the data selected in a time sliding window. We show how a low cost (because recursive) implementation of such estimation is possible and we illustrate the validity of the presented approach with a few examples using simulated random noises.

E. Chassande-Mottin

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

416

Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

49031 49031 Varnish cache server Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 40km resolution for China from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Monthly Average Solar Resource for 2-axis tracking concentrating collectors for China. (Purpose): Provide information on the solar resource potential for the data domain. The insolation values represent the average solar energy available to a concentrating collector, such as a dish collector, which tracks the sun continuously. (Supplemental Information): These data provide monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of approximately 40 km by 40 km in size. The solar resource value is represented as watt-hours per square meter per day for each month. The data were developed from NREL's Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) Model. This model uses information on cloud cover, atmospheric water vapor and trace gases, and the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere to calculate the monthly average daily total insolation (sun and sky) falling on a horizontal surface. Existing ground measurement stations are used to validate the data where possible. The modeled values are accurate to approximately 10% of a true measured value within the grid cell due to the uncertainties associated with meteorological input to

417

Rapid and transient stimulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by melatonin in normal and tumor leukocytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melatonin is a modified tryptophan with potent biological activity, exerted by stimulation of specific plasma membrane (MT1/MT2) receptors, by lower affinity intracellular enzymatic targets (quinone reductase, calmodulin), or through its strong anti-oxidant ability. Scattered studies also report a perplexing pro-oxidant activity, showing that melatonin is able to stimulate production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that on U937 human monocytes melatonin promotes intracellular ROS in a fast (< 1 min) and transient (up to 5-6 h) way. Melatonin equally elicits its pro-radical effect on a set of normal or tumor leukocytes; intriguingly, ROS production does not lead to oxidative stress, as shown by absence of protein carbonylation, maintenance of free thiols, preservation of viability and regular proliferation rate. ROS production is independent from MT1/MT2 receptor interaction, since a) requires micromolar (as opposed to nanomolar) doses of melatonin; b) is not contrasted by the specific MT1/MT2 antagonist luzindole; c) is not mimicked by a set of MT1/MT2 high affinity melatonin analogues. Instead, chlorpromazine, the calmodulin inhibitor shown to prevent melatonin-calmodulin interaction, also prevents melatonin pro-radical effect, suggesting that the low affinity binding to calmodulin (in the micromolar range) may promote ROS production.

Radogna, Flavia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Paternoster, Laura [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Istitututo di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Urbino Carlo Bo (Italy); De Nicola, Milena; Cerella, Claudia [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ammendola, Sergio [Ambiotec (Italy); Bedini, Annalida; Tarzia, Giorgio [Istituto di Chimica Farmaceutica, Universita di Urbino Carlo Bo (Italy); Aquilano, Katia; Ciriolo, Maria [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ghibelli, Lina [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, via Ricerca Scientifica, 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: ghibelli@uniroma2.it

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Brazil Direct Normal Solar Radiation Model (40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 40km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Normal direct solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): To provide a set of consistent, reliable, verifiable, and accessible global data sets for international and in-country investors and other stakeholders (Supplemental Information): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files. The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory.

419

Brazil Direct Normal Solar Radiation Model (10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR 10km) from INPE and LABSOLAR Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Normal direct solar radiation in kWh/m2/day for 1 year organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The BRASIL-SR model and the SPRING software (both developed by INPE - National Institute for Space Research) were used to produce the dataset and SHAPE files (Supplemental Information): The assessment of reliability levels of the BRASIL-SR model were performed through the evaluation of the deviations shown by the estimated values for solar radiation flux vis-à-vis the values measured at the surface (ground truth). This evaluation was done in two phases. The first phase consisted in an inter-comparison between the core radiation transfer models adopted by the SWERA Project to map the solar energy in the various countries participating in the project. The HELIOSAT model took part in this phase like benchmark due to its employment to map solar energy resources in countries from European Union. In the second phase, the solar flux estimates provided by the BRASIL-SR model were compared with measured values acquired at several solarimetric stations spread along the Brazilian territory

420

Determination of cohesive and normal stresses and simulation of fluidization using kinetic theory  

SciTech Connect

The general objective of this study is focused on the solid stresses involved in gas-solid flow. These stresses are generally included in the momentum conservation equations, essentially for stability and to prevent particles from collapsing to unreasonably low values of gas volume fraction. The first half of this work undertakes the measurement of the stresses in various powders by direct means, while the second part uses a newly developed kinetic theory constitutive equation for stress to predict the flow and also the solids viscosity in a CFB. The cohesive or tensile stress found to exist in some classes of powders is measured using a Cohetester, based on which a cohesive force model is derived, which is sensitive to the characteristic properties of the powder material. The normal stress is measured using a Consolidometer, and the powder solids modulus is obtained as a function of the volume fraction. The solids modulus is seen to vary with particle size and particle type, with the smaller size particles being more compressible. The simulation of flow in the CFB using Gidaspow's (1991) extension of Ding's (1990) kinetic theory model to dilute phase flow, predicts realistic values of solids viscosity that are comparable to viscosities obtained experimentally by Miller (1991). However, to obtain a match between the two the value of the restitution coefficient has to be close to unity. The flow behavior showed periodic oscillations of flow (turbulence) as seen in a real system. 26 refs., 51 figs., 1 tab.

Bezbaruah, R.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Automatic segmentation of histological structures in normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue sections  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a scheme for real time segmentation of histological structures in microscopic images of normal and neoplastic mammary gland sections. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are sliced, and sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy. The background of the images is corrected by arithmetic manipulation using a ''phantom.'' Then we use the fast marching method with a speed function that depends on the brightness gradient of the image to obtain a preliminary approximation to the boundaries of the structures of interest within a region of interest (ROI) of the entire section manually selected by the user. We use the result of the fast marching method as the initial condition for the level set motion equation. We run this last method for a few steps and obtain the final result of the segmentation. These results can be connected from section to section to build a three-dimensional reconstruction of the entire tissue block that we are studying.

Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravi; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

2003-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Modelling the ultraviolet/submillimeter spectral energy distributions of normal galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an overview of the factors shaping the ultraviolet (UV)/optical - far-infrared (FIR)/submillimeter (submm) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of normal (non-starburst) galaxies. Particular emphasis is placed on the influen ce of the geometry of dust and stars on the propagation of light through the int erstellar medium. Although strong constraints can be placed on the amount and la rge scale distribution of dust in disks from the appearance of the galaxies in t he optical/UV range, this dust does not account for the observed amplitude and c olour of the FIR/submm radiation. Additional, optically thick components of dust associated with the young stellar population on large and small scales are requ ired to account for the complete UV/optical - FIR/submm SEDs. Self-consistent mo dels for the calculation of SEDs of spiral galaxies are reviewed, and their pred ictions for the dust emission and the attenuation of starlight are compared and contrasted.

Cristina C. Popescu; Richard J. Tuffs

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

The EGNoG Survey: Gas Excitation in Normal Galaxies at z~0.3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As observations of molecular gas in galaxies are pushed to lower star formation rate galaxies at higher redshifts, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the conditions of the gas in these systems to properly infer their molecular gas content. The rotational transitions of the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule provide an excellent probe of the gas excitation conditions in these galaxies. In this paper we present the results from the gas excitation sample of the Evolution of molecular Gas in Normal Galaxies (EGNoG) survey at the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). This subset of the full EGNoG sample consists of four galaxies at z~0.3 with star formation rates of 40-65 M_Sun yr^-1 and stellar masses of ~2x10^11 M_Sun. Using the 3 mm and 1 mm bands at CARMA, we observe both the CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) transitions in these four galaxies in order to probe the excitation of the molecular gas. We report robust detections of both lines in three galaxies (and an upper limit on the f...

Bauermeister, Amber; Bolatto, Alberto D; Bureau, Martin; Teuben, Peter J; Wong, Tony; Wright, Melvyn C H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Prediction and measurement of direct-normal solar irradiance: A closure experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident on a plane perpendicular to the Sun`s direction on a unit area at the earth`s surface in unit time, depends only on the atmospheric extinction of sunlight without regard to the details of extinction--whether absorption or scattering. Here the authors describe a set of closure experiments performed in north-central Oklahoma, wherein measured atmospheric composition is input to a radiative transfer model, MODTRAN-3, to predict DNSI, which is then compared to measured values. Thirty six independent comparisons are presented; the agreement between predicted and measured values falls within the combined uncertainties in the prediction (2%) and measurement (0.2%) albeit with a slight bias ({approximately} 1% overprediction) that is independent of the solar zenith angle. Thus these results establish the adequacy of current knowledge of the solar spectrum and atmospheric extinction as embodied in MODTRAN-3 for use in climate models. An important consequence is the overwhelming likelihood that the atmospheric clear-sky absorption is accurately described to within comparable uncertainties.

Halthore, R.N.; Schwartz, S.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Michalsky, J.J. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States); Anderson, G.P. [Hanscomb AFB (United States); Ferrare, R.A. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Ten Brink, H.M. [Energy Research Inst. (Netherlands)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

University Loaned Normal Uranium Slug Disposition Study: University survey responses. Predecisional draft  

SciTech Connect

During the 1950`s and 1960`s, the Atomic Energy Commission loaned rejected natural uranium slugs from the Savannah River Site to United States universities for use in subcritical assemblies. Currently, there are sixty-two universities holding 91,798 slugs, containing about 167 metric tons of natural uranium. It was originally planned that the universities would return the material to Fernald when they no longer required it. Fernald has not received slugs since it was shut down in 1988. The Department of Energy`s Office of Weapons and Materials Planning requested that the Planning Support Group develop information to assist them in facilitating the return of the unwanted slugs to one or more of their facilities and develop alternatives for the ultimate disposition of this material. This supplemental report to the University Loaned Normal Uranium Slug Disposition Study documents responses to and summarizes the results of a survey of fifty-eight universities. University contacts and survey responses covering loaned slug descriptions, historical information, radiological data, current status, and plans and schedules are documented.

Becker, G.W. Jr.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

RF Couplers for Normal-Conducting Photoinjector of High-Power CW FEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. A preliminary design of a normal-conducting, 2.5-cell pi-mode, 700-MHz CW RF photoinjector that will be built for demonstration purposes, is completed. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating a 100-mA electron beam (3 nC per bunch at 35 MHz bunch repetition rate) to 2.7 MeV while providing an emittance below 7 mm-mrad at the wiggler. More than 1 MW of RF power will be fed into the photoinjector cavity through two ridge-loaded tapered waveguides. The waveguides are coupled to the cavity by "dog-bone" irises cut in a thick wall. Due to CW operation of the photoinjector, the cooling of the coupler irises is a rather challenging thermal management project. This paper presents results of a detailed electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system, which has been performed to select the coupler design that minimizes the iris heating due to RF power loss in its walls.

Kurennoy, Sergey; Wood, Richard L; Schultheiss, T J; Rathke, John; Young, Lloyd

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fuzzy Approach to Critical Bus Ranking under Normal and Line Outage Contingencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of critical or weak buses for a given operating condition is an important task in the load dispatch centre. It has become more vital in view of the threat of voltage instability leading to voltage collapse. This paper presents a fuzzy approach for ranking critical buses in a power system under normal and network contingencies based on Line Flow index and voltage profiles at load buses. The Line Flow index determines the maximum load that is possible to be connected to a bus in order to maintain stability before the system reaches its bifurcation point. Line Flow index (LF index) along with voltage profiles at the load buses are represented in Fuzzy Set notation. Further they are evaluated using fuzzy rules to compute Criticality Index. Based on this index, critical buses are ranked. The bus with highest rank is the weakest bus as it can withstand a small amount of load before causing voltage collapse. The proposed method is tested on Five Bus Test System.

Shankar, Shobha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

RF couplers for normal-conducting photoinjector of high-power CW FEL  

SciTech Connect

A high-current emittance-compensated RF photoinjector is a key enabling technology for a high-power CW FEL. A preliminary design of a normal-conducting, 2.5-cell pi-mode, 700-MHz CW RF photoinjector that will be built for demonstration purposes, is completed. This photoinjector will be capable of accelerating a 100-mA electron beam (3 nC per bunch at 35 MHz bunch repetition rate) to 2.7 MeV while providing an emittance below 7 mm-mrad at the wiggler. More than 1 MW of RF power will be fed into the photoinjector cavity through two ridge-loaded tapered waveguides. The waveguides are coupled to the cavity by 'dog-bone' irises cut in a thick wall. Due to CW operation of the photoinjector, the cooling of the coupler irises is a rather challenging thermal management project. This paper presents results of a detailed electromagnetic modeling of the coupler-cavity system, which has been performed to select the coupler design that minimizes the iris heating due to RF power loss in its walls.

Kurennoy, S. (Sergey)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Multicompartmental model for iodide, thyroxine, and triiodothyronine metabolism in normal and spontaneously hyperthyroid cats  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive multicompartmental kinetic model was developed to account for the distribution and metabolism of simultaneously injected radioactive iodide (iodide*), T3 (T3*), and T4 (T4*) in six normal and seven spontaneously hyperthyroid cats. Data from plasma samples (analyzed by HPLC), urine, feces, and thyroid accumulation were incorporated into the model. The submodels for iodide*, T3*, and T4* all included both a fast and a slow exchange compartment connecting with the plasma compartment. The best-fit iodide* model also included a delay compartment, presumed to be pooling of gastrosalivary secretions. This delay was 62% longer in the hyperthyroid cats than in the euthyroid cats. Unexpectedly, all of the exchange parameters for both T4 and T3 were significantly slowed in hyperthyroidism, possibly because the hyperthyroid cats were older. None of the plasma equivalent volumes of the exchange compartments of iodide*, T3*, or T4* was significantly different in the hyperthyroid cats, although the plasma equivalent volume of the fast T4 exchange compartments were reduced. Secretion of recycled T4* from the thyroid into the plasma T4* compartment was essential to model fit, but its quantity could not be uniquely identified in the absence of multiple thyroid data points. Thyroid secretion of T3* was not detectable. Comparing the fast and slow compartments, there was a shift of T4* deiodination into the fast exchange compartment in hyperthyroidism. Total body mean residence times (MRTs) of iodide* and T3* were not affected by hyperthyroidism, but mean T4* MRT was decreased 23%. Total fractional T4 to T3 conversion was unchanged in hyperthyroidism, although the amount of T3 produced by this route was increased nearly 5-fold because of higher concentrations of donor stable T4.

Hays, M.T.; Broome, M.R.; Turrel, J.M.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Thermal Analysis of the 9975 Package with the 3013 Configuration During Normal Conditions of Transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal analysis of the 9975 package with three configurations of the BNFL 3013 outer container (with Rocky Flats, SRS, and BNFL inner containers) have been performed for Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) of plutonium oxide and metal. The NCT is defined in 10 CFR 71.71(c)(1) s an ambient of 100 F (38 C) in still air with 800 W/m{sup 2} and 400 W/m{sup 2} of solar heating on the drum top and sides, respectively. The 9975 drum package is considered to be in an upright position, and the drum bottom is adiabatic. The Rocky and SRS 3013 configurations with Pu metal contents (19 watts) result in acceptable (similar) packaging temperatures, however the plutonium metal temperatures are lower for the SRS design (SRS has helium fill gas whereas Rocky is essentially air filled). The BNFL configuration for Pu oxide contents (19 watts) result in acceptable temperatures and pressures based on limits in the 9975 Safety Analysis Report (SARP). However, for 30 watts of Pu oxide, the fiberboard peak temperatures are very near the SARP allowable. The pressure in the 3013 container is 688.4 psig for the 30 watt Pu oxide content and 569.5 psig for the 19 watt Pu oxide content. Gas species in the pressure computations include air, helium and hydrogen from complete radiolysis of the moisture. The oxygen generated from the radiolysis of the water is not included as a pressure contributor. The gas temperature in the pressure computations was very conservatively assumed to be the maximum plutonium temperature.

Hensel, S

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

431

Incident detection using the Standard Normal Deviate model and travel time information from probe vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One application of travel time information explored in this thesis is freeway incident detection. It is vital to develop reliable methods for automatically detecting incidents to facilitate the quick response and removal of incidents before they cause breakdowns in traffic flow. The use of real-time travel time data to monitor freeway conditions has the advantages over conventional loop detectors of taking into account the dynamic, longitudinal nature of traffic flow and requiring data from only a portion of the traffic stream. This study employed the Standard Normal Deviate (SND) Model to test the feasibility of using travel time data to detect lane blocking incidents. The fundamental concept of the SND Model was based on the comparison of real-time travel time data to historical travel time data for given freeway segments during specified times. The travel time and incident reports used were collected through the Real-Time Traffic Information System (RTTIS) in the north freeway corridor of Houston, Texas using probe vehicles equipped with cellular telephones. The data were compiled on 39 freeway links from October 1991 through August 1992 on weekdays during morning and afternoon data collection periods. The results of incident detection tests, applying the SND Model to incident and travel time me data from the North Freeway, indicated high successful incident detection rates. However, high false alarm rates also resulted from the SND Model test applications. An optimum SND value of 2.0 was observed for the North Freeway test data. At this value the SND tests produced successful incident detection rates of 70 percent and higher during both the morning and afternoon periods. False alarm rates were also 70 percent. The best results were achieved on those freeway sections where the most incident and travel time data had been collected. The overall results of the incident detection tests on the North Freeway demonstrated that the SND Model was a feasible incident detection algorithm, but required an extensive historical travel time data base.

Mountain, Christopher Eugene

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The Status of Normal Conducting RF (NCRF) Guns, a Summary of the ERL2005 Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 32nd Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL2005) was held at Jefferson Laboratory, March 20 to 23, 2005. A wide range of ERL-related topics were presented and discussed in several working groups with Working Group 1 concentrated upon the physics and technology issues for DC, superconducting RF (SRF) and normal conducting RF (NCRF) guns. This paper summarizes the NCRF gun talks and reviews the status of NCRF gun technology. It begins with the presentations made on the subject of low-frequency, high-duty factor guns most appropriate for ERLs. One such gun at 433MHz was demonstrated at 25%DF in 1992, while the CW and much improved version is currently being constructed at 700MHz for LANL. In addition, the idea of combining the NCRF gun with a SRF linac booster was presented and is described in this paper. There was also a talk on high-field guns typically used for SASE free electron lasers. In particular, the DESY coaxial RF feed design provides rotationally symmetric RF fields and greater flexibility in the placement of the focusing magnetic field. While in the LCLS approach, the symmetric fields are obtained with a dual RF feed and racetrack cell shape. Although these guns cannot be operated at high-duty factor, they do produce the best quality beams. With these limitations in mind, a section with material not presented at the workshop has been included in the paper. This work describes a re-entrant approach which may allow NCRF guns to operate with simultaneously increased RF fields and duty factors. And finally, a novel proposal describing a high-duty factor, two-frequency RF gun using a field emission source instead of a laser driven photocathode was also presented.

Dowell, D.H.; /SLAC; Lewellen, J.W.; /Argonne; Nguyen, D.; /Los Alamos; Rimmer, R.; /Jefferson Lab

2006-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

433

The status of normal conducting RF (NCRF) guns; a summary of the ERL2005 Workshop  

SciTech Connect

The 32nd Advanced ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop on Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL2005) was held at Jefferson Laboratory, March 20 to 23, 2005. A wide range of ERL-related topics were presented and discussed in several working groups with Working Group 1 concentrated upon the physics and technology issues for DC, superconducting RF (SRF) and normal conducting RF (NCRF) guns. This paper summarizes the NCRF gun talks and reviews the status of NCRF gun technology. It begins with the presentations made on the subject of low-frequency, high-duty factor guns most appropriate for ERLs. One such gun at 433MHz was demonstrated at 25%DF in 1992, while the CW and much improved version is currently being constructed at 700MHz for LANL. In addition, the idea of combining the NCRF gun with a SRF linac booster was presented and is described in this paper. There was also a talk on high-field guns typically used for SASE free electron lasers. In particular, the DESY coaxial RF feed design provides rotationally symmetric RF fields and greater flexibility in the placement of the focusing magnetic field. While in the LCLS approach, the symmetric fields are obtained with a dual RF feed and racetrack cell shape. Although these guns cannot be operated at high-duty factor, they do produce the best quality beams. With these limitations in mind, a section with material not presented at the workshop has been included in the paper. This work describes a re-entrant approach which may allow NCRF guns to operate with simultaneously increased RF fields and duty factors. And finally, a novel proposal describing a high-duty factor, two-frequency RF gun using a field emission source instead of a laser driven photocathode was also presented.

D.H. Dowell; J.W. Lewellen; D. Nguyen; R.A. Rimmer

2005-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

Performance of Alternative Normals for Tracking Climate Changes, Using Homogenized and Nonhomogenized Seasonal U.S. Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eleven alternatives to the annually updated 30-yr average for specifying climate normals are considered for the purpose of projecting nonstationarity in the mean U.S. temperature climate during 200612. Comparisons are made for homogenized U.S. ...

Daniel S. Wilks; Robert E. Livezey

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

STcorr: An IDL code for image based normalization of lapse rate and illumination effects on nighttime TIR imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal infrared imagery (TIR) is a useful tool to detect and quantify the surface temperature anomalies associated with geothermal fields. Accurate detection of anomalies in surface temperature is an important aspect of geothermal research. Although ... Keywords: ASTER, Illumination, Nemrut volcano, Normalization, Thermal infrared, Topographic

?Nan Ulusoy; Philippe Labazuy; Erkan Aydar

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Joint development normal to regional compression during exural-ow folding: the Lilstock buttress anticline, Somerset, England  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joint development normal to regional compression during ¯exural-¯ow folding: the Lilstock buttress. At Lilstock Beach, joint sets in Lower Jurassic limestone beds cluster about the trend of the hinge of the Lilstock buttress anticline. In horizontal and gently north-dipping beds, J3 joints ( 295±2858 strike

Engelder, Terry

437

Identification and selection rules of the spin-wave eigen-modes in a normally magnetized nano-pillar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification and selection rules of the spin-wave eigen-modes in a normally magnetized nano nano-pillar (Permalloy-Copper-Permalloy) by means of a Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM). We azimuthal index = 0, the RF cur- rent flowing through the nano-pillar, creating a circular RF Oersted field

438

Quantification of tc-99m sestamibi distribution in normal breast tissue using dedicated breast SPECT-CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of Tc-99m-Sestamibi in molecular breast imaging is common due to its preferential uptake in malignant tissue. However, quantification of the baseline uptake in normal, healthy breast tissue is not possible using planar-imaging devices. Using ... Keywords: CT, SPECT, breast cancer, breast imaging, quantification, sestamibi

Steve D. Mann; Kristy L. Perez; Emily K. E. McCracken; Jainil P. Shah; Kingshuk R. Choudhury; Terence Z. Wong; Martin P. Tornai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Hybrid segmentation, characterization and classification of basal cell nuclei from histopathological images of normal oral mucosa and oral submucous fibrosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a quantitative microscopic approach for discriminating oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) from normal oral mucosa (NOM) in respect to morphological and textural properties of the basal cell nuclei. Practically, basal cells constitute the ... Keywords: Color deconvolution, Fuzzy divergence, Gradient vector flow, Oral submucous fibrosis, Parabola fitting, Pattern classification, Unsupervised feature selection, Zernike moments

M. Muthu Rama Krishnan; Chandan Chakraborty; Ranjan Rashmi Paul; Ajoy K. Ray

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

User contributions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Geochart) 16:53, 31 January 2013 (diff | hist) . . (+95) . . User:JayhugginsTest (top) 16:31, 31 January 2013 (diff | hist) . . (+214) . . User:JayhugginsTest...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

User contributions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tax Credit (Connecticut) (top) 14:51, 2 July 2013 (diff | hist) . . (+14) . . EXP Job Creation Incentive Program (Connecticut) (top) 14:48, 2 July 2013 (diff | hist) . ....

442

Adaptive Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: Responses to Low Dose/Low Dose-Rate γ-Rays in Normal Human Fibroblasts: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism Edouard I. Azzam 1 , Sonia M. de Toledo 1 , Badri N. Pandey 1 , Perumal Venkatachalam 1 , Manuela Buoannano 1 , Zhi Yang 1 , Ling Li 3 , Donna M. Gordon 2 , Roger W. Howell 1 , Debkumar Pain 2 and Douglas R. Spitz 3 1 Department of Radiology, 2 Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 3 Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA To investigate low dose/low dose-rate effects of low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation, we used γ-irradiated cells adapted to grow in three-dimensional architecture that mimics cell growth in vivo. We determined cellular, molecular and biochemical changes in these

443

Rock Joint Surfaces Measurement and Analysis of Aperture Distribution under Different Normal and Shear Loading Using GIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geometry of the rock joint is a governing factor for joint mechanical and hydraulic behavior. A new method of evaluating aperture distribution based on measurement of joint surfaces and three dimensional characteristics of each surface is developed. Artificial joint of granite surfaces are measured,processed, analyzed and three dimensional approaches are carried out for surface characterization. Parameters such as asperity's heights, slope angles, and aspects distribution at micro scale,local concentration of elements and their spatial localization at local scale are determined by Geographic Information System (GIS). Changes of aperture distribution at different normal stresses and various shear displacements are visualized and interpreted. Increasing normal load causes negative changes in aperture frequency distribution which indicates high joint matching. However, increasing shear displacement causes a rapid increase in the aperture and positive changes in the aperture frequency distribution which could be ...

Sharifzadeh, Mostafa; Esaki, Tetsuro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Normalized Span Method for Thermo-Mechanical Design of Duct-Manhole and Pipe-Manhole Cable Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Normalized Span (NSPAN) method provides design tools for the mechanical design of transmission-class XLPE insulated power cables installed in pipe or duct manhole systems. It is based on the method and experimentally measured XLPE cable parameters recorded in EPRI report 1001849, Mechanical Effects on Extruded Dielectric Cables and Joints Installed in Underground Transmission Systems in North America (publically available at no charge). The NSPAN method is implemented in an EPRI software program...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

445

Effects of dietary beef tallow and soy oil on glucose and cholesterol homeostasis in normal and diabetic pigs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toe valuate whether dietary fats of different degrees of unsaturation alter glucose and very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-CH) homeostasis, normal and alloxan-diabetic pigs were fed diets containing either beef tallow or soy oil as the primary source of fat for 6 weeks. After intra-arterial and oral doses of glucose, pigs fed soy oil had similar glucose and greater insulin concentrations in plasma when compared with pigs fed beef tallow. Beef tallow-fed pigs additionally were 40% more glucose effective than were soy oil-fed pigs. Disappearance of injected autologous /sup 14/C-VLDL-CH was analyzed in pigs using a two-pool model. Diabetes resulted in a twofold increase in half-lives and a 60-fold increase in pool sizes of the primary and secondary components of VLDL-CH disappearance when compared with those of normal pigs. In normal pigs, feeding beef tallow resulted in longer half-lives of both components of VLDL-CH disappearance and no effect in pool size of both components of VLDL-CH disappearance than did feeding soy oil. In comparison, diabetic pigs fed beef tallow had a similar half-life of the primary component, a twofold shorter half-life of the secondary component, and threefold larger pool size of the primary component, and a similar pool size of the secondary component of VLDL-CH disappearance than did diabetic pigs fed soy oil. Thus, dietary fat seems to play an important role in regulation of glucose and VLDL-CH homeostasis in normal and diabetic animals.

Woollett, L.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Computer-assisted rapid-scan cyclic staircase voltametry in normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography  

SciTech Connect

The use of a large-volume wall-jet detector for cyclic staircase voltametry following normal-phase HPLC separation is described. Both reductive and oxidative ranges are investigated. The detection limits of the technique (of the order of tens of picomoles) are comparable to other scanning voltametry techniques following reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The techniques is tested for some oxy and nitro derivatives of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, catechlolamines, and oestrogen steroids.

Gunasingham, H.; Tay, B.T.; Ang, K.P.

1987-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Bypass Flow Computations using a One-Twelfth Symmetric Sector For Normal Operation in a 350 MWth VHTR  

SciTech Connect

Significant uncertainty exists about the effects of bypass flow in a prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Bypass flow is the flow in the gaps between prismatic graphite blocks in the core. The gaps are present because of variations in their construction, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage from thermal heating and neutron fluence. Calculations are performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for flow of the helium coolant in the gap and coolant channels along with conjugate heat generation and heat transfer in the fuel compacts and graphite. A commercial CFD code is used for all of the computations. A one-twelfth sector of a standard hexagonal block column is used for the CFD model because of its symmetry. Various scenarios are computed by varying the gap width from zero to 5 mm, varying the total heat generation rate to examine average and peak radial generation rates and variation of the graphite block geometry to account for the effects of shrinkage caused by irradiation. The calculations are for a 350 MWth prismatic reactor. It is shown that the effect of increasing gap width, while maintaining the same total mass flow rate, causes increased maximum fuel temperature while providing significant cooling to the near-gap region. The maximum outlet coolant temperature variation is increased by the presence of gap flow and also by an increase in total heat generation with a gap present. The effect of block shrinkage is actually to decrease maximum fuel temperature compared to a similar reference case.

Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

What if you could actually trust your kernel?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of formally verified OS kernels means that for the first time we have a truly trustworthy foundation for systems. In this paper we explore the design space this opens up. The obvious applications are in security, although not all of them are ...

Gernot Heiser; Leonid Ryzhyk; Michael Von Tessin; Aleksander Budzynowski

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.00 17.89 17.55 17.24 16.98 16.99 AEO 1983 15.82 16.13 16.37 16.50 16.56 16.63 17.37 AEO 1984 15.77 15.76 16.01...

450

Energy Efficiency in Denmark - Results and actual programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renato Ezban is responsible for the implementation of a new system for certification of buildings and inspection of boilers and ventilation systems. Peter Bach is chairman of ECEEE...

451

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

452

Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

OSullivan, Francis Martin

454

experiment actually sees," Smith says. "When we were  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,200 pieces of music from record companies and various artists, and that number is still growing. "As more of ceremonies for a number of nationally known gospel artists' concerts and have produced a CD titled Thank You components. The students' main robot features customized parts made with a titanium powder manufacturing

455

Actual Commercial Buildings Energy Use and Emissions and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

An analysis of trends in energy consumption and energy-related carbon emissions in U.S. buildings, 1970-1998.

456

The potential and actual effectiveness of interactive query expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Van Rijsbergen,C.J. Magennis,M. Proceedings of the 20th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Reseach and Development in Information Retrieval (Seattle, USA) pp 324-332 ACM

Van Rijsbergen, C.J.

457

Optimal Planning of a Load Transfer Substation Pair between Two Normally Closed-Loop Feeders Considering Minimization of System Power Losses Using a Genetic Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes an effective approach for planning a load transfer substation pair(LTSP) between two normally closed-loop feeders considering minimization of system power losses. Firstly, the annual equivalent load of each load point is calculated. ... Keywords: distribution feeder, normally closed-loop feeder, distribution substation, genetic algorithm, power losses

Wei-Tzer Huang; Kai-chao Yao; Shiuan-Tai Chen; Hsiau-Hsian Nien; Deng-Chung Lin; Po-Tung Huang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

PQ TechWatch: What To Expect from Normal, Utility-Grade Electrical Power: Educating End Users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although perfect electrical powerpower that never stops or deviates from a true sine wavemay be an impossibility, consumers want to know what kind of power they can expect from electric power providers. It is up to utilities to educate their customers on what normal, utility-grade power looks like, how it is generated and distributed, and how to identify and deal with problems related to reliability and power quality. This education should also lead to a two-way ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Effects of BRCA2 cis-regulation in normal breast and cancer risk amongst BRCA2 mutation carriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

random hexamers and oligo-dT pri- mers, according to the manufacturers instructions. Breast cell lines culture Breast cancer (PMC42, MCF-7 and SUM-159) and nor- mal breast (MCF-10A) cell lines were cultured as pre- viously described [29... in the Chromatin Immunoprecipitation section. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) ChIP experiments were performed using chromatin extracted from SUM-159 (cancer), PMC42 (cancer), MCF-7 (cancer) and MCF10-A (normal) breast cell lines with antibodies against RNA...

Maia, Ana-Teresa; Antoniou, Antonis C; O'Reilly, Martin; Samarajiwa, Shamith; Dunning, Mark; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Chin, Suet-Feung; Curtis, Christina N; McGuffog, Lesley; Domchek, Susan M; Embrace, Embrace; Easton, Douglas F; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Evans, D Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana; Gemo, Gemo; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Faivre, Laurence; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Delnatte, Capucine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Couch, Fergus J; Godwin, Andrew K; Caligo, Maria-Adelaide; Swe-brca, Swe-brca; Barkardottir, Rosa B; kConFab, kConFab; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Caldas, Carlos; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Ponder, Bruce AJ

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

460

A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes  

SciTech Connect

The structural properties of spent nuclear fuel shipping containers vary as a function of the cask wall temperature. An analysis is performed to determine the effect of a realistic, though bounding, hot day environment on the thermal behavior of spent fuel shipping casks. These results are compared to those which develop under a steady-state application of the prescribed normal thermal conditions of 10CFR71. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by using the steady-state application of the regulatory boundary conditions. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the regulatory condition. This is due to the conservative assumptions present in the ambient conditions used. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations which penetrate the cask wall have maxima substantially less than the corresponding temperatures obtained when applying the steady-state regulatory boundary conditions. Therefore, it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the steady-state interpretation of the 10CFR71 normal conditions.

Manson, S.J. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Coll. of Engineering; Gianoulakis, S.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual normal diff" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Bianchi Type-II String Cosmological Models in Normal Gauge for Lyra's Manifold with Constant Deceleration Parameter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study deals with a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi-II cosmological models representing massive strings in normal gauge for Lyra's manifold by applying the variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter that yields a constant value of deceleration parameter. The variation law for Hubble's parameter generates two types of solutions for the average scale factor, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential form. Using these two forms, Einstein's modified field equations are solved separately that correspond to expanding singular and non-singular models of the universe respectively. The energy-momentum tensor for such string as formulated by Letelier (1983) is used to construct massive string cosmological models for which we assume that the expansion ($\\theta$) in the model is proportional to the component $\\sigma^{1}_{~1}$ of the shear tensor $\\sigma^{j}_{i}$. This condition leads to $A = (BC)^{m}$, where A, B and C are the metric coefficients and m is proportionality constant. Our models are in accelerating phase which is consistent to the recent observations. It has been found that the displacement vector $\\beta$ behaves like cosmological term $\\Lambda$ in the normal gauge treatment and the solutions are consistent with recent observations of SNe Ia. It has been found that massive strings dominate in the decelerating universe whereas strings dominate in the accelerating universe. Some physical and geometric behaviour of these models are also discussed.

Shilpi Agarwal; R. K. Pandey; Anirudh Pradhan

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Relativistic effects in the tidal interaction between a white dwarf and a massive black hole in Fermi normal coordinates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider tidal encounters between a white dwarf and an intermediate mass black hole. Both weak encounters and those at the threshold of disruption are modeled. The numerical code combines mesh-based hydrodynamics, a spectral method solution of the self-gravity, and a general relativistic Fermi normal coordinate system that follows the star and debris. Fermi normal coordinates provide an expansion of the black hole tidal field that includes quadrupole and higher multipole moments and relativistic corrections. We compute the mass loss from the white dwarf that occurs in weak tidal encounters. Secondly, we compute carefully the energy deposition onto the star, examining the effects of nonradial and radial mode excitation, surface layer heating, mass loss, and relativistic orbital motion. We find evidence of a slight relativistic suppression in tidal energy transfer. Tidal energy deposition is compared to orbital energy loss due to gravitational bremsstrahlung and the combined losses are used to estimate tidal capture orbits. Heating and partial mass stripping will lead to an expansion of the white dwarf, making it easier for the star to be tidally disrupted on the next passage. Finally, we examine angular momentum deposition. By including the octupole tide, we are able for the first time to calculate deflection of the center of mass of the star and debris. With this observed deflection, and taking into account orbital relativistic effects, we compute directly the change in orbital angular momentum and show its balance with computed spin angular momentum deposition.

Roseanne M. Cheng; Charles R. Evans

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Infrared Spectral Energy Distribution of Normal Star-Forming Galaxies: Calibration at Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New far-infrared and submillimeter data are used to solidify and to extend to long wavelengths the empirical calibration of the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of normal star-forming galaxies. As was found by Dale et al. (2001), a single parameter family, characterized by f_nu(60 microns)/f_nu(100 microns), is adequate to describe the range of normal galaxy spectral energy distributions observed by IRAS and ISO from 3 to 100 microns. However, predictions based on the first generation models at longer wavelengths (122 to 850 microns) are increasingly overluminous compared to the data for smaller f_nu(60 microns)/f_nu(100 microns), or alternatively, for weaker global interstellar radiation fields. After slightly modifying the far-infrared/submillimeter dust emissivity in those models as a function of the radiation field intensity to better match the long wavelength data, a suite of SEDs from 3 microns to 20 cm in wavelength is presented. Results from relevant applications are also discussed, including submillimeter-based photometric redshift indicators, the infrared energy budget and simple formulae for recovering the bolometric infrared luminosity, and dust mass estimates in galaxies. Regarding the latter, since galaxy infrared SEDs are not well-described by single blackbody curves, the usual methods of estimating dust masses can be grossly inadequate. The improved model presented herein is used to provide a more accurate relation between infrared luminosity and dust mass.

Daniel A. Dale; George Helou

2002-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

464

An improved multipyranometer array for the measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development of an improved multipyranometer array (NDA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diff-use solar radiation. The NWA described in this thesis is an improvement over previously published MPA studies due to the incorporation of an artificial horizon that prevents reflected ground radiation from striking the tilted sensors, the development of an improved solution scheme for the calculation of the beam and diff-use solar radiation components, and the development of an empirical spectral correction for the photovoltaic-type sensors used in the NWA. In this thesis a description of the NIST-traceable calibration facility is provided and results are presented that compare the NWA predicted beam to beam measurements from a precision normal incidence pyrheliometer.

Munger, Bryce Kirtley

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Normal Conducting CLIC Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) multi?lateral study group based at CERN is studying the technology for an electron?positron linear collider with a centre?of?mass energy up to 5 TeV. In contrast to the International Linear Collider (ILC) study which has chosen to use super?conducting cavities with accelerating gradients in the range of 3040 MV/m to obtain centre?of?mass collision energies of 0.51 TeV

Erk Jensen; CLIC Study Team

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Technical basis for normal water chemistry guidelines: Review of laboratory studies of water chemistry effects on SCC (stress corrosion cracking)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of dissolved oxygen, hydrogen, and various impurity anions on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel (SS) and alternative piping materials such as Types 316NG and 347NG SS is being investigated in constant-extension-rate-tensile (CERT) tests and in cyclic loading experiments on fatigue precracked fracture-mechanics-type specimens at 289/sup 0/C. In these experiments, the crack growth behavior of the materials is being correlated with the impurity concentration and the electrochemical potentials of Type 304 SS and platinum electrodes in simulated BWR normal operating environments (approx. 200 to 300 ppb oxygen and < 100 ppb of various oxyanions of halides added as acid or salts, at a total conductivity of <1 ..mu..S/cm).

Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Chloroplast Gene Order and the Divergence of Plants and Algae, from the Normalized Number of Induced Breakpoints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction. The origin and diversification of plants and algae, and their relationships with other chloroplast-containing organisms, are some of the fundamental problems of evolutionary theory. The widely accepted endosymbiotic origin of the chloroplast and its consequent evolution, in key respects independent of the evolution of the nuclear genome, make it a natural focus of phylogenetic studies, though in a narrower range than the almost-ubiquitous eukaryote mitochondrion. Thus phylogenies based on the amino acid sequences of a number of proteins coded by organellar genes give a clearer understanding of the evolution of classes of green plants than was possible based on morphological classifications alone or on ribosomal RNA surveys [17, 16, 7]. In this note, we propose to study another type of chloroplast genome data, namely gene order, to see what this can contribute to the sequence-level analyses. The key methodology used here is that of the normalized number of induced breakp

David Sankoff; Melanie Deneault; David Bryant; Claude Lemieux; Monique Turmel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

A hybrid electron and photon IMRT planning technique that lowers normal tissue integral patient dose using standard hardware  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To present a mixed electron and photon IMRT planning technique using electron beams with an energy range of 6-22 MeV and standard hardware that minimizes integral dose to patients for targets as deep as 7.5 cm. Methods: Ten brain cases, two lung, a thyroid, an abdominal, and a parotid case were planned using two planning techniques: a photon-only IMRT (IMRT) versus a mixed modality treatment (E + IMRT) that includes an enface electron beam and a photon IMRT portion that ensures a uniform target coverage. The electron beam is delivered using a regular cutout placed in an electron cone. The electron energy was chosen to provide a good trade-off between minimizing integral dose and generating a uniform, deliverable plan. The authors choose electron energies that cover the deepest part of PTV with the 65%-70% isodose line. The normal tissue integral dose, the dose for ring structures around the PTV, and the volumes of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isosurfaces were used to compare the dose distributions generated by the two planning techniques. Results: The normal tissue integral dose was lowered by about 20% by the E + IMRT plans compared to the photon-only IMRT ones for most studied cases. With the exception of lungs, the dose reduction associated to the E + IMRT plans was more pronounced further away from the target. The average dose ratio delivered to the 0-2 cm and the 2-4 cm ring structures for brain patients for the two planning techniques were 89.6% and 70.8%, respectively. The enhanced dose sparing away from the target for the brain patients can also be observed in the ratio of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isodose line volumes for the two techniques, which decreases from 85.5% to 72.6% and further to 65.1%, respectively. For lungs, the lateral electron beams used in the E + IMRT plans were perpendicular to the mostly anterior/posterior photon beams, generating much more conformal plans. Conclusions: The authors proved that even using the existing electron delivery hardware, a mixed electron/photon planning technique (E + IMRT) can decrease the normal tissue integral dose compared to a photon-only IMRT plan. Different planning approaches can be enabled by the use of an electron beam directed toward organs at risk distal to the target, which are still spared due the rapid dose fall-off of the electron beam. Examples of such cases are the lateral electron beams in the thoracic region that do not irradiate the heart and contralateral lung, electron beams pointed toward kidneys in the abdominal region, or beams treating brain lesions pointed toward the brainstem or optical apparatus. For brain, electron vertex beams can also be used without irradiating the whole body. Since radiation retreatments become more and more common, minimizing the normal tissue integral dose and the dose delivered to tissues surrounding the target, as enabled by E + IMRT type techniques, should receive more attention.

Rosca, Florin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Danvers, Massachusetts 01923 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Electric-Field Enhancement by Nodular Defects in Multilayer Coatings Irradiated at Normal and 45 (degree) Incidence  

SciTech Connect

The standing-wave electric-field profile within multilayer coatings is significantly perturbated by a nodular defect. The intensity, which is proportional to the electric field squared, is increased in the high index material by {>=}3x at normal incidence and {>=}12x at 45 degrees incidence angle. Therefore it is not surprising that nodular defects are initiation sites of laser-induced damage. In this study, the impact of reflectance-band centering and incident angle are explored for a 1 {micro}m diameter nodular defect seed overcoated with a 24 layer high-reflector constructed of quarter-wave thick alternating layers of hafnia and silica. The modeling was performed using a three-dimensional finite-element analysis code.

Stolz, C J; Genin, F Y; Pistor,T V

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

470

Dynamical response of the "GGG" rotor to test the Equivalence Principle: theory, simulation and experiment. Part I: the normal modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the Equivalence Principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration $\\eta$ between two test bodies -of different composition, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass- if the measurement is made to the level of $\\eta\\simeq 10^{-13}$ or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments, gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the "Galileo Galilei on the Ground" (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following paper (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation -in particular its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)- can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes, and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus.

G. L. Comandi; M. L. Chiofalo; R. Toncelli; D. Bramanti; E. Polacco; A. M. Nobili

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

471

Predictability of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index in Kenya and Potential Applications as an Indicator of Rift Valley Fever Outbreaks in the Greater Horn of Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the progress made in producing predictions of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) over Kenya in the Greater Horn of Africa (GHA) for the OctoberDecember (OND) season is discussed. Several studies have identified a ...

Matayo Indeje; M. Neil Ward; Laban J. Ogallo; Glyn Davies; Maxx Dilley; Assaf Anyamba

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

The Sensitivity of the Simulated Normal and Enhanced C02 Climates to Different Heat Transport Parameterizations in a Two-Dimensional Multilevel Energy Balance Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric sensible and latent heat fluxes constitute an important component of the total poleward energy transport in the climate system. The authors investigate the relative role of these heat fluxes in normal and enhanced C02 warming ...

Douglas Chan; Kaz Higuchi; Charles A. Lin

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Comparison of Normalized and Unnormalized Single Cell and Population Assemblies (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

University of Queensland's Phil Hugenholtz on "Comparison of Normalized and Unnormalized Single Cell and Population Assemblies" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

Hugenholtz, Phil [University of Queensland

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

474

Using depth-normalized coordinates to examine mass transport residual circulation in estuaries with large tidal amplitude relative to the mean depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual (subtidal) circulation profiles in estuaries with a large tidal amplitude to depth ratio often are quite complex and do not resemble the traditional estuarine gravitational circulation profile. In this paper we show how a depth-normalized,...

Sarah N. Giddings; Stephen G. Monismith; Derek A. Fong; Dr. Mark T. Stacey

475

Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue complication probability models showed a parallel architecture for the thyroid. The mean dose model can be used as the best model to describe the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism complication.

Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Effect of Shock Stress and Field Strength on Shock-Induced Depoling of Normally Poled PZT 95/5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shock-induced depoling of the ferroelectric ceramic PZT 95/5 is utilized in a number of pulsed power devices. Several experimental and theoretical efforts are in progress in order to improve numerical simulations of these devices. In this study we have examined the shock response of normally poled PZT 95/5 under uniaxial strain conditions. On each experiment the current produced in an external circuit and the transmitted waveform at a window interface were recorded. The peak electrical field generated within the PZT sample was varied through the choice of external circuit resistance. Shock pressures were varied from 0.6 to 4.6 GPa, and peak electrical fields were varied from 0.2 to 37 kV/cm. For a 2.4 GPa shock and the lowest peak field, a nearly constant current governed simply by the remanent polarization and the shock velocity was recorded. Both decreasing the shock pressure and increasing the electrical field resulted in reduced current generation, indicating a retardation of the depoling kinetics.

CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; FURNISH,MICHAEL D.; MONTGOMERY,STEPHEN T.; SETCHELL,ROBERT E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Differential action on cancer and normal tissue by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate and cytochrome C combined with radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility that radioprotective effects on potent natural killer (NK) cells by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate (AMM) + cytochrome C during radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer might result in the radiosensitization of human lung cancer cells in vivo is examined. Human lung cancer xenografts in the right hind legs of KSN mice (10 weeks old) were locally irradiated with 20 Gy of X ray. AMM (10 mg/kg/day) and/or cytochrome C (CCC) (5 mg/kg/day) were given intraperitoneally immediately before or after RT, followed by daily administration for 4 days. Natural killer activities of host splenocytes were also tested with the standard [sup 51]Cr releasing assay with YAC-1 cells as target cells. In a clinical study, 65 patients with lung cancer were treated with more than 50 Gy of RT with or without combination with AMM + CCC, OK-432 or AMM + CCC + OK-432. Before and after RT, lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood were examined with dichromatic analysis using an Ortho Spectrum IIIFCM system and fluorescent MABs. In this study, the change in the absolute number of each subset was investigated. AMM + cytochrome C augumented NK activity in KSN nude mice, protected potent NK cells in patients with lung cancer against RT and sensitized the human lung cancer xenografts to RT. AMM + cytochrome C may have potential as a differential modulator of radiosensitivity of normal tissues and of tumors. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Nakatsugawa, S. (Fukui Medical School (Japan)); Sugahara, T. (Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan))

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Statistical Physics of Dark and Normal Matter Distribution in Galaxy Formation : Dark Matter Lumps and Black Holes in Core and Halo of Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In unified field theory the cosmological model of the universe has supersymmetric fields. Supersymmetric particles as dark and normal matter in galaxy clusters have a phase separation. Dark matter in halos have a statistical physics equation of state. Neutralino particle gas with gravitation can have a collapse of dark matter lumps. A condensate phase due to boson creation by annhillation and exchange can occur at high densities. The collapse of the boson condensate, including neutralinos, into the Schwarzschild radius creates dark matter black holes. Microscopic dark matter black holes can evaporate with Hawking effect giving gamma ray bursts and create a spectrum of normal particles. The phase separation of normal and dark matter in galaxy clusters and inside galaxies is given by statistical physics.

Ajay Patwardhan

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z