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1

Power System Security in Market Clearing and Dispatch Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs while maintaining grid security; however, the dominant concern was system reliability, while costs1 Power System Security in Market Clearing and Dispatch Mechanisms Claudio A. Ca~nizares, Senior typical market clearing and dispatch mechanisms based on security- constrained (SC) optimal power flow

Cañizares, Claudio A.

2

Hidden Costs of Energy Chris Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hidden Costs of Energy NRC: 2010 Chris Field Carnegie Institution: Department of Global Ecology www.global-ecology.org #12;What are the real costs of energy? · Health · Environment · Conflict and security · Infrastructure #12;What are the real costs of energy? · Unpriced components · Production · Distribution · Consumption

Kammen, Daniel M.

3

Mid-term electricity market clearing price forecasting: A hybrid LSSVM and ARMAX approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A hybrid mid-term electricity market clearing price (MCP) forecasting model combining both least squares support vector machine (LSSVM) and auto-regressive moving average with external input (ARMAX) modules is presented in this paper. Mid-term electricity MCP forecasting has become essential for resources reallocation, maintenance scheduling, bilateral contracting, budgeting and planning purposes. Currently, there are many techniques available for short-term electricity market clearing price (MCP) forecasting, but very little has been done in the area of mid-term electricity MCP forecasting. PJM interconnection data have been utilized to illustrate the proposed model with numerical examples. The proposed hybrid model showed improved forecasting accuracy compared to a forecasting model using a single LSSVM.

Xing Yan; Nurul A. Chowdhury

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Levelized Cost of Energy in US | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Levelized Cost of Energy in US Home I'd like to pull a cost comparison for the levelized cost of energy in the US. How do I do this on this site? Does the LCOE interactive table...

5

Sandia National Laboratories: Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProgramsAnalysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014 Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014 The "20% Wind Energy by...

6

The Impact of Market Clearing Time and Price Signal Delay on the Stability of Electric Power Markets  

SciTech Connect

We generalize a model, proposed by Alvarado, of the electric power market by including the effects of control and communication. To simulate realistic markets, our model issues control signals only at given times and those signals are delayed during transmission. These two effects transform Alvarado's continuous system into a hybrid system, with consequential effects. The stability analysis of the new system reveals two important properties. First, there is an upper limit on the market clearing time and the delay of the price signal beyond which the system becomes unstable. Second, there is a counter-intuitive relationship between the market clearing time and price signal delay: when the market clearing time is relatively long, delaying the price signal can improve the market's stability while reducing the communication delay can destabilize the market. This counter-intuitive effect shows that the full impact of information technology on power markets can be significant and difficult to anticipate. Therefore, as markets are designed and regulated, careful attention should be paid to the effects of information technology on the market's dynamic behavior.

Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Protopopescu, Vladimir A [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

8

levelized cost of energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

levelized cost of energy levelized cost of energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

9

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator NREL-Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Cost of Energy Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Solar, Water Power, Wind Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Finance, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/tech_lcoe.html OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools

10

Overview of Levelized Cost of Energy in the AEO  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presented to the EIA Energy Conference Presented to the EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 Chris Namovicz Assessing the Economic Value of New Utility-Scale Renewable Generation Projects Overview * Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) has been used by planners, analysts, policymakers, advocates and others to assess the economic competitiveness of technology options in the electric power sector * While of limited usefulness in the analysis of "conventional" utility systems, this approach is not generally appropriate when considering "unconventional" resources like wind and solar * EIA is developing a new framework to address the major weaknesses of LCOE analysis

11

A system-level cost-of-energy wind farm layout optimization with landowner modeling  

SciTech Connect

This work applies an enhanced levelized wind farm cost model, including landowner remittance fees, to determine optimal turbine placements under three landowner participation scenarios and two land-plot shapes. Instead of assuming a continuous piece of land is available for the wind farm construction, as in most layout optimizations, the problem formulation represents landowner participation scenarios as a binary string variable, along with the number of turbines. The cost parameters and model are a combination of models from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Windustiy. The system-level cost-of-energy (COE) optimization model is also tested under two land-plot shapes: equally-sized square land plots and unequal rectangle land plots. The optimal COEs results are compared to actual COE data and found to be realistic. The results show that landowner remittances account for approximately 10% of farm operating costs across all cases. Irregular land-plot shapes are easily handled by the model. We find that larger land plots do not necessarily receive higher remittance fees. The model can help site developers identify the most crucial land plots for project success and the optimal positions of turbines, with realistic estimates of costs and profitability. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Chen, Le [Ames Laboratory; MacDonald, Erin [Ames Laboratory

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Reducing the Cost of Energy from Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Parabolic trough solar technology is the most proven and lowest cost large-scale solar power technology available today, primarily because of the nine large commercial-scale solar power plants that are operating in the California Mojave Desert. However, no new plants have been built during the past ten years because the cost of power from these plants is more expensive than power from conventional fossil fuel power plants. This paper reviews the current cost of energy and the potential for reducing the cost of energy from parabolic trough solar power plant technology based on the latest technological advancements and projected improvements from industry and sponsored R&D. The paper also looks at the impact of project financing and incentives on the cost of energy.

Price, H.; Kearney, D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46671 October 2009 Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables Karlynn Cory and Paul Schwabe Prepared under Task No. WER9.3550 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

14

Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Sensitivity Analysis Plant Sensitivity Analysis Abstract NREL Wind Energy Systems Engineering Tool Sensitivity Analysis and Results Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy K. Dykes, A. Ning, P. Graf, G. Scott, R. Damiani, M. Hand, R. Meadows, W. Musial, P. Moriarty, P. Veers * National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Golden, Colorado K. Dykes, A. Ning, P. Graf, G. Scott, R. Damiani, M. Hand, R. Meadows, W. Musial, P. Moriarty, P. Veers * National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Golden, Colorado Introduction OFFSHORE WINDPOWER 2012, Virginia Beach, October 911, 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL/PO-5000-56411

15

Wind Levelized Cost of Energy: A Comparison of Technical and Financing Input Variables  

SciTech Connect

The expansion of wind power capacity in the United States has increased the demand for project development capital. In response, innovative approaches to financing wind projects have emerged and are proliferating in the U.S. renewable energy marketplace. Wind power developers and financiers have become more efficient and creative in structuring their financial relationships, and often tailor them to different investor types and objectives. As a result, two similar projects may use very different cash flows and financing arrangements, which can significantly vary the economic competitiveness of wind projects. This report assesses the relative impact of numerous financing, technical, and operating variables on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with a wind project under various financing structures in the U.S. marketplace. Under this analysis, the impacts of several financial and technical variables on the cost of wind electricity generation are first examined individually to better understand the relative importance of each. Then, analysts examine a low-cost and a high-cost financing scenario, where multiple variables are modified simultaneously. Lastly, the analysis also considers the impact of a suite of financial variables versus a suite of technical variables.

Cory, K.; Schwabe, P.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Market Clearing under Uncertainty: Wind Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power systems are subject to a great variety of uncertainties. Restructuring and competition in electricity systems are definitely contingent on the available means to overcome the difficulties brought by thes...

Antonio J. Conejo; Miguel Carrin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cost of energy analysis of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with respect to CO2 capture ratio under climate change scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the cost of energy (COE) analysis of an integrated gasification...2...capture ratio under the climate change scenarios. To obtain process data for a COE analysis, simulation mod...

Kyungtae Park; Dongil Shin; Gibaek Lee

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

SPACE TECHNOLOGY Actual Estimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPACE TECHNOLOGY TECH-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY.7 247.0 Exploration Technology Development 144.6 189.9 202.0 215.5 215.7 214.5 216.5 Notional SPACE TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW .............................. TECH- 2 SBIR AND STTR

19

The Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of wave energy using GIS based analysis: The case study of Portugal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main objective of this paper is to establish an economic modelling of wave energy through a Geographical Information System (GIS). Furthermore, this method has been tested for the particular case of the Portuguese coast. It determines the best sea areas to install wave energy converters in this region, using spatial analysis of the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE). Several economic parameters, as capital or O&M costs, have been considered. In addition, a sensitivity analysis has been performed by varying the discount rate in three different scenarios. Several types of physical restrictions have been taken into account: bathymetry, submarine electrical cables, seabed geology, environmental conditions, protected areas in terms of heritage, navigation areas, seismic fault lines, etc. Spatial operations have been carried out to complete the procedure, using Model Builder of GIS software. Results indicate the most suitable areas in economic terms in Portugal to install wave energy devices.

Laura Castro-Santos; Geuffer Prado Garcia; Ana Estanqueiro; Paulo A.P.S. Justino

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Electricity market clearing price forecasting under a deregulated electricity market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Under deregulated electric market, electricity price is no longer set by the monopoly utility company rather it responds to the market and operating conditions. Offering (more)

Yan, Xing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Improvement Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006 J. Cohen and T. Schweizer Princeton Energy Resources International (PERI) Rockville, Maryland A. Laxson, S. Butterfield, S. Schreck, and L. Fingersh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado P. Veers and T. Ashwill Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Technical Report NREL/TP-500-41036 February 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

22

The future costs of energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2002 GDP per capita: Argentina...15 000 in GDP per capita, then a...afford higher energy cost? Or, should we demand OPEC countries...15 000 in GDP per capita, then a...afford higher energy cost? Or, should we demand OPEC countries...

Matthew R. Simmons

23

Effective utilization of excess energy in standalone hybrid renewable energy systems for improving comfort ability and reducing cost of energy: A review and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract One of the features that characterize renewable energy sources is their variability and intermittency. Intermittency covers both the predictable and unpredictable variations of their power outputs and uncertainty in the power availability. To overcome the drawback of intermittency, special design considerations should be taken into account. These additional design considerations increases the overall cost of the renewable energy systems. Adding storage system and/or backup source to the renewable sources is one of the measures used to guarantee the continuity of power supply to the loads, and therefore improve the reliability of the renewable energy systems. The operation of renewable energy systems results in the creation of surplus energy, which is the energy generated by renewable energy systems, but is not consumed by the loads in standalone power systems. Effective utilization of this excess energy has the potential to decrease the cost of energy (COE) production by these hybrid renewable energy systems. In this paper, a review of the literature will be carried out in order to provide further insight into the approaches suggested in the literature on how to deal with the utilization of excess energy. Furthermore, various possible configurations of hybrid systems will be analyzed in detail for the effective utilization of the excess energy produced by hybrid systems. This is done in order to evaluate the effectiveness of utilization of excess energy by various means, especially for improving the living space comfort ability and decreasing the COE. Case studies will be carried out to demonstrate the proposed configurations for the effective utilization of the excess energy, and the results will be presented.

M.S. Ismail; M. Moghavvemi; T.M.I. Mahlia; K.M. Muttaqi; S. Moghavvemi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

25

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

26

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

27

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

28

Cost of Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

as well as projections for the future. Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Smith, A.; Schwabe, P. (March 2013). 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review. National Renewable...

29

,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

January 23, 2008" ,"Next Update: October 2007" ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, " ,"2005...

30

Embedding renewable energy pricing policies in day-ahead electricity market clearing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Since the 90s various policies have been applied for supporting the development of Renewable Energy Sources (RES), including quota or amount-based systems and price-based systems (feed-in tariffs or FiT). In both cases, there is a political stress when there is a need to increase the renewable uplift charge rates (out-of-market mechanism), in order to finance the RES projects. This issue is resolved by adopting a novel market framework, in which the demand entities clearing price entails the whole cost they are willing to pay for their participation in the energy market, including energy prices, reserve prices and the RES uplift price. A Mixed Complementarity Problem is utilized for clearing the market, in which the demand clearing prices are implicitly defined by mixing the explicit prices for energy, reserves and the RES uplift. The model retains the consistency of the supply (energy and reserves) and demand cleared quantities with the respective bids and the clearing prices, and attains a significant decrease of the payments through the relevant uplift accounts. The efficiency of the proposed model is demonstrated on a 24-h day-ahead market simulation using the IEEE RTS-96, defining endogenously the RES uplift under a system-wide FiT and a Green Certificate mechanism.

Andreas G. Vlachos; Pandelis N. Biskas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Market Clearing Mechanisms for Efficiently Incorporating Renewable Energy and Mitigating CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years there has been a move in the majority of industrialized countries to invest in renewable resources for the production of energy. This move has come about as people ... of negative effects of fossi...

Golbon Zakeri; Javad Khazaei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

33

Estimation of Regional Actual Evapotranspiration in the Panama Canal Watershed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The upper Ro Chagres basin is a part of the Panama Canal Watershed. The least known water balance...SEBAL...). We use an image from March 27, 2000, for estimation of the distribution of the regional actual evapo...

Jan M.H. Hendrickx; Wim G.M. Bastiaanssen; Edwin J.M. Noordman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Self-actualization as it relates to aerobic physical fitness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higher than the aerobic and archery group on the TC, Ex, and C scales. The archery group was significantly higher than the preaerobic and aerobic groups on the Fr and S scales. Females from the preaerobic group were significantly lower than archery... Inventory Sav Self-actualization values measures how well a person holds and lives by values of se 1f- ac tualizing people Ex Existentiality measures ability to flexibly apply self-actualizing values to one's own life Fr Feeling reactivity measures...

Russell, Kathryn Terese Vecchio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

experiment actually sees," Smith says. "When we were  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiment actually sees," Smith says. "When we were finished, we got much more ­ a method in science depend on atoms and molecules moving," Smith says. "We want to create movies of molecules science development," Smith says.--Morgan McCorkle A theoretical technique developed at ORNL is bringing

Pennycook, Steve

36

COORDINATING ADVICE AND ACTUAL TREATMENT Thomas A. Russ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Unfortunately, this information is not always immediately available. For example, the exact fluid infused via an intravenous line can only be determined after someone checks the infusion bottle to determine how much fluid differ in timing and exact amount from what is actually done. For example, an infusion order might call

Russ, Thomas A.

37

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final July 01, 2010 Final July 01, 2010 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2010 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

38

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

39

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft July 9, 2009 Draft July 9, 2009 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2009 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

40

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884 7924 AEO 1998 6895 6906 7066 7161 7278 7400 7488 7597 7719 7859 7959 8074 8190 8286 8361 AEO 1999 6884 7007 7269 7383 7472 7539 7620 7725 7841 7949 8069 8174 8283 8351 AEO 2000 7056 7141 7266 7363 7452 7578 7694 7815 7926 8028 8113 8217 8288

42

Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2935 3201 3362 3504 3657 3738 3880 3993 4099 4212 4303 4398 4475 4541 4584 4639 4668 4672 AEO 1995 2953 3157 3281 3489 3610 3741 3818 3920 4000 4103 4208 4303 4362 4420 4442 4460 4460 AEO 1996 3011 3106 3219 3398 3519 3679 3807 3891 3979 4070 4165 4212 4260 4289 4303 4322 4325 AEO 1997 3099 3245 3497 3665 3825 3975 4084 4190 4285 4380 4464 4552 4617 4654 4709 4760 AEO 1998 3303 3391 3654 3713 3876 4053 4137 4298 4415 4556 4639 4750 4910 4992 5087 AEO 1999 3380 3442 3888 4022 4153 4238 4336 4441 4545 4652 4780 4888 4999 5073 AEO 2000 3599 3847 4036 4187 4320 4465 4579 4690 4780 4882 4968 5055 5113

43

Tropical Africa: Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Closed Forests (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Land Use Maximum Potential Biomass Density Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By Country) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1960 (By Administrative Unit)

44

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.983258692,2.124739238,2.26534793,2.409252566,2.585728477,2.727400662,2.854942053,2.980927152,3.13861755,3.345819536,3.591100993,3.849544702,4.184279801,4.510016556,4.915074503,5.29147351,5.56022351,5.960471854 "AEO 1995",,1.891706924,1.998384058,1.952818035,2.064227053,2.152302174,2.400016103,2.569033816,2.897681159,3.160088567,3.556344605,3.869033816,4.267391304,4.561932367,4.848599034,5.157246377,5.413405797,5.660917874 "AEO 1996",,,1.630674532,1.740334763,1.862956911,1.9915856,2.10351261,2.194934146,2.287655669,2.378991658,2.476043002,2.589847464,2.717610782,2.836870306,2.967124845,3.117719429,3.294003735,3.485657428,3.728419409

45

Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2.02,2.4,2.66,2.74,2.81,2.85,2.89,2.93,2.95,2.97,3,3.16,3.31,3.5,3.57,3.63,3.74,3.85 "AEO 1995",,2.46,2.54,2.8,2.87,2.87,2.89,2.9,2.9,2.92,2.95,2.97,3,3.03,3.19,3.35,3.51,3.6 "AEO 1996",,,2.56,2.75,2.85,2.88,2.93,2.98,3.02,3.06,3.07,3.09,3.12,3.17,3.23,3.29,3.37,3.46,3.56 "AEO 1997",,,,2.82,2.96,3.16,3.43,3.46,3.5,3.53,3.58,3.64,3.69,3.74,3.78,3.83,3.87,3.92,3.97 "AEO 1998",,,,,2.95,3.19,3.531808376,3.842532873,3.869043112,3.894513845,3.935930967,3.976293564,4.021911621,4.062207222,4.107616425,4.164502144,4.221304417,4.277039051,4.339964867

46

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099 1104 AEO 1998 1009 1051 1044 1058 1087 1084 1090 1097 1112 1130 1142 1148 1160 1162 1180 AEO 1999 1040 1075 1092 1109 1113 1118 1120 1120 1133 1139 1150 1155 1156 1173 AEO 2000 1053 1086 1103 1124 1142 1164 1175 1184 1189 1194 1199 1195 1200 AEO 2001 1078 1112 1135 1153 1165 1183 1191 1220 1228 1228 1235 1240

47

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

48

Table 16. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual (billion kilowatt-hours) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2364 2454 2534 2626 2708 2811 AEO 1983 2318 2395 2476 2565 2650 2739 3153 AEO 1984 2321 2376 2461 2551 2637 2738 3182 AEO 1985 2317 2360 2427 2491 2570 2651 2730 2808 2879 2949 3026 AEO 1986 2363 2416 2479 2533 2608 2706 2798 2883 2966 3048 3116 3185 3255 3324 3397 AEO 1987 2460 2494 2555 2622 2683 2748 2823 2902 2977 3363 AEO 1989* 2556 2619 2689 2760 2835 2917 2994 3072 3156 3236 3313 3394 3473 AEO 1990 2612 2689 3083 3488.0 3870.0 AEO 1991 2700 2762 2806 2855 2904 2959 3022 3088 3151 3214 3282 3355 3427 3496 3563 3632 3704 3776 3846 3916 AEO 1992 2746 2845 2858 2913 2975 3030 3087 3146 3209 3276 3345 3415 3483 3552 3625 3699 3774 3847 3921 AEO 1993 2803 2840 2893 2946 2998 3052 3104 3157 3214 3271 3327

49

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

50

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

51

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO Dollar Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1992,1.9399,2.029,2.1099,2.1899,2.29,2.35,2.39,2.42,2.47,2.55,2.65,2.75,2.89,3.01,3.17,3.3,3.35,3.47 "AEO 1995",1993,,1.85,1.899,1.81,1.87,1.8999,2.06,2.14,2.34,2.47,2.69,2.83,3.02,3.12,3.21,3.3,3.35,3.39 "AEO 1996",1994,,,1.597672343,1.665446997,1.74129355,1.815978527,1.866241336,1.892736554,1.913619637,1.928664207,1.943216205,1.964540124,1.988652706,2.003382921,2.024799585,2.056392431,2.099974155,2.14731431,2.218094587

52

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 AEO 1996 1994 7.09 6.99 6.94 6.93 6.96 6.96 6.96 6.97 6.98 6.97 6.98 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.96 6.95 6.91 AEO 1997 1995 6.94 6.89 6.90 6.91 6.86 6.84 6.78 6.73 6.66 6.60 6.58 6.54 6.49 6.48 6.45 6.36

53

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO 1995",,6398.45,6544.45,6555.4,6675.85,6745.2,6821.85,6887.55,6964.2,7048.15,7146.7,7245.25,7336.5,7405.85,7471.55,7537.25,7581.05,7621.2 "AEO 1996",,,6489.7,6526.2,6606.5,6708.7,6781.7,6854.7,6942.3,7008,7084.65,7175.9,7259.85,7329.2,7383.95,7449.65,7500.75,7544.55,7581.05 "AEO 1997",,,,6635.7,6694.1,6825.5,6953.25,7073.7,7183.2,7267.15,7369.35,7460.6,7548.2,7643.1,7730.7,7792.75,7832.9,7884,7924.15

54

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",17.71,17.68,17.84,18.12,18.25,18.43,18.58,18.93,19.28,19.51,19.8,19.92,20.13,20.18,20.38,20.35,20.16,20.19 "AEO 1995",,18.28,17.98,17.92,18.21,18.63,18.92,19.08,19.2,19.36,19.52,19.75,19.94,20.17,20.28,20.6,20.59,20.88 "AEO 1996",,,18.9,19.15,19.52,19.59,19.59,19.65,19.73,19.97,20.36,20.82,21.25,21.37,21.68,22.11,22.47,22.83,23.36 "AEO 1997",,,,19.1,19.7,20.17,20.32,20.54,20.77,21.26,21.9,22.31,22.66,22.93,23.38,23.68,23.99,24.25,24.65 "AEO 1998",,,,,18.85,19.06,20.34936142,20.27427673,20.60257721,20.94442177,21.44076347,21.80969238,22.25416183,22.65365219,23.176651,23.74545097,24.22989273,24.70069313,24.96691322

55

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.94 2.03 2.11 2.19 2.29 2.35 2.39 2.42 2.47 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.89 3.01 3.17 3.30 3.35 3.47 AEO 1995 1993 1.85 1.90 1.81 1.87 1.90 2.06 2.14 2.34 2.47 2.69 2.83 3.02 3.12 3.21 3.30 3.35 3.39 AEO 1996 1994 1.60 1.67 1.74 1.82 1.87 1.89 1.91 1.93 1.94 1.96 1.99 2.00 2.02 2.06 2.10 2.15 2.22

56

Pose estimation of an uncooperative spacecraft from actual space imagery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses the preliminary design of a spaceborne monocular vision-based navigation system for on-orbit-servicing and formation-flying applications. The aim is to estimate the pose of a passive space resident object using its known three-dimensional model and single low-resolution two-dimensional images collected on-board the active spacecraft. In contrast to previous work, no supportive means are available on the target satellite (e.g., light emitting diodes) and no a-priori knowledge of the relative position and attitude is available (i.e., lost-in-space scenario). Three fundamental mechanisms - perceptual organisation, true perspective projection, and random sample consensus - are exploited to overcome the limitations of monocular passive optical navigation in space. The preliminary design is conducted and validated making use of actual images collected in the frame of the PRISMA mission at about 700 km altitude and 10 m inter-spacecraft separation.

Simone D'Amico; Mathias Benn; John L. Jørgensen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

58

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

59

Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production, Projected vs. Actual Production, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 14.74 14.26 14.33 14.89 15.39 15.88 AEO 1983 16.48 16.27 16.20 16.31 16.27 16.29 14.89 AEO 1984 17.48 17.10 17.44 17.58 17.52 17.32 16.39 AEO 1985 16.95 17.08 17.11 17.29 17.40 17.33 17.32 17.27 17.05 16.80 16.50 AEO 1986 16.30 16.27 17.15 16.68 16.90 16.97 16.87 16.93 16.86 16.62 16.40 16.33 16.57 16.23 16.12 AEO 1987 16.21 16.09 16.38 16.32 16.30 16.30 16.44 16.62 16.81 17.39 AEO 1989* 16.71 16.71 16.94 17.01 16.83 17.09 17.35 17.54 17.67 17.98 18.20 18.25 18.49 AEO 1990 16.91 17.25 18.84 20.58 20.24 AEO 1991 17.40 17.48 18.11 18.22 18.15 18.22 18.39 18.82 19.03 19.28 19.62 19.89 20.13 20.07 19.95 19.82 19.64 19.50 19.30 19.08 AEO 1992 17.43 17.69 17.95 18.00 18.29 18.27 18.51 18.75 18.97

60

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

62

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

63

Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 9.2 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 7.29 8.09 8.94 9.62 10.27 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 6.37 6.89 7.50 8.15 9.05 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30

64

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

65

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 23.36 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25 24.65 AEO 1998 18.85 19.06 20.35 20.27 20.60 20.94 21.44 21.81 22.25 22.65 23.18 23.75 24.23 24.70 24.97 AEO 1999 18.80 19.13 19.28 19.82 20.23 20.77 21.05 21.57 21.98 22.47 22.85 23.26 23.77 24.15

66

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

67

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

68

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

69

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

70

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

71

Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 7.58 7.45 7.12 6.82 6.66 7.09 AEO 1983 5.15 5.44 5.73 5.79 5.72 5.95 6.96 AEO 1984 4.85 5.11 5.53 5.95 6.31 6.59 8.65 AEO 1985 4.17 4.38 4.73 4.93 5.36 5.72 6.23 6.66 7.14 7.39 7.74 AEO 1986 5.15 5.38 5.46 5.92 6.46 7.09 7.50 7.78 7.96 8.20 8.47 8.74 9.04 9.57 9.76 AEO 1987 5.81 6.04 6.81 7.28 7.82 8.34 8.71 8.94 8.98 10.01 AEO 1989* 6.28 6.84 7.49 7.96 8.53 8.83 9.04 9.28 9.60 9.64 9.75 10.02 10.20 AEO 1990 7.20 7.61 9.13 9.95 11.02 AEO 1991 7.28 7.25 7.34 7.48 7.72 8.10 8.57 9.09 9.61 10.07 10.51 11.00 11.44 11.72 11.86 12.11 12.30 12.49 12.71 12.91 AEO 1992 6.86 7.42 7.88 8.16 8.55 8.80 9.06 9.32 9.50 9.80 10.17 10.35 10.56 10.61 10.85 11.00 11.15 11.29 11.50 AEO 1993 7.25 8.01 8.49 9.06

72

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1.98 2.12 2.27 2.41 2.59 2.73 2.85 2.98 3.14 3.35 3.59 3.85 4.18 4.51 4.92 5.29 5.56 5.96 AEO 1995 1.89 2.00 1.95 2.06 2.15 2.40 2.57 2.90 3.16 3.56 3.87 4.27 4.56 4.85 5.16 5.41 5.66 AEO 1996 1.63 1.74 1.86 1.99 2.10 2.19 2.29 2.38 2.48 2.59 2.72 2.84 2.97 3.12 3.29 3.49 3.73 AEO 1997 2.03 1.82 1.90 1.99 2.06 2.13 2.21 2.32 2.43 2.54 2.65 2.77 2.88 3.00 3.11 3.24 AEO 1998 2.30 2.20 2.26 2.31 2.38 2.44 2.52 2.60 2.69 2.79 2.93 3.06 3.20 3.35 3.48 AEO 1999 1.98 2.15 2.20 2.32 2.43 2.53 2.63 2.76 2.90 3.02 3.12 3.23 3.35 3.47

73

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

74

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

75

Table 15. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual (nominal cents per kilowatt-hour) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.38 6.96 7.63 8.23 8.83 9.49 AEO 1983 6.85 7.28 7.74 8.22 8.68 9.18 13.12 AEO 1984 6.67 7.05 7.48 7.89 8.25 8.65 11.53 AEO 1985 6.62 6.94 7.32 7.63 7.89 8.15 8.46 8.85 9.20 9.61 10.04 AEO 1986 6.67 6.88 7.05 7.18 7.35 7.52 7.65 7.87 8.31 8.83 9.41 10.01 10.61 11.33 12.02 AEO 1987 6.63 6.65 6.92 7.12 7.38 7.62 7.94 8.36 8.86 11.99 AEO 1989* 6.50 6.75 7.14 7.48 7.82 8.11 8.50 8.91 9.39 9.91 10.49 11.05 11.61 AEO 1990 6.49 6.72 8.40 10.99 14.5 AEO 1991 6.94 7.31 7.59 7.82 8.18 8.38 8.54 8.73 8.99 9.38 9.83 10.29 10.83 11.36 11.94 12.58 13.21 13.88 14.58 15.21 AEO 1992 6.97 7.16 7.32 7.56 7.78 8.04 8.29 8.57 8.93 9.38 9.82 10.26 10.73 11.25 11.83 12.37 12.96 13.58 14.23 AEO 1993

76

Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 AEO 1983 1.08 1.16 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 AEO 1984 0.99 1.05 1.16 1.27 1.43 1.57 2.11 AEO 1985 0.94 1.00 1.19 1.45 1.58 1.86 1.94 2.06 2.17 2.32 2.44 AEO 1986 0.74 0.88 0.62 1.03 1.05 1.27 1.39 1.47 1.66 1.79 1.96 2.17 2.38 2.42 2.43 AEO 1987 0.84 0.89 1.07 1.16 1.26 1.36 1.46 1.65 1.75 2.50 AEO 1989* 1.15 1.32 1.44 1.52 1.61 1.70 1.79 1.87 1.98 2.06 2.15 2.23 2.31 AEO 1990 1.26 1.43 2.07 2.68 2.95 AEO 1991 1.36 1.53 1.70 1.82 2.11 2.30 2.33 2.36 2.42 2.49 2.56 2.70 2.75 2.83 2.90 2.95 3.02 3.09 3.17 3.19 AEO 1992 1.48 1.62 1.88 2.08 2.25 2.41 2.56 2.68 2.70 2.72 2.76 2.84 2.92 3.05 3.10 3.20 3.25 3.30 3.30 AEO 1993 1.79 2.08 2.35 2.49 2.61 2.74 2.89 2.95 3.00 3.05 3.10

77

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00 26.63 AEO 1997 22.15 22.75 23.24 23.64 23.86 24.13 24.65 25.34 25.82 26.22 26.52 27.00 27.35 27.70 28.01 28.47 AEO 1998 21.84 23.03 23.84 24.08 24.44 24.81 25.33 25.72 26.22 26.65 27.22 27.84 28.35 28.84 29.17 AEO 1999 21.35 22.36 22.54 23.18 23.65 24.17 24.57 25.19 25.77 26.41 26.92 27.42 28.02 28.50

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual results satellitenexperiment Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The actual case here corresponds to the minor windows (U0.5) case in Table 6. Table A1: Load and energy... .96) 6343.77 (3316.14) 933.65 (901.44) Major windows (Actual) Diff. - -...

79

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales relacionadas con Sample Search...  

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for: actuales relacionadas con Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Departamento de Fsica (EPS) Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Summary: fsica relacionada con la implosin de los...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales clasificaciones del Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 30 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales del sector Sample Search Results  

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Collection: Engineering 60 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

83

XAFS Study of Phase-Change Recording Material Using Actual Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of the interface layer to the local structure for atomic arrangement of a GeBiTe phase-change material was investigated by using XAFS on the actual rewritable HD DVD...

Nakai, Tsukasa; Yoshiki, Masahiko; Satoh, Yasuhiro

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del ultrasonido Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: : evolucin histrica y situacin actual. 8 l) Evaluacin de la capacidad de carga del Parque para los... Proyectos A lo largo del ao 2010 han estado vigentes 85...

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - anciano consideraciones actuales Sample...  

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mitigacin de los efectos del cambio climtico y con... polticas De proseguir las emisiones de GEI a una tasa igual o superior a la actual, el calentamiento Source: Binette,...

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual terrestrial rabies Sample Search...  

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and Information Sciences 56 innovati nNREL Advances a Unique Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Summary: actually begins at another of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del huemul Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 88 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del franciscanismo Sample Search...  

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and Information Sciences 75 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del control Sample Search Results  

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and Information Sciences 30 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

90

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del tabaquismo Sample Search Results  

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and Information Sciences 91 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

91

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del no-acceso Sample Search Results  

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and Information Sciences 73 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del rabdomiosarcoma Sample Search...  

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and Information Sciences 74 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del estreptococo Sample Search Results  

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and Information Sciences 80 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

94

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Date Published 05/2013 Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Traditional energy performance calculated using building simulation with the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data represents the energy performance in a typical year but not necessarily the average or typical energy performance of a building in long term. Furthermore, the simulated results do not provide the range of variations due to the change of weather, which is important in building energy management and risk assessment of energy efficiency investment. This study analyzes the weather impact on peak electric demand and energy use by building simulation using 30-year actual meteorological year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels across all 17 climate zones. The simulated results from the AMY are compared to those from TMY3 to determine and analyze the differences. It was found that yearly weather variation has significant impact on building performance especially peak electric demand. Energy savings of building technologies should be evaluated using simulations with multi-decade actual weather data to fully consider investment risk and the long term performance.

95

Gasoline direct injection: Actual trends and future strategies for injection and combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

Recent developments have raised increased interest on the concept of gasoline direct injection as the most promising future strategy for fuel economy improvement of SI engines. The general requirements for mixture preparation and combustion systems in a GDI engine are presented in view of known and actual systems regarding fuel economy and emission potential. The characteristics of the actually favored injection systems are discussed and guidelines for the development of appropriate combustion systems are derived. The differences between such mixture preparation strategies as air distributed fuel and fuel wall impingement are discussed, leading to the alternative approach to the problem of mixture preparation with the fully air distributing concept of direct mixture injection.

Fraidl, G.K.; Piock, W.F.; Wirth, M.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A COGNITIVE-SYSTEMIC RECONSTRUCTION OF MASLOW'S THEORY OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A COGNITIVE-SYSTEMIC RECONSTRUCTION OF MASLOW'S THEORY OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION by Francis Heylighen1-order, cognitive-sys- temic framework. A hierarchy of basic needs is derived from the ur- gency of perturbations: material, cognitive and subjective. Material and/or cognitive incompetence during child- hood create

Toint, Philippe

97

SAMPLE GENERAL TERMS WHEN PURCHASING SERVICES* ACTUAL TERMS REQUIRED WILL BE DETERMINED BY CONTRACTS &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 SAMPLE GENERAL TERMS WHEN PURCHASING SERVICES* ACTUAL TERMS REQUIRED WILL BE DETERMINED Contracts and Procurement (x4532) if you have questions regarding purchasing services. 1. Independent Status in an independent capacity and not as officers or employees or agents of the State of California. While Contractor

de Lijser, Peter

98

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

99

Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect

Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics, Professor and Extension Economist? Management, The Texas A&M System; and Extension Agricultural Economist, Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. The U.S. Dept. of Agriculture?s (USDA) Risk..., levels of coverage, price elections, applicable premium rates and subsidy amounts. The special provisions list program calendar dates and contain general and special statements that may further define, limit or modify coverage. MPCI?s Actual...

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

.A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

102

Treatability studies of actual listed waste sludges from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are investigating vitrification for various low-level and mixed wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Treatability studies have included surrogate waste formulations at the laboratory-, pilot-, and field-scales and actual waste testing at the laboratory- and pilot-scales. The initial waste to be processing through SRTC`s Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is the K-1407-B and K-1407-C (B/C) Pond sludge waste which is a RCRA F-listed waste. The B/C ponds at the ORR K-25 site were used as holding and settling ponds for various waste water treatment streams. Laboratory-, pilot-, and field- scale ``proof-of-principle`` demonstrations are providing needed operating parameters for the planned field-scale demonstration with actual B/C Pond sludge waste at ORR. This report discusses the applied systems approach to optimize glass compositions for this particular waste stream through laboratory-, pilot-, and field-scale studies with surrogate and actual B/C waste. These glass compositions will maximize glass durability and waste loading while optimizing melt properties which affect melter operation, such as melt viscosity and melter refractory corrosion. Maximum waste loadings minimize storage volume of the final waste form translating into considerable cost savings.

Jantzen, C.M.; Peeler, D.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Gilliam, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Spence, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

103

Laboratory stabilization/solidification of surrogate and actual mixed-waste sludge in glass and grout  

SciTech Connect

Grouting and vitrification are currently the most likely stabilization/solidification technologies for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level waste for decades. Vitrification has long been developed as a high-level-waste alternative and has been under development recently as an alternative treatment technology for low-level mixed waste. Laboratory testing has been performed to develop grout and vitrification formulas for mixed-waste sludges currently stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to compare these waste forms. Envelopes, or operating windows, for both grout and soda-lime-silica glass formulations for a surrogate sludge were developed. One formulation within each envelope was selected for testing the sensitivity of performance to variations ({+-}10 wt%) in the waste form composition and variations in the surrogate sludge composition over the range previously characterized in the sludges. In addition, one sludge sample of an actual mixed-waste tank was obtained, a surrogate was developed for this sludge sample, and grout and glass samples were prepared and tested in the laboratory using both surrogate and the actual sludge. The sensitivity testing of a surrogate tank sludge in selected glass and grout formulations is discussed in this paper, along with the hot-cell testing of an actual tank sludge sample.

Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

104

ACTUAL WASTE TESTING OF GYCOLATE IMPACTS ON THE SRS TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect

Glycolic acid is being studied as a replacement for formic acid in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. After implementation, the recycle stream from DWPF back to the high-level waste Tank Farm will contain soluble sodium glycolate. Most of the potential impacts of glycolate in the Tank Farm were addressed via a literature review and simulant testing, but several outstanding issues remained. This report documents the actual-waste tests to determine the impacts of glycolate on storage and evaporation of Savannah River Site high-level waste. The objectives of this study are to address the following: ? Determine the extent to which sludge constituents (Pu, U, Fe, etc.) dissolve (the solubility of sludge constituents) in the glycolate-containing 2H-evaporator feed. ? Determine the impact of glycolate on the sorption of fissile (Pu, U, etc.) components onto sodium aluminosilicate solids. The first objective was accomplished through actual-waste testing using Tank 43H and 38H supernatant and Tank 51H sludge at Tank Farm storage conditions. The second objective was accomplished by contacting actual 2H-evaporator scale with the products from the testing for the first objective. There is no anticipated impact of up to 10 g/L of glycolate in DWPF recycle to the Tank Farm on tank waste component solubilities as investigated in this test. Most components were not influenced by glycolate during solubility tests, including major components such as aluminum, sodium, and most salt anions. There was potentially a slight increase in soluble iron with added glycolate, but the soluble iron concentration remained so low (on the order of 10 mg/L) as to not impact the iron to fissile ratio in sludge. Uranium and plutonium appear to have been supersaturated in 2H-evaporator feed solution mixture used for this testing. As a result, there was a reduction of soluble uranium and plutonium as a function of time. The change in soluble uranium concentration was independent of added glycolate concentration. The change in soluble plutonium content was dependent on the added glycolate concentration, with higher levels of glycolate (5 g/L and 10 g/L) appearing to suppress the plutonium solubility. The inclusion of glycolate did not change the dissolution of or sorption onto actual-waste 2H-evaporator pot scale to an extent that will impact Tank Farm storage and concentration. The effects that were noted involved dissolution of components from evaporator scale and precipitation of components onto evaporator scale that were independent of the level of added glycolate.

Martino, C.

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

106

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

107

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

108

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

109

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

110

File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:33, 3 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 09:33, 3 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (257 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools High School Curricula

111

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

112

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included caustic leaching for Al removal solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr solids filtration with the CUF follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF ion exchange processing for Cs removal evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

115

Predicted and actual productions of horizontal wells in heavy-oil fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the comparison of predicted and actual cumulative and daily oil production. The predicted results were obtained from the use of Joshi's equation, wherein, the effects of anisotropy and eccentricity were included. The cumulative production obtained from the use of equations developed by Borisov, Giger, Renard and Dupuy resulted in errors in excess of 100%, thus, they were not considered applicable for predicting cumulative and daily flows of heavy oils in horizontal wells. The wells considered in this analysis varied from 537 to 1201 metres with corresponding well bores of 0.089 to. 0.110 m. Using Joshi's equation, the predicted cumulative oil-production was within a 20% difference for up to 12 months of production for long wells and up to 24 months for short wells. Short wells were defined as those being under 1000 m.

Peter Catania

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Submitted to ApJ Letters, June 29, 2005 Are Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from Novae Actually from Supernovae?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submitted to ApJ Letters, June 29, 2005 Are Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from Novae Actually stellar nucleosynthesis and mixing. The best-studied presolar phase, silicon carbide (SiC), exhibits

Nittler, Larry R.

117

Energy Conservation and Comfort of Heat Pump Desiccant Air Conditioning System in Actual Living Space in Summer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conservation and Comfort of Heat Pump Desiccant Air Conditioning System in Actual Living and total heat exchanger in terms of both energy conservation and thermal comfort in summer. 1. COP

Miyashita, Yasushi

118

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

119

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

120

Actual Versus Estimated Utility Factor of a Large Set of Privately Owned Chevrolet Volts  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the overall fuel economy of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the amount of operation in charge depleting (CD) versus charge sustaining modes must be determined. Mode of operation is predominantly dependent on customer usage of the vehicle and is therefore highly variable. The utility factor (UF) concept was developed to quantify the distance a group of vehicles has traveled or may travel in CD mode. SAE J2841 presents a UF calculation method based on data collected from travel surveys of conventional vehicles. UF estimates have been used in a variety of areas, including the calculation of window sticker fuel economy, policy decisions, and vehicle design determination. The EV Project, a plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure demonstration being conducted across the United States, provides the opportunity to determine the real-world UF of a large group of privately owned Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicles. Using data collected from Volts enrolled in The EV Project, this paper compares the real-world UF of two groups of Chevrolet Volts to estimated UF's based on J2841. The actual observed fleet utility factors (FUF) for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups studied were observed to be 72% and 74%, respectively. Using the EPA CD ranges, the method prescribed by J2841 estimates a FUF of 65% and 68% for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups, respectively. Volt drivers achieved higher percentages of distance traveled in EV mode for two reasons. First, they had fewer long-distance travel days than drivers in the national travel survey referenced by J2841. Second, they charged more frequently than the J2841 assumption of once per day - drivers of Volts in this study averaged over 1.4 charging events per day. Although actual CD range varied widely as driving conditions varied, the average CD ranges for the two Volt groups studied matched the EPA CD range estimates, so CD range variation did not affect FUF results.

John Smart; Thomas Bradley; Stephen Schey

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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121

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Building Energy Report Card is used to compare the actual annual energy consumption of buildings to a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Building Energy Report Card is used to compare the actual annual energy consumption Thermal Unit (Btu). For convenience, this annual energy consumption is expressed as thousands of Btus (i of buildings to a State of Minnesota "target." This target represents the amount of energy that would

Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

123

General Project Sequence The following are typical steps on many projects. Actual required steps may vary from project to project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General Project Sequence The following are typical steps on many projects. Actual required steps may vary from project to project depending upon the scope, complexity, and specific features. Time periods indicated will vary depending on the nature of the project and needs of the user group

Mather, Patrick T.

124

An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers...

Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Actual Crimes Reported For: Offense Type (includes attempts) 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 0 0 0 0 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Drug Law Violations Arrest 0 3 4 0 1 0 0 4 4 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Liquor Law Violations Arrest 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 OSU-Tulsa Campus Crime Statistics Act. Number of Arrests/Referrals for Select Offenses #12;Actual Crimes Reported For

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

126

Introduction: The cost of energy is an important concern for businesses, institutions, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that it sparked a serious interest in alternative energies. Much renewable energy, like solar, wind, geothermal wood chips annually because mills and logging cites are not large enough to own a chipper that can

Aalberts, Daniel P.

127

Experimental evaluation of actual delivered dose using mega-voltage cone-beam CT and direct point dose measurement  

SciTech Connect

Radiation therapy in patients is planned by using computed tomography (CT) images acquired before start of the treatment course. Here, tumor shrinkage or weight loss or both, which are common during the treatment course for patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancer, causes unexpected differences from the plan, as well as dose uncertainty with the daily positional error of patients. For accurate clinical evaluation, it is essential to identify these anatomical changes and daily positional errors, as well as consequent dosimetric changes. To evaluate the actual delivered dose, the authors proposed direct dose measurement and dose calculation with mega-voltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT). The purpose of the present study was to experimentally evaluate dose calculation by MVCBCT. Furthermore, actual delivered dose was evaluated directly with accurate phantom setup. Because MVCBCT has CT-number variation, even when the analyzed object has a uniform density, a specific and simple CT-number correction method was developed and applied for the H and N site of a RANDO phantom. Dose distributions were calculated with the corrected MVCBCT images of a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom. Treatment processes from planning to beam delivery were performed for the H and N site of the RANDO phantom. The image-guided radiation therapy procedure was utilized for the phantom setup to improve measurement reliability. The calculated dose in the RANDO phantom was compared to the measured dose obtained by metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. In the polymethyl methacrylate phantom, the calculated and measured doses agreed within about +3%. In the RANDO phantom, the dose difference was less than +5%. The calculated dose based on simulation-CT agreed with the measured dose within3%, even in the region with a high dose gradient. The actual delivered dose was successfully determined by dose calculation with MVCBCT, and the point dose measurement with the image-guided radiation therapy procedure.

Matsubara, Kana, E-mail: matsubara-kana@hs.tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Ryosuke [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Nishioka, Shie; Shibuya, Toshiyuki; Ariji, Takaki; Akimoto, Tetsuo [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Saitoh, Hidetoshi [Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku Tokyo (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Making appropriate comparisons of estimated and actual costs of reducing SO{sub 2} emissions under Title IV  

SciTech Connect

A current sentiment within some parts of the environmental policy community is that market-based regulatory approaches such as emissions trading have proven so effective that actual costs will be only a small fraction of what ex ante cost estimation procedures would project. With this line of reasoning, some have dismissed available cost estimates for major proposed new regulations, such as the new PM and ozone NAAQS, as not meaningful for policy decisions. The most commonly used evidence in support of this position is the experience with SO{sub 2} reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. In Title IV, a market for emissions allowances has been used to achieve reductions in sulfur dioxides (SO{sub 2}) to ameliorate acid rain. It is commonly asserted today that the cost of achieving the SO{sub 2} emissions reductions has been only one-tenth or less of what Title IV was originally expected to cost. This paper demonstrates that, to the contrary, actual costs for SO{sub 2} reductions remain roughly in line with original estimates associated with Title IV. Erroneous conclusions about Title IV`s costs are due to inappropriate comparisons of a variety of different measures that appear to be comparable only because they are all stated in dollars per ton. Program cost estimates include the total costs of a fully-implemented regulatory program. The very low costs of Title IV that are commonly cited today are neither directly reflective of a fully implemented Title IV, (which is still many years away) nor reflective of all the costs already incurred. Further, a careful review of history finds that the initial cost estimates that many cite were never associated with Title IV. Technically speaking, people are comparing the estimated control costs for the most-costly power plant associated with earlier acid rain regulatory proposals with prices from a market that do not directly reflect total costs.

Smith, A.E. [DFI/Aeronomics Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Why E-government Usage Lags Behind: Explaining the Gap Between Potential and Actual Usage of Electronic Public Services in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the EU-15 countries illustrate a gap between potential usage and actual usage of electronic public services. Using a model ... the case of current Dutch electronic governmental service usage. Motivational...

Alexander van Deursen; Jan van Dijk; Wolfgang Ebbers

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A comparative study on conventional and advanced exergetic analyses of geothermal district heating systems based on actual operational data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper comparatively evaluates exergy destructions of a geothermal district heating system (GDHS) using both conventional and advanced exergetic analysis methods to identify the potential for improvement and the interactions among the components. As a real case study, the Afyon GDHS in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey, is considered based on actual operational data. For the first time, advanced exergetic analysis is applied to the GDHSs, in which the exergy destruction rate within each component is split into unavoidable/avoidable and endogenous/exogenous parts. The results indicate that the interconnections among all the components are not very strong. Thus, one should focus on how to reduce the internal inefficiency (destruction) rates of the components. The highest priority for improvement in the advanced exergetic analysis is in the re-injection pump (PM-IX), while it is the heat exchanger (HEX-III) in the conventional analysis. In addition, there is a substantial influence on the overall system as the total avoidable exergy destruction rate of the heat exchanger (HEX-V) has the highest value. On the overall system basis, the value for the conventional exergetic efficiency is determined to be 29.29% while that for the modified exergetic efficiency is calculated to be 34.46% through improving the overall components.

Arif Hepbasli; Ali Keeba?

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Production-ecological modelling explains the difference between potential soil N mineralisation and actual herbage N uptake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We studied two different grassland fertiliser management regimes on sand and peat soils: above-ground application of a combination of organic N-rich slurry manure and solid cattle manure (SCM) vs. slit-injected, mineral N-rich slurry manure, whether or not supplemented with chemical fertiliser (non-SCM). Measurements of field N mineralisation as estimated from herbage N uptake in unfertilised plots were compared with (i) potential N mineralisation as determined from a standard laboratory soil incubation, (ii) the contribution of groups of soil organisms to N mineralisation based on production-ecological model calculations, and (iii) N mineralisation calculated according to the Dutch fertilisation recommendation for grasslands. Density and biomass of soil biota (bacteria, fungi, enchytraeids, microarthropods and earthworms) as well as net plant N-uptake were higher in the SCM input grasslands compared to the non-SCM input grasslands. The currently used method in Dutch fertilisation recommendations underestimated actual soil N supply capacity by, on average, 102kg Nha?1 (202 vs. 304kgha?1=34%). The summed production-ecological model estimate for N mineralisation by bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and enchytraeids was 87120% of the measured potential soil N mineralisation. Adding the modelled N mineralisation by earthworms to potential soil N mineralisation explained 98107% of the measured herbage N uptake from soil. For all grasslands and soil biota groups together, the model estimated 105% of the measured net herbage N uptake from soil. Soil biota production-ecological modelling is a powerful tool to understand and predict N uptake in grassland, reflecting the effects of previous manure management and soil type. The results show that combining production ecological modelling to predict N supply with existing soil N tests using aerobic incubation methods, can add to a scientifically based improvement of the N fertilisation recommendations for production grasslands.

Muhammad Imtiaz Rashid; Ron G.M. de Goede; Lijbert Brussaard; Jaap Bloem; Egbert A. Lantinga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groupsbismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group2)are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

134

Software Engineering Model Schedule -(with CS 1131) example only; actual schedule may vary; see your academic dept. Includes 3 units of co-curricular activities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software Engineering Model Schedule - (with CS 1131) example only; actual schedule may vary; see FALL SPRING FALL SPRING CS 1000 1 CS 2321 3 CS 1141 2 CS 3141 3 CS 1131 5 MA 2160 4 CS 2311 3 CS 3421 4 Activity (1) Total 17 Total 15 Total 14-15 Total 16-17 3rd Year 4th Year FALL SPRING FALL SPRING CS 3311 3

135

Software Engineering Model Schedule -(Starting with CS 1121) example only; actual schedule may vary; see your academic dept. Includes 3 units of co-curricular activities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software Engineering Model Schedule - (Starting with CS 1121) example only; actual schedule may Year 2nd Year FALL SPRING FALL SPRING CS 1000 1 CS 1122 3 CS 1141 2 CS 2311 3 CS 1121 3 MA 2160 4 CS Cocurricular Activity (1) Total 15 Total 15 Total 14-15 Total 16-17 3rd Year 4th Year FALL SPRING FALL SPRING

136

Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groupsplutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cost of energy saving and CO2 emissions reduction in Chinas iron and steel sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper estimated the cost curve of energy saving and CO2 emissions reduction in Chinas iron and steel sector. Forty-one energy saving technologies which are widely used or popularized are selected, their investments, operation costs, energy savings and CO2 abatement are collected and the data in 2010 are taken as a baseline. Then energy conservation supply curve and CO2 conservation supply curve under two different discount rates are calculated in the paper. These 41 technologies result in a saving contribution of 4.63GJ/t and a CO2 abatement contribution of 443.21kg/t. Cost-effectiveness of technologies was analyzed based on the fuel price and an estimated CO2 price. When comparing the result with the promoted technologies during the 12th five-year-plan, we found that some promoted technologies are not cost-effective in current situation. Three scenarios are set through changing the diffusion rate of technologies and the share of BOF and EAF, based on this energy saving potentials of technologies in 2020 and 2030 are forecasted. At the same time, we compared the change of the CSC depending on the year and the energy saving potentials in three scenarios of 2020 and 2030, respectively.

Yuan Li; Lei Zhu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

2D representation of life cycle greenhouse gas emission and life cycle cost of energy conversion for various energy resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We suggest a 2D-plot representation combined with life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and life cycle cost for various energy conversion technologies. In general, life cycle ... use life cycle GHG emissions ...

Heetae Kim; Claudio Tenreiro; Tae Kyu Ahn

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165-174. Shipworth, M. ,and sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.timer/programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. Nelson,

Meier, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165- Shipworth,and Sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.Timer/Programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. Nelson,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Systems. Applied Ergonomics, 40(2), 165- Shipworth,and Sensations. Applied Ergonomics, 12(1), 29-33. Boait, P.Timer/Programmer. Applied Ergonomics, 13(1), 15-23. Nelson,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermostats, such as the Honeywell Round introduced in 1953,and PTs, such as the Honeywell RTH7600 shown in Figure 1.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermostats, such as the Honeywell Round introduced in 1953,and PTs, such as the Honeywell RTH7600 shown in Figure 1.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermostats, such as the Honeywell Round introduced in 1953,and PTs, such as the Honeywell RTH7600 shown in Figure 1.

Meier, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8.233-238.244.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Diamond, R.

Meier, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 2, 91-100.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8.233-238.244.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Parker, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Performance of high-velocity oxy-fuel-sprayed chromium carbide-nickel chromium coating in an actual boiler environment of a thermal power plant  

SciTech Connect

The present study aims to evaluate the performance of a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr (chromium carbide-nickel chromium) coating on a nickel-based super-alloy in an actual industrial environment of a coal-fired boiler, with the objective to protect the boiler super-heater and reheater tubes from hot corrosion. The tests were performed in the platen super heater zone of a coal-fired boiler for 1,000 h at 900 degrees C under cyclic conditions. The Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coating imparted the necessary protection to the nickel-based super alloy in the given environment. The dense and flat splat structure of the coating, and the formation of oxides of chromium and nickel and their spinels, might have protected the substrate super alloy from the inward permeation of corrosive species.

Sidhu, T.S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R.D. [Industrial Technology Institute, Roorkee (India)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time The endPermian mass extinction: A rapid volcanic CO2 and CH4climatic catastrophe Uwe Brand a, , Renato

151

Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ  

SciTech Connect

A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

CITY OF SANTA FE V. KOMIS REVISITED: AN ANALYSIS OF THE ACTUAL IMPACTS OF CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF THE SANTA FE BYPASS ON THE VALUE OF NEARBY REAL ESTATE  

SciTech Connect

The Santa Fe Bypass for transport of transuranic waste (TRU) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico has been constructed and is operational (as of 2000). This paper presents a review of actual empirical data from the sales of real estate in the Santa Fe City/County area since the filing of the City of Santa Fe v. Komis lawsuit in 1988. The data analyzed covers the time period from 1989 through the last quarter of 2001.

Bentz, Dr. E. J., Jr.,; Bentz, C. B.; O'Hora, T. D.; Baepler, Dr. D.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

153

Technology Improvement Opportunities for Low Wind Speed Turbines and Implications for Cost of Energy Reduction: July 9, 2005 - July 8, 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the status of wind energy technology in 2002 and describes the potential for technology advancements to reduce the cost and increase the performance of wind turbines.

Cohen, J.; Schweizer, T.; Laxson, A.; Butterfield, S.; Schreck, S.; Fingersh, L.; Veers, P.; Ashwill, T.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Improving Industrial Refrigeration System Efficiency - Actual Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle cooling during winter operation, compressor intercooling, direct refrigeration vs. brine cooling, insulation of cold piping to reduce heat gain, multiple screw compressors for improved part load operation, evaporative condensers for reduced system...

White, T. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Espasticidad muscular: situacin actual y perspectivas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

La espasticidad muscular forma parte de las manifestaciones clnicas del sndrome piramidal. En el campo de las neurociencias, este trastorno constituye una buena introduccin a la plasticidad neuronal (a travs de los conceptos de plasticidad espinal, reorganizacin de redes funcionales [vicarianza o adaptacin de la orden motora]) y a las estrategias de seleccin de las dianas neurofarmacolgicas. A pesar de la gran incidencia de este trastorno, sobre todo en la enfermedad cerebrovascular, la dificultad clnica reside en la eleccin del objetivo teraputico, en particular si es funcional. En este sentido, no hay una relacin unvoca entre espasticidad y rendimiento motor o entre espasticidad y calidad de vida. Adems, la valoracin analtica y funcional de este trastorno todava presenta numerosas deficiencias. Las perspectivas de investigacin en esta rea son, en consecuencia, muy amplias y estn dirigidas a los tratamientos, de los cuales los ms recientes son relativamente costosos, como la toxina botulnica y el baclofeno intratecal. As, la tecnologa aplicada, propuesta para la evaluacin de los trastornos motores en algunas afecciones neurolgicas crnicas como la enfermedad de Parkinson, tiene un elevado potencial de desarrollo en la espasticidad muscular y efecto sobre el resultado funcional en el entorno de la persona.

P. Le Cavorzin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Did Hospital Engagement Networks Actually Improve Care?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of evidence to assess the effect of the PfP. We agree with Pronovost and Jha that science should drive quality-improvement efforts, and we look forward to collaborating with them and others on improving the science while also driving rapid, large-scale improvements to benefit patients. To the Editor: The Partnership for Patients model test (PfP), discussed in a Perspective article by Pronovost and Jha (Aug. 21 issue),1 is a large-scale quality-improvement program designed to make hospital care safer, more reliable, and less costly by ...

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

Era el actual supervit de neurocirujanos previsible en 2009? Anlisis de la situacin sobre la base de los datos del Informe de oferta y necesidad de especialistas mdicos en Espaa (2008-2025)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ResumenIntroduccin En el ao 2009 el Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo (MSC), en el Informe de oferta y necesidad de especialistas mdicos en Espaa (2008-2025), categoriz el escenario de nuestra especialidad como de dficit moderado de especialistas. Sin embargo, la neurociruga espaola vive actualmente una situacin caracterizada por un excedente de neurocirujanos. Objetivos Determinar si, tras el informe del MSC, era posible en el ao 2009 prever el exceso actual de neurocirujanos, as como cul ser la proyeccin ms probable de oferta y demanda en el ao 2017. Material y mtodos A partir de los datos crudos extrados del informe del MSC, del estudio sobre la edad de los neurocirujanos espaoles realizado por la Junta Directiva de la SENEC en 2001 y de las tasas de mortalidad anual para los distintos rangos de edad ofrecidas por el Instituto Nacional de Estadstica, realizamos una prediccin de la evolucin de la oferta y la demanda de neurocirujanos para los periodos 2008-2012 y 2013-2017. Resultados La situacin actual de exceso de especialistas era previsible en 2009 y, de no tomarse las medidas oportunas, en el ao 2017 probablemente existir un supervit de ms de 100 neurocirujanos en nuestro pas, pudiendo alcanzarse una tasa de paro superior al 26% en el peor escenario. Conclusiones Es necesario y urgente limitar la oferta de plazas de residencia de neurociruga y adecuarlas a la demanda real de especialistas existente. Para ello resulta imprescindible recabar informacin estructural actualizada y peridica de los distintos Servicios y Unidades de Neurociruga, as como revisar las condiciones de acreditacin de las ms de 50 unidades docentes existentes en nuestro pas. Introduction In 2009 the Spanish Ministry of Health (SMH) published the report of supply and demand of medical specialists in Spain (2008-2025), in which our specialty was considered as presenting a moderate deficit of consultants. However, Spanish neurosurgery is currently in a situation of having a surplus of neurosurgeons. Objectives To determine whether it was possible to predict the current excess of neurosurgeons in 2009 and to forecast the most likely perspective of supply and demand in 2017. Material and methods Raw data extracted from the SMH report, information on the ages of the Spanish neurosurgeons obtained from the study performed by our Board of Directors in 2001, and annual mortality rates for different age ranges provided by the National Institute of Statistics, were used to predict the evolution of supply and demand of neurosurgeons for the periods 2008-2012 and 2013-2017. Results The current situation of an excess of specialists was predictable in 2009, and if appropriate measures are not taken, a surplus of more than 100 neurosurgeons is likely in 2017, with an unemployment rate above 26% in the worst scenario. Conclusions In order to match the actual and future demand of specialists, it is necessary and urgent to reduce the number of neurosurgical in-training positions. To achieve this goal, it is essential to obtain periodical and up-to-date structural information of the different Neurosurgery Departments and Units, and to revisit the accreditation terms of the more than fifty current teaching units.

Rubn Martn-Lez; Javier Ibez; Alfonso Lagares; Jos Fernndez-Aln; Ramiro Dez-Lobato

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

CTES Temp staff employee actual salary + 34% 72202568058 Temp health employee actual salary + 36%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Refrigeration Specialist $75/hr Security Specialist $75/hr Sheet Metal Worker $68/hr Sign Maker $68/hr RUSH foot of mail per week $65/mo Labor Rate $22/hour Peritem charge (FedEx, UPS, etc.) $1/transaction Discounted charge for up to 10 additional boxes $10 Delivery of palletized material $50 Delivery or pickup

Rose, Michael R.

159

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum View topic -Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553d  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553d of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553 Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 3 of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/php

Temple, Blake

160

Predicted vs. Actual Energy Savings of Retrofitted House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-physical properties of the envelope and the changes in schedules and number of users. In order to account for those differences, electrical consumption attributed to A/C in summer was isolated and compared. The study followed the International Performance Measurement...

Al-Mofeez, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and 2007 Base Year)" ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid",,,," " ,"Projected Year...

162

,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and 2008 Base Year)" ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid",,,," " ,"Projected Year...

163

,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and 2003 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,"Projected Year...

164

,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and 2009 Base Year)" ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid",,,," " ,"Projected Year...

165

,"Table 2a. Noncoincident Summer Peak Load, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Base Year)",,,," " ,"Summer Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,"Projected Year...

166

,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and 2004 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,"Projected Year...

167

,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and 2009 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,"Projected Year Base","Year",,"FRCC",...

168

,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and 2007 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,"Texas Power Grid","Western Power Grid" ,"Projected Year Base","Year",,"FRCC",...

169

Actual and Counterfactual Attitudes: Reply to Brueckner and Fischer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a recent article, I criticized Anthony L. Brueckner and John Martin Fischers influential argument ... and prenatal non-existence are relevantly similar. Brueckner and Fischer have replied, however, that ... ...

Jens Johansson

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on there is a hydraul ic shock in the forn! of a water hammer. The standard trap used at the Olin-Joliet Plant is an Armstrong carbon steel inverted bucket. The hydraulic shock has not only broken the valve assembly on the inverted buckets, but has also... service is what caused the traps to fail closed. The last set of traps tested was the Armstrong 1013LV stainless steel inverted buckets. The capacity of these units required that for each coil two traps in parallel would be required. The traps do...

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Introduction: Selforganization as an actual theme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...knowledge is dominated by two, perhaps three, hierarchical ontologies. The world...his view such `agents' are seen as a pillar for the development of a new theory of...dimen- sions of life into a science of sustainability. New York: Doubleday. Corning, P...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Self-actualization as it relates to sports participation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Richard Magill, chairman of the author's committee, who gave freely of his time and assistance; Dr. Brad Chissom and Dr. Homer Toison, members of the author's committee; and Dr. Carl Land1ss. Sincere appreciation is expressed to William Husak for his... character1stic profile, athletes from that particular sport may not fit the stereotype. Morgan (25) stated that appl1cation of psychological methods to groups will l1kely be as ineffective as the prescr1ption of medication on a group basis. Personalized...

Husak, Patricia Larkin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

173

books & arts prayed-for group actually did worse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all on the afterlife); the problem of evil, or why bad things happen to good people (why can't God and Innovation at CERN, in Geneva. Fittingly for an exhibition at CERN, several particle physicists feature among particle, made at Brookhaven National Laboratory in November 1974 -- on the right is the unmissable peak

Loss, Daniel

174

A Measurement Method of Actual Thermal Performance of Detached Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of residential houses based on field measurement (In Japanese), AIJ Report on Environmental engineering Vol.3, 1981 2) Martin Sandberg, J?rgen Eriksson: Commissioning of residential buildings in Sweden, IEA ECBCS Annex40 meetings held in Quebec, 2001/9, Doc...

Iwamae, A.; Nagai, H.; Miura, H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

How Well Do Social Ratings Actually Measure Corporate Social Responsibility?*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environmental strengths, in contrast, do not accurately predict pollution levels or compliance violations. Levine Haas School of Business University of California at Berkeley 545 Student Services Building #1900 Responsibility? Abstract: Ratings of corporations' environmental activities and capabilities influence billions

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

176

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

177

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

OSullivan, Francis Martin

178

Actual operating experience with a new NRU unit  

SciTech Connect

The Baker Gas Plant in the Oklahoma Panhandle is a turbo-expander plant combined with a nitrogen rejection unit (NRU). The NRU unit was installed to remove nitrogen and recover helium. Operating problems and solutions of the NRU are discussed.

McKenzie, D. [Williams Field Services, Houston, TX (United States); Brown, B.D. [ABB Randall Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

El desarrollo de la actual produccin teatral en Mxico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calificados que mostraban sobre el escenario solidez y calidad de conjunto. En la actualidad se ha reducido paulatinamente este personal, desmembrando un conjunto ejemplar. No se ha podido competir con la iniciativa privada que ha ido contratando a sus...

Gimeno, Luis

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Actuality and Prospect of Solar Collector Technology in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development tendency and the future of the solar heater utilization product are going to determine the solar energy collector technology development. The vacuum tube solar water heater development direction i...

Luo Yunjun; Liu Airong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reductions to wholesale energy market clearing prices areSystem Operator (CAISO) energy market In general, costhistorical Midwest energy spot-market prices as the basis

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NREL demonstrated the ability of electrolyzers to provide ancillary support as a demand-response resource. 4. ERCOT used market clearing price since it switched pricing methods...

183

4433.ps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 8, 2014 ... capabilities. As shown in Figure 1, the startup capability SU is the maximum energy that ...... An MIP formulation for joint market-. clearing of...

2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

International Monetary Policy Analysis with Durable Goods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION................................................................................ 1 II THE MODEL....................................................................................... 5 1. Representative Household.............................................................. 13 5. Market Clearing Conditions ....................................................... 14 III EQUILIBRIUM .................................................................................. 17 1. Steady-State Equilibrium...

Lee, Kang Koo

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

185

Preschool English Language Learners with Disabilities: A Comparison of Recommended and Actual Language of Instruction Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) 27 th Annual Report to Congress (2005) states that since 1992, an 89% reduction exists in the percentage of students ages 6 through 11 receiving special education services under ?specific learning disabilities? (SLD). OSERS... also reports that starting in 1998 the new DD label appears to have de facto replaced the SLD label for children 3 through 9. As a result, the numbers of children identified with SLD have decreased as the numbers of children assigned under the DD...

Cole, Corinna V.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

IEEE BCTM5.1 Dependenceof ThermalResistanceon Ambientand Actual Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the temperature dependence of the thermal resistance. We extract the thermal resistance as function of ambient, that the temperature dependence of the thermal resistance has not yet being taken into account. It is well-known that the thermal conductivity changes with temperature [I]. For many ofthe,materials used in semiconduc- tor

Technische Universiteit Delft

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales del metabolismo Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

y un mnimo del 10% de xido de calcio. El resultado no es txico ni... del tipo triclosan, altamente txicos y contaminantes. Liberacin de iones por parte de las...

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual higher education Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 7 Models of Mathematics Curriculum Development in Egypt Fayez M. Mina, MA PhD C.Math FIMA Summary: of secondary education, its curricula,...

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - antecedentes situacion actual Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 21 Carro, R.M., Pulido, E. and Rodrguez, P. (2000): Utilizacin del sistema TANGOW en aplicaciones de enseanza adaptativa a...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del marco Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marco Q SILI SCAVALLIAntonio RICERCATORI E PERSONALE DI RUOLO EQUIPARATO AI SENSI DEL D.P.R. 382... AVVISO ELETTORALE Elezioni per la designazione delle rappresentanze del...

191

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual flow calibration Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Saiers1, David P. Genereux2, and Carl H... of data in automated calibration of a ground water flow and solute transport model at a complex field site... Targets ... Source:...

192

Characterization and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

This report describes processing and analysis results of boehmite waste type (Group 5) and insoluble high Cr waste type (Group 6). The sample selection, compositing, subdivision, physical and chemical characterization are described. Extensive batch leach testing was conducted to define kinetics and leach factors of selected analytes as functions of NaOH concentration and temperature. Testing supports issue M-12 resolution for the Waste Treatment Plant.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Behavioral strategies to bridge the gap betweenpotential and actual savings in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Electricity and natural gas use trends in Californiacapita electricity and natural gas use trends in Californiaelectricity use, and natural gas use trends for California

Moezzi, Mithra; Hammer, Christine; Goins, John; Meier, Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Sugars Can Actually Be Good For Your Health (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Like peanut M&Ms, all cells are coated with sugars but the functions of these sugar coatings were a mystery until very recently. This presentation will highlight recent fascinating discoveries regarding why cells are coated with sugars, as well as new tools for cancer detection that take advantage of the cells sugar coating. Professor Bertozzis lab focuses on profiling changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and exploiting this information for development of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In addition, her group develops nanoscience-based technologies for probing cell function and for medical diagnostics.

Bertozzi, Carolyn

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

Correlated preferences for facial masculinity and ideal or actual partner's masculinity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of past health problems (assessed from medical records; Rhodes et al. 2003a ). While...women may be better placed to offset the costs associated with preferring a masculine...taken in the same room under the same lighting. (b) Stimulus calibration Seventy-six...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual intec calcines Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electrodes calcined at 750... electrodes calcined at 750 C on phenol degradation. 3.3. Removal efficiency of TOC with Eu doped SnO2Sb... electrodes calcined at different...

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual acidic tank Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Attachment A PPOP 08.10 Summary: < Refrigerant Storage Tanks Ventilated vaults: < Acid Vaults (May or may not require a permit depending... Boilers...

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual hanford high-level Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three major facilities are planned: a pretreatment facility, a high-level... -shell tanks) that contain millions of liters of high-level liquid waste. The 400 Area is...

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual hanford tank Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T. M. Poston Summary: -West Areas on the Hanford Site. The tank farms house 177 tanks (149 single-shell tanks and 28 double... Hanford's tank waste). Hanford At A Glance...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual tank 48h Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

septic... Purdue AgronomyPurdue Agronomy CROP, SOIL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Septic Tanks: The Primary... Introduction Septic tanks play an essential role in effectively...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual living liver Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A. - Department of Genetics, Stanford University Collection: Biology and Medicine 67 Semi-Automated Soft-Tissue Acquisition and Modeling for Surgical Simulation Summary: measure...

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual key success Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

explains the property as the ability for an ... Source: Schneier, Bruce - BT Group plc Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >>...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual car fleet Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

potential for misidentifying the ... Source: Denver, University of - Fuel Efficiency Automobile Test Data Center Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 15 Smog...

204

The Impacts of Contributory Factors in the Gap between Predicted and Actual Office Building Energy Use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ten years ago, the primary author developed the Building Energy-Efficient Hive (BEEHive) concept in order ... can support the design and operation of energy-efficient office buildings. This was a result of his ...

Emeka E. Osaji; Subashini Suresh; Ezekiel Chinyio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales para determinar Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 F. Ciencias Revisado a fecha: Calendario de exmenes Summary: Primer Parcial T Segundo Parcial T Final T Convocatoria de Septiembre T ALGEBRA I Por...

206

An innovative experimental approach aiming to understand and quantify the actual fire hazards of ionic liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

access to fundamental flammability properties of these chemicals through the use of Pyrolysis Combustion to flash point values, various threshold values being considered in different regulatory frameworks to rate, in the Classification Labelling and Packaging regulation,14 flammable liquids are those having a flash point below

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del trasplante Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plazo, como: - enfermedad del... con una enfermedad o problema mdico que reduce la resistencia del cuerpo a las infecciones, como Source: Oliver, Douglas L. - Department of...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual gobierno venezolano Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 2 CONDICIONES DE TRABAJO EN VENEZUELA EN EL PERODO 1999-2005: ELEMENTOS PARA UN BALANCE DE LA CUESTIN LABORAL EN EL...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - agudo estado actual Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de Agudo" para la Conservacin de... . 1990 First report of Stenella clymene in Venezuela. Agudo, 1990 1991 First ... Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries Review Collection:...

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual waste sample Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 1 10 Fission... though this low-level waste was added to these tanks, the ... Source: Yucca Mountain Project, US EPA Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3 PUB-3093,...

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual acid sulfate Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16 6, 116, 2006 Hygroscopicity of Summary: phase sulfuric acid is in the form of10 ammoniated sulfate clusters. Hence, these compounds are expected... particles either as...

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual driving performance Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

designed to provide "buffering" for a disk ... Source: Mann, Tim - VMware, Palo Alto, California Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 2 A...

213

Evaluation of the accuracy of DHIA predicted milk using actual milk shipped  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the levels of variables for comparisons of interest. Types of tests were grouped for comparison in three ways: Official versus Unofficial, DHI versus DHK and 2X versus APCS versus APT. Official records were compared to Unofficial records and showed a...

Coker, Richard Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales del choque Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE FLUIDOS Asignatura Curso: 1 del Mster en... : Espaol Pgina web: http:www.iac.esenseanza.master Departamento y Datos del Profesorado Telfonos... diferenciales...

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual doe savannah Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska Fairbanks Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 28 Hydrogen Delivery Pipeline Working Group Workshop September 25-26, 2007 Center for Hydrogen Research, Aiken, GA...

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual beta-blocker prescribing Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

patient care and treatment--such as who should be prescribed beta-blocker therapy after a heart attack... the effectiveness of beta- blocker therapy. The data included informa-...

217

Do we get actual vendor name while we searched with zip code...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co has utility id 14006 located in Ohio". But I had also check the zip code in google earth, It falling in other state "Rincorn, PR". Please let me know? Submitted by SUTHARI on...

218

Behavioral strategies to bridge the gap betweenpotential and actual savings in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. American CouncilStudy on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. American CouncilStudy on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. American Council

Moezzi, Mithra; Hammer, Christine; Goins, John; Meier, Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual site soil Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bosque Del Apache Wildlife Refuge. The first soil at the Sevilleta site... % clay. The bulk density of the soil is approximately 1.6 ... Source: Borchers, Brian - Department of...

220

No actual conflict over colony inheritance despite high potential conflict in the social wasp Polistes dominulus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0 and 3.0, respectively, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA: H 2,32=5.595...quartiles=2.0 and 4.0, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA: H 2,32=0.894...2 and 26.2, respectively, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA: H 2,32=1.689...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

H-delta in the Integrated Light of Galaxies: What Are We Actually Measuring?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a cautionary study exploring the reliability of the H-delta line in the integrated spectra of galaxies for determining galaxy ages. Our database consists of the observed integrated spectra of ~120 early-type galaxies, of 7 metal-rich globular clusters in M31 and the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tuc, and of the open cluster M67. We have measured H-delta using index definitions designed to assess contamination from the CN molecule in and around H-delta by choosing combinations of bandpasses that both avoid and include a region of CN molecular lines redward of H-delta. We find systematic differences in the ages derived from H-delta measurements among the various definitions when extracting ages from H-delta in old stellar populations with enhanced CN bands due to non-solar abundance ratios. We propose that neighboring CN lines have a strong effect on pseudocontinuum and central bandpass levels. For stellar populations which have non-solar abundance ratios in C and/or N, population synthesis models that do not account for abundance ratio variations cannot reproduce accurately the CN 4216 \\AA band, which leads to a corresponding inaccuracy in reproducing the various H-delta indices. Hence, caution must be used when extracting galaxy ages from the H-delta line in old stellar populations with significant non-solar abundance ratios.

L. C. Prochaska; J. A. Rose; N. Caldwell; B. V. Castilho; K. Concannon; P. Harding; H. Morrison; R. P. Schiavon

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales para los Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pg. 2 -http:www.eduteka.orgEstandaresDocentesUnesco.php Summary: Comunicacin (TIC) pueden ayudar a los estudiantes a adquirir las capacidades necesarias para llegar a...

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual assistance received Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as- sistance and the other did not. The study used a client-side automated ... Source: Jansen, James - College of Information Sciences and Technology, Pennsylvania State University...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual genome-wide single-nucleotide Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and Medicine 28 Modified version of: Li Y, Tesson BM, Churchill GA and Jansen RC (2010) Critical reasoning on causal inference in genome-wide linkage and...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual una perspectiva Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 9 Publi dans TRACE 54, diciembre 2008, p92-94 Atlas de la diversidad religiosa en Mxico, Rene de la...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - algunas tendencias actuales Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

e Inteligencia Artificial, Universitat d'Alacant Collection: Engineering 7 Publi dans TRACE 54, diciembre 2008, p92-94 Atlas de la diversidad religiosa en Mxico, Rene de la...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual fatigue usage Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2007 Published online 18 June 2007 Keywords: Bone Dentin Fatigue Mineralized tissues Fracture Life... in the fatigue and fracture of mineralized tissues, and to discover how these...

228

,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Organization (MRO)." ," * The MRO, SERC, and SPP regional boundaries were altered as utilities changed reliability organizations. The historical data series " ,"have not been...

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del resultado Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

un ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 30 INGENIERA TCNICA EN INFORMTICA DE SISTEMAS Curso Acadmico 2002 2003 Summary: condiciones...

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - adventicia estado actual Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uso indebido o malgastar recursos del estado incluyendo... identidad de Mensaje del Auditor del Estado DENUNCIA ACTIVIDADES IMPROPIOS HOY -- Contacta la Lnea Directa...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual dos conhecimentos Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

qualquer conhecimento prvio sobre a linguagem Perl Source: Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica - Polo de Lisboa (Institute for Systems and Robotics, Lisbon pole) Portugal...

232

Estimating actual evapotranspiration for a coupled human environment system: sensitivity to drought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the overall aim of this study is to quantify regional water consumption using remote sensing. More Remote sensing can estimate ET as a residual of the energy balance: Friction Velocity Roughness Length Aerodynamic Resistance Net radiation (Rn) Soil Heat Flux (G) T Hot & Cold Pixels Sensible Heat Flux (H

Hall, Sharon J.

233

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual situation analysis Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(ACL) Anthology Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 100 Learning Organizational Roles in a Heterogeneous Multi-agent System Summary: 's subjective...

234

The myth of the single mode man : how the mobility pass better meets actual travel demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this thesis is to investigate how employer transportation subsidy programs can result in more sustainable outcomes. Cities are growth machines that increasingly seek to mitigate the effects of that growth caused ...

Block-Schachter, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Students' Perceived and Actual Use of Strategies for Reading and Writing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the two interrelated processes: reading and writingfor the two interrelated processes: reading and writinginterrelated studies, examined university students' processes

Yoo, Monica

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual radioecological problems Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and radiobiology Radioecology Environmental pollution Reliability and risk analysis of industrial installations... is in the field of radioecology in relation to the dynamics of...

237

Actual compatibility between three-dimensional time conjecture and experienced doppler effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To remove some doubts in this regard, it is pointed out that the idea of one temporal co-ordinate for each spatial freedom degree is by no means in disagreement either with Ives and Stilwell experiment or with mo...

G. Ziino

1983-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

238

Behavioral strategies to bridge the gap betweenpotential and actual savings in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Vol. III, 393-for keynote lecture at Healthy Buildings. December 7-11.In Proceedings of Healthy Buildings Vol. III, 365-370. June.

Moezzi, Mithra; Hammer, Christine; Goins, John; Meier, Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - aporte actual del Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California, al suroeste a travs de la... No Inundacin, la Represa Imperial en el Ro Colorado contribuy con el 85% ... Source: Pacific Institute for Studies in Development,...

240

,"Table 3a. January Monthly Peak Hour Demand, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

which oversees electric reliability. * NERC Regional names may be found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. " ," * Regional name and function has changed from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Economic evaluation of a residential photovoltaic system based on a probability model using actual meteorological data  

SciTech Connect

To design a photovoltaic (PV) generation system economically, it is necessary to use date of the total insolation on a horizontal surface. However, such data is only the total daily values and does not represent the power variation caused by the cloud cover. This paper presents the probability method which represents not only the average but also the variance of the PV generation power, and shows simulated results using this methodology. This study's results indicate that the distribution of the PV power divided by the estimated value of the total insolation on a tilted surface is similar to a normal distribution and that a residential (privately-owned) system without storage, whose PV capacity is more than 2 kWp, has little effect upon the reduction of the energy of an average Japanese household.

Sutoh, T.; Suzuki, H.; Sekine, Y.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual screening platform Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences 88 Correlating the Visual Representation of User Interfaces with their Internal Structures and Metadata Summary: and evaluate two new...

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del mecanismo Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surez - Cartography and Graphic Engineering Department, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 46 081009 Acta...

244

Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Save-a-Watt mechanism: Example avoided costs of energy andSave-a-Watt mechanism example: Avoided costs of energy andRepresents forecasted avoided cost resource savings from EE

Cappers, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Photonic Design: From Fundamental Solar Cell Physics to Computational Inverse Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the levelized cost of energy of photovoltaic systems,an efficient and cost-effective way. Photovoltaic cells are

Miller, Owen Dennis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Photonic Design: From Fundamental Solar Cell Physics to Computational Inverse Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiencies for photovoltaic energy conversion, Solaraspects of photovoltaic solar energy conversion, Solarlevelized cost of energy of photovoltaic systems, Renew-

Miller, Owen Dennis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

9/18/09 2:58 PMDark energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 4http://blog.taragana.com/n/dark-energy-may-not-actually-exist-142560/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rules Ascorbic acid, sugar with green tea helps absorb antioxidants Related News Type 1a superno Australian green lacewing toughest: Study Cell isolated from bio-clock can still keep time Robot trawls

Temple, Blake

248

6.0 UNCERTAINTIES The major uncertainty in this analysis is the actual exposure that people will experience.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-lying aquifers, so shallow open-pit or underground mines may not contaminate the water because of the limited will experience. Because many abandoned uranium mines are on federal lands, the most likely exposure scenario to this are Native Americans who live around the uranium mines and personnel who may work around the sites

249

How Continuous Quantum Measurements in Finite Dimensions Are Actually Discrete Giulio Chiribella* and Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* and Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano QUIT Group, Dipartimento di Fisica ``A. Volta'' and INFM, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia

D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

250

How the Bayesians Got Their Beliefs (and What Those Beliefs Actually Are): Comment on Bowers and Davis (2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Bowers and Davis (2012) Thomas L. Griffiths University of California, Berkeley Nick Chater University view as the unique merits of the Bayesian approach. Keywords: Bayesian inference, probabilistic models the weaknesses of the Bayesian approach rather than considering its merits relative to other theoretical

Pillow, Jonathan

251

Actual Crimes Reported For: Offense Type (includes attempts) 2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 0 1 0 0 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Drug Law Violations Arrest 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Liquor Law Violations Arrest 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Crimes Reported of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. Number of Arrests/Referrals for Select Offenses

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

252

Actual Crimes Reported For: Offense Type (includes attempts) 2011 2012 2013 2011 2012 2013 2011 2012 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 0 0 0 0 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Drug Law Violations Arrest 3 4 0 1 0 0 4 4 0 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Liquor Law Violations Arrest 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Crimes Reported and the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. Number of Arrests/Referrals

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

253

Improving the schedulability of soft real-time open dynamic systems: The inheritor is actually a debtor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a debtor Rodrigo Santos a,*, Giuseppe Lipari b , Jorge Santos a a Dep. Ing. Ele´ctrica y Computadoras. Santos), lipari@sssup.it (G. Lipari), iesantos@criba.edu.ar (J. Santos). www

Lipari, Giuseppe

254

A simple method to estimate actual evapotranspiration from a combination of net radiation, vegetation index, and temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the dynamic nature of heat transfer processes. Satellite remote sensing is a promising tool which has been] Satellite remote sensing is a promising technique for estimating global or regional evapotranspiration (ET). A simple and accurate method is essential when estimating ET using remote sensing data. Such a method

Li, Zhanqing

255

4. The amount of food a person actually eats is called a . . . 5. Americans get most of their sodium from . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? (check only one box) Hispanic or Latino Not Hispanic/Latino 9. With what race do you identify? (You may 10. How many people live in your household (total number)? _________________ 11. How many children under 18 live in your household (total number)? ___________________ 12. What is your current marital

256

On the user-scheduler relationship in high-performance computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.4.2. Power Grid Market Analogy 3.4.3. A Pricestructured solution. Power Grid Market Analogy Using the GAof allocations. Electric power grid market clearing and

Lee, Cynthia Bailey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Market power analysis in electricity markets using supply function equilibrium model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......market operator aggregates the supply and demand bid curves to determine market clearing prices as well as the corresponding supply and demand schedules. In our model, we do not consider the demand side bidding because the load is almost inelastic......

Tao Li; Mohammad Shahidehpour; Ali Keyhani

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Minimization of Transportation, Installation and Maintenance Operations Costs for Offshore Wind Turbines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Although it is a sustainable source and there is abundant potential for energy, cost of energy generated from offshore wind is still high compared to (more)

Faiz, Tasnim Ibn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

PVWatts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calculator estimates the energy production and cost of energy of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) energy systems throughout the world. It allows homeowners, small building...

260

COE Reductions through Active Aerodynamic Control of Rotor Aerodynamics and Geometry  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates potential cost of energy reductions that might be achieved by designing active systems to mitigate loads throughout the wind turbine system.

Griffin, D. A.; McCoy, T. J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 4: Transmission and Integration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

costs would be generally less than 10% wholesale cost of energy Date Study Wind Capacity Penetration (%) Regulation Cost (MWh) Load Following Cost (MWh) Unit Commit- ment Cost...

262

Systems Advisor Model | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Systems Advisor Model Systems Advisor Model Systems Advisor Model (SAM) makes performance predictions and cost of energy estimates for grid-connected power projects based on...

263

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

information NREL has developed the following cost of energy tools: System Advisor Model (SAM): https:sam.nrel.gov SAM makes performance predictions and cost of...

264

January2005 NNSANews  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

than current designs and should significantly reduce the cost-of-energy of wind turbines at low-wind-speed sites. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, researchers...

265

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

location, price of electricity, and cost of ENERGY STAR andtreatment systems. Electricity costs can compose anywhereBear in mind that electricity costs represent as much as 96

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY ALSTOM POWER, INC. ("ALSTOM...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

participation under the above referenced award entitled "Cost of Energy Reduction for Offshore Tension Leg Platfonn (TLP) Wind Turbine Systems Through Advanced Control Strategies...

267

Cost Analysis: Technology, Competitiveness, Market Uncertainty...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

policy impacts on system financing, and to perform detailed levelized cost of energy (LCOE) analyses. This shows the path to cost-equalizing as envisioned under the...

268

2008 Solar Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

levelized cost of energy, solar resource, and capacitySolar Energy Technologies Program. www.solaramericacities.energy.gov/resources.Renewable Energy System Analysis, Solar Resource Assessment,

Price, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Building America Case Study: Advanced Boiler Load Monitoring...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Applicable Climate Zones: Cold, Very Cold, Mixed-Humid PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of energy efficiency measure (including labor): 7,700 Projected energy savings: Up to 14%...

270

SILICON--1997 68.1 By Thomas S. Jones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or quartzite) and costs of energy, reductant coke or low ash coal, iron in the form of steel scrap (if required

271

Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

notes describe each input and provide reasonable default values. Outputs * Minimum energy payment to meet financial criteria * Levelized cost of energy * Payback period * Net...

272

Geothermal Brief: Market and Policy Impacts Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

these initiatives to evaluate their impact on the associated cost of energy and the development of geothermal electric generating capacity using conventional hydrothermal...

273

Results of fracture mechanics analyses of the Adorer cranes in the device assembly facility using actual, rather than conservative, stress-components  

SciTech Connect

Fracture mechanics analyses were done on 3 critical locations on the lower flange of the load beam of the Ederer 5 ton and 4 ton cranes in the D.A.F. Facility. This was done to determine appropriate flaw sizes for NDE detection during periodic inspection, and appropriate inspection intervals.

Dalder, E.N.C.

1996-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

274

5.1 DREAM 2012 Annual Report Executive Summary While the Moon is often considered a stagnant "dead" body, it actually percolates with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

animated by incoming solar energy and matter. In fact, the oxide-rich interface is in constant interaction with its environment, acting as an obstacle to inflowing solar plasma and continually releasing solar solar energy and matter affects the lunar surface (including the effect on surficial water, OH, Na

Christian, Eric

275

Assessment of actual versus modeled SO/sub 2/ impacts of two pulps mills in a northwestern river valley using complex I  

SciTech Connect

On March 8, 1982, the Air Quality Division of the state of Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) informed Publishers Paper Company, and Crown Zellerbach Corporation West Linn that recent ambient air quality modeling in support of a proposed municipal solid waste resource recovery facility indicated that the mills were causing violations of state and national ambient air quality standards for SO/sub 2/. These violations were predicted in elevated terrain surrounding the West Linn/Oregon city area. The department stated that the mills had two options: one, have their air contaminant discharge permits restricted to some amount of low or no sulfur boiler fuels; or two, perform an ambient monitoring program to resolve the SO/sub 2/ attainment status of the area and to ''calibrate/validate'' the air quality impact model. Discussions with DEQ regarding the companies' concerns led to a cooperative five month monitoring program involving equipment and personnel resources from Publishers, Crown and DEQ. All sampling was done in conformance with Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ambient monitoring guidelines for prevention of significant deterioration with strict quality assurance and quality control. The monitoring program began in October of 1982 and ended in April of 1983. Five months of valid ambient SO/sub 2/ and meteorological data were acquired (November through March).

Crews, W.B.; Gilbert, R.E.; Walther, J.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste  

SciTech Connect

Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes of HVAC source EUI between AMY and TMY3. (a) largeof total building source EUI. (a) large office, 90.1-2004a) changes in HVAC source EUI; (b) changes in total source

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Comparison of Planned Versus Actual Dose Delivered for External Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Cone-Beam CT and Deformable Registration  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the adequacy of dose delivery to the clinical target volume (CTV) using external beam (EB) accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients treated with EB APBI underwent cone beam CT (CBCT) before each fraction and daily helical CT (HCT) scans to determine setup errors and calculate the dose per fraction. For 12 patients, an in-house image-intensity-based deformable registration program was used to register the HCTs to the planning CT and generate the cumulative dose. Treatment was 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. EB APBI constraints from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 Phase III protocol were used. Results: The mean setup error per CBCT registration was 9 {+-} 5 mm. Dose-volume histogram analysis showed only one patient (8%) with a decrease in the CTV V90 (8% underdosage). All other patients demonstrated adequate target coverage. PTV{sub E}VAL V90 was on average 3% (range, 0%-16%) less than planned. For the ipsilateral breast, four patients had an increase in V50 ({<=}1% increase) and three patients had an increase in V100 ({<=}9% increase). Only one patient showed an increase >5%. Four patients had an increase in ipsilateral lung V30 (maximum 3%), and one had an increase in heart V5 (1%). Four patients had an increase in MaxDose (maximum 89 cGy). Conclusions: The current CTV-to-PTV margin of 10 mm appears sufficient for {approx}92% of patients treated with EB APBI. Although expansion of the population PTV margin to 14 mm would provide {approx}97% confidence level for CTV coverage, online image guidance should be considered.

Hasan, Yasmin; Kim, Leonard; Wloch, Jennifer; Chi, Y.; Liang, J.; Martinez, Alvaro; Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank, E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

While 84,559 homebuyers in Illinois put in a claim for the Federal Home Buyer Tax Credit, only 25,504 sales were actually boosted by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While 84,559 homebuyers in Illinois put in a claim for the Federal Home Buyer Tax Credit, only 25 (REAL) at the University of Illinois have estimated that the real boost from the Home Buyer Tax Credit that only about 16.5% of the sales in Illinois could be attributed to the Home Buyer Tax Credit rather than

Frank, Thomas D.

280

Simultaneous estimation of actual litter enzymatic catalysis and respiration rates with a simple model of C dynamics in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

caerulea, Betula spp, soluble carbohydrates, Water Extractable Organic Carbon. insu-00852055,version1-19Aug and decomposition, leading to organic matter (OM) accumulation and long-term C-sequestration in peat (Clymo, 1984

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Compensation of Handicap and Autonomy Loss through e-Technologies and Home Automation for Elderly People in Rural Regions: An Actual Need for International Initiatives Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To face the problems of elderly and disabled people in a rural environment, the district of Guret (department of Creuse, France) has set up the Home automation and Health Pole. In association with ... on the u...

Laurent Billonnet; Jean-Michel Dumas; Emmanuel Desbordes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Examining the Cycle: How Perceived and Actual Bicycling Risk Influence Cylcing Frequency, Roadway Design Preferences, and Support for Cycling Among Bay Area Residents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guppy, A. , 1996. Driver awareness and motorcycle accidents.of the International Motorcycle Safety Conference, 2(10):No person riding upon any motorcycle, motorized bicycle,

Sanders, Rebecca L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

53: Total energy use in buildings evaluation and analysisTY. A design day for building load and energy estimation.Building and Environment, 1999; 34(4): 469-477. [5] Hong TZ,

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Ecological Research Some ethical scenarios These research scenarios are based, at least in part, on actual experiments performed in the field.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the invasive species, Phragmites australis, that is becoming dominant in the dune slack. Two other populations are left with Phragmites still present. You also study two additional populations of Sabatia, which

Gotelli, Nicholas J.

285

Chapter 26 - Economic and Reliability Benefits of Large-Scale Solar Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distributed and large-scale solar resources are expected to expand rapidly in some regional and utility systems over the next few years. As this growth takes place, utilities and regional planners are increasingly using economic valuation methods to determine the net costs of alternative renewable resource additions. The net cost equation is the renewable plant's contracted cost or estimated levelized cost of energy plus its transmission and integration costs, minus its energy, ancillary service, and capacity benefits. There is a large and growing research literature analyzing components of this net cost equation for solar resources on an individual project level and as components of expanding renewable portfolios. A key finding is that because of solar's production shape, there are significant changes in energy and capacity value for marginal solar additions in many regions as aggregate solar penetration increases beyond 510% of annual energy. To date, studies have not identified significant constraints on integration into system operations until solar penetrations reach 1015% and even higher (with a larger renewable portfolio), especially if solar resources are sufficiently spatially distributed. However, there are indications that actual system operations may encounter integration constraints at lower penetrations. These operational limits are leading to an increasing focus on integration solutions, including storage, as a possible long-term requirement for continued solar penetration.

Udi Helman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

SciTech Connect

In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This report describes calculation of equipment energy consumption (fuel and electricity) based on estimated conditions in a sample of homes that are representative of expected furnace and boiler installations. To represent actual houses with furnaces and boilers in the United States, we used a set of houses from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey of 1997 conducted by the Energy Information Administration. Our calculation methodology estimates the energy consumption of alternative (more-efficient) furnaces, if they were to be used in each house in place of the existing equipment. We developed the method of calculation described in this report for non-weatherized gas furnaces. We generalized the energy consumption calculation for this product class to the other furnace product classes. Fuel consumption calculations for boilers are similar to those for the other furnace product classes. The electricity calculations for boilers are simpler than for furnaces, because boilers do not provide thermal distribution for space cooling as furnaces often do.

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Decentralized coordination through digital technology, dynamic pricing, and Customer-Driven control: the GridWise testbed demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

The project highlights the idea that technology-enabled decentralized coordination can achieve the same, or better, economic and reliability benefits when compared to utility-focused centralized physical and economic control. Among the design's unique features was a retail double auction with five-minute market-clearing intervals that included residential customers as direct, active market participants. (author)

Chassin, David P.; Kiesling, Lynne

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

This article has been accepted for inclusion in a future issue of this journal. Content is final as presented, with the exception of pagination. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to optimize a generator's profit in an offer-based electricity market cleared by an optimal power flow (OPF) program. A generator's offer is optimized based on its transmission-constrained residual demand derivative and a three-bus looped net- work, respectively; [3] analyzes the linear supply function equi- librium both

Baldick, Ross

289

A Market-Based Mechanism for Providing Demand-Side Regulation Service Ioannis Ch. Paschalidis, Binbin Li, Michael C. Caramanis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

obligation of fast response to commands issued by the wholesale market Independent System Operator (ISO) who provides energy and purchases reserves. The proposed market-based mechanism allows the SMO to control, and command market clearing prices comparable to the price of energy, an increase in RS requirements without

Caramanis, Michael

290

PAPER ACCEPTED TO THE IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Sensitivity-based Security-constrained OPF Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAPER ACCEPTED TO THE IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Sensitivity-based Security-constrained OPF Market Clearing Model F. Milano, Member, IEEE, C. A. Ca~nizares, Senior Member, IEEE, and A. J constraints that properly include voltage stability limits in the operation of competitive electricity markets

Cañizares, Claudio A.

291

A Stochastic Equilibrium Economy with Irreversible Investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their optimal choices and the markets clear. Key words. general equilibrium, capacity expansion, capital asset Value and Market Capitalization 7 Existence 3.1 Capacity Expansion with Irreversible Investment 8 for capacity expansion, (ii) agents who maximize expected total utility of consumption, of money holding

Haussmann, Ulrich

292

Market Design and Price Behavior in Restructured Electricity Markets: An International Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Workable Energy Regulation (POWER). POWER is a program of the University of California Energy Institute of California Energy Institute 2539 Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12 of market- clearing prices. Using evidence on the design of electricity markets in England and Wales, Norway

California at Berkeley. University of

293

Abstract: Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) produce fluctuating output power, which may cause voltage fluctuations and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) produce fluctuating output power, which may cause, solar energy conversion, virtual test bed simulation. Preprint Order Number: PE-531EC (02- plying its market-clearing mechanism. This mechanism determines the accepted and unaccepted energy bids

Gross, George

294

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments in the Levelized Cost of Energy From U.S. WindA; Simonot, E. (2011). The Cost of Wind Energy. Spanish WindUtility Construction Costs: Sources and Impacts. Prepared by

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Measuring and mapping the night sky brightness of Perth, Western Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......global affects of non-renewable energy use through the efforts...city light abatement, energy conservation and the...those involved in the mitigation of light pollution as...pollution and the cost of energy mentioned in Section......

James D. Biggs; Tiffany Fouch; Frank Bilki; Marjan G. Zadnik

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources and Lower Cost of Energy U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources and...

297

Science and Technology Development for Renewable Energy Applications: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-03-00122  

SciTech Connect

This CRADA PTS is a vital element of a larger GE effort to design and build higher-power next-generation wind turbine generators with a cost of energy production competitive or less than conventional fuel-based generation.

Musial, W.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Energy conservation policy in developing countries : the case for market solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interest in energy conservation, although to some degree cyclical, has been stimulated during the last twenty years by the rising cost of energy in a wide range of developing and developed countries, especially following ...

Bates, Robin W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate paid at the utilitys avoided cost. Results of theroughly to the utilitys avoided cost of energy. Details anda reasonable value for the avoided cost of residential PV

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help...

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Transition Strategies for a Hydrogen Economy in Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The economic viability of the energy sector is fundamental for the development of Mexico. The main objective of the economic sectors is to reduce the cost of energy production. The application of the nuclear a...

Sergio Dale Bazn-Perkins

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Levelized Electricity Costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of levelized energy costs responds to the necessity of disclosing the ... in order to recover the total life cycle cost of energy production. This chapter charts the effectiveness of levelized cost fo...

Nuno Luis Madureira

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Solar forecasting review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to solar thermal power pants energy production planning,to solar ther- mal power plants energy production planning [solar resource, seasonal deviations in production and load profiles, the high cost of energy

Inman, Richard Headen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Low Wind Speed Turbine Development Project Report: November 4, 2002 - December 31, 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work conducted by Clipper Windpower under the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine project. The objective of this project was to produce a wind turbine that can lower the cost of energy.

Mikhail, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydroxide LCOE levelized cost of energy LHV lower heating value LPG liquefied petroleum gas MP mass production MYPP Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan NaS...

306

Rethinking Market Governance and Energy Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy security is no longer just a matter of securing access to adequate energy suppliesit is concerned with other aspects ... such as the environmental and social costs of energy use. This chapter presents the...

Youngho Chang; Swee Lean Collin Koh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Argonne National Laboratory Develops Extreme-Scale Wind Farm...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

studies of complex flow and wind turbine interactions in large land-based and offshore wind farms that will improve wind plant design and reduce the levelized cost of energy....

308

WiFi Meet FuFi: Disruptive Innovation in Logistics Catalysed by Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost of energy per unit of goods or services is likely to evolve as a key differentiator of economic growth. The debt of nations will be re-structured. Corporations, big or small, may not escape from managing their energy ...

Datta, Shoumen

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ASSESSMENT OF PIEZOELECTRIC MATERIALS FOR ROADWAY ENERGY HARVESTING Cost of Energy and Demonstration Roadmap Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: DNV KEMA Energy & Sustainability JANUARY 2014 CEC5002013007

310

The Utility Relationship to its Key Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the price of energy may have stabilized for the moment, the impact of several years of rate increases in the cost of energy, materials, and labor have made American industry re-evaluate their operations. Utilities serving clusters...

Gilbert, J. S.

311

Measuring and mapping the night sky brightness of Perth, Western Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......affects of non-renewable energy use through the...and environmental costs continue to rise...estimate that the energy used to create light pollution cost Japan 20 billion...pollution and the cost of energy mentioned in Section......

James D. Biggs; Tiffany Fouch; Frank Bilki; Marjan G. Zadnik

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Tower Manufacturing and Installation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The DOE Wind Program has issued a Notice of Intent for a funding opportunity, tentatively titled U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources, and Lower Cost of Energy.

313

Do Americans Consume Too Little Natural Gas? An Empirical Test of Marginal Cost Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production, and in particular, coal, are associated with considerably larger external costs than natural gas.costs of energy. In the United States, 81% of greenhouse gas emissions are derived directly from the production

Davis, Lucas; Muehlegger, Erich

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Chris, Calamita, Renewable Energy Certificates and Energy Savings...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

savings" is defined in part as - A reducGon in the cost of energy, water, or wastewater treatment, from a base cost established through a methodology set forth in the...

315

EIA Form-826 and EIA Form-861 Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

green attributes on line 1? No you need to provide a reasonable estimate of the cost of energy plus green attribute based on the best data you have available. Our customers...

316

Producing Fuel and Electricity from Coal with Low Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,W.C. Turkenburg Depanrnentof Science,Technologyand Society University of Utrecht Oudegracht320,NL-3511 PL Utrecht-use energydemandsto which this processcan be applied; .the costs of energy production compared to the costs

317

Industrial Energy Audit Basics by an Energy Auditor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and expenses and not coming in as savings. There must also be a project manager assigned to coordinate communications. The Investment Grade audit makes continuous commissioning and performance contracting possible. With the high cost of energy today, energy...

Phillips, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Building America Case Study: Raised Ceiling Interior Duct System...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): all PERFORMANCE DATA (of the measure alone, not whole house) Cost of energy-efficiency measure (including labor): 1890 or 1.51ft 2 Projected...

319

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing bearing faults in wind turbines: A data-mining approach Andrew Kusiak*, Anoop Verma Department to wear prematurely, leading to increased turbine maintenance costs, and could lead to sudden, expensive mining is applied to identify bearing faults in wind turbines. Historical wind turbine data are analyzed

Kusiak, Andrew

320

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- gated and used as permanent magnets because of their high mag- netization (Ms), Curie temperature (Tc on the structural and magnetic properties of high coercivity (Hc) SrFe10Al2O19 hexaferrite have been investigated are ferromagnetically aligned but the coupling between Fe moments at the different crystallographic positions may

Liu, J. Ping

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have attracted considerable interest as a promising "green" substitute for organic solvents. The broad as an environmentally-benign source for alternative solvents. By tuning their molecular compositions, ILs exhibit into the atmosphere. In consequence, ILs have been used in recent years in diverse applica- tions, both as solvents

Jelinek, Raz

322

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on physically or chemically textured surfaces are encoun- tered in dropwise mode of vapor condensation features are altered when sliding drops leach away the promoter layer. In the absence of chemical reactions between the promoter and the condensing liquid, the wall shear stress is the primary parameter controlling

Khandekar, Sameer

323

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thickness, viscosity of the boundary layer, and considered hydrothermal and lower boundary heat losses and exposing detachment scars to the melting front, (3) due to rapid melting, hydrothermal heat loss through and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling or licensing

Bindeman, Ilya N.

324

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from various devices (e.g., engines, hot gas exhausts, reactors, furnaces, heaters, boilers, hot water and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling or licensing generation Energy harvesting refers to the conversion to electricity of var- ious forms of energy (mechanical

Chung, Deborah D.L.

325

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydraulic flow unit tortuosity porosity­permeability relationship cementation exponent Although several techniques have been proposed to predict permeability using porosity­permeability rela- tionships, the Kozeny in any reservoir rock. Its importance arises due to the major role it plays during the development phase

Hossain, M. Enamul

326

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at the authors institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling or licensing and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil

Galland, Olivier

327

Actual trends of decentralized CHP integration -- The Californian investment subsidy system and its implication for the energy efficiency directive (Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWK Technologie Integration -- Das kalifornische Fordermodell und dessen Implikation fur die Endenergieeffizienzrichtlinie)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://www.epa.gov/chp/project_resources/calculator.htmVerbrennungsmotoren. Quelle: Midwest CHP Application Center,Mikroturbinen. Quelle: Midwest CHP Application Center, 2003

Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Actual trends of decentralized CHP integration -- The Californian investment subsidy system and its implication for the energy efficiency directive (Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWK Technologie Integration -- Das kalifornische Fordermodell und dessen Implikation fur die Endenergieeffizienzrichtlinie)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

z.B. Wind versus Brennstoffzelle) und der Vermaschung desBrennstoffzellen Eine Brennstoffzelle konvertiert Energierichtig gewarteten Brennstoffzelle, enorm - im Vergleich zu

Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center (DLR), Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany n Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR, Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA l Ashima Research, 600 S

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

330

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An in vitro injury model for SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells: Effect of strain and strain rate Maciej Skotak, Fang injury model wherein a wide range of strain () and strain rate ( ) can be precisely and independently encounter during either blunt or blast impact-induced traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). In combination

Farritor, Shane

331

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Solid state synthesis Solid electrolyte LiPON Lithium ion battery Computational prediction X as amorphous thin film electrolytes for use in all solid state micro-batteries. In the course-ray diffraction The new crystalline compound, Li2PO2N, was synthesized using high temperature solid state methods

Holzwarth, Natalie

333

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data. " Advantages and issues with different types of wind turbine wake data are given. " Metrics of offshore wind farms to maximized power production and minimize turbine fatigue loading. This paper of the drive towards optimizing multi-mega- watt wind farm layouts to both maximize power production [1

Pryor, Sara C.

334

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and herbicide-fire treatments affected survival of cotton rats, but the evidence for the effect of her- bicide- fire treatment in both species. Without clear understanding of their ecological impacts, alternatives Longleaf pine management practices and their impact on small mammal populations Binab Karmacharya

Oli, Madan K.

335

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,11], to name a few. Among the various techniques hydrothermal processing is a widely contested method and kinetics. Owing to this unique characteristic hydrothermal processing has been used to synthesize a wide Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Copper; Crystal growth; Hydrothermal synthesis; Dendrite formation

Zheng, Yufeng

336

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Axion physics in a Josephson junction environment Christian Beck Queen Mary University of London junction Axions SQUIDs a b s t r a c t We show that recent experiments based on Josephson junctions, SQUIDs experimental setups in which SQUID-like axionic interactions in a resonant Josephson junction environment can

Beck, Christian

337

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by comparison to recent experimental data of Dietze, and to an analytical solution for an oscillating free, in the pharmaceutical industry or in nuclear reactors. Their main advan- tages are the good heat transfer liquid and gas phase. The concern of the present paper is the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of wavy

Bothe, Dieter

338

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a transport phenomenon in reservoirs that came to be known as CBM (Coalbed Methane). Today, production from has been focused on their characteristics in the recent years. Studies of methane production from coal

Mohaghegh, Shahab

339

CODES AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR INVESTIGATOR DATA SHEET (VA FORM 10-5368; PAGE 18) 5a. ACADEMIC RANK: The default Academic Rank for each Series is shown. If actual rank is different, or code is 06,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= Not Applicable 34 = Dermatopathology 14 = Immunology 21 = Pediatric Allergy 07 = Diagnostic Radiology 15 = Oral Surgery 58 = Radiology 08 = Biology 24 = Health Economics 42 = Orthopedic Surgery 59 = Speech Pathology 68 = Clinical Pathology 28 = Mathematics 46 = Pediatrics 63 = Surgery (General) 12

Karsai, Istvan

340

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Roads have varied ecological impacts on the adjacent, roadside maintenance, and vehicle emis- sions (Forman, 2000; Lee e

Neher, Deborah A.

342

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and Barrett (2003) review this litera- ture. IEA members internalize the effect of their actions on other strategy We modify a canonical participation game used to study International Environmental Agreements (IEA Environmental Agreements (IEAs) attempt to alleviate the free riding problem associated with transboundary

Karp, Larry S.

343

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the static pressure in a predetermined range. A dynamic, penalty-based, electromagnetism-like algorithm has increased over the years. Heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems use as much energy consumption in the United States [2]. The energy efficiency of HVAC systems is being considered

Kusiak, Andrew

344

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experimentally by Fairbrother and Stubbs (1935), Taylor (1961) and theoretically by Bretherton (1961). Using

Muradoglu, Metin

345

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Despite the absence of subcritical crack growth, average fracture toughness values of 6.1 and 3.3 MPa m1, fiber toughening, transformation toughening and micro- crack toughening. Over the past decade, many

Ritchie, Robert

346

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Market Price Forecast Study.  

SciTech Connect

This study presents BPA's market price forecasts for the Final Proposal, which are based on AURORA modeling. AURORA calculates the variable cost of the marginal resource in a competitively priced energy market. In competitive market pricing, the marginal cost of production is equivalent to the market-clearing price. Market-clearing prices are important factors for informing BPA's power rates. AURORA was used as the primary tool for (a) estimating the forward price for the IOU REP Settlement benefits calculation for fiscal years (FY) 2008 and 2009, (b) estimating the uncertainty surrounding DSI payments and IOU REP Settlements benefits, (c) informing the secondary revenue forecast and (d) providing a price input used for the risk analysis. For information about the calculation of the secondary revenues, uncertainty regarding the IOU REP Settlement benefits and DSI payment uncertainty, and the risk run, see Risk Analysis Study WP-07-FS-BPA-04.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Data:A45d0394-d7d0-4296-acaf-274bc5ebdca3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

394-d7d0-4296-acaf-274bc5ebdca3 394-d7d0-4296-acaf-274bc5ebdca3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Southern Indiana Gas & Elec Co Effective date: 2011/05/03 End date if known: Rate name: CSP - Cogeneration and Small Power Sector: Commercial Description: RATES FOR SALE OF ENERGY AND CAPACITY If the qualifying facility desires to purchase electric service from Company, the electric requirements for the qualifying facility shall be separately metered and billed in accordance with the applicable Rate Schedule. PURCHASE PRICES Company will pay for energy and capacity received from the qualifying facility on a monthly basis as follows: Energy Component: Prices paid are based on Company's avoided cost of energy associated with a one (1) megawatt decrement of load. The energy payment is expressed on a cents-per-kWh basis in Table 1 of this schedule. Payments for energy are adjusted to reflect line losses, expressed as a percentage for the previous year. It is expected that the projected energy payment will vary as Company's actual fuel costs change. Energy rates listed in Table 1 will be revised on or before February 28th in each subsequent year in accordance with the Commission Cause No. 37494. In the case of contracts for purchases of 72,000 Kilowatt-hours or more per month from a qualifying facility, the following factors may be considered and an appropriate adjustment made to the agreed purchase price in each contract: 1. The extent to which scheduled outages of the qualifying facility can be usefully coordinated with scheduled outages of Company's generation facilities. 2. The relationship of the availability of energy from the qualifying facility to the ability of Company to avoid costs, particularly as is evidenced by Company's ability to dispatch the qualifying facility. 3. The availability of energy from a qualifying facility during Company's system daily or seasonal peak. 4. The usefulness of energy from a qualifying facility during Company system emergencies, including its ability to separate its load from its generation.

348

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

349

Optimal Control of Residential Energy Storage Under Price Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Control of Residential Energy Storage Under Price Fluctuations Peter van de ven Department habits. We formulate the problem of minimizing the cost of energy storage purchases subject to both user- gramming, energy storage, threshold policy. I. INTRODUCTION Wholesale energy prices exhibit significant

350

Toward a national plan for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy: guidelines for regional planning  

SciTech Connect

This document provides data and guidelines for the development of regional programs for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy. It estimates the solar potential for individual regions based on the solar resources, competing costs of energy, and specific regional characteristics. It also points out the primary decision makers, technology distributors, and potential barriers that should be addressed by a commercialization program.

Miller, G.; Bennington, G.; Bohannon, M.; Gerstein, R.; Kannan, N.; Page, A.; Rebibo, K.; Shulman, M.; Swepak, P.; Taul, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Optimal Design of a Stand-Alone Hybrid PV/Fuel Cell Power System for the City of Brest in France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= Photovoltaic; FC = Fuel Cell; COE = cost of energy; CC = Capital Costs; NPC = Net Present Cost; TNPC = Total. Elbaset4 Abstract ­ This paper deals with the optimal design of a stand-alone hybrid photovoltaic and fuel reserved. Keywords: Hybrid power system, renewable energy, photovoltaic, fuel cell, generation unit sizing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

352

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy turbine EIA Energy Information Administration LCOE levelized cost of energy NG natural gas PSCo Public

353

Emerging approaches, challenges and opportunities in life cycle assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than conventional fuels, mainly because...over conventional fuels before any tax exemptions...and their specific effects, thus missing a...been available, average market mixes have...estimating mass, fuel consumption and costs of energy conversion...C. Hellweg S. , Effects of consumptive water use...

Stefanie Hellweg; Lloren Mil i Canals

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

354

Preprint of a paper to be presented at UUVS 2005, Southampton, Sept 2005 Cost vs. performance for fuel cells and batteries within AUVs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that secondary lithium batteries offer the lowest energy cost. PEM fuel cells should produce energy at a lower integrators, we are in a position to make estimates of the cost of energy from a marinised fuel cell for fuel cells and batteries within AUVs Gwyn Griffiths National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

Griffiths, Gwyn

355

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Harlingen Irrigation District Cameron County No. 1 Canal Meters and Telemetry Equipment, Impervious-Lining of Delivery Canals, Pipelines Replacing Delivery Canals, and On-Farm Delivery-Site Meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, impervious-lining of delivery canals, 24" pipelines replacing delivery canals, and on-farm delivery-site meters). Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Expected cost...

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

356

Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis Jeremy Van monitoring (OSHM) and condition-based maintenance (CBM) of wind turbine blades has the potential to reduce O cost of energy (LCOE) [1]. The costs required to keep wind turbines working in extreme temperatures

McCalley, James D.

357

Why genetically modified crops?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...expensive energy, with no...The cost of energy directly...methods to measure variation...farmers, reducing return on...weevil and related Lepidopteran...release of greenhouse gas emissions...address pending energy shortfalls...influencing policies in developing...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Emerging approaches, challenges and opportunities in life cycle assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...on environmental benefits and costs before money is invested in new...Acidification impacts of hydro and nuclear are not shown because they were negligible...1021/es2030577 16 BSI, BS EN 15804:2012 + A1:2013 Sustainability...mass, fuel consumption and costs of energy conversion equipments...

Stefanie Hellweg; Lloren Mil i Canals

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

359

Modelling and geometry optimisation of wave energy converters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling and geometry optimisation of wave energy converters Adi Kurniawan Supervisors: Prof DIY Riding radical wave power" #12;#12;Any device will deliver some energyAny device will deliver some energy #12;What matters is the cost of energy Ultimate problem Given the waves, design a device

Nørvåg, Kjetil

360

Transmission Design at the National Level: Benefits, Risks and Possible Paths Forward  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

James Bushnell University of California, Davis PSERC Publication 12-01 May 2012 #12;Information about to move electric energy interregionally is limited to the capacity of the existing transmission system, the levelized cost of energy production for renewables (e.g., wind, solar, and deep geoth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

An Analysis of Hard Drive Energy Consumption Anthony Hylick, Ripduman Sohan, Andrew Rice, and Brian Jones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Analysis of Hard Drive Energy Consumption Anthony Hylick, Ripduman Sohan, Andrew Rice, and Brian consumed by the electronics of a drive is just as important as the mechanical energy consumption; (ii consumption was a concern pri- marily for mobile computing domains. The rising cost of energy and increased

Cambridge, University of

362

Study Finds 54 Gigawatts of Offshore Wind Capacity Technically Possible by 2030  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE recently funded a study that finds the deployment of at least 54 gigawatts of offshore wind power to be technically possible by 2030. The National Offshore Wind Energy Grid Interconnection Study (NOWEGIS), which focused on two DOE objectives in reducing barriers to deployment of offshore wind, cost of energy and timeline of deployment.

363

Outcomes from Breakout Sessions The core concepts to address in climate change education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the changes that are already occurring and keep it from getting worse. a. Risk assessment b. Cost / benefit demands a. Demonstrate the "embedded" costs of energy (what it takes to produce a particular product: 1. Scientific basis a. biogeochemical cycling (e.g., carbon) b. solar radiation/ variation c

364

SiC's Potential Impact on the Design of Wind Generation System , Leon M. Tolbert1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is that SiC devices would reduce substantially the cost of energy of large wind turbines that use power with the fixed voltage and frequency of the grid. SiC- based power devices have several advantages, includingSiC's Potential Impact on the Design of Wind Generation System Hui Zhang1 , Leon M. Tolbert1

Tolbert, Leon M.

365

Schrepel, Eric From: Jenkins, Kris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to capture the true costs of energy when choosing to buy their first wind generation plant, noting that wind, the utility estimates wind energy to be 25% cheaper than natural gas fired power and 5% cheaper than coal-fired power." With these numbers, it only seems reasonable to develop the wind infrastructure and generation

366

Virginia Offshore Wind Cost Reduction Through Innovation Study (VOWCRIS) (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

The VOWCRIS project is an integrated systems approach to the feasibility-level design, performance, and cost-of-energy estimate for a notional 600-megawatt offshore wind project using site characteristics that apply to the Wind Energy Areas of Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina.

Maples, B.; Campbell, J.; Arora, D.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

CX-007567: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cost of Energy Reduction for Offshore Tension Leg Platform (TLP) Wind Turbine Systems Through Advanced Control Strategies for Energy Yield Improvement, Load Mitigation and Stabilization CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 01/19/2012 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office

368

Utility Roles in Preserving the Industrial Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While the price of energy may have stabilized for the moment, the impact of several years of rate increases in the cost of energy, materials, and labor has made American industry re-evaluate its operations. Utilities serving clusters of industrial...

Gilbert, J. S.

369

This is a preprint of the following article, which is available from http://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://mdolab.engin.umich.edu/content/ multidisciplinary-design-optimization-offshore-wind-turbines-minimum-levelized-cost-energy. The published article.A.M. van Kuik. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines for Minimum Levelized Cost of Energy. Renewable Energy (In press), 2014 Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of Offshore Wind Turbines

Papalambros, Panos

370

Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this plan cycle - http://www.nwcouncil.org/energy/grac/home/. #12;9/30/2014 1 Generating Resourcesg&M · Construction Schedule GENESYS 5 · Levelized Cost of Energy · Levelized Fixed Cost (annual basis) Fuel Price Forecasts Natural gas, coal, oil Transmission, Integration Costs Reference Plant Key Attributes (1

371

Generating Resources Advisory Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plants 10:45 AM Break 11:00 AM Peaking Technologies Continued... 11:30 AM Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine and Utility Scale Solar PV Reference plant updates Levelized cost of energy 12:00 PM Lunch in the PNW Technology and development Offshore 2:30 PM Hydropower Scoping Study ­ Preliminary Plan

372

February 16, 2011 Dear Associate Deans for Research and Department Heads,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Cost of Energy (COE) of offshore wind plant systems. US Offshore Wind: Removing Market Barriers.energy.gov/windandhydro/financial.html US Offshore Wind: Technology Development Deadlines: 4/1/2011 ­ Pre-application; 6 research activities to address market barriers limiting the deployment of offshore wind energy projects

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

373

Fast Nonconvex Model Predictive Control for Commercial Refrigeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

its capabil- ity to minimize the total cost of energy for a commercial refrigeration system while multi-zone refrigeration system, consisting of several cooling units that share a common compressor. This corresponds roughly to 2% of the entire electricity consumption in the country. Refrigerated goods constitute

374

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwest is No Longer More Energy Intensive than the U.S. Total Energy Use Per GDP 0.00 2.00 4.00 6.00 8 (including conservation), energy and electricity prices, and changing policies over the past 20 to 25 years services ­ Bonneville's role ­ Changing technology ­ Growing cost of energy · (Poses questions

375

iSTOCK PHOTO Oklahoma State University's innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND INDIVIDUALS TO OFFER INNOVATIVE WAYS TO REDUCE THE COST OF ENERGY. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT IGSHPAiSTOCK PHOTO FALL 2013 52 Oklahoma State University's innovation in geothermal production technology is a green option that provides long-term cost savings and production efficiency. The ground

376

The Virginia Tech Climate Action Commitment Resolution Commission on University Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Whereas, efforts to reduce electricity and energy use and related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also approaches to reduce energy consumption and costs and reduce GHG emissions; and Whereas, Virginia Tech has reduce the rising costs of energy; Whereas, the 2007 Virginia Energy Plan and 2008 report of the Governor

Virginia Tech

377

Volume 30, Issue 2 Penalizing Consumers for Saving Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not only households' financial constraints but also demand inertia (Department of Energy & Climate Change, 2008). Another strategy is to increase the cost of energy through taxes on household consumption energy savings also from customers for whom there is a net cost in doing so. The author is grateful

Boyer, Edmond

378

A new comprehensive model to simulate the restructured power market for seasonal price signals by considering on the wind resources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generation expansion planning requires simulating the medium term power market. This can be done based on electricity price signals in the power market. The market clearing price is one of the most important factors to determine the incremental rate of private investor's profit. When calculating this parameter the planners encounter greater uncertainties in a restructured power market than in a centralized market. This can be critical when renewable energies participate in this type of electricity market. In this study the scenario based method is used to model a wind power plant in the restructured power market. The hourly output of the wind turbine generators is simulated based on a hybrid Auto Regressive and Moving Average-Monte Carlo method. Each scenario of the wind power plant as well as its occurrence probability is determined based on a data mining technique. Then a new comprehensive model for the restructured power market is proposed to maximize the profit of investors as well as to determine the market clearing price by considering stochastic and rational uncertainties. The stochastic uncertainties include the demand and fuel price that are modelled by using the Monte-Carlo method. The Nash equilibrium in the rational uncertainty as a strategic behaviour of players in the power market is determined by using the Cournot game. The effect of the CO2 tax rate and the bilateral contract are investigated in this study. Finally the model is implemented in a test power market. According to the findings this model can be used as a robust and comprehensive model to determine the market clearing price which can be applied for capacity expansion planning.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daily Electrical Consumption of Simulation Model vs. ActualDaily Electrical Consumption of Simulation Model vs. ActualHourly Electrical Consumption of Simulation Model vs. Actual

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

1.Field intensity values in the original source documents were expressed in a range of upper and lower values (e.g.40 to 80 milligauss).For illustrative purposes,mid-point values were used in this chart.Actual values may be higher or lower.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 5 mG Transmission Lines (115-500 kV) Distribution Lines (34.5 kV and under) 50 feet 100 to electric transmission and distribution lines.You will see that many common items are higher than LIPA that the magnetic fields at the edge of right-of-way for transmission lines would not exceed 150 mG.

Krstic, Miroslav

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

natural gas transmission and distribution module (NGTDM) of NEMS represents the natural gas market and determines regional market-clearing prices for natural gas supplies and for end-use consumption, given the information passed from other NEMS modules. A transmission and distribution network (Figure 15), composed of nodes and arcs, is used to simulate the interregional flow and pricing of gas in the contiguous United States and Canada in both the peak (December through March) and offpeak (April through November) period. This network is a simplified representation of the physical natural gas pipeline system and establishes the possible interregional flows and associated prices as gas moves from supply sources to end users. natural gas transmission and distribution module (NGTDM) of NEMS represents the natural gas market and determines regional market-clearing prices for natural gas supplies and for end-use consumption, given the information passed from other NEMS modules. A transmission and distribution network (Figure 15), composed of nodes and arcs, is used to simulate the interregional flow and pricing of gas in the contiguous United States and Canada in both the peak (December through March) and offpeak (April through November) period. This network is a simplified representation of the physical natural gas pipeline system and establishes the possible interregional flows and associated prices as gas moves from supply sources to end users. Figure 15. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module Network

382

Consumer cost effectiveness of CO2 mitigation policies in restructured electricity markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the cost of carbon dioxide mitigation to consumers in restructured USA markets under two policy instruments, a carbon price and a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). To estimate the effect of policies on market clearing prices, we constructed hourly economic dispatch models of the generators in PJM and in ERCOT. We find that the cost effectiveness of policies for consumers is strongly dependent on the price of natural gas and on the characteristics of the generators in the dispatch stack. If gas prices are low (~$4/MMBTU), a technology-agnostic, rational consumer seeking to minimize costs would prefer a carbon price over an RPS in both regions. Expensive gas (~$7/MMBTU) requires a high carbon price to induce fuel switching and this leads to wealth transfers from consumers to low carbon producers. The RPS may be more cost effective for consumers because the added energy supply lowers market clearing prices and reduces CO2 emissions. We find that both policies have consequences in capacity markets and that the RPS can be more cost effective than a carbon price under certain circumstances: continued excess supply of capacity, retention of nuclear generators, and high natural gas prices.

Jared Moore; Jay Apt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

RETFinance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RETFinance RETFinance Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: RETFinance Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: analysis.nrel.gov/retfinance/ Cost: Free Language: English RETFinance Screenshot References: RETFinance [1] Logo: RETFinance RETFinance is a levelized cost-of-energy model, which simulates a detailed 20-year nominal dollar cash flow for renewable energy projects power projects including project earnings, cash flows, and debt payment to calculate a project's levelized cost-of-electricity, after-tax nominal Internal Rate of Return, and annual Debt-Service-Coverage-Ratios. "RETFinance is a levelized cost-of-energy model, which simulates a detailed

384

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, No. 3 [http://eetd.lbl.gov/newsletter/nl30/] 8, No. 3 [http://eetd.lbl.gov/newsletter/nl30/] Environmental Energy Technologies Division News [http://eetd.lbl.gov/newsletter/] © 2010 Environmental Energy Technologies Division [http://eetd.lbl.gov/] E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [http://www.lbl.gov/] Disclaimer [http://www.lbl.gov/Disclaimers.html] WINTER NEWSLETTER: VOL. 8, NO. 3 Hidden Costs of Energy Production NRC Report The Rosenfeld Named After California's Godfather of Energy Solar Photovoltaic Report II Release Methane in Central California Wind Power Property Values Community Wind FABS21 Release Franchise Tax Board Data Center Project Sources and Credits This issue addresses everything from a National Academy of Sciences report on the hidden costs of energy production to tools for making semiconductor fabrication facilities and data centers more

385

CX-007432: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7432: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7432: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007432: Categorical Exclusion Determination Integrated Optimization and Cost Analysis of an Innovative Offshore Wind Plant Design for Shallow and Transitional Water Depths CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 12/07/2011 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office DOE proposes to provide funding to Virginia Electric and Power Company to conduct cost of energy analyses for offshore wind project cost reduction innovations. The project goal is to model a 25 percent decrease in the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Innovation areas that would be modeled to determine LCOE reductions include turbine, foundation and installation, and electrical systems. Information on site specific conditions from at least two dozen offshore locations would be obtained from existing data sources

386

Energy management systems for commercial buildings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Increasing costs of energy and the development of lower cost microelectronics have created a growing market for energy management systems applied to commercial buildings. This report examines the spectrum of EMS available and how they are used in different types of commercial buildings. An informal survey of 197 commercial building owners provided additional information on EMS installed and the energy savings attributed to those systems. Evaluations were performed to identify types of EMS appropriate to specific types of commercial buildings.

Woody, A.W.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Project Profile: System Advisor Model Enhancements for CSP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since the first public release, over 35,000 people representing manufacturers, project developers, academic researchers, and policy makers have downloaded the System Advisor Model (SAM). Manufacturers are using the model to evaluate the impact of efficiency improvements or cost reductions in their products on the cost of energy from installed systems. Project developers use SAM to evaluate different system configurations to maximize earnings from electricity sales. Policy makers and designers use the model to experiment with different incentive structures.

388

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering UMassAmherst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nalubega Advisors: Professor Erin Baker and Dylan Chase Abstract Currently Offshore wind Energy is very of the wind Farm vs. Cost of Energy 9.947 9.9475 9.948 9.9485 9.949 9.9495 9.95 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 CostofEnergyMechanical and Industrial Engineering UMassAmherst OFFSHORE WIND ENERGY COST MODEL Charlene

Mountziaris, T. J.

389

Regionalized Life Cycle Assessment: Computational Methodology and Application to Inventory Databases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) studies have shown that site-dependent impact assessment for categories like acidification and eutrophication give more accurate and realistic results than site-generic assessments. ... In addition, we use indicators, developed by the CASES (cost assessment for sustainable energy systems) project, which assess the external costs of energy generation (38), and consider impacts on human health, agriculture, acidification damage to structures, and loss of biodiversity. ...

Christopher L. Mutel; Stefanie Hellweg

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

390

Argonne National Laboratory Develops Extreme-Scale Wind Farm Simulation Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Researchers at DOE's Argonne National Laboratory are developing a computational simulation tool to conduct studies of complex flow and wind turbine interactions in large land-based and offshore wind farms that will improve wind plant design and reduce the levelized cost of energy. Simulations on a wind-plant-scale require accurate simultaneous resolution of multiple flow scales, from mesoscale weather to turbine-blade scale turbulence, which presents special demands on the computational solver efficiency and requires extreme scalability.

391

Fluidized-bed retrofit a practical alternative to FGD  

SciTech Connect

A comparison is made between the costs of flue-gas desulphurization retrofit to a 112 MW pf-fired boiler, fluidized-bed combustion retrofit to the boiler, and a new fluidized-bed boiler. Breakdowns are given for capital costs, operating and maintenance costs and the busbar cost of energy for a 20 year unit life. The analysis shows that fbc is a viable option for the retrofit of many existing boilers from both a technical and economic viewpoint.

Stringfellow, T.E.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

CRSP CASH PROJECTIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CASH PROJECTIONS CASH PROJECTIONS FY 2012-FY 2014 ($ IN THOUSANDS) KEY: = more than $70 million = less than $70 million more than $35 million = less than $35 million ACTUAL FORECAST ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL FORECAST ACTUAL ACTUAL FORECAST FORECAST FY 2012 FY 2013 OCT 2012 NOV 2012 DEC 2012 JAN 2013 FEB 2013 MAR 2013 APR 2013 MAY 2013 JUN 2013 JUL 2013 AUG 2013 SEP 2013 SEP 2013 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 Note REVENUES Firm 141,638 $ 150,984 $ 9,356 $ 14,951 $ 15,015 $ 13,131 $ 12,470 $ 11,088 $ 11,817 $ 11,754 $ 12,954 $ 19,737 $ 13,914 $ 12,582 $ 10,652 $ 156,839 $ 152,591 $ 164,182 $ a WRP 32,170 $ 62,774 $ 755 $ 2,418

393

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Table 2. Total Energy Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 5. Total Coal Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 6. Total Electricity Sales, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 7. Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 8. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 9. Coal Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 12. Net Coal Exports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 13. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 14. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 15. Coal Prices to Electric Utilities, Actual vs. Forecasts

394

Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the efficacy of a novel sorbent can effectively remove trace metal contaminants (Hg, As, Se and Cd) from actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams at high temperature (above the dew point of the gas). The performance of TDA's sorbent has been evaluated in several field demonstrations using synthesis gas generated by laboratory and pilot-scale coal gasifiers in a state-of-the-art test skid that houses the absorbent and all auxiliary equipment for monitoring and data logging of critical operating parameters. The test skid was originally designed to treat 10,000 SCFH gas at 250 psig and 350 C, however, because of the limited gas handling capabilities of the test sites, the capacity was downsized to 500 SCFH gas flow. As part of the test program, we carried out four demonstrations at two different sites using the synthesis gas generated by the gasification of various lignites and a bituminous coal. Two of these tests were conducted at the Power Systems Demonstration Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama; a Falkirk (North Dakota) lignite and a high sodium lignite (the PSDF operator Southern Company did not disclose the source of this lignite) were used as the feedstock. We also carried out two other demonstrations in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) using synthesis gas slipstreams generated by the gasification of Sufco (Utah) bituminous coal and Oak Hills (Texas) lignite. In the PSDF tests, we showed successful operation of the test system at the conditions of interest and showed the efficacy of sorbent in removing the mercury from synthesis gas. In Test Campaign No.1, TDA sorbent reduced Hg concentration of the synthesis gas to less than 5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and achieved over 99% Hg removal efficiency for the entire test duration. Unfortunately, due to the relatively low concentration of the trace metals in the lignite feed and as a result of the intermittent operation of the PSDF gasifier (due to the difficulties in the handling of the low quality lignite), only a small fraction of the sorbent capacity was utilized (we measured a mercury capacity of 3.27 mg/kg, which is only a fraction of the 680 mg/kg Hg capacity measured for the same sorbent used at our bench-scale evaluations at TDA). Post reaction examination of the sorbent by chemical analysis also indicated some removal As and Se (we did not detect any significant amounts of Cd in the synthesis gas or over the sorbent). The tests at UNDEERC was more successful and showed clearly that the TDA sorbent can effectively remove Hg and other trace metals (As and Se) at high temperature. The on-line gas measurements carried out by TDA and UNDEERC separately showed that TDA sorbent can achieve greater than 95% Hg removal efficiency at 260 C ({approx}200g sorbent treated more than 15,000 SCF synthesis gas). Chemical analysis conducted following the tests also showed modest amounts of As and Se accumulation in the sorbent bed (the test durations were still short to show higher capacities to these contaminants). We also evaluated the stability of the sorbent and the fate of mercury (the most volatile and unstable of the trace metal compounds). The Synthetic Ground Water Leaching Procedure Test carried out by an independent environmental laboratory showed that the mercury will remain on the sorbent once the sorbent is disposed. Based on a preliminary engineering and cost analysis, TDA estimated the cost of mercury removal from coal-derived synthesis gas as $2,995/lb (this analysis assumes that this cost also includes the cost of removal of all other trace metal contaminants). The projected cost will result in a small increase (less than 1%) in the cost of energy.

Gokhan Alptekin

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the dump valve on these two appliances would have eliminated uncertainty in knowing when waste water was flowing and the recovery system operated. The study also suggested that capture of dryer exhaust heat to heat incoming air to the dryer should be examined as an alternative to using drying exhaust energy for water heating. The study found that over a 6-week test period, the system in each house was able to recover on average approximately 3000 W-h of waste heat daily from these appliance and showers with slightly less on simulated weekdays and slightly more on simulated weekends which were heavy wash/dry days. Most of these energy savings were due to the shower/GFX operation, and the least savings were for the dishwasher/GFX operation. Overall, the value of the 3000 W-h of displaced energy would have been $0.27/day based on an electricity price of $.09/kWh. Although small for today s convention house, these savings are significant for a home designed to approach maximum affordable efficiency where daily operating costs for the whole house are less than a dollar per day. In 2010 the actual measured cost of energy in one of the simulated occupancy houses which waste heat recovery testing was undertaken was $0.77/day.

Tomlinson, John J [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

B  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Utility Form (actual form was pink) EIA-457G Fuel Oil Supplier Form (actual form was green) EIA-457H Liquefied Petroleum Gas Supplier Form (actual form was blue) RECS:...

397

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION MODULE NATURAL GAS TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Annual Flow Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Capacity Expansion Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Pipeline Tariff Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Distributor Tariff Submodule The natural gas transmission and distribution module (NGTDM) is the component of NEMS that represents the natural gas market. The NGTDM models the natural gas transmission and distribution network in the lower 48 States, which links suppliers (including importers) and consumers of natural gas. The module determines regional market-clearing prices for natural gas supplies (including border prices) and end-use consumption. The NGTDM has four primary submodules: the annual flow submodule, the capacity expansion submodule, the pipeline tariff submodule, and the

398

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

399

Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplement Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility (DOE/EIS-0236-S2)(6/6/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

487 487 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 107 / Wednesday, June 4, 2003 / Notices We look forward to an informative discussion of the options and a determination of which would best provide all participants in the market clear, transparent, dependable, and accurate price signals with which to make informed decisions. The Capitol Connection offers coverage of all open and special Commission meetings held at the Commission's headquarters live over the Internet, as well as via telephone and satellite. For a fee, you can receive these meetings in your office, at home, or anywhere in the world. To find out more about Capitol Connection's live Internet, phone bridge, or satellite coverage, contact David Reininger or Julia Morelli at (703) 993-3100, or visit http://www.capitolconnection.org.

400

Microsoft Word - Documentation - Price Forecast Uncertainty.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

October 2009 October 2009 1 October 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty 1 Summary It is often noted that energy prices are quite volatile, reflecting market participants' adjustments to new information from physical energy markets and/or markets in energy- related financial derivatives. Price volatility is an indication of the level of uncertainty, or risk, in the market. This paper describes how markets price risk and how the market- clearing process for risk transfer can be used to generate "price bands" around observed futures prices for crude oil, natural gas, and other commodities. These bands provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty regarding the range in which markets expect prices to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

LAARPresentation_CERTSSept2012-v4.pptx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B. Cardell B. Cardell Smith College C. L. Anderson Cornell University Using demand response makes sense to balance wind uncertainty and variability, but... ...why shouldn't wind provide self reserves? * Modeling framework * Quick re-cap of the impact of using DR to balance wind variability and uncertainty * Representing generator forced outages * Preliminary results on the use of wind "self- reserves" * Achieved through the integration of sub-models Capturing the impact of load and wind forecasting errors on system dispatch Dispatch/ Market clearing Wind uncertainty Load uncertainty Ramping costs and constraints Power flow Carbon production C(x) e f (x) e L (x) * 15% of load is responsive in the 'real- time' market * Optimize use of HA (slower responding &

402

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(99), (Washington, DC, February 1999).

403

International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude he International Energy Module determines changes in the world oil price and the supply prices of crude oils and petroleum products for import to the United States in response to changes in U.S. import requirements. A market clearing method is used to determine the price at which worldwide demand for oil is equal to the worldwide supply. The module determines new values for oil production and demand for regions outside the United States, along with a new world oil price that balances supply and demand in the international oil market. A detailed description of the International Energy Module is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System, DOE/EIA-M071(06), (Washington, DC, February 2006).

404

Sustainable resource planning in energy markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the role of sustainable energy volatility in a market participants competitive expansion planning problem. The incomplete information non-cooperative game-theoretic method is utilized in which each generation company (GENCO) perceives strategies of other market participants in order to make a decision on its strategic generation capacity expansion. Sustainable generation incentives, carbon emission penalties, and fuel price forecast errors are considered in the strategic decisions. The market clearing process for energy and reserves is simulated by each GENCO for deriving generation expansion decisions. A merit criterion (i.e., the utility value) is proposed for a more realistic calculation of the expected payoff of a GENCO with sustainable energy resources. Finally, the impact of transmission constraints is investigated on the GENCOs expansion planning decision. The case studies illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

Saeed Kamalinia; Mohammad Shahidehpour; Lei Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shows how the actual load profile follows the hourly bidscriteria were as follows: Low load variability enhancesloads, the actual loads do not closely follow the forecasted

Kiliccote, Sila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Microsoft Word - sDE-FOA-0000033.rtf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reporting Requirements Checklist. The Milestone Status will present actual performance in comparison with Milestone Log, and include: (1) the actual status and progress of the...

407

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and Weather for a Medium-Size Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Buildingand actual building energy consumption can be attributed touncertainties in energy consumption due to actual weather

Wang, Liping

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Biomimetic Membrane for CO2 Capture from Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

These Phase III experiments successfully addressed several issues needed to characterize a permeator system for application to a pulverized coal (PC) burning furnace/boiler assuming typical post-combustion cleanup devices in place. We completed key laboratory stage optimization and modeling efforts needed to move towards larger scale testing. The SOPO addressed six areas. Task 1--Post-Combustion Particle Cleanup--The first object was to determine if the Carbozyme permeator performance was likely to be reduced by particles (materials) in the flue gas stream that would either obstruct the mouth of the hollow fibers (HF) or stick to the HF bore wall surface. The second, based on the Acceptance Standards (see below), was to determine whether it would be preferable to clean the inlet gas stream (removing acid gases and particulates) or to develop methods to clean the Carbozyme permeator if performance declined due to HF block. We concluded that condensation of particle and particulate emissions, in the heat exchanger, could result in the formation of very sticky sulfate aerosols with a strong likelihood of obtruding the HF. These must be managed carefully and minimized to near-zero status before entering the permeator inlet stream. More extensive post-combustion cleanup is expected to be a necessary expense, independent of CO{sub 2} capture technology This finding is in agreement with views now emerging in the literature for a variety of CO{sub 2} capture methods. Task 2--Water Condensation--The key goal was to monitor and control temperature distributions within the permeator and between the permeator and its surroundings to determine whether water condensation in the pores or the HF bore would block flow, decreasing performance. A heat transfer fluid and delivery system were developed and employed. The result was near isothermal performance that avoided all instances of flow block. Direct thermocouple measurements provided the basis for developing a heat transfer model that supports prediction of heat transfer profiles for larger permeators Tasks 3. 4.1, 4.2--Temperature Range of Enzymes--The goal was to determine if the enzyme operating temperature would limit the range of thermal conditions available to the capture system. We demonstrated the ability of various isozymes (enzyme variants) to operate from 4-85 C. Consequently, the operating characteristics of the enzyme are not a controlling factor. Further, any isozyme whose upper temperature bound is at least 10 C greater than that of the planned inlet temperature will be stable under unanticipated, uncontrolled 'hiccups' in power plant operation. Task 4.4, 4.4--Examination of the Effects of SOx and NOx on Enzyme Activity (Development of Flue Gas Composition Acceptance Standards)--The purpose was to define the inlet gas profile boundaries. We examined the potential adverse effects of flue gas constituents including different acids from to develop an acceptance standard and compared these values to actual PC flue gas composition. Potential issues include changes in pH, accumulation of specific inhibitory anions and cations. A model was developed and validated by test with a SO{sub 2}-laden stream. The predicted and actual data very largely coincided. The model predicted feed stream requirements to allow continuous operation in excess of 2500 hours. We developed operational (physical and chemical) strategies to avoid or ameliorate these effects. Avoidance, the preferred strategy (noted above), is accomplished by more extensive cleanup of the flue gas stream. Task 5--Process Engineering Model--We developed a process-engineering model for two purposes. The first was to predict the physical and chemical status at each test point in the design as a basis for scale-up. The second was to model the capital and operating cost of the apparatus. These were accomplished and used to predict capex, opex and cost of energy. Task 6--Preliminary Commercialization Plan--We carried out analyses of the market and the competition by a variety of parameters. The conclusion was that there is a l

Michael C. Trachtenberg

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Modeling and optimization of hybrid windsolar-powered reverse osmosis water desalination system in Saudi Arabia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A hybrid wind/solar powered reverse osmosis desalination system has been modeled and simulated. The results of the simulation have been used to optimize the system for the minimum cost per cubic meter of the desalinated water. The performance of the hybrid wind/solar powered RO system has been analyzed under Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, weather data for a typical year. The performance has been evaluated under a constant RO load of 1kW for 12h/day and 24h/day. The simulation results revealed that the optimum system that powers a 1-kW RO system for 12h/day that yields a minimum levelized cost of energy comprises 2 wind turbines, 40 \\{PVs\\} modules and 6 batteries and the levelized cost of energy of such system is found to be 0.624$/kWh. On the other hand, for a load of 1-kW for 24h/day, the optimum system consists of 6 wind turbines, 66 \\{PVs\\} modules and 16 batteries with a minimum levelized cost of energy 0.672$/kWh. Depending on the salinity of the raw water, the energy consumption for desalination ranges between 8 and 20kWh/m3. This means that the cost of using the proposed optimum hybrid wind/solar system for water desalination will range between $3.693/m3 and $3. 812/m3 which is less than the range reported in the literature.

Esmail M.A. Mokheimer; Ahmet Z. Sahin; Abdullah Al-Sharafi; Ahmad I. Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action on the Electricity Workforce - October 17, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MEMORANDUM MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy FROM: Electricity Advisory Committee Richard Cowart, Chair DATE: October 17, 2012 RE: Recommendations on Electricity Workforce _________________________________________________________________________ Overview The energy industry is undergoing a significant transition, described by some as a revolution. Driving this change are many technology breakthroughs aimed at addressing a growing and aging population, rising cost of energy, increasing environmental awareness and concerns and escalating cybersecurity needs. Advancements have been realized and are continuing to facilitate carbon management, electric transportation, sustainability and increased system reliability

411

Tags | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tags Tags Home > Community OpenEI imported Open Data data Utility Rates developer United States linked open data Legal review Energy data Categorical Exclusions workshop Big Data LOD Town Hall meeting API Green Button BHFS quarterly meeting Solar clean energy web services forum analysis energy permitting utility rate Renewable Energy NREL wiki Datapalooza geothermal DOE Smart Grid Innovation GRR Literature Review NEPA Semantic Mediawiki EDI Wind roadmap current energy ocean energy feedback transmission result formats multicolor Google maps results design FONSI GMREC compound queries maps Performance interface MHK LEDS Tidal building power plant GTO challenge marine energy levelized cost of energy CBS Wave Cost Current facilities management indoor architecture

412

Northern Energy Program (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Program (Ontario, Canada) Energy Program (Ontario, Canada) Northern Energy Program (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Ontario Program Type Grant Program By pursuing innovative solutions to renewable energy generation and conservation, northerners will be able to reduce their costs of energy

413

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam System Balancing Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Location: Chicago, IL Partners: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Steam heating distribution system and controls Application: Retrofit; Multifamily Year Tested: 2011-2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold humid continental PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $9,000 on average Projected Energy Savings: 10.2% heating savings Chicago's older multifamily housing stock is primarily heated by centrally metered steam or hydronic systems. Often, significant temperature differentials

414

Renewable Energy Technologies Financial Model (RET Finance) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Technologies Financial Model (RET Finance) Renewable Energy Technologies Financial Model (RET Finance) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Technologies Financial Model (RET Finance) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: analysis.nrel.gov/retfinance/login.asp Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-technologies-financi Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance The RET Finance model calculates levelized cost of energy of renewable electricity generation technologies including biomass, geothermal, solar, and wind. The model calculates project earnings, detailed cash flows, and debt payments and also computes a project's levelized cost of electricity,

415

Buried and Encapsulated Ducts, Jacksonville, Florida (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buried and Encapsulated Ducts Buried and Encapsulated Ducts Jacksonville, Florida PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Buried and Encapsulated Ducts Location: Jacksonville, FL Partners: BASF http://www.basf.com Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Ductwork and Attic Insulation Application: New and/or Retrofit; Single-Family Year Tested: 2010-2011 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All Climates in IECC Moisture Regime A. PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy-Efficiency Measure (including labor): $2,439 Projected Energy Savings: 34% cooling and heating savings Projected Energy Cost Savings: $11/month or $135/year Ductwork installed in unconditioned attics can significantly increase the overall

416

APS - Solutions for Business Financing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APS - Solutions for Business Financing APS - Solutions for Business Financing APS - Solutions for Business Financing < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Retail Supplier Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info Funding Source APS State Arizona Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Varies (project costs, less rebate amount) APS and National Bank of Arizona have partnered to offer low-interest financing to all customers qualifying for energy efficiency incentives under the Solutions for Business program. Combined with program rebates, financing can help cover the up-front costs of energy-saving improvements,

417

Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects (Double-Gatefold Brochure)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

How Does WEF Work? How Does WEF Work? Inputs The user enters data about the project, including: * General assumptions * Capital costs * Operating expenses * Financing assumptions * Tax assumptions * Economic assumptions * Financial constraining assumptions. Extensive help notes describe each input and provide reasonable default values. Outputs * Minimum energy payment to meet financial criteria * Levelized cost of energy * Payback period * Net present value * Internal rate of return * Summary and detailed cash flows. As an alternative option, if the user enters a first-year energy payment, the program will calculate the rate of return, coverage ratios, etc. Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects The National Renewable Energy Laboratory created

418

Fairness and dynamic pricing: comments  

SciTech Connect

In ''The Ethics of Dynamic Pricing,'' Ahmad Faruqui lays out a case for improved efficiency in using dynamic prices for retail electricity tariffs and addresses various issues about the distributional effects of alternative pricing mechanisms. The principal contrast is between flat or nearly constant energy prices and time-varying prices that reflect more closely the marginal costs of energy and capacity. The related issues of fairness criteria, contracts, risk allocation, cost allocation, means testing, real-time pricing, and ethical policies of electricity market design also must be considered. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This fact sheet describes a UCLA-led solar project to investigate high operating temperature liquid metal heat transfer fluids, funded by the SunShot initiative. The project team is using a combination of modeling along with a variety of property measurement and validation studies to demonstrate that the metal alloys identified can meet all the needs of a concentrating solar power plant. A successful candidate fluid would allow for the reduction of the levelized cost of energy by increasing the operating temperature for the CSP plant power cycle, which would increase thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency.

420

Economic Optimal Operation of Community Energy Storage Systems in Competitive Energy Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed, controllable energy storage devices offer several significant benefits to electric power system operation. Three such benefits include reducing peak load, providing standby power, and enhancing power quality. These benefits, however, are only realized during peak load or during an outage, events that are infrequent. This paper presents a means of realizing additional benefits by taking advantage of the fluctuating costs of energy in competitive energy markets. An algorithm for optimal charge/discharge scheduling of community energy storage (CES) devices as well as an analysis of several of the key drivers of such optimization are discussed.

Arghandeh, Reza; Onen, Ahmet; Jung, Jaesung; Broadwater, Robert P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Wind Turbine Gearbox Failure Modes - A Brief (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbine gearboxes are not always meeting 20-year design life. Premature failure of gearboxes increases cost of energy, turbine downtime, unplanned maintenance, gearbox replacement and rebuild, and increased warranty reserves. The problem is widespread, affects most Original Equipment Manufacturers, and is not caused by manufacturing practices. There is a need to improve gearbox reliability and reduce turbine downtime. The topics of this presentation are: GRC (Gearbox Reliability Collaborative) technical approach; Gearbox failure database; Recorded incidents summary; Top failure modes for bearings; Top failure modes for gears; GRC test gearbox; Bearing nomenclature; Test history; Real damage; Gear sets; Bearings; Observations; and Summary. 5 refs.

Sheng, S.; McDade, M.; Errichello, R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Industrial heat pumps - types and costs  

SciTech Connect

Confusion about energy savings and economics is preventing many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps. The variety of heat pumps available and the lack of a standard rating system cause some of this confusion. The authors illustrate how a simple categorization based on coefficient of performance (COP) can compare the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps. After evaluating examples in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs, they compare heat pumps from the various categories on the basis of economics. 6 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Economic optimal operation of Community Energy Storage systems in competitive energy markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distributed, controllable energy storage devices offer several benefits to electric power system operation. Three such benefits include reducing peak load, providing standby power, and enhancing power quality. These benefits, however, are only realized during peak load or during an outage, events that are infrequent. This paper presents a means of realizing additional benefits by taking advantage of the fluctuating costs of energy in competitive energy markets. An algorithm for optimal charge/discharge scheduling of Community Energy Storage (CES) devices as well as an analysis of several of the key drivers of the optimization are discussed.

Reza Arghandeh; Jeremy Woyak; Ahmet Onen; Jaesung Jung; Robert P. Broadwater

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

End-use taxes: Current EIA practices  

SciTech Connect

There are inconsistencies in the EIA published end-use price data with respect to Federal, state, and local government sales and excise taxes; some publications include end-use taxes and others do not. The reason for including these taxes in end-use energy prices is to provide consistent and accurate information on the total cost of energy purchased by the final consumer. Preliminary estimates are made of the effect on prices (bias) reported in SEPER (State Energy Price and Expenditure Report) resulting from the inconsistent treatment of taxes. EIA has undertaken several actions to enhance the reporting of end-use energy prices.

Not Available

1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

Outdoor PV Module Degradation of Current-Voltage Parameters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic (PV) module degradation rate analysis quantifies the loss of PV power output over time and is useful for estimating the impact of degradation on the cost of energy. An understanding of the degradation of all current-voltage (I-V) parameters helps to determine the cause of the degradation and also gives useful information for the design of the system. This study reports on data collected from 12 distinct mono- and poly-crystalline modules deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Most modules investigated showed < 0.5%/year decrease in maximum power due to short-circuit current decline.

Smith, R. M.; Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Production of Bio-Synthetic Natural Gas in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The land area within 100 km of Canadas network of natural gas pipelines was estimated to be capable of producing 67?210 Mt of dry lignocellulosic biomass per year with minimal adverse impacts on food and fiber production. ... Although predicted production costs ($17?21 GJ?1) were much higher than current energy prices, a value for low-carbon energy would narrow the price differential. ... The competition between these cost factors leads to an optimum size at which the cost of energy produced from biomass is minimized. ...

Kevork Hacatoglu; P. James McLellan; David B. Layzell

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

Current Status of Concentrator Photovoltaic (CPV) Technology  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the current status of the market and technology for concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) cells and modules. Significant progress in CPV has been achieved, including record efficiencies for modules (36.7%) and cells (46%), as well as growth of large field installations in recent years. CPV technology may also have the potential to be cost-competitive on a levelized cost of energy (LCOE) basis in regions of high direct normal irradiance (DNI). The study includes an overview of all installations larger than 1 MW, information on companies currently active in the CPV field, efficiency data, and estimates of the LCOE in different scenarios.

Philipps, S. P.; Bett, A. W.; Horowitz, K.; Kurtz, S.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Devens: Cold Climate Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40 Harvard, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Devens Sustainable Housing Location: Harvard, MA Partners: Metric Construction www.metriccorp.com Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings www.carb-swa.com Size: 1,300 ft 2 plus basement Price: approx. $250,000 Year Completed: 2012 Climate Zone: Cold PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index: 39 (before renewables) Projected Annual Energy Savings: $580 Incremental Cost of Energy Efficiency Measures: $7,804 Incremental Annual Mortgage increase: $503 Achieving aggressive energy efficiency targets requires tight coordination and clear communication among owners, designers, builders, and subcontrac-

431

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data collected from energy suppliers are supplemented withmail questionnaires from energy suppliers who provide actual

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

UvA in the spotlight interview with Susan Bgels `Learning how to think really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, so lame and unexciting on the surface, actually expresses a great and terrible truth.' David Foster

van Rooij, Robert

433

Creswell is appointed as new faculty senator,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(actually, we just raised our hands and identified ourselves) * Midway through the meeting, I looked over

434

Electric Power from the Rhine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... prepared and verified before they are actually made by direct control or by signals to substations: ...

1933-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

435

Estimation of Atmospheric Corrosion of High-Strength, Low-Alloy Steels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the corrosion resistance of low-alloy weathering steels from chemical composition data and from actual

436

The U.S. Department of Energy Wind Turbine Development Program  

SciTech Connect

The development of technologically-advanced wind turbines continues to be a high priority of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a range of projects that assist the wind industry to design, develop, and test new wind turbines. The overall goal is to develop turbines that can compete with conventional electric generation with a cost of energy (COE) of 5 cents/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with a cost of energy of 4 cents/kWh or less at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be supported through the DOE Turbine Development Program. The Turbine Development Program uses a two-path approach. The first path assists US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid-1990s). The second path assists industry to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. This paper describes present and planned projects under the Turbine Development Program.

Link, H.; Laxson, A.; Smith, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Land-Based Wind Plant Balance-of-System Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 30% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understand the BOS costs for wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by industry partners. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, foundations for various wind turbines, transportation, civil work, and electrical arrays. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and geographic characteristics. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine wind plant costs associated with turbine sizes ranging from 1-6 MW and wind plant sizes ranging from 100-1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the capital investment cost and the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrate the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US wind plants.

Mone, C.; Maples, B.; Hand, M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Passive solar multi-family housing: design, development, finance and market strategies  

SciTech Connect

A basis is provided for problem definition of energy and multi-family housing. A comprehensive look at the costs of energy is taken, not just in the cost per Btu, but also in terms of the marginal or replacement cost of energy, the social and environmental costs of consuming imported energy, and at the projected future costs and availability of non-renewable energy supplies. Some reasons are identified why a developer should consider an energy efficient passive solar project, and the roles that each project team should play to achieve the successful project are described. The concepts necessary to understand the physics and design of passive solar systems are introduced. The unique characteristics of multiple housing are covered and basic ideas for the application of solar concepts are provided. Site selection and planning, design considerations for planning the building, design considerations for individual unit designs, and ways to integrate energy efficient and passive solar components in townhouses and apartments are covered. Techniques are covered for energy conscious and solar design and construction, with emphasis on supplying the tools for making decisions at the appropriate times in the design process. Also covered are: the profit motive to develop housing; state and federal programs, present or planned, the encourage passive solar and energy efficient construction; Solar and Conservation Banks; state and federal tax credits; and financial analysis and marketing strategies. The Massachusetts Passive Multi-Family Program is described. Twelve examples of passive solar multifamily projects from around the country are also described. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

U.S. Balance-of-Station Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

With balance-of-system (BOS) costs contributing up to 70% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understanding the BOS costs for offshore wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger offshore turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by GL Garrad Hassan. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, ports and staging, transportation and installation, vessels, foundations, and electrical. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and soil type. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine costs has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of offshore wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrates the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from U.S. offshore wind plants.

Maples, B.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Summary of number of over-estimated results between AEO Reference 2. Summary of number of over-estimated results between AEO Reference cases and realized outcomes All AEOs NEMS AEOs Percent of Projections Over-Estimated Percent of Projections Over-Estimated Table 3. Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth), Actual vs. Projected 24% 37% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Projected 52% 24% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 44% 61% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Projected 59% 65% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Projected 56% 61% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Projected 54% 23% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 49% 70% Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Projected 56% 71% Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Actual vs. Projected 45% 64%

442

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Table 1. Summary of Differences between AEO Reference Cases and Realized Outcomes Percent Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Percent Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Actual vs. Forecasts 34% 5.5% 18% 4.5% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts 68% 52.9% 36% 20.8% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts 31% 2.9% 44% 1.8% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Forecasts 51% 4.9% 53% 5.2% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts 49% 6.4% 51% 3.6% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts 61% 63.5% 23% 28.9% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts 38% 6.7% 59% 5.6% Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Forecasts 51% 5.5% 70% 5.8%

443

March  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 2. Table 2. Summary of Differences between AEO Reference Cases and Realized Outcomes Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Average Absolute Percent Difference Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Actual vs. Projected 41% 1.0% 51% 1.0% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Projected 55% 51.1% 26% 30.6% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 40% 3.3% 56% 3.0% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Projected 58% 5.8% 64% 6.5% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Projected 53% 6.5% 57% 4.7% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Projected 53% 57.6% 18% 32.7% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 47% 7.1% 68% 7.0% Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Projected

444

JGI - Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statistics Statistics FY 2014 Overall Sequencing Progress, Updated Quarterly Quarter Total Bases (trillions) Operating Hours Goal Actual Total* Actual % of Goal Goal (hours)** Actual Total Actual % Goal Q1 2014 15,000 18.827 126% 2,164 2208 102% Q2 2014 17,000 2,117 Q3 2014 18,000 2,140 Q4 2014 18,000 2,164 FY 2014 Total 68,000 18.827 28% 8,585 2208 26% * Includes Illumina HiSeq, MiSeq and PacBio sequencing platforms. ** Operating Hour target is based on 98% of the total available hours. FY 2013 Overall Sequencing Progress, Updated Quarterly Quarter Total Bases (Billions) Operating Hours Goal Actual Total* Actual % of Goal Goal (hours)** Actual Total Actual % Goal Q1 2013 15,000 20,004 133% 2,164 2,208 102%

445

Inverse Fluid Convection Problems in Enclosures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency, security, and reliability of industrial and domestic processes essentially depend on the deep understanding of their actual processes of fluid flow and heat transfer. Actual processes of fluid flow control and ...

Zhao, Fu-Yun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Microsoft PowerPoint - Session2_Rogers.pptx  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2008 - 2015 1,400 ACTUAL FORECAST search Program 1,200 Yemen USA - Kenai Trinidad Russia ACTUAL FORECAST atural Gas Res 1,000 Qatar Peru Papua New Guinea Oman Nameplate...

447

Study on effects of resident-perceived neighborhood boundaries on public services accessibility & its relation to utilization: using Geographic Information System, focusing on the case of public parks in Austin, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parks based on equity consideration and its relationship to park utilization. The study also addressed whether the neighborhood boundaries perceived by the actual residents may exhibit more actual neighborhood construct than Census-based Neighborhood...

Cho, Chun Man

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and Weather for a Medium between predicted and actual building energy consumption can be attributed to uncertainties introduced in energy consumption due to actual weather and building operational practices, using a simulation

449

Methodology for the Preliminary Design of High Performance Schools in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steps include: 1) Using an actual 2006 weather file with measured solar radiation, 2) Modifying lighting & equipment schedule using ASHRAE's RP-1093 methods, 3) Using actual equipment performance curves (i.e., scroll chiller), 4) Using the Winkelmann...

Im, Piljae

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Mobilization of plasmid pHSV106 from Escherichia coli HB101 in a laboratory-scale waste treatment facility.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...approximating that of an actual wastewater treatment plant) did not prevent plas...proportionally) those of an actual wastewater treatment plant, which suggests that there...R-plasmid transfer in wastewater treatment plant. Appl. Environ. Microbiol...

P Mancini; S Fertels; D Nave; M A Gealt

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Pumping System Measurements To Estimate Energy Savings: Why and How  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measuring performance parameters (flow rate, pressures, and power) for existing systems is essential to understanding how both the pump(s) and system are actually performing. Examples of reasons why actual measurements are critical and practical...

Casada, D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Natural disasters and the challenge of extreme events: risk management from an insurance perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high uncertainty in actual risk evaluation to an acceptable level. Due to the rarity...extreme events, specific risk prevention measures are hardly...high uncertainty in actual risk evaluation to an acceptable level. Due to the rarity...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

GL Report BU 355  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MC MC BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT ($ IN THOUSANDS) CRSP MC CRSP MC BUDGET BUDGET FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 TOTAL DESCRIPTION ACTIVITY ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET OBS EXPEND OBS OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP O&M N/FLCR ANLVM 100 $ - $ 539 $ 354 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ Power Billing N/FLCR BILLM - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ Conserv & Renew Energy N/FLCR CAREM 159 $ 118

454

Calculation Theory of Nonuniform Distribution in Cleanroom  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the nonuniform distributions of airflow and dust particles, particles in cleanroom are actually not evenly distributed. This chapter...

Zhonglin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Literature Survay in the Field of Primary and Secondary Concentrating Solar Energy Systems Concerning the Choice and Manufacturing Process of Suitable Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The following report summarizes the actual knowledge concerning aspects of solar energy, that had been specified in the convocation.

A. Grychta; J. Kaufmann; P. Lippert; G. Lensch

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Commissariat l'nergie Atomique Centre de Grenoble -17, rue des Martyrs -38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that is a key research area for the development of electric car. A problem observed on actual graphitic

Sart, Remi

457

Preparado como una iniciativa de NARSTO, esta evaluacin de Ozono (O3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emisiones de estos precursores de O3 están directamente relacionadas a los actuales estilos de vida, las

458

CONGRESSMAN SHERWOOD BOEHLERT (R-NY) OPENING STATEMENT FOR ENERGY MARK-UP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-deep drilling program and landmark compromise on the Clean Coal Program to ensure that it actually leads to true

459

Design of Integrated Laboratory and Heavy-Duty Emissions Testing Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Both simulated and actual diesel emissions were able to be measured and analyzed using a bench-top adiabatic reactor.

460

Fundamental Characteristics of Semiconductor Nanowires for Intersubband Optoelectronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bulk e?ective permittivity to a layer actually comprised of subwavelength variations relies on the identification

Burnett, Benjamin Adams

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Cooling Tower Energy Conservation Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? State of art retrofit, pumping head reduction methodology and hydraulic calculations will be discussed with actual field illustrations....

Burger, R.

462

Designing PV Incentive Programs to Promote System Performance: A Review of Current Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program Washington Renewable Energy Production Incentivesfor Renewable Energy October 2006 actual energy productionrenewable energy credits (RECs) through energy production-

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Effects of Synthesis, Sr-doping, and Co3O4 on the Perovskite LaCoO3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Josephson junction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .a sample via two Josephson junctions, which can detect verymaterial (the actual Josephson junctions). A schematic can

Durand, Alice Marica

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONFERENCE ON ENERGY RESEARCH AT HISTORICALLY BLACK UNIVERSITIES, JUNE 17-19, 1980, SHERATON PATRIOT INN, WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy availability (gas, oil, electricity), unit cost and alternatives, actual usage, and detailed measurement and adjustments of principal units.

Authors, Various

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Coupling of laser energy into plasma channels D. A. Dimitrov, R. E. Giacone, D. L. Bruhwiler, and R. Busby  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ramp leads to an actual focus at the top of the ramp due to plasma focusing, resulting in reduced spot

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

466

Topical Lunch Minutes 1. Dave Dieterich: the mission of CCSF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are not equal to healthy buildings a. Is green housing actually healthy housing? i. Asthma 1. Mold and dust

Angenent, Lars T.

467

Law, Sustainability, and the Pursuit of Happiness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the steps needed for sustainability can actually improvesatisfaction. Thus, sustainability for society and theSustainability.

Farber, Daniel A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Validating the Estimated Cost of Saving Water Through Infrastructure Rehabilitation in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Case Study Using Actual Construction Costs for the Curry Main Pipeline Project, Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg)...

Lacewell, R. D.; Rister, M.; Sturdivant, A. W.

469

Effect of Tip-Speed Constraints on the Optimized Design of a Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates the effect of tip-velocity constraints on system levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The results indicate that a change in maximum tip speed from 80 to 100~m/s could produce a 32% decrease in gearbox weight (a 33% reduction in cost) which would result in an overall reduction of 1%-9% in system LCOE depending on the design approach. Three 100~m/s design cases were considered including a low tip-speed ratio/high-solidity rotor design, a high tip-speed ratio/ low-solidity rotor design, and finally a flexible blade design in which a high tip-speed ratio was used along with removing the tip deflection constraint on the rotor design. In all three cases, the significant reduction in gearbox weight caused by the higher tip-speed and lower overall gear ratio was counterbalanced by increased weights for the rotor and/or other drivetrain components and the tower. As a result, the increased costs of either the rotor or drivetrain components offset the overall reduction in turbine costs from down-sizing the gearbox. Other system costs were not significantly affected, whereas energy production was slightly reduced in the 100~m/s case low tip-speed ratio case and increased in the high tip-speed ratio case. This resulted in system cost of energy reductions moving from the 80~m/s design to the 100~m/s designs of 1.2% for the low tip-speed ratio, 4.6% for the high tip-speed ratio, and 9.5% for the final flexible case (the latter result is optimistic because the impact of deflection of the flexible blade on power production was not modeled). Overall, the results demonstrate that there is a trade-off in system design between the maximum tip velocity and the overall wind plant cost of energy, and there are many trade-offs within the overall system in designing a turbine for a high maximum tip velocity.

Dykes, K.; Resor, B.; Platt, A.; Guo, Y.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Parsons, T.; Petch, D.; Veers, P.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Midwest) 1998-1999 Actual 1999-2000 Actual 2000-2001 Actual 2001-2002 Base Forecast Consumption (Mcf) 84.5 81.7 97.3 89.7 Avg. Price (Mcf) 6.29 6.67 9.49 6.98 Expenditure...

471

Review of real-time electricity markets for integrating Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The high penetration of both Distributed Energy Resources (DER) and Demand Response (DR) in modern power systems requires a sequence of advanced strategies and technologies for maintaining system reliability and flexibility. Real-time electricity markets (RTM) are the non-discriminatory transaction platforms for providing necessary balancing services, where the market clearing (nodal or zonal prices depending on markets) is very close to real time operations of power systems. One of the primary functions of \\{RTMs\\} in modern power systems is establishing an efficient and effective mechanism for small DER and DR to participate in balancing market transactions, while handling their meteorological or intermittent characteristics, facilitating asset utilization, and stimulating their active responses. Consequently, \\{RTMs\\} are dedicated to maintaining the flexibility and reliability of power systems. This paper reviews advanced typical \\{RTMs\\} respectively in the North America, Australia and Europe, focusing on their market architectures and incentive policies for integrating DER and DR in electricity markets. In this paper, \\{RTMs\\} are classified into three groups: Group I applies nodal prices implemented by optimal power flow, which clears energy prices every 5min. Group II applies zonal prices, with the time resolution of 5-min. Group III is a general balancing market, which clears zonal prices intro-hourly. The various successful advanced RTM experiences have been summarized and discussed, which provides a technical overview of the present \\{RTMs\\} integrating DER and DR.

Qi Wang; Chunyu Zhang; Yi Ding; George Xydis; Jianhui Wang; Jacob stergaard

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Will competition hurt electricity consumers in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect

A computer model was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to analyze the electricity production, costs, and prices for two geographical regions for a single year. Bulk-power trading is allowed between the two regions and market clearing prices are determined based on marginal costs. The authors used this model, ORCED, to evaluate the market price of power over the year 2000 in the Pacific Northwest and California. The authors found that, absent intervention by the regulators in the Northwest, generation prices would increase 1.1 {cents}/kWh on average, from 1.91 {cents}/kWh for the regulated price to 3.02 {cents}/kWh as the competitive price. If regulators use transition charges and price caps, then customers in the Pacific Northwest need not be penalized by the change to marginal-cost pricing. Customer responses to price changes will increase the transfer of power between regions. A gas price increase of 20%, while only raising the average-cost-based price to 1.95 {cents}/kWh, raised the marginal-cost-based price to 3.56{cents}/kWh. Reductions in hydroelectric resources also dramatically change the price and flow of power.

Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Data:5b63b402-75a7-4094-b634-8e50ae6804f2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

02-75a7-4094-b634-8e50ae6804f2 02-75a7-4094-b634-8e50ae6804f2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Stillwater Utilities Authority Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: ELECTRIC RATE ENERGY EFFICIENT RESIDENTIAL SERVICES Sector: Residential Description: *This rate is no longer available to new customers. Production Cost Adjustment (PCA: A factor determined by SEU and applied to the cost of energy used by the consumer to account for variations in the cost of generating or purchasing power may apply. Source or reference: http://files.stillwater.org/forms/2012/electric/EERSRev15.pdf

474

current energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

current energy current energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

475

CX-002147: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2147: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2147: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002147: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Dakota American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 02/26/2010 Location(s): South Dakota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The State of South Dakota is proposing to use $275,040 of their Recovery Act funds as grants to state institutions for the cost of energy audits and/or technical feasibility studies. The State will also award grants to develop a program to create and implement building codes in South Dakota. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002147.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000205: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009008: Categorical Exclusion Determination

476

Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Power Forum Water Power Forum Home > Water Power Forum > Posts by term Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds CBS (1) community (1) Cost (1) Current (1) current energy (1) DOE (1) forum (1) gateway (1) GMREC (1) LCOE (2) levelized cost of energy (1) marine energy (1) MHK (1) numerical modeling (1) ocean energy (1) OpenEI (1) Performance (1) Tidal (1) Water power (1) Wave (1) Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Group members (8) Managers: Graham7781 Recent members: Gdavis Jim mcveigh Ocop Thomas.heibel NickL Kch Rmckeel 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

477

Strengthening Americas Energy Security with Offshore Wind (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

crane mounted on a barge designed for offshore crane mounted on a barge designed for offshore wind turbine installation lifts a rotor into place. Photo courtesy of © DOTI 2009-alpha ventus Offshore wind energy is a clean, domestic, renewable resource that can help the United States meet its critical energy, environmental, and economic challenges. By generating electricity from offshore wind turbines, the nation can reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, diversify its energy supply, provide cost-competitive electricity to key coastal regions, and help revitalize key sectors of its economy, including manufacturing. However, realizing these benefits will require overcoming key barriers to the development and deployment of offshore wind technology, including its relatively high cost of energy, technical challenges surrounding installation and

478

Question of the Week: Do Energy-Related Financial Incentives Prompt You to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Related Financial Incentives Prompt Energy-Related Financial Incentives Prompt You to Be More Energy Efficient? Question of the Week: Do Energy-Related Financial Incentives Prompt You to Be More Energy Efficient? September 25, 2008 - 10:31am Addthis On Tuesday, we wrote about some resources that offer assistance with offsetting the cost of energy. Do energy-related financial incentives or assistance programs prompt you to be more energy efficient or to purchase products that can help you save energy? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Consumers can track their energy usage and get energy-saving tips with online tools | File photo Homeowners using smart technology to save energy, money How Have You Helped Someone Else Save Energy?

479

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for Distributed Generation Transparent Cost Database Button Recent cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies are available across capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Use the tabs below to navigate the charts. The LCOE tab provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and DG technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, O&M, performance, and fuel costs. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update)

480

News Item  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delia Milliron Delia Milliron Milliron Staff Scientist, Inorganic Nanostructures Synthesis dmilliron@lbl.gov 510.486.6723 personal website Biography Delia J. Milliron is a Staff Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Molecular Foundry, a research center and user facility for nanoscience supported by the U. S. Department of Energy. She received her PhD in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2004. From 2004 to 2008 she worked for IBM's research division, initially as a postdoctoral researcher and subsequently as a member of the research staff. Her research is motivated by the potential for nanomaterials to introduce new functionality to and reduce manufacturing costs of energy technologies. Her group's activities span from the fundamental chemistry of nanomaterials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual market-clearing cost-of-energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

DOE Wind Vision Community | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE Wind Vision Community DOE Wind Vision Community Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Poll Question Keywords Author Apply GrandpasKnob Wind technology roadmap Posted by: GrandpasKnob 13 Aug 2013 - 12:58 I think it would be valuable for DOE to consider the creation of a wind technology roadmap as part of their new vision. In the semiconductor industry, Moore's Law became a self-fulfilling prophecy due... Jamespr Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Posted by: Jamespr 6 May 2013 - 17:52 In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost...

482

Long Island Power Authority - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long Island Power Authority - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Long Island Power Authority - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Long Island Power Authority - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Maximum Rebate Whole Building: $400,000 per building annually ($500,000 for LEED-certified) Commissioning Incentive: Up to 100% of cost, up to $100,000 LEED Certification: Up to $25,000 Energy Modeling: 100% of cost of energy modeling, up to $50,000 Custom and Whole Building Additional Incentive: technical assistance up to

483

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organized Village of Kasaan proposes to use EECBG funds to pay for the incremental cost of "Energy Star" building materials, appliances and Organized Village of Kasaan proposes to use EECBG funds to pay for the incremental cost of "Energy Star" building materials, appliances and fixtures for its soon to be built Tribal Office. The EECBG grant funds would pay for the difference in cost for upgrading from less energy efficient materials and appliances in the current construction contract to energy efficient materials and appliances. EECBG funds would be used to purchase and install energy efficient windows, doors, lights, appliances, hot water heaters, oil heaters, and weatherization materials at the Tribal Office being constructed by the Organized Village of Kasaan. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Organized Village of Kasaan Energy Efficiency and Conservation Programs for Buildings and Facilities

484

CX-007390: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

390: Categorical Exclusion Determination 390: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007390: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Hot Carrier Collection in Thin Film Silicon with Tailored Nanocrystalline/Amorphous Structure CX(s) Applied: B3.15, A9, B3.6 Date: 12/05/2011 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office DOE proposes to provide federal funding to the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) to conduct research on the synthesis and testing of nanocrystalline/amorphous, hybrid, thin film silicon. This material has application in photovoltaic cells. The goal would be to commercialize a machine that would meet market and certification requirements, and reduce the cost of energy. The work will take place at several existing facilities: Hill (HH) and Meyer Halls (MH) on the campus of CSM, and

485

CX-001710: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1710: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1710: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001710: Categorical Exclusion Determination Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) Family Village at Issaquah CX(s) Applied: B2.1, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/16/2010 Location(s): Issaquah, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office King County, Washington proposes to use $750,000.00 of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funds to cover the delta in cost of energy efficient upgrades on homes in the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) Family Village at Issaquah, an affordable housing complex. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001710.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001830: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005240: Categorical Exclusion Determination

486

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Isothermal Compressed Air Energy Storage for Grid-Scale Applications - Adam Rauwerdink, SustainX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Isothermal Isothermal C AES f or G rid---Scale A pplica7ons Permanent Magnet Motor/Generator CONTACT: Adam Rauwerdink Manager, Business Development arauwerdink@sustainx.com Crankshaft Key advantages * Clean: isothermal process consumes no fuel, produces no emissions * Flexible: can be sited where best utilized, not where geology mandates * Proven components  Crankshaft, generator, pipe-type storage  20-year life at full power/capacity * Scalable: power and energy scale independently * Safe: no hazardous materials or chemicals Proven mechanical systems using steel, water, and air SustainX Heat Transfer Technology (Compression/Expansion) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Lead Acid Lithium Ion ICAES 20 YEAR PROJECT LEVELIZED COST OF ENERGY (cents/kWh) INITIAL CAPEX DoD DERATING REPLACEMENT FUEL & O&M

487

Building America Update - January 9, 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building America Update - January 9, 2013 Building America Update - January 9, 2013 Building America Update - January 9, 2013 January 14, 2014 - 4:37pm Addthis Top Innovation Spotlight: Next Generation Advanced Framing Image of house framing. Building America field studies involving thousands of homes have verified significant savings in energy, materials, and labor when production builders apply advanced framing techniques-exceeding $1,000 per home. The Partnership for Home Innovation (PHI), a Building America team, won a 2013 Top Innovation award for its research into simple, cost-effective ways to implement advanced framing techniques. The team tested three innovative techniques that improve the thermal performance of the building enclosure, reduce the cost of energy-efficient construction, and simplify the

488

Tax Incentives for Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Commercial Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Commercial Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Commercial Buildings Tax Incentives for Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Commercial Buildings On this page you'll find information about the tax deductions available for improving the energy efficiency of commercial buildings, as well as links to qualified software available for calculating these savings. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT) offered businesses tax deductions for the costs of improving the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 extended provisions in EPACT. The following tax incentives are available under this act. Deduction of the Cost of Energy-Efficient Property Installed in Commercial Buildings Make quick calculations of the estimated energy cost savings from

489

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-NANWALEK (AKA ENGLISH BAY) AK-TRIBE-NANWALEK (AKA ENGLISH BAY) Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE- NANWALEK (AKA ENGLISH BAY) AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Nanwalek IRA Council proposes to explore the feasibility of wind generation capacity specifically for the purpose of determining if wind generation is a viable alternative to the high cost of energy in this remote Alaskan village. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including DOE and/or Executive Orders; require siting, construction, or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or

490

Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Applications November 1, 2011 Tweet EmailPrint The current levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from concentrated solar power (CSP) is ~ $0.11/kWh. The U.S. Department of Energy has set goals to reduce this cost to ~$0.07/kWh with 6 hours of storage by 2015 and to ~$0.05/kWh with 16 hours of storage by 2020. To help meet these goals, scientists at Argonne National Laboratory are working to improve the overall CSP plant efficiency by enhancing the thermophysical properties of heat transfer

491

EIS-0427-ROD-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

29 Federal Register 29 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 176 / Tuesday, September 11, 2012 / Notices supplied for the benefit of the customer for pumping during the specified month. L p = Energy loss factor for transmission on energy purchased or supplied for the benefit of the customer for pumping (Expected to be .03 or three percent.) = Kilowatt-hours of energy in storage as of the end of the month immediately preceding the specified month. = Weighted average cost of energy for pumping for the month immediately preceding the specified month. F wav = E G ÷ E T (Weighted average energy conversion factor is equal to the energy generated from pumping divided by the total energy for pumping) E G = Energy generated from pumping. L d = Weighted average energy loss factor on energy delivered by the facilitator to the

492

Grid Applications for Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications for Energy Storage Applications for Energy Storage Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Washington DC 7-8 March 2012 Joe Eto jheto@lbl.gov (510) 486-7284 Referencing a Recent Sandia Study,* This Talk Will: Describe and illustrate selected grid applications for energy storage Time-of-use energy cost management Demand charge management Load following Area Regulation Renewables energy time shift Renewables capacity firming Compare Sandia's estimates of the economic value of these applications to the Electricity Storage Association's estimates of the capital costs of energy storage technologies *Eyer, J. and G. Corey. Energy Storage for the Electricity Grid: Benefits and Market Potential Assessment Guide. February 2010. SAND2010-0815 A Recent Sandia Study Estimates the Economic

493

NREL: Energy Analysis - News Archive 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Archive 2010 News Archive 2010 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 December 2010 Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Biofuels Production Based on Gasification Biomass to Fuel Products via Fast Pyrolysis Financing Renewable Energy Projects Web Site October/November 2010 Renewable Energy Data Book Clean Energy Data Book for States Green Power Status Feed-In Tariffs and Interconnection Clean Energy Technology Cooperation Renewables in India Microalgae Production in India PV in St. Marks, Florida September 2010 Cost of Energy Calculator Increasing Clean Energy Technologies Globally PV in Nitro, West Virginia August 2010 Feed-in Tariff Policy Design EE and RE in Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions 2009 Wind Market Data Commercial Rate Structures and PV

494

MHK | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK MHK Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

495

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ranjani Ranjani Siriwardane, Ming Shen, Edward Fisher NETL/U.S. DOE, Morgantown. WV CO 2 Capture & Separation -Sorbents (2) session Fourth Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration May 2-5, 2005 Hilton Alexandria Mark Center, Alexandria Virginia Descriptor - include initials, /org#/date Goals * President Bush's global climatic initiative/NETL carbon sequestration road map plan - CO 2 capture from fossil fuels very important - Develop commercial systems that result in less than10% increase in the cost of energy services by 2012 * Develop technologies to separate/capture CO 2 - Combustion and gasification gas streams - Techniques for both low and high temperatures - Applications at both high and low pressures - Superior to the existing capture techniques - Commercialization of the developed techniques

496

Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bay Ridge Gardens-Mixed Bay Ridge Gardens-Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit Annapolis, Maryland PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Existing Type: Apartment building: Bay Ridge Gardens Annapolis, MD www.bayridgegardens.com Size: 12 apartment units, 713 ft 2 and 909 ft 2 each Year of construction: 1970s Date completed: 2013 Climate Zone: Mixed-humid PERFORMANCE DATA Pre-retrofit annual energy use (normalized): 28.4 kilowatt-hour per square foot (kWh/ft 2 ) Post-retrofit annual energy use (normalized): 16.3 kWh/ft 2 Percent energy savings: 43% Incremental cost of energy efficiency measures: $85,996 Monetized annual energy savings: $6,900 Savings to Investment Ratio: 1.1 Significant energy savings-43% in this case-are possible in older multifamily

497

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Economics  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Cost Components Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England How does wind compare to the cost of other electricity options? Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Economics Long-Term Cost Trends Since the first major installations of commercial-scale wind turbines in the 1980s, the cost of energy from wind power projects has decreased substantially due to larger turbine generators, towers, and rotor lengths; scale economies associated with larger projects; improvements in manufacturing efficiency, and technological advances in turbine generator and blade design. These technological advances have allowed for higher generating capacities per turbine and more efficient capture of wind, especially at lower wind speeds.

498

Wind Power for America: Rural Electric Utilities Harvest a New Crop  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Independent Power Independent Power Producer Financing Co-op Financing Cost of Energy (cents /kWh) 8.0 7.0 6.0 5.0 4.0 3.0 Installed Wind Turbine Capacity 2 MW 10 MW 50 MW 50 MW Without Federal incentives (current $) With Federal incentives (current $) WIND ECONOMICS AT A GLANCE Wind power is one of mankind's oldest energy sources. In 1700, the most powerful machines in Europe were Dutch windmills. During the 1930s, half a million windmills pumped water on the Great Plains. Today's wind turbine is a far cry from the old water pumpers. By using state-of-the-art engineering, wind turbine manufacturers have produced sleek, highly efficient machines that produce inexpensive electricity, and lots of it. Depending on their size and location, wind farms can produce electricity for 4-6 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

499

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2012 9, 2012 CX-007567: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cost of Energy Reduction for Offshore Tension Leg Platform (TLP) Wind Turbine Systems Through Advanced Control Strategies for Energy Yield Improvement, Load Mitigation and Stabilization CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 01/19/2012 Location(s): Virginia Offices(s): Golden Field Office January 19, 2012 CX-007558: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Energy Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.19 Date: 01/19/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Golden Field Office January 19, 2012 CX-007553: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable Energy Research and Development: Entrepreneur-In-Residence Education Program (Yindra Dixon) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 01/19/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office January 19, 2012

500

CBS | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CBS CBS Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload