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1

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Best Practice Indicates technical potential Actual energy efficiencyenergy efficiency over time. Building on past OECD experience and best practices,best practices. Figure 4. Plant Benchmarking Energy Efficiency

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Energy-conservation indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of Energy Conservation Indicators were developed for the Department of Energy to assist in the evaluation of current and proposed conservation strategies. As descriptive statistics that signify current conditions and trends related to efficiency of energy use, indicators provide a way of measuring, monitoring, or inferring actual responses by consumers in markets for energy services. Related sets of indicators are presented in some 30 one-page indicator summaries. Indicators are shown graphically, followed by several paragraphs that explain their derivation and highlight key findings. Indicators are classified according to broad end-use sectors: Aggregate (economy), Residential, Commercial, Industrial, and transportation. In most cases annual time series information is presented covering the period 1960 through 1981.

Belzer, D.B.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data collected from energy suppliers are supplemented withmail questionnaires from energy suppliers who provide actual

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

5

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

6

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy use. Biomass energy consumption In developingHence large quantity of biomass energy is required to serveas for Indicator 7, biomass energy use, primary energy and

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

International energy indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive data are compiled for energy on the international scene and for the US. Data are indicated from the date given and into 1980 as far as available. Data are given for the international scene on: world crude oil production, 1975-to date; Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; Saudi Arabia: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973-to date; petroleum consumption by industrial countries, 1973-to date; USSR crude oil production, 1974-to date; Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, 1973-to date. Data are supplied specifically for the US on US gross imports of crude oil and products, 1973-to date; landed cost of Saudi crude in current and 1974 dollars; US trade in bituminous coal, 1973-to date; summary of US merchandise trade, 1976-to date; and energy/GNP ratio.

Bauer, E.K. (ed.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Industrial energy use indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and colder are determined by annual average temperature weather data). Data scatter may have several explanations, including climate, plant area accounting, the influence of low cost energy and low cost buildings used in the south of the U.S. iv... This analysis uses electricity and natural gas energy consumption and area data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department of Energy’s national Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database. The data there come from Industrial Assessment Centers...

Hanegan, Andrew Aaron

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

Energy conservation indicators. 1982 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of Energy Conservation Indicators were developed for the Department of Energy to assist in the evaluation of current and proposed conservation strategies. As descriptive statistics that signify current conditions and trends related to efficiency of energy use, indicators provide a way of measuring, monitoring, or inferring actual responses by consumers in markets for energy services. Related sets of indicators are presented in some 40 one-page indicator summaries. Indicators are shown graphically, followed by several paragraphs that explain their derivation and highlight key findings. Indicators are classified according to broad end-use sectors: Aggregate (economy), Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Transportation and Electric Utilities. In most cases annual time series information is presented covering the period 1960 through 1981.

Belzer, D.B.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Energy Performance Indicator Tool  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The EnPI V4.0 is a regression analysis based tool developed by the U.S. Department of Energy to help plant and corporate managers establish a normalized baseline of energy consumption, track annual progress of intensity improvements, energy savings, Superior Energy Performance (SEP) EnPIs, and other EnPIs that account for variations due to weather, production, and other variables. The tool is designed to accommodate multiple users including Better Buildings, Better Plants Program and Challenge Partners, SEP participants, other manufacturing firms, and non-manufacturing facilities such as data centers.

12

Industrial energy use indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, plant area accounting, the influence of low cost energy and low cost buildings used in the south of the U.S. This analysis uses electricity and natural gas energy consumption and area data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department...

Hanegan, Andrew Aaron

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

International energy indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are compiled and graphs are presented for Iran: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Saudi Arabia: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, 1973-1980; Oil Stocks: Free World, US, Japan and Europe (landed), 1973-1980; Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, 1973-1980; USSR Crude Oil Production, 1974-1980; Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, 1973-1980; US Imports of Crude Oil and Products, 1973-1980; Landed Cost of Saudi Crude in Current and 1974 Dollars; US Trade in Bituminous Coal, 1973-1980; Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-1980; and Energy/GNP Ratio.

Bauer, E.K. (ed.)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

International energy indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tabulated data and graphic displays are presented for: world crude oil production for each year since 1974; OPEC crude oil production capacity; world crude oil and refined product inventory level for each year since 1975; oil consumption in OECD Countries for each year since 1975; USSR crude oil production for each year since 1975; and the free world and US nuclear electricity generation for 1973 and the current capacity. Also, tabulated data and graphic displays are included on: US domestic oil supply for each year since 1977; US gross imports of crude oil and products for each year since 1973; landed cost of Saudi crude in current and 1974 dollars; US coal trade for each year since 1975; US natural gas trade for each year since 1975; a summary of US merchandise trade for each year since 1977; and the US energy/GNP ratio in 1972 dollars.

Weiss, R.M. (ed.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

International energy indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented in graphs and tables on the following: Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, monthly, June 1974 to May 1980; Saudi Arabia: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, monthly, March 1974 to May 1980; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): capacity, production and shut-in, monthly, June 1974 to April 1980; non-OPEC Free World and US production of crude oil, monthly, January 1973 to March 1980; oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973 to first quarter 1980; petroleum consumption by industrial countries, monthly, January 1973 to December 1979; USSR crude oil production, monthly, January 1974 to May 1980; Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, monthly, January 1973 to April 1980; world crude oil production by area, annually, 1947 to 1979; estimated proved world reserves of crude oil, annually, January 1, 1948 to 1980; world marketed production of natural gas, annually, 1950 to 1979; estimated proved world reserves of natural gas, annually, January 1, 1967 to 1980; US trade in natural gas, 1955 to 1979; US imports of crude oil and products, monthly, January 1973 to May 1980; landed cast of Saudi crude oil in current and 1974 dollars, monthly, April 1974 to March 1980; US trade in coal, monthly, January 1973 to April 1980; summary of US merchandise trade, 1976 to April 1980 and Energy/GNP ratio, annually, 1947 to 1949 and, quarterly, first 1973 to first 1980.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

International energy indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are compiled in tables and graphs on Iran and Saudi Arabia: Crude Oil Capacity, Production, and Shut-in, June 1974 to July 1980; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): Capacity, Production, and Shut-in, June 1974 to June 1980; Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude oil, January 1973 to May 1980; Oil Stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973 - 1st quarter 1980; Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, January 1973 to February 1980; USSR Crude Oil Production, January 1974 to July 1980; Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, January 1973 to June 1980; US Import of Crude Oil and Products, January 1973 to July 1980; Landed Cost of Saudi Crude in Current and 1974 Dollars, April 1974 to May 1980; US trade in Coal, January 1973 to June 1980; Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976 to June 1980; and Energy/GNP Ratio, 1974-1st quarter 1980. The highlight of each is summarized very briefly in the Table of Contents.

Bauer, E.K. (ed.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

18

IRENA Renewable Energy Indicators | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » IRENA Renewable Energy Indicators Jump to: navigation, search Name Developing the IRENA Renewable Energy Indicators (Phase I) Agency/Company /Organization Worldwatch Institute Partner International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, People and Policy Topics Background analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Publications Program Start 2011 Program End 2012 References IRENA[1] Abstract The Draft Concept Paper for Developing the IRENA Renewable Energy Indicators provides analysis regarding the design of a set of indicators to measure the extent of barriers to renewable energy development and deployment, the effectiveness of enabling policies to remove those barriers, and the impact that renewable energy deployment has on broader development goals. Ultimately, the IRENA Renewable Energy Indicators will be a critical asset in monitoring, tracking, and assessing global developments in the renewable energy sector.

19

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

20

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

22

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

23

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

24

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

25

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

26

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

27

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

28

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

29

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

30

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in shaping total energy consumption. These changes may bethe reduction of total energy consumption is not due toimprovements on the total energy consumption is estimated by

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by end user while primary energy consumption includes finalof both final and primary energy consumption at the end usecalculate energy consumption in primary terms by adjusting

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12   Table 5. US EIA Energy ConsumptionTable 5. US EIA Energy Consumption Surveys Form # EIA-846US Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducts 3 major consumption

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

targets over their energy per GDP intensity. However, littleefficiency. Only total energy per GDP was available for useintensities (Energy Consumption per $ GDP or $ PPP), are

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the monitoring of energy intensity developments in theSchaeffer. 1997. Energy intensity in the iron and steelParity Internationally, Energy Intensity of GDP or subsector

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000 NRCAN, 2006. Energy Efficiency Trends in Canada 1990 toResources Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency, Ottawa.NRCAN, 2009. Energy Efficiency Trends in Canada 1990 to

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium) while secondary forms cover energy contained in products or carriers resulting from the transformation or conversion

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicators that track the penetration rate of new standardrates increase the penetration rate of more efficientshare of technology Penetration rate of different technology

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S. de la Rue du Can, J. Sinton,, and E. Worrell. , 2006.the Energy Economy Link. Sinton JE et al. An assessment of

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Energy Performance Indicator | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

managers establish a normalized baseline of energy consumption, track annual progress of intensity improvements, energy savings, Superior Energy Performance (SEP) EnPIs, and other...

40

The Building Energy Report Card is used to compare the actual annual energy consumption of buildings to a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Building Energy Report Card is used to compare the actual annual energy consumption Thermal Unit (Btu). For convenience, this annual energy consumption is expressed as thousands of Btus (i of buildings to a State of Minnesota "target." This target represents the amount of energy that would

Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Policy Applications of Energy Indicators | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Applications of Energy Indicators Policy Applications of Energy Indicators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Policy Applications of Energy Indicators Agency/Company /Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.blackwell-synergy.com/toc/narf/29/4 References: Policy Applications of Energy Indicators[1] "In November 2005, a special issue of the Natural Resources Forum was published on 'Policy Applications of Energy Indicators' based on the ISED programme. To read the full issue, click here. The special issue features articles highlighting how energy indicators were developed, refined and tested by international and regional agencies and national experts to

42

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

43

Mexican energy policy and sustainability indicators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors analyze the Mexican energy policy taking as reference the methodological framework for sustainable energy development proposed by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean. This methodology takes eight related indicators to the social, environmental and economic dimensions in order to calculate a general sustainability indicator for the energy sector. In this methodology, the weight of each dimension is different; namely, the social and environmental issues have less relevance than the economic issues. The authors use this methodology because government institutions as the Department of Energy and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources have used some indicators from such a methodology to propose plans, programs, projects and bills. Authors know of the existence of other methodologies about sustainability. Nonetheless, opting for the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean's methodology is convenient because this organization is a respectable authority for civil servants from the Mexican institutions. Our objective is just to contrast the sustainability grade of the energy sector between 1990 and 2008 for Mexico whose government started reforms in the 1990s. It concludes that those reforms did not bring about a higher sustainability level for the energy sector.

Claudia Sheinbaum-Pardo; Belizza Janet Ruiz-Mendoza; Víctor Rodríguez-Padilla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Performance Indicators of Wind Energy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling wind speed is one of the key element when dealing with the production of energy through wind turbines. A good model can be used for forecasting, site evaluation, turbines design and many other purposes. In this work we are interested in the analysis of the future financial cash flows generated by selling the electrical energy produced. We apply an indexed semi-Markov model of wind speed that has been shown, in previous investigation, to reproduce accurately the statistical behavior of wind speed. The model is applied to the evaluation of financial indicators like the Internal Rate of Return, semi-Elasticity and relative Convexity that are widely used for the assessment of the profitability of an investment and for the measurement and analysis of interest rate risk. We compare the computation of these indicators for real and synthetic data. Moreover, we propose a new indicator that can be used to compare the degree of utilization of different power plants.

D'Amico, G; Prattico, F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Energy Conservation and Comfort of Heat Pump Desiccant Air Conditioning System in Actual Living Space in Summer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Conservation and Comfort of Heat Pump Desiccant Air Conditioning System in Actual Living and total heat exchanger in terms of both energy conservation and thermal comfort in summer. 1. COP

Miyashita, Yasushi

46

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

47

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

48

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

49

Federal Water Use Indices | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Water Use Indices Federal Water Use Indices Federal Water Use Indices FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably. The following indices should be used only to assist in determining baseline data when no other information is available on site water usage. Conversion factors for the Federal water use indices are also available. Source: American Water Works Association 1996. Data represents gallons per unit per day. Commercial User Unit Range Typical Airport Passenger 4-5 3 Apartment house Person 100-200 100 Boarding house Person 25-50 40 Hotel Guest 40-60 50 Employee 8-13 10 Lodging house and tourist home Guest 30-50 40 Motel Guest 25-40 35

50

Annual Energy Review - financial indicators section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Annual statistics on consumer energy prices and expenditures, fossil fuel production prices and value, and value of fossil fuel imports and exports back to 1949.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

52

FTCP Quarterly Indicator Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program » Assistance » Federal Technical Capability Program » FTCP Quarterly Indicator Reports FTCP Quarterly Indicator Reports November 20, 2013 FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, November 20, 2013 This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis. Report also displays trend data for overall TQP qualification and staffing shortfalls. August 16, 2013 FTCP Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability, August 16, 2013 This Quarterly Report on the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) contains information on the status of qualifications in the Technical Qualification Program (TQP) and technical skill gaps, on a quarterly basis.

53

International energy indicators, February-March 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are compiled and graphs are presented for: world crude oil production, 1974 to 1981; OPEC crude oil productive capacity; world crude oil and refined product inventory levels, 1975 to 1981; oil consumption in OECD countries, 1975 to 1981; USSR crude oil production and exports, 1975 to 1981; free world and US nuclear electricity generation, 1973-current capacity; US domestic oil supply, 1977 to 1981; US gross imports of crude oil and products, 1973 to 1981; landed cost of Saudi crude current and 1974 dollars; US coal trade, 1975 to 1981; US natural gas trade, 1975 to 1981; summary of US merchandise trade, 1977 to 1981; and energy/gross national product ratio.

Rossi, E Jr [ed.] [ed.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

*indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kwillis@energy.state.ca.us California Energy Commission Stephen Adams Senior Staff Counsel Staff Attorney-mail service preferred choffman@energy.state.ca.us California Energy Commission Caryn Holmes Staff Counsel IV e1 *indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION

55

International energy indicators. [Statistical tables and graphs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

International statistical tables and graphs are given for the following: (1) Iran - Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, June 1974-April 1980; (2) Saudi Arabia - Crude Oil Capacity, Production, and Shut-in, March 1974-Apr 1980; (3) OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia) - Capacity, Production and Shut-in, June 1974-March 1980; (4) Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, January 1973-February 1980; (5) Oil Stocks - Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (Landed, 1973-1st Quarter, 1980); (6) Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, January 1973-December 1979; (7) USSR Crude Oil Production and Exports, January 1974-April 1980; and (8) Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, January 1973-March 1980. Similar statistical tables and graphs included for the United States include: (1) Imports of Crude Oil and Products, January 1973-April 1980; (2) Landed Cost of Saudi Oil in Current and 1974 Dollars, April 1974-January 1980; (3) US Trade in Coal, January 1973-March 1980; (4) Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-March 1980; and (5) US Energy/GNP Ratio, 1947 to 1979.

Bauer, E.K. (ed.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.state.ca.us Alan Solomon Project Manager asolomon@energy.state.ca.us Kerry Willis Staff Counsel kwillis@energy*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY

57

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.state.ca.us Lisa DeCarlo Staff Counsel ldecarlo@energy.state.ca.us Robin Mayer Staff Counsel rmayer@energy*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY

58

* Indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Counsel kevin.w.bell@energy.ca.gov ENERGY COMMISSION ­ PUBLIC ADVISER *Blake Roberts Assistant Public* Indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY

59

*indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Counsel alana.mathews-davis@energy.ca.gov ENERGY COMMISSION ­ PUBLIC ADVISER *Blake Roberts Assistant*indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY.CA.GOV APPLICATION

60

*Indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manager keith.winstead@energy.ca.gov Jeffrey Ogata Assistant Chief Counsel jeffrey.ogata@energy*Indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

*indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manager fmiller@energy.ca.gov Jeff Ogata Staff Counsel e-mail service preferred jogata@energy: California Energy Commission Michael J. Levy, Chief Counsel 1516 Ninth Street MS-14 Sacramento, CA 95814*indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE

62

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hoffman Siting Project Manager choffman@energy.state.ca.usU U Kerry Willis Staff Counsel Ukwillis@energy*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ HUWWW.ENERGY.CA.GOVUH 1

63

*indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ratliff Staff Counsel IV dick.ratliff@energy.ca.gov Kerry Willis Staff Counsel kerry.willis@energy*indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY.CA.GOV APPLICATION

64

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR RELIABLE ENERGY (Revised 9/12/11) RESPONDENT Ormat Nevada, Inc. 6225 Neil Road Reno, NV 89511 COUNSEL.state.ca.us Jeff Ogata Assistant Chief Counsel jogata@energy.state.ca.us ENERGY COMMISSION PUBLIC ADVISER Jennifer*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION

65

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Speaker(s): Bernard Aebischer Date: February 6, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indictor for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed. Prerequisites in order to be able to use these indicators in energy efficiency programmes are discussed. The opportunity of an internationally coordinated research activity is also presented. Since 1999, Dr. Bernard Aebischer has served as a senior scientist at CEPE (Centre for Energy Policy and Economics) of the Swiss Federal Institutes of

66

File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:33, 3 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 09:33, 3 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (257 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools High School Curricula

67

The Impacts of Contributory Factors in the Gap between Predicted and Actual Office Building Energy Use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ten years ago, the primary author developed the Building Energy-Efficient Hive (BEEHive) concept in order ... – can support the design and operation of energy-efficient office buildings. This was a result of his ...

Emeka E. Osaji; Subashini Suresh; Ezekiel Chinyio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carlo Staff Counsel ldecarlo@energy.state.ca.us Jennifer Jennings Public Adviser E-mail Service Preferred*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY

69

*indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.ca.gov #12;2 *indicates change ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF Caryn Holmes Acting Assistant Chief Counsel e-mail service preferred caryn.holmes@energy.ca.gov *Alana Mathews-Davis Senior Staff Counsel e-mail service preferred alana.mathews-davis@energy.ca.gov *Pippin Brehler Senior Staff Counsel e-mail service preferred

70

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.state.ca.us Kevin W. Bell Staff Counsel kwbell@energy.state.ca.us Jennifer Jennings Public Adviser E-mail preferred*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY

71

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

95814-5512 pierre.martinez@energy.ca.gov Lisa DeCarlo Staff Counsel Office of the Chief Counsel 1516*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY

72

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.ca.gov Kevin W. Bell Staff Counsel kevin.w.bell@energy.ca.gov Eileen Allen Commissioners' Technical Advisor*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY

73

Energy Flow: A Multimodal `Ready' Indication For Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Flow: A Multimodal `Ready' Indication For Electric Vehicles Abstract The lack of sound and vibration while starting the drive system of an electric vehicle (EV) is one of the major differences the energy level to the driver. With Energy Flow (see Figure 1), we test if there will be a benefit in terms

74

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency Indicator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency Indicator for Food Processing Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports

76

Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) (Redirected from Climate Analysis Indicators Tool) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: cait.wri.org/ Language: English WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool Screenshot References: Climate Analysis Indicators Tool[1] CAIT is the Climate Analysis Indicators Tool -- an information and analysis tool on global climate change. It provides a comprehensive and comparable database of greenhouse gas emissions data (including all major sources and sinks) and other climate-relevant indicators. CAIT can be used to analyze a

77

*Indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 *Indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ WWW.ENERGY.CA.GOV PALEN Suite 140-377 Roseville, CA 95661 andrea@agrenier.com APPLICANT'S COUNSEL Scott Galati, Esq. Marie

78

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1516 NINTH STREET, SACRAMENTO, CA 95814 1-800-822-6228 ­ HUWWW.ENERGY.CA.GOVUH 1BAPPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATION Docket No. 09-AFC-5 FOR THE ABENGOA MOJAVE PROOF OF SERVICE SOLAR POWER PLANT

79

Monthly Indices: A Procedure for Energy Use Display Creating Monthly Indices for Comparing the Energy Consumption of Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This technical paper describes the construction of comparative monthly energy and weather indices for buildings and their usefulness in simple comparisons across sites. These graphs show monthly electric and natural gas average power levels (i.e., W...

Landman, D. S.; Haberl, J. S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: cait.wri.org/ Language: English WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool Screenshot References: Climate Analysis Indicators Tool[1] CAIT is the Climate Analysis Indicators Tool -- an information and analysis tool on global climate change. It provides a comprehensive and comparable database of greenhouse gas emissions data (including all major sources and sinks) and other climate-relevant indicators. CAIT can be used to analyze a wide range of climate-related data questions and to help support future

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Modeling Windows in Energy Plus with Simple Performance Indices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling Windows in Energy Plus with Simple Performance Indices Modeling Windows in Energy Plus with Simple Performance Indices Title Modeling Windows in Energy Plus with Simple Performance Indices Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-2804E Year of Publication 2009 Authors Arasteh, Dariush K., Christian Kohler, and Brent T. Griffith Date Published 10/2009 Call Number LBNL-2804E Abstract The paper describes the development of a model specification for performance monitoring systems for commercial buildings. The specification focuses on four key aspects of performance monitoring: performance metrics measurement system requirements data acquisition and archiving data visualization and reporting The aim is to assist building owners in specifying the extensions to their control systems that are required to provide building operators with the information needed to operate their buildings more efficiently and to provide automated diagnostic tools with the information required to detect and diagnose faults and problems that degrade energy performance.

82

Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Climate Analysis Indicators Tool (CAIT) (Redirected from WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: cait.wri.org/ Language: English WRI Climate Analysis Indicators Tool Screenshot References: Climate Analysis Indicators Tool[1] CAIT is the Climate Analysis Indicators Tool -- an information and analysis

83

Energy Indicators for Sustainable Development: Guidelines and Methodologies  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Indicators for Sustainable Development: Guidelines and Methodologies Energy Indicators for Sustainable Development: Guidelines and Methodologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Energy Indicators for Sustainable Development: Guidelines and Methodologies Agency/Company /Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Pathways analysis Website: www.iaea.org/Publications/Factsheets/English/indicators.pdf Country: Brazil, Cuba, Lithuania, Mexico, Russia, Slovakia, Thailand UN Region: South-Eastern Asia, "Latin America and Caribbean" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property., "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

84

Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Biomass Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/i1673e/i1673e00.pdf Criteria and Indicators for Sustainable Woodfuels Screenshot References: Sustainable Woodfuels[1] Overview "This publication assesses the environmental, social and economic issues as well as the legal and institutional frameworks that can ensure the sustainable production of woodfuels from forests, trees outside forests and other sources. The study continues FAO's long interest in wood energy issues and complements the many other FAO reports on wood energy and

85

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Surface/Near Surface Indication - Characterization of Surface Anomalies from Magnetic Particle and Liquid Penetrant Indications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The systematic study and characterization of surface indications has never been conducted. Producers and users of castings do not have any data on which they can reliably communicate the nature of these indications or their effect on the performance of parts. Clearly, the ultimate intent of any work in this area is to eliminate indications that do in fact degrade properties. However, it may be impractical physically and/or financially to eliminate all surface imperfections. This project focused on the ones that actually degrade properties. The initial work was to identify those that degrade properties. Accurate numerical simulations of casting service performance allow designers to use the geometric flexibility of castings and the superior properties of steel to produce lighter weight and more energy efficient components for transportation systems (cars and trucks), construction, and mining. Accurate simulations increase the net melting energy efficiency by improving casting yield and reducing rework and scrap. Conservatively assuming a 10% improvement in yield, approximately 1.33 x 1012 BTU/year can be saved with this technology. In addition, CO2 emissions will be reduced by approximately 117,050 tons per year.

Griffin, John [university of Alabama - Birmingham] [university of Alabama - Birmingham

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Using Key Performance Indicators to Manage Energy Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-effective to collect much more data than ever before, many energy managers find themselves drowning in the volume of data generated. Business information systems faced a similar challenge a decade ago, and it is now common practice to use Key Performance Indicators...

Van Gorp, J. C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

0 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Report describes the 2010 edition of energy price indices and discount factors for performing...

88

Plant Energy Benchmarking: A Ten Year Retrospective of the ENERGY STAR Energy Performace Indicators (ES-EPI)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency Indicator for Automobile Assembly Plants. ARgonne IL, Argonne National Laboratory: May 2005. Boyd, G. A. (2005). "A Method for Measuring the Efficiency Gap between Average and Best Practice... Energy Use: The ENERGY STAR Industrial Energy Performance Indicator." Journal of Industrial Ecology 9(3): 51-65. Boyd, G. A. (2006). Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency Indicator for Cement Manufacturing Plants. Argonne IL...

Boyd, G.; Tunnessen, W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be far above those of any known chemical source. Even by the most conservative assumptions as to the errors in the measurements, the result is still one order of magnitude greater than conventional energy sources.

Giuseppe Levi; Evelyn Foschi; Torbjörn Hartman; Bo Höistad; Roland Pettersson; Lars Tegnér; Hanno Essén

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

90

Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be fa...

Levi, Giuseppe; Hartman, Torbjörn; Höistad, Bo; Pettersson, Roland; Tegnér, Lars; Essén, Hanno

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

United States' Clean Energy Patents Soar, Report Indicates |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

are: solar and wind energy; hybrid and electric vehicles (EV); fuel cells; hydroelectric, tidal, and wave power; geothermal energy; biomass and biofuels; and other...

92

Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency Indicator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Automobile Assembly Plants Automobile Assembly Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

93

Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency Indicator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Plants Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

94

Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency Indicator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cement Manufacturing Plants Cement Manufacturing Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

95

Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency Indicator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Mills Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

96

Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency Indicator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Corn Refining Plants Corn Refining Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

97

November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and district heating scheme* data. Year Energy Consumption (KWh) Percentage Change 2005/06 65,916,243 N/A 2006 buildings are connected to the Nottingham District Heating Scheme. This service meets all the heating

Evans, Paul

98

GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The use of fluid inclusion gas analysis propene/propene ratios is investigated. Ratios of these species are affected by geothermal fluid temperature and oxidations state. Our purpose is to determine if analyses of these species in fluid inclusions these species to can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process. Analyses were performed on drill cuttings at 20ft intervals from four Coso geothermal wells. Two wells are good producers, one has cold-water entrants in the production zone, and the fourth is a non-producer. The ratios show distinct differences between

99

Abstract B30: Indicators of energy balance and breast cancer risk among white and black women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lifestyle, and Genetics Physical Activity and Energy Balance Physical Activity and Energy Balance: Poster Presentations - Proffered Abstracts...2013; Atlanta, GA Abstract B30: Indicators of energy balance and breast cancer risk among white and...

Maureen Sanderson; Sandra L. Deming-Halverson; Alecia M. Fair; Martha J. Shrubsole; Alicia Beeghly-Fadiel; Sarah Nechuta; Yong Cui; David Shen-Miller; Heather O'Hara; Nia Foderingham; Xiao-Ou Shu; Wei Zheng

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis- 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report describes the 2010 edition of energy price indices and discount factors for performing life-cycle cost analyses of energy and water conservation and renewable energy projects in federal facilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

19 November 2007 Energy innovation and competitiveness indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the largest markets in technologies such as wind power, photo voltaics and bio-diesel. IEA estimates energy technology is one of very few new technologies where Europe not yet has lost the technological and industrial competition to America and Asia. European firms are the leading industrial actors and Europe has

102

A study on the proposes of energy analysis indicator by the window elements of office buildings in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recently, the window area ratio of buildings has increased but the thermal insulation performance of windows is lower than the wall. Therefore, many studies have been carried out to reduce this heat loss. The Republic of Korea policies and guidelines for windows do not consider the optical and design elements of windows because it is more important to the insulation performance of windows. This paper proposes the supplement point of the Korea's policies and guidelines regarding windows through a comparison of Korea's policies and guidelines for windows, checks the variation of the energy consumption of buildings through the variation of the window elements, and proposes an energy analysis indicator for the Republic of Korea's situation. This study confirmed that the variation of the window elements affect to energy consumption by previous studies to consider in window design according to the policies and guidelines. The window elements were divided into performance elements of the windows and architectural/equipment plan element. By analyzing the energy consumption by changing the element, this study confirmed the variation of energy consumption by using the COMFEN4.0 simulation tool. This paper proposes an actual energy analysis indicator in the Republic of Korea.

Seok-Hyun Kim; Sun-Sook Kim; Kwang-Woo Kim; Young-Hum Cho

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Energy Policy 30 (2002) 151163 Aggregating physical intensity indicators: results of applying the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicators measure the energy used per dollar of GDP produced by some sector, sub-sector, industry or productEnergy Policy 30 (2002) 151­163 Aggregating physical intensity indicators: results of applying School of Resource and Environmental Management, Energy Research Group, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby

104

Research on energy efficiency evaluation based on indicators for industry sectors in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The so-called Hierarchical–Indicator Comparison (HIC) method is introduced in this paper. It mainly serves for industrial energy conservation programs in China. A chemical industry named purified terephthalic acid (PTA) is used to outline this method. Two key points of the HIC method are the construction of energy efficiency indicators (EEI) system and the way to utilize indicators appropriately. After a brief review of EE evaluation methods in literature, the construction procedure of energy efficiency indicators (EEI) system for PTA industry is presented firstly. How to correct reference values for indicators according to non-comparable factors is discussed. Then, how to implement the HIC method based on EEI system is presented. Every indicator has its own advantages and disadvantages. Disadvantages of an indicator can be conquered by other indicators. With multiple indicators used together, more objective EE evaluation result can be obtained. Finally, some proposals for further work of this method are also presented.

Chenxi Song; Mingjia Li; Zhexi Wen; Ya-Ling He; Wen-Quan Tao; Yangzhe Li; Xiangyang Wei; Xiaolan Yin; Xing Huang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analysis-2013 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2013 Handbook describes the annual supplements to the NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special...

106

* Indicates Change1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.state.ca.us Kerry Willis Staff Counsel kwillis@energy.state.ca.us Public Adviser pao@energy.state.ca.us DECLARATION* Indicates Change1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION Send the original signed document plus the required 12 copies to the address below: CALIFORNIA ENERGY

107

SPACE TECHNOLOGY Actual Estimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPACE TECHNOLOGY TECH-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY.7 247.0 Exploration Technology Development 144.6 189.9 202.0 215.5 215.7 214.5 216.5 Notional SPACE TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW .............................. TECH- 2 SBIR AND STTR

108

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Report provides tables of present-value factors for use in the life-cycle cost analysis of capital...

109

Extreme Poverty Indicator: Proportion of Population Below Minimum Level of Dietary Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the comparison of many current poverty measurement indicators in the world, the report has chosen the most basic ... proportion of population below minimum level of dietary energy consumption”.

Qi Zhang; Fei Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis- 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report provides tables of present-value factors for use in the life-cycle cost analysis of capital investment projects for federal facilities. It also provides energy price indices based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) forecasts from 2012 to 2042.

111

Development of a general sustainability indicator for renewable energy systems: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Renewable energy is considered as a solution for mitigating climate change and environmental pollution; however, an important problem of the application of renewable energy systems (RESs) is that the evaluation of the sustainability of these systems is extremely complex. In order to assess the sustainability of renewable energy systems comprehensively, the use of sustainability indicators (SIs) is often necessary. Since sustainability indicators are necessary to reflect various aspects of sustainability, the development of a general sustainability indicator (GSI) including many basic sustainability indicators (BSIs) becomes critical. In this paper, the methods of selection, quantification, evaluation and weighting of the basic indicators as well as the methods of GSI aggregation are reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. Based on these discussion and the analysis of the uncertainties of sustainability assessment, an effective framework and its procedures of the development of GSI for renewable energy systems is presented. This GSI is not only able to evaluate all the sustainability criteria of RESs, but also can provide numerical results of sustainability assessment for different objective systems. The proposed framework in this study can be used as a guidance of the development of sustainability indicator for various renewable energy systems.

Gang Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 (Rev. 5/10) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special Publication 709 Barbara C. Lippiatt U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 May 2010 ENERGY PRICE INDICES AND DISCOUNT FACTORS FOR LIFE-CYCLE COST ANALYSIS Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 April 1, 2010 to March 31, 2011 Data for the Federal Methodology for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis, Title 10, CFR, Part 436, Subpart A; and for the Energy Conservation Mandatory Performance Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings,

113

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 2005 April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-26 (Rev. 9/11) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2011 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special Publication 709 Barbara C. Lippiatt U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program September 2011 NISTIR 85-3273-26 ENERGY PRICE INDICES AND DISCOUNT FACTORS FOR LIFE-CYCLE COST ANALYSIS Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012 Data for the Federal Methodology for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis, Title 10, CFR, Part 436, Subpart A; and for the Energy Conservation Mandatory Performance Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings,

114

Analysis of energy consumption and indicators of energy use in Bangladesh  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid growth in the demand for commercial energy in Bangladesh poses serious development constraints in recent years. Per capita energy consumption of Bangladesh is one of the lowest in the world (252 kgoe in 200...

Joarder Mohammad Abdul Munim; Md. Mahbubul Hakim…

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Indicator for in Use Energy Consumption (IUE): a tool enhancing Design for Energy Efficiency of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impact of Electric and Electronic Product and the potential of Design for Energy Efficiency in Use, it explains the increasing interest on efficient management of energy during use of electr(on)ic equipment Union can decrease by 27%. The potential for decreasing is based on the estimated wastage of energy

Boyer, Edmond

116

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-28 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-28 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt Applied Economics Office Engineering Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-28

117

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-27 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-27 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt Applied Economics Office Engineering Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-27

118

Is Cumulative Fossil Energy Demand a Useful Indicator for the Environmental Performance of Products?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Is Cumulative Fossil Energy Demand a Useful Indicator for the Environmental Performance of Products? ... The Ecoinvent database v1.2 (4), containing life-cycle information for many products consumed in the western economy, has been used to derive cumulative fossil energy demands and life-cycle impact scores. ... The project work proved to be demanding in terms of co-ordination efforts required and consent identification. ...

Mark A. J. Huijbregts; Linda J. A. Rombouts; Stefanie Hellweg; Rolf Frischknecht; A. Jan Hendriks; Dik van de Meent; Ad M. J. Ragas; Lucas Reijnders; Jaap Struijs

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

119

Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator Index (NERI): A benchmarking tool for assessing nuclear capacity in developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Declining natural resources, rising oil prices, looming climate change and the introduction of nuclear energy partnerships, such as GNEP, have reinvigorated global interest in nuclear energy. The convergence of such issues has prompted countries to move ahead quickly to deal with the challenges that lie ahead. However, developing countries, in particular, often lack the domestic infrastructure and public support needed to implement a nuclear energy program in a safe, secure, and nonproliferation-conscious environment. How might countries become ready for nuclear energy? What is needed is a framework for assessing a country's readiness for nuclear energy. This paper suggests that a Nuclear Energy Readiness Indicator (NERI) Index might serve as a meaningful basis for assessing a country's status in terms of progress toward nuclear energy utilization under appropriate conditions. The NERI Index is a benchmarking tool that measures a country's level of 'readiness' for nonproliferation-conscious nuclear energy development. NERI first identifies 8 key indicators that have been recognized by the International Atomic Energy Agency as key nonproliferation and security milestones to achieve prior to establishing a nuclear energy program. It then measures a country's progress in each of these areas on a 1-5 point scale. In doing so NERI illuminates gaps or underdeveloped areas in a country's nuclear infrastructure with a view to enable stakeholders to prioritize the allocation of resources toward programs and policies supporting international nonproliferation goals through responsible nuclear energy development. On a preliminary basis, the indicators selected include: (1) demonstrated need; (2) expressed political support; (3) participation in nonproliferation and nuclear security treaties, international terrorism conventions, and export and border control arrangements; (4) national nuclear-related legal and regulatory mechanisms; (5) nuclear infrastructure; (6) the utilization of IAEA technical assistance; (7) participation in regional arrangements; and (8) public support for nuclear power. In this paper, the Index aggregates the indicators and evaluates and compares the level of readiness in seven countries that have recently expressed various degrees of interest in establishing a nuclear energy program. The NERI Index could be a valuable tool to be utilized by: (1) country officials who are considering nuclear power; (2) the international community, desiring reassurance of a country's capacity for the peaceful, safe, and secure use of nuclear energy; (3) foreign governments/NGO's, seeking to prioritize and direct resources toward developing countries; and (4) private stakeholders interested in nuclear infrastructure investment opportunities.

Saum-Manning,L.

2008-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

120

Dynamic energy-consumption indicators for domestic appliances: environment, behaviour and design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The literature concerning the application of information-feedback methods for saving energy in the home is reviewed. Particular attention is given to electronic feedback via smart meters and displays, or “energy-consumption indicators” (ECI). Previous studies have not focused on individual appliances, but this paper presents the findings of a UK field study involving 44 households which considered domestic cooking: it compares the effectiveness of providing paper-based energy-use/saving information with electronic feedback of energy-consumption via \\{ECIs\\} designed specifically for this investigation. Twelve Control Group households were monitored for a period of at least 12 months and this revealed an average daily consumption for electric cooking of 1.30 kWh. Subsequently across a minimum monitoring period of 2 months, 14 out of 31 households achieved energy savings of greater than 10% and six of these achieved savings of greater than 20%. The average reduction for households employing an ECI was 15%, whereas those given antecedent information alone reduced their electricity consumption, on average, by only 3%. The associated behavioural changes and the importance of providing regular feedback during use are identified. It is recommended that further attention be given to optimising the design and assessing the use of energy-consumption indicators in the home, in order to maximise the associated energy-saving potential.

G. Wood; M. Newborough

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5c. Economic and Physical Indicators for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5c Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5c. Economic and Physical Indicators for the Aluminum Industry (NAICS 3313), 1998, 2002, and 2006 Indicators MECS Survey Years 1998 2002 2006 Physical (Thousand Metric Tons) Primary Aluminum Production 3,713 2,707 2,284 Secondary Aluminum Production 3,440 2,930 3,560 Aluminum Imports 3,550 4,060 5,180 Aluminum Exports 1,590 1,590 2,820 Nominal Economic Indicators (Current Billion Dollars) Value of Shipments 57 48 42 Value Added 24 19 12 Real Economic Indicators (Billion 2000 Dollars) Value of Shipments 1 57 49 29 Value Added 2 23 20 8 Notes: 1. Deflated using BEA's chain-type price indices for value of shipments. 2. Deflated using BEA's chain-type price indices for value added.

122

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5d. Economic and Physical Indicators for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5d Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Manufacturing Trend Data, 1998, 2002, and 2006 > Table 5d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5d. Economic and Physical Indicators for Basic Chemicals (NAICS 325), 1998, 2002, and 2006 Indicators MECS Survey Years 1998 2002 2006 Production1 (Million Short Tons) Inorganic Chemicals 179 163 170 Bulk Petrochemical 69 73 80 Organic Intermediate 73 73 64 Plastic Resins 40 48 50 Synthetic Rubber 2 2 NA Synthetic Fibers 5 5 4 Value of Shipments (Current Billion Dollars) Inorganic Chemicals 25 25 34 Bulk Petrochemicals & Intermediates 39 45 90 Plastic Resins 45 47 78 Synthetic Rubber 5 5 7 Synthetic Fibers 13 8 9 Value of Shipments2 (Billion 2000 Dollars) Inorganic Chemicals 27 25 26

123

ON THE CORRELATION OF LOW-ENERGY SPECTRAL INDICES AND REDSHIFTS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It was found by Amati et al. in 2002 that for a small sample of nine gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), more distant events appear to be systematically harder in the soft gamma-ray band. Here, we have collected a larger sample of 65 GRBs, whose time-integrated spectra are well established and can be well fitted with the so-called Band function. It is confirmed that a correlation between the redshifts (z) and the low-energy indices ({alpha}) of the Band function does exist, though it is a bit more scattered than the result of Amati et al. This correlation cannot be simply attributed to the effect of photon reddening. Furthermore, correlations between {alpha} and E {sub peak} (the peak energy in the {nu}F {sub {nu}} spectrum in the rest frame), {alpha} and E {sub iso} (the isotropic energy release), and {alpha} and L {sub iso} (the isotropic luminosity) are also found, which indicate that these parameters are somehow connected. The results may provide useful constraints on the physics of GRBs.

Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

53: Total energy use in buildings – evaluation and analysisTY. A design day for building load and energy estimation.Building and Environment, 1999; 34(4): 469-477. [5] Hong TZ,

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Development of pre-screening indices to improve energy analysis of public K-12 schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Mechanical Engineering ABSTRACT Development of Pre-Screening Indices to Improve Energy Analysis of Public K-12 Schools. (May 1998) David Shea Landman, B. S. , University of Rochester Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jeff S. Haberl Dr... percentiles. . . . . . . . . . 166 6. 17 25th percentile for 28 months and monthly and daily weekend school year baseline data in W/sf . 169 6. 18 25th percentile and monthly school year baseline data for 28 months of natural gas data in Btu/(hr-sf). 171...

Landman, David Shea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Combining indicators of energy consumption and CO2 emissions: a cross-country comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When countries are compared in terms of their carbon emission intensities, carbon emissions are normally considered as a function of either energy consumption, GDP, population or any other suitable variable. These can be termed as partial indicators as they consider emissions as a function of only one variable. Simultaneous consideration of more variables affecting carbon emissions is relatively complex. In this paper, several variables are simultaneously considered in comparing carbon emissions of countries using a new mathematical programming methodology, called the Data Envelopment Analysis. We have illustrated the use of the methodology with four variables representing CO2 emissions, energy consumption and economic activity. The illustrative analysis shows that Luxembourg, Norway, Sudan, Switzerland and Tanzania have been considered the most efficient countries, followed by India and Nigeria. Central European countries such as Poland, Romania, the Czech Republic, and South Africa are the least efficient.

R. Ramanathan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Envelope-related energy demand: A design indicator of energy performance for residential buildings in early design stages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The architectural design variables which most influence the energy performance of a building are the envelope materials, shape and window areas. As these start to be defined in the early design stages, designers require simple tools to obtain information about the energy performance of the building for the design variations being considered at this phase. The shape factor is one of those tools, but it fails to correlate with energy demand in the presence of important solar gains. This paper presents a new design indicator of energy performance for residential buildings, the Envelope-Related Energy Demand (ERED), which aims to overcome the shortcomings of the shape factor while maintaining a reasonable simplicity of use. The inputs to ERED are areas of envelope elements (floor, walls, roofs and windows), U-values of envelope materials, solar heat gain coefficients (SHGC) of windows and site related parameters, concerning temperature and solar irradiation. ERED was validated against detailed simulation results of 8000 hypothetical residential buildings, varying in envelope shape, window areas and materials. Results show that there is a strong correlation between ERED and simulated energy demand. These results confirm the adequacy of ERED to assist design decisions in early stages of the design process.

Vasco Granadeiro; João R. Correia; Vítor M.S. Leal; José P. Duarte

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Comprehensive System of Energy Intensity Indicators for the U.S.: Methods, Data and Key Trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a comprehensive system of energy intensity indicators for the United States that has been developed for the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) over the past decade. This system of indicators is hierarchical in nature, beginning with detailed indexes of energy intensity for various sectors of the economy, which are ultimately aggregated to an overall energy intensity index for the economy as a whole. The aggregation of energy intensity indexes to higher levels in the hierarchy is performed with a version of the Log Mean Divisia Index (LMDI) method. Based upon the data and methods in the system of indicators, the economy-wide energy intensity index shows a decline of about 14% in 2010 relative to a 1985 base year. Discussion of energy intensity indicators for each of the broad end-use sectors of the economy—residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation—is presented in the report. An analysis of recent changes in the efficiency of electricity generation in the U.S. is also included. A detailed appendix describes the data sources and methodology behind the energy intensity indicators for each sector.

Belzer, David B.

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Estimating Energy Efficiency Technology Adoption Curve Elasticity with Respect to Government and Utility Deployment Program Indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency Technology Adoption Curve Elasticity withEnvironmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest OrlandoEnergy, Building Technologies Office under Contract no. DE-

Van Buskirk, Robert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Estimating Energy Efficiency Technology Adoption Curve Elasticity with Respect to Government and Utility Deployment Program Indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

circles represent Energy Star market share data for statesdiamonds represent the Energy Star market share data foris assembled for Energy Star product markets covering all 50

Van Buskirk, Robert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A New System of Energy Intensity Indicators for the U.S. Economy Focus on Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The U.S. commitment to energy efficiency and conservation policy was emphasized in the National Energy Policy (NEP) made public in May 2001. Recommendation 14 in Chapter 4 of the NEP - "Making Energy Efficiency a National Priority" -recommended...

Roop, J. M.

132

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5f. Economic Indicators a for the Metalcasting  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

f f Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5f. Economic Indicators 1 for the Metalcasting Industry (NAICS 3315), 1998, 2002, and 2006 MECS Survey Years Indicators 1998 2002 2006 Nominal Economic Indicator (Current Billion Dollars) Value of Shipments 29 27 33 Value Added 17 15 18 Real Economic Indicator (Billion 2000 Dollars) Value of Shipments 2 29 27 23 Value Added 3 17 16 12 Notes: 1. Physical indicators are not available. 2.Deflated using BEA's price indices for value of shipments for primary metal (NAICS 331). 3 Deflated using BEA's price indices for value added for primary metal (NAICS 331). Sources: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of Manufacturers, Statistics for Industry Groups and Industries, 2001, 2004 and 2006; Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), "Value of Shipments by

134

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8.233-238.244.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Diamond, R.

Meier, Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

How people actually use thermostats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 2, 91-100.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8.233-238.244.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Parker, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 5a. Economic and Physical Indicators for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 5a. Economic and Physical Indicators for the Forest Products Industry, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (NAICS 321 and NAICS 322) MECS Survey Years Indicators 1998 2002 2006 Physical Wood Products (Millions of Board Feet) 47,263 47,359 NA Paper Products (Thousand Short Tons) 96,315 91,138 NA Total paper 44,761 41,540 41,810 Total paperboard 49,793 48,126 50,415 Wet Machine Board 90 47 NA Building paper 759 578 NA Insulating Board 912 846 NA Nominal Economic Indicators (Current Billion Dollars) Value of Shipments 246 243 281 Gross Output 244 239 278 Value Added 107 111 124 Real Economic Indicators (Billion 2000 Dollars) Value of Shipments 1 259 245 253 Gross Output 2 257 245 249 Value Added 3 119 112 121 Notes: 1. Deflated using BEA's chain-type price indices for value of shipments.

137

Green Key Performance Indicator Based on Embedded Lifecycle Energy for Selection of Cutting Tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many companies face increasing demands from markets to have environmentally friendly manufacturing processes. This paper proposes a Green Key Performance Indicator for selection of cutting tools, based on embedde...

Tomas Beno; Staffan Anderberg; Tahira Raza…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Indicators To Determine Winning Renewable Energy Technologies with an Application to Photovoltaics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peak prices can also be reduced through grid balancing with intelligent grids (57) that use information on hourly electricity use to allow demand response (60). ... Stadler, I. Power grid balancing of energy systems with high renewable energy penetration by demand response Util. ...

Wolf D. Grossmann; Iris Grossmann; Karl Steininger

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Improving Energy Use Forecast for Campus Micro-grids using Indirect Indicators Department of Computer Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.32%, and a reduction in error from baseline models by up to 53%. Keywords-energy forecast models; energy informatics I that physically char- acterize a building, or are based on measured building performance data. Smart meters have analysis and machine learning methods can be used to mine sensor data and extract forecast models

Prasanna, Viktor K.

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual results satellitenexperiment Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The actual case here corresponds to the minor windows (U0.5) case in Table 6. Table A1: Load and energy... .96) 6343.77 (3316.14) 933.65 (901.44) Major windows (Actual) Diff. - -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Indicators: Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% 100% 88% Quality Inspections Completed 26% -17% 95% 43% 72% 0% 61% 10% 63% Utilities: Performance for descriptions of performance measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators which may understate actual compliance results. All Zones Combined Zone Breakdown Steam/Chilled Water 0

Webb, Peter

142

Reliability enhancement of a radial distribution system using coordinated aggregation based particle swarm optimization considering customer and energy based indices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes an algorithm for optimum modifications for failure rate and repair time for a radial electrical distribution system. The modifications are with respect to a penalty cost function minimization. The cost function has been minimized subject to the energy based and customer oriented indices, i.e. AENS, SAIFI, SAIDI and CAIDI. Coordinated aggregation based particle swarm optimization (CAPSO) has been used for optimization. The algorithm has been implemented on a sample radial distribution system. The results obtained have been compared with those obtained using PSO.

Rajesh Arya; S.C. Choube; L.D. Arya; D.P. Kothari

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Analysis of load match and grid interaction indicators in net zero energy buildings with simulated and monitored data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main objective of this paper is to contribute to the discussion on the role of Net Zero Energy Buildings (Net ZEBs) on future energy systems by the interplay between on-site generation and the building loads, often called load matching, and the resulting import/export interaction with the surrounding electricity grid, commonly named grid interaction. This investigation analyzes five case studies with high resolution data, three of which are based on real monitored buildings. The research aims at selecting and suggesting a limited set of quantitative indicators that: (a) can provide practical information for building as well as grid designers and operators, and (b) are understandable for a wider audience and do not require complex simulation tools or additional resources. This paper also presents novel graphical representations describing the yearly or daily variation of the indexes in an understandable manner. It has been found that the hourly values of the cover factors (namely, the load cover factor and the supply cover factor) provide quite a good picture of the correlation between on-site demand and supply of energy. These factors illustrate both the daily and seasonal effect, the production pattern of different renewable energy technologies, and applied operation/control strategies. The loss-of load probability factor shows how often the on-site supply does not cover the on-site demand but it provides limited information. Several grid interaction indicators are presented in a normalized form based on the connection capacity between the building and the grid. The generation multiple is an index that compares peak values of exported/imported energy; it may also be used with generation/load values. The dimensioning rate and the connection capacity credit relate the building with the electrical grid. These indexes can be used to analyze individual buildings and extend their use in the case of cluster of buildings. Although some general trends have been identified in the results and the usefulness of these indicators is demonstrated, it should be noted that further studies are needed in order to define reference values for particular building topologies, clusters of buildings and climates, which could be used as a rule-of-thumb for grid/building designers.

Jaume Salom; Anna Joanna Marszal; Joakim Widén; José Candanedo; Karen Byskov Lindberg

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Climate Indices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indices Indices Climate Indices Climate indices are diagnostic tools used to describe the state of the climate system and monitor climate. They are most often represented with a time series, where each point in time corresponds to one index value. An index can be constructed to describe almost any atmospheric event; as such, they are myriad. Therefore, CDIAC provides these links to other web sites to help guide users to the most widely used climate indices, which in many cases are updated monthly. Data Set Website/Name NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, Monitoring and Data Index Page NOAA's Earth Systems Research Laboratory, Monthly Atmospheric and Ocean Time Series Page (plot, analyze, and compare time series) The Monthly Teleconnection Indices Page from NOAA's National

145

Carbon Footprint as a Single Indicator in Energy Systems: The Case of Biofuels and CO2 Capture Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy sector is one of the main sources of greenhouse gas emissions, in both the transport and electricity subsectors. Taking into account the current context of the energy sector, relevant case studies c...

Diego Iribarren; Javier Dufour

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Tropical Africa: Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Closed Forests (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Land Use Maximum Potential Biomass Density Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By Country) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1960 (By Administrative Unit)

147

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Date Published 05/2013 Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Traditional energy performance calculated using building simulation with the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data represents the energy performance in a typical year but not necessarily the average or typical energy performance of a building in long term. Furthermore, the simulated results do not provide the range of variations due to the change of weather, which is important in building energy management and risk assessment of energy efficiency investment. This study analyzes the weather impact on peak electric demand and energy use by building simulation using 30-year actual meteorological year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels across all 17 climate zones. The simulated results from the AMY are compared to those from TMY3 to determine and analyze the differences. It was found that yearly weather variation has significant impact on building performance especially peak electric demand. Energy savings of building technologies should be evaluated using simulations with multi-decade actual weather data to fully consider investment risk and the long term performance.

148

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual terrestrial rabies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 56 innovati nNREL Advances a Unique Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Summary: actually begins at another of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

150

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum View topic -Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553d  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553d of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553 Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 3 of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/php

Temple, Blake

151

Indicators of the Transformation Sector, Distribution Losses and Foreign Trade in Derived Energy Products in the Member States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis of the transformation sector includes all the subsectors listed in the Energy Statistics Yearbook of EUROSTAT. As far as national data were available, the analysis also includes combined heat and ...

Dr. Tihomir Morovi?; Franz-Josef Gründing…

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Identifying the relative importance of energy and water costs in hydraulic transport systems through a combined physics- and cost-based indicator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Modern long distance ore pipeline systems are subject to strong costs, both from the economic and environmental standpoints. The task of assessing the relative importance of energy and water consumption without a detailed engineering analysis is often not obvious. In the present paper, the relative importance of water and energy unit costs is assessed by a novel dimensionless formulation accounting for the essential hydraulic and cost elements that conform the slurry transport. It is found that, for conditions resembling those of copper and iron concentrate pipelines, the ratio between energy and water costs has a wide range, depending on the particular transport conditions and unit cost scenarios. Although operating at similar volume fractions, results indicate that energy/water cost relations may differ between copper and iron concentrate pipelines and local conditions, thus suggesting the need to explicitly include energy and water cost in the design strategy.

Christian F. Ihle; Aldo Tamburrino; Santiago Montserrat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

154

Gene Expression Analysis of Energy Metabolism Mutants of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Indicates an Important Role for Alcohol Dehydrogenase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ed., p. 318. Oxford University Press, New York, N.Y. 34 Widdel, F., and F. Bak. 1992...2nd ed., vol. 4. Springer-Verlag, New York, N.Y. Gene expression analysis of energy metabolism mutants of Desulfovibrio vulgaris...

Shelley A. Haveman; Véronique Brunelle; Johanna K. Voordouw; Gerrit Voordouw; John F. Heidelberg; Ralf Rabus

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Wind energy resources analysis of Western Greece coast in terms of sustainable environmental indicators and towards their community-based exploitation in South-East Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind energy resources in the Ionian-Adriatic coast of South-East Europe were analyzed. Status of wind energy development in the countries of Greece Albania Montenegro Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia and regions of moderate and high wind potential at their west coasts were reviewed. The feasibility of the application of specific wind turbine generators with lower cut-in cut-out and rated speeds in moderate wind fields was investigated. The wind speed and direction as well as the availability the duration and the diurnal variation of several coastal sites in Western Greece were assessed and the results were statistically analyzed as time-series or with the Weibull probability distribution function. The mean wind power densities were less than 200?W?m?2 at 10?m suggesting the limiting suitability of the sites for the usual wind energy applications. However further technical-economical analysis revealed that the recent technological turbine improvements with lower cut-in and rated speeds make wind power viable even at moderate wind fields. Environmental indicators like energy payback period and avoided greenhouse emissions were determined to be significant for the utilization of wind energy resources in these coastal areas. Since the region is important for sea-related activities the implementation of wind energy applications in the frame of cross-border cooperation should be prioritized.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Predicted vs. Actual Energy Savings of Retrofitted House  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-physical properties of the envelope and the changes in schedules and number of users. In order to account for those differences, electrical consumption attributed to A/C in summer was isolated and compared. The study followed the International Performance Measurement...

Al-Mofeez, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Triboluminescent indicator system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided a light emitting device comprising a plurality of triboluminescent particles dispersed throughout a low density, frangible body and activated by rapidly crushing the body in order to transfer mechanical energy to some portion of the particles. The light emitted by these mechanically excited particles is collected and directed into a light conduit and transmitted to a detector/indicator means.

Goods, Steven H. (Livermore, CA); Dentinger, Paul M. (Sunol, CA); Whinnery, Jr., Leroy L. (Danville, CA)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

January 23, 2008" ,"Next Update: October 2007" ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, " ,"2005...

159

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

160

Geothermal energy development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book studies the impact of geothermal energy development in Imperial County, California. An integrated assessment model for public policy is presented. Geothermal energy resources in Imperial County are identified. Population and employment studies project the impact of geothermal on demography and population movement in the county. A public opinion, and a leadership opinion survey indicate support for well-regulated geothermal development. Actual development events are updated. Finally, research conclusions and policy recommendations are presented.

Butler, E.W.; Pick, J.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Estimation of Regional Actual Evapotranspiration in the Panama Canal Watershed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The upper Río Chagres basin is a part of the Panama Canal Watershed. The least known water balance...SEBAL...). We use an image from March 27, 2000, for estimation of the distribution of the regional actual evapo...

Jan M.H. Hendrickx; Wim G.M. Bastiaanssen; Edwin J.M. Noordman…

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Sawtooth substorms generated under conditions of the steadily high solar wind energy input into the magnetosphere: Relationship between PC, AL and ASYM indices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Periodicity in occurrence of magnetic disturbances in polar cap and auroral zone under conditions of steady and powerful solar wind influence on the magnetosphere is analyzed on the example of 9 storm events with distinctly expressed sawtooth substorms (N = 48). Relationships between the polar cap magnetic activity (PC-index), magnetic disturbances in the auroral zone (AL-index) and value of the ring current asymmetry (ASYM index) were examined within the intervals of the PC growth phase and the PC decline phase inherent to each substorm. It is shown that the substorm sudden onsets are always preceded by the PC growth and that the substorm development does not affect the PC growth rate. On achieving the disturbance maximum, the PC and AL indices are simultaneously fall down to the level preceding the substorm, so that the higher the substorm intensity, the larger is the AL and PC drop in the decline phase. The ASYM index increases and decreases in conformity with the PC and AL behavior, the correlation between ASYM and PC being better than between ASYM and AL. Level of the solar wind energy input into the magnetosphere determines periodicity and intensity of disturbances: the higher the coupling function EKL, the higher is substorm intensity and shorter is substorm length. Taking into account the permanently high level of auroral activity and inconsistency of aurora behavior and magnetic onsets during sawtooth substorms, the conclusion is made that auroral ionosphere conductivity is typically high and ensures an extremely high intensity of field-aligned currents in R1 FAC system. The periodicity of sawtooth substorms is determined by recurrent depletions and restorations of R1 currents, which are responsible for coordinated variations of magnetic activity in the polar cap and auroral zone.

O. Troshichev; D. Sormakov; A. Janzhura

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

4Q CY2008, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (4QCY2008) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 3 1 100 1 100 100 70 86 ID (EM) 13 12 11 85 0 82 82 43 84 OR (EM) 19 18 18 95 0 72 72 44 66 ORP 15 15 14 93 0 79 64 43 72 PPPO 6 5 5 83 0 80 80 44 70 RL 19 18 18 95 1 84 84 45 70 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 30 80 SR 32 24 24 75 2 71 67 45 74 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 42 70 EM Totals 108 98 94 87 4 77 72 44 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of available work hours is the actual number of hours a Facility Representative works in a calendar quarter, including overtime hours. It does not include

164

Abstract 2198: A literature-based sum score of genetic variants in IGF genes modifies associations between indicators of energy balance and colorectal cancer risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Association for Cancer Research April 15, 2010 meeting-abstract Cellular and...Abstract 4834: Energy-dependent AMPK...in response to energy stress. Importantly...autophagy under energy stress conditions...Authors}. {Abstract title} [abstract...Association for Cancer Research; 2010 Apr 17-21...

Colinda CJM Simons; Leo J. Schouten; Roger Godschalk; Frederik-Jan van Schooten; Piet A. van den Brandt; and Matty P. Weijenberg

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Paper presented at the 2010 European Wind Energy Conference, Warsaw, Poland, 20-23 April 2010 Wind power prediction risk indices based on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paper presented at the 2010 European Wind Energy Conference, Warsaw, Poland, 20-23 April 2010 Wind. I. INTRODUCTION Wind power is a rapidly growing renewable energy source increasing its share Siebert** and George Kariniotakis*** MINES ParisTech, CEP - Center for Energy and Processes BP 207, 06904

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

166

Self-actualization as it relates to aerobic physical fitness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

higher than the aerobic and archery group on the TC, Ex, and C scales. The archery group was significantly higher than the preaerobic and aerobic groups on the Fr and S scales. Females from the preaerobic group were significantly lower than archery... Inventory Sav Self-actualization values measures how well a person holds and lives by values of se 1f- ac tualizing people Ex Existentiality measures ability to flexibly apply self-actualizing values to one's own life Fr Feeling reactivity measures...

Russell, Kathryn Terese Vecchio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

167

experiment actually sees," Smith says. "When we were  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiment actually sees," Smith says. "When we were finished, we got much more ­ a method in science depend on atoms and molecules moving," Smith says. "We want to create movies of molecules science development," Smith says.--Morgan McCorkle A theoretical technique developed at ORNL is bringing

Pennycook, Steve

168

COORDINATING ADVICE AND ACTUAL TREATMENT Thomas A. Russ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Unfortunately, this information is not always immediately available. For example, the exact fluid infused via an intravenous line can only be determined after someone checks the infusion bottle to determine how much fluid differ in timing and exact amount from what is actually done. For example, an infusion order might call

Russ, Thomas A.

169

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Table 2. Total Energy Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 3. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 4. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 5. Total Coal Consumption, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 6. Total Electricity Sales, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 7. Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 8. Natural Gas Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 9. Coal Production, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 10. Net Petroleum Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 11. Net Natural Gas Imports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 12. Net Coal Exports, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 13. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 14. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Forecasts Table 15. Coal Prices to Electric Utilities, Actual vs. Forecasts

170

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and Weather for a Medium-Size Office Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Buildingand actual building energy consumption can be attributed touncertainties in energy consumption due to actual weather

Wang, Liping

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

General Project Sequence The following are typical steps on many projects. Actual required steps may vary from project to project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Project Sequence The following are typical steps on many projects. Actual required steps may vary from project to project depending upon the scope, complexity, and specific features. Time periods indicated will vary depending on the nature of the project and needs of the user group

Mather, Patrick T.

172

FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

173

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final July 01, 2010 Final July 01, 2010 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2010 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

174

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

175

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft July 9, 2009 Draft July 9, 2009 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2009 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

176

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

177

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884 7924 AEO 1998 6895 6906 7066 7161 7278 7400 7488 7597 7719 7859 7959 8074 8190 8286 8361 AEO 1999 6884 7007 7269 7383 7472 7539 7620 7725 7841 7949 8069 8174 8283 8351 AEO 2000 7056 7141 7266 7363 7452 7578 7694 7815 7926 8028 8113 8217 8288

178

Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2935 3201 3362 3504 3657 3738 3880 3993 4099 4212 4303 4398 4475 4541 4584 4639 4668 4672 AEO 1995 2953 3157 3281 3489 3610 3741 3818 3920 4000 4103 4208 4303 4362 4420 4442 4460 4460 AEO 1996 3011 3106 3219 3398 3519 3679 3807 3891 3979 4070 4165 4212 4260 4289 4303 4322 4325 AEO 1997 3099 3245 3497 3665 3825 3975 4084 4190 4285 4380 4464 4552 4617 4654 4709 4760 AEO 1998 3303 3391 3654 3713 3876 4053 4137 4298 4415 4556 4639 4750 4910 4992 5087 AEO 1999 3380 3442 3888 4022 4153 4238 4336 4441 4545 4652 4780 4888 4999 5073 AEO 2000 3599 3847 4036 4187 4320 4465 4579 4690 4780 4882 4968 5055 5113

179

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.983258692,2.124739238,2.26534793,2.409252566,2.585728477,2.727400662,2.854942053,2.980927152,3.13861755,3.345819536,3.591100993,3.849544702,4.184279801,4.510016556,4.915074503,5.29147351,5.56022351,5.960471854 "AEO 1995",,1.891706924,1.998384058,1.952818035,2.064227053,2.152302174,2.400016103,2.569033816,2.897681159,3.160088567,3.556344605,3.869033816,4.267391304,4.561932367,4.848599034,5.157246377,5.413405797,5.660917874 "AEO 1996",,,1.630674532,1.740334763,1.862956911,1.9915856,2.10351261,2.194934146,2.287655669,2.378991658,2.476043002,2.589847464,2.717610782,2.836870306,2.967124845,3.117719429,3.294003735,3.485657428,3.728419409

180

Sustainability Indicators for Discrete Manufacturing Processes Applied to Grinding Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study, the indicatorEnergy intensity” measures the energylabor intensity, energy intensity, water intensity, andand we consider the energy intensity. Number, Weight, or

Linke, Barbara S.; Corman, Gero J.; Dornfeld, David A.; Tönissen, Stefan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A model to determine financial indicators for organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic solar cells are an emerging photovoltaic technology that is inexpensive and easy to manufacture, despite low efficiency and stability. A model, named TEEOS (Technical and Economic Evaluator for Organic Solar), is presented that evaluates organic solar cells for various solar energy applications in different geographic locations, in terms of two financial indicators, payback period and net present value (NPV). TEEOS uses SMARTS2 software to estimate broadband (280–4000 nm) spectral irradiance data and with the use of a cloud modification factor, predicts hourly irradiation in the absence of actual broadband irradiance data, which is scarce for most urban locations. By using the avoided cost of electricity, annual savings are calculated which produce the financial indicators. It is hoped that these financial indicators can help guide certain technical decisions regarding the direction of research for organic solar cells, for example, increasing efficiency or increasing the absorptive wavelength range. A sample calculation using solar hats is shown to be uneconomical, but a good example of large-scale organic PV production.

Colin Powell; Timothy Bender; Yuri Lawryshyn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

A model to determine financial indicators for organic solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic solar cells are an emerging photovoltaic technology that is inexpensive and easy to manufacture, despite low efficiency and stability. A model, named TEEOS (Technical and Economic Evaluator for Organic Solar), is presented that evaluates organic solar cells for various solar energy applications in different geographic locations, in terms of two financial indicators, payback period and net present value (NPV). TEEOS uses SMARTS2 software to estimate broadband (280-4000 nm) spectral irradiance data and with the use of a cloud modification factor, predicts hourly irradiation in the absence of actual broadband irradiance data, which is scarce for most urban locations. By using the avoided cost of electricity, annual savings are calculated which produce the financial indicators. It is hoped that these financial indicators can help guide certain technical decisions regarding the direction of research for organic solar cells, for example, increasing efficiency or increasing the absorptive wavelength range. A sample calculation using solar hats is shown to be uneconomical, but a good example of large-scale organic PV production. (author)

Powell, Colin; Bender, Timothy; Lawryshyn, Yuri [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2.02,2.4,2.66,2.74,2.81,2.85,2.89,2.93,2.95,2.97,3,3.16,3.31,3.5,3.57,3.63,3.74,3.85 "AEO 1995",,2.46,2.54,2.8,2.87,2.87,2.89,2.9,2.9,2.92,2.95,2.97,3,3.03,3.19,3.35,3.51,3.6 "AEO 1996",,,2.56,2.75,2.85,2.88,2.93,2.98,3.02,3.06,3.07,3.09,3.12,3.17,3.23,3.29,3.37,3.46,3.56 "AEO 1997",,,,2.82,2.96,3.16,3.43,3.46,3.5,3.53,3.58,3.64,3.69,3.74,3.78,3.83,3.87,3.92,3.97 "AEO 1998",,,,,2.95,3.19,3.531808376,3.842532873,3.869043112,3.894513845,3.935930967,3.976293564,4.021911621,4.062207222,4.107616425,4.164502144,4.221304417,4.277039051,4.339964867

184

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099 1104 AEO 1998 1009 1051 1044 1058 1087 1084 1090 1097 1112 1130 1142 1148 1160 1162 1180 AEO 1999 1040 1075 1092 1109 1113 1118 1120 1120 1133 1139 1150 1155 1156 1173 AEO 2000 1053 1086 1103 1124 1142 1164 1175 1184 1189 1194 1199 1195 1200 AEO 2001 1078 1112 1135 1153 1165 1183 1191 1220 1228 1228 1235 1240

185

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

186

Table 16. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual (billion kilowatt-hours) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2364 2454 2534 2626 2708 2811 AEO 1983 2318 2395 2476 2565 2650 2739 3153 AEO 1984 2321 2376 2461 2551 2637 2738 3182 AEO 1985 2317 2360 2427 2491 2570 2651 2730 2808 2879 2949 3026 AEO 1986 2363 2416 2479 2533 2608 2706 2798 2883 2966 3048 3116 3185 3255 3324 3397 AEO 1987 2460 2494 2555 2622 2683 2748 2823 2902 2977 3363 AEO 1989* 2556 2619 2689 2760 2835 2917 2994 3072 3156 3236 3313 3394 3473 AEO 1990 2612 2689 3083 3488.0 3870.0 AEO 1991 2700 2762 2806 2855 2904 2959 3022 3088 3151 3214 3282 3355 3427 3496 3563 3632 3704 3776 3846 3916 AEO 1992 2746 2845 2858 2913 2975 3030 3087 3146 3209 3276 3345 3415 3483 3552 3625 3699 3774 3847 3921 AEO 1993 2803 2840 2893 2946 2998 3052 3104 3157 3214 3271 3327

187

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

188

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO Dollar Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1992,1.9399,2.029,2.1099,2.1899,2.29,2.35,2.39,2.42,2.47,2.55,2.65,2.75,2.89,3.01,3.17,3.3,3.35,3.47 "AEO 1995",1993,,1.85,1.899,1.81,1.87,1.8999,2.06,2.14,2.34,2.47,2.69,2.83,3.02,3.12,3.21,3.3,3.35,3.39 "AEO 1996",1994,,,1.597672343,1.665446997,1.74129355,1.815978527,1.866241336,1.892736554,1.913619637,1.928664207,1.943216205,1.964540124,1.988652706,2.003382921,2.024799585,2.056392431,2.099974155,2.14731431,2.218094587

189

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 AEO 1996 1994 7.09 6.99 6.94 6.93 6.96 6.96 6.96 6.97 6.98 6.97 6.98 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.96 6.95 6.91 AEO 1997 1995 6.94 6.89 6.90 6.91 6.86 6.84 6.78 6.73 6.66 6.60 6.58 6.54 6.49 6.48 6.45 6.36

190

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO 1995",,6398.45,6544.45,6555.4,6675.85,6745.2,6821.85,6887.55,6964.2,7048.15,7146.7,7245.25,7336.5,7405.85,7471.55,7537.25,7581.05,7621.2 "AEO 1996",,,6489.7,6526.2,6606.5,6708.7,6781.7,6854.7,6942.3,7008,7084.65,7175.9,7259.85,7329.2,7383.95,7449.65,7500.75,7544.55,7581.05 "AEO 1997",,,,6635.7,6694.1,6825.5,6953.25,7073.7,7183.2,7267.15,7369.35,7460.6,7548.2,7643.1,7730.7,7792.75,7832.9,7884,7924.15

191

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",17.71,17.68,17.84,18.12,18.25,18.43,18.58,18.93,19.28,19.51,19.8,19.92,20.13,20.18,20.38,20.35,20.16,20.19 "AEO 1995",,18.28,17.98,17.92,18.21,18.63,18.92,19.08,19.2,19.36,19.52,19.75,19.94,20.17,20.28,20.6,20.59,20.88 "AEO 1996",,,18.9,19.15,19.52,19.59,19.59,19.65,19.73,19.97,20.36,20.82,21.25,21.37,21.68,22.11,22.47,22.83,23.36 "AEO 1997",,,,19.1,19.7,20.17,20.32,20.54,20.77,21.26,21.9,22.31,22.66,22.93,23.38,23.68,23.99,24.25,24.65 "AEO 1998",,,,,18.85,19.06,20.34936142,20.27427673,20.60257721,20.94442177,21.44076347,21.80969238,22.25416183,22.65365219,23.176651,23.74545097,24.22989273,24.70069313,24.96691322

192

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.94 2.03 2.11 2.19 2.29 2.35 2.39 2.42 2.47 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.89 3.01 3.17 3.30 3.35 3.47 AEO 1995 1993 1.85 1.90 1.81 1.87 1.90 2.06 2.14 2.34 2.47 2.69 2.83 3.02 3.12 3.21 3.30 3.35 3.39 AEO 1996 1994 1.60 1.67 1.74 1.82 1.87 1.89 1.91 1.93 1.94 1.96 1.99 2.00 2.02 2.06 2.10 2.15 2.22

193

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review - Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections Release Date: March 16, 2012 | Next Release Date: March 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0640(2011) The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy production, consumption and prices each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). Each year, EIA also produces this AEO Retrospective Review document, which presents a comparison between realized energy outcomes and the Reference case projections included in previous editions of the AEO. The purpose of the AEO Retrospective is to demonstrate how the AEO projections have tracked actual energy indicators, enable trend analysis, and inform discussions of potential improvements to the AEO. The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of

194

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review - Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2012 and Prior Reference Case AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2012 and Prior Reference Case Projections Release Date: March 15, 2013 | Next Release Date: March 2014 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0640(2012) The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy production, consumption and prices each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). Each year, EIA also produces an AEO Retrospective Review document, which presents a comparison between realized energy outcomes and the Reference case projections included in previous editions of the AEO. The purpose of the Retrospective is to show the relationship between past AEO projections and actual energy indicators, enable trend analysis, and inform discussions of potential improvements to the AEO. The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of

195

Measuring Changes in Energy Efficiency for the Annual Energy Outlook 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Changes in Energy Efficiency Changes in Energy Efficiency for the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 by Steven H. Wade This paper describes the construction of an aggregate energy efficiency index based on projections of sectoral and subsector energy consumption and subsector-specific energy service indicators. The results are compared with the ratio energy to real gross domestic product, which typically is pre- sented as a measure of energy intensity. Introduction Energy efficiency and conservation are currently impor- tant components of the debate about the direction of future energy policy. Measuring the actual energy effi- ciency of the U.S. economy is a daunting task because of the immense data requirements for a proper calculation. Appropriate data are difficult to obtain, and as a result historical descriptions of the economy usually are sum- marized in two energy intensity measures: (1) energy

196

Acoustic plug release indicator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention comprises an acoustic plug release indicator system. The acoustic plug release indicatior system comprises a microphone, recording system and operator listening device.

Carter, E.E. Jr.

1984-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Pose estimation of an uncooperative spacecraft from actual space imagery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses the preliminary design of a spaceborne monocular vision-based navigation system for on-orbit-servicing and formation-flying applications. The aim is to estimate the pose of a passive space resident object using its known three-dimensional model and single low-resolution two-dimensional images collected on-board the active spacecraft. In contrast to previous work, no supportive means are available on the target satellite (e.g., light emitting diodes) and no a-priori knowledge of the relative position and attitude is available (i.e., lost-in-space scenario). Three fundamental mechanisms - perceptual organisation, true perspective projection, and random sample consensus - are exploited to overcome the limitations of monocular passive optical navigation in space. The preliminary design is conducted and validated making use of actual images collected in the frame of the PRISMA mission at about 700 km altitude and 10 m inter-spacecraft separation.

Simone D'Amico; Mathias Benn; John L. Jørgensen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Engagement Indicators Wittenberg University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indicators Report Theme Engagement Indicator Higher-Order Learning Reflective and Integrative Learning-and-whisker charts show the variation in scores within your institution and comparison groups. Straightforward in magnitude (before rounding) are highlighted in the Overview. EIs vary more among students within

Bogaerts, Steven

200

Revisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High Performance Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy consumed by buildings accounts for one third of the world?s total primary energy use. Associated with the conscious of energy savings in buildings, High Performance Buildings (HPBs) has surged across the world, with wide promotion and adoption of various performance rating and certification systems. It is valuable to look into the actual energy performance of HPBs and to understand their influencing factors. To shed some light on this topic, this paper conducted a series of portfolio analysis based on a database of 51 high performance office buildings across the world. Analyses showed that the actual site Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of the 51 buildings varied by a factor of up to 11, indicating a large scale of variation of the actual energy performance of the current HPBs. Further analysis of the correlation between EUI and climate elucidated ubiquitous phenomenon of EUI scatter throughout all climate zones, implying that the weather is not a decisive factor, although important, for the actual energy consumption of an individual building. On the building size via EUI, analysis disclosed that smaller buildings have a tendency to achieving lower energy use. Even so, the correlation is not absolute since some large buildings demonstrated low energy use while some small buildings performed opposite. Concerning the technologies, statistics indicated that the application of some technologies had correlations with some specific building size and climate characteristic. However, it was still hard to pinpoint a set of technologies which was directly correlative with a group of low EUI buildings. It is concluded that no a single factor essentially determines the actual energy performance of HPBs. To deliver energy-efficient buildings, an integrated design taking account of climate, technology, occupant behavior as well as operation and maintenance should be implemented.

Li , Cheng; Hong , Tianzhen

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable energy source and with abundant solar resources inEnergy Generation and Sources 2005 Actual Wind Solar Biomasssources of non- fossil electricity generation including wind, solar, hydro, nuclear and geothermal, renewable energy

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Plant indicators in Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Native plants of Iraq have shown considerable variation in their ability...Seidlitzia rosmarinus andHalocnemum strobilaceum indicate very high soil sodium contents, and others high magnesium and sulphate contents...

T. A. Al-Ani; I. M. Habib; A. I. Abdulaziz; N. A. Ouda

1971-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production, Projected vs. Actual Production, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 14.74 14.26 14.33 14.89 15.39 15.88 AEO 1983 16.48 16.27 16.20 16.31 16.27 16.29 14.89 AEO 1984 17.48 17.10 17.44 17.58 17.52 17.32 16.39 AEO 1985 16.95 17.08 17.11 17.29 17.40 17.33 17.32 17.27 17.05 16.80 16.50 AEO 1986 16.30 16.27 17.15 16.68 16.90 16.97 16.87 16.93 16.86 16.62 16.40 16.33 16.57 16.23 16.12 AEO 1987 16.21 16.09 16.38 16.32 16.30 16.30 16.44 16.62 16.81 17.39 AEO 1989* 16.71 16.71 16.94 17.01 16.83 17.09 17.35 17.54 17.67 17.98 18.20 18.25 18.49 AEO 1990 16.91 17.25 18.84 20.58 20.24 AEO 1991 17.40 17.48 18.11 18.22 18.15 18.22 18.39 18.82 19.03 19.28 19.62 19.89 20.13 20.07 19.95 19.82 19.64 19.50 19.30 19.08 AEO 1992 17.43 17.69 17.95 18.00 18.29 18.27 18.51 18.75 18.97

204

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

205

Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 9.2 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 7.29 8.09 8.94 9.62 10.27 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 6.37 6.89 7.50 8.15 9.05 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30

206

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 23.36 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25 24.65 AEO 1998 18.85 19.06 20.35 20.27 20.60 20.94 21.44 21.81 22.25 22.65 23.18 23.75 24.23 24.70 24.97 AEO 1999 18.80 19.13 19.28 19.82 20.23 20.77 21.05 21.57 21.98 22.47 22.85 23.26 23.77 24.15

207

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

208

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

209

Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 7.58 7.45 7.12 6.82 6.66 7.09 AEO 1983 5.15 5.44 5.73 5.79 5.72 5.95 6.96 AEO 1984 4.85 5.11 5.53 5.95 6.31 6.59 8.65 AEO 1985 4.17 4.38 4.73 4.93 5.36 5.72 6.23 6.66 7.14 7.39 7.74 AEO 1986 5.15 5.38 5.46 5.92 6.46 7.09 7.50 7.78 7.96 8.20 8.47 8.74 9.04 9.57 9.76 AEO 1987 5.81 6.04 6.81 7.28 7.82 8.34 8.71 8.94 8.98 10.01 AEO 1989* 6.28 6.84 7.49 7.96 8.53 8.83 9.04 9.28 9.60 9.64 9.75 10.02 10.20 AEO 1990 7.20 7.61 9.13 9.95 11.02 AEO 1991 7.28 7.25 7.34 7.48 7.72 8.10 8.57 9.09 9.61 10.07 10.51 11.00 11.44 11.72 11.86 12.11 12.30 12.49 12.71 12.91 AEO 1992 6.86 7.42 7.88 8.16 8.55 8.80 9.06 9.32 9.50 9.80 10.17 10.35 10.56 10.61 10.85 11.00 11.15 11.29 11.50 AEO 1993 7.25 8.01 8.49 9.06

210

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1.98 2.12 2.27 2.41 2.59 2.73 2.85 2.98 3.14 3.35 3.59 3.85 4.18 4.51 4.92 5.29 5.56 5.96 AEO 1995 1.89 2.00 1.95 2.06 2.15 2.40 2.57 2.90 3.16 3.56 3.87 4.27 4.56 4.85 5.16 5.41 5.66 AEO 1996 1.63 1.74 1.86 1.99 2.10 2.19 2.29 2.38 2.48 2.59 2.72 2.84 2.97 3.12 3.29 3.49 3.73 AEO 1997 2.03 1.82 1.90 1.99 2.06 2.13 2.21 2.32 2.43 2.54 2.65 2.77 2.88 3.00 3.11 3.24 AEO 1998 2.30 2.20 2.26 2.31 2.38 2.44 2.52 2.60 2.69 2.79 2.93 3.06 3.20 3.35 3.48 AEO 1999 1.98 2.15 2.20 2.32 2.43 2.53 2.63 2.76 2.90 3.02 3.12 3.23 3.35 3.47

211

Table 15. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual (nominal cents per kilowatt-hour) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.38 6.96 7.63 8.23 8.83 9.49 AEO 1983 6.85 7.28 7.74 8.22 8.68 9.18 13.12 AEO 1984 6.67 7.05 7.48 7.89 8.25 8.65 11.53 AEO 1985 6.62 6.94 7.32 7.63 7.89 8.15 8.46 8.85 9.20 9.61 10.04 AEO 1986 6.67 6.88 7.05 7.18 7.35 7.52 7.65 7.87 8.31 8.83 9.41 10.01 10.61 11.33 12.02 AEO 1987 6.63 6.65 6.92 7.12 7.38 7.62 7.94 8.36 8.86 11.99 AEO 1989* 6.50 6.75 7.14 7.48 7.82 8.11 8.50 8.91 9.39 9.91 10.49 11.05 11.61 AEO 1990 6.49 6.72 8.40 10.99 14.5 AEO 1991 6.94 7.31 7.59 7.82 8.18 8.38 8.54 8.73 8.99 9.38 9.83 10.29 10.83 11.36 11.94 12.58 13.21 13.88 14.58 15.21 AEO 1992 6.97 7.16 7.32 7.56 7.78 8.04 8.29 8.57 8.93 9.38 9.82 10.26 10.73 11.25 11.83 12.37 12.96 13.58 14.23 AEO 1993

212

Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 AEO 1983 1.08 1.16 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 AEO 1984 0.99 1.05 1.16 1.27 1.43 1.57 2.11 AEO 1985 0.94 1.00 1.19 1.45 1.58 1.86 1.94 2.06 2.17 2.32 2.44 AEO 1986 0.74 0.88 0.62 1.03 1.05 1.27 1.39 1.47 1.66 1.79 1.96 2.17 2.38 2.42 2.43 AEO 1987 0.84 0.89 1.07 1.16 1.26 1.36 1.46 1.65 1.75 2.50 AEO 1989* 1.15 1.32 1.44 1.52 1.61 1.70 1.79 1.87 1.98 2.06 2.15 2.23 2.31 AEO 1990 1.26 1.43 2.07 2.68 2.95 AEO 1991 1.36 1.53 1.70 1.82 2.11 2.30 2.33 2.36 2.42 2.49 2.56 2.70 2.75 2.83 2.90 2.95 3.02 3.09 3.17 3.19 AEO 1992 1.48 1.62 1.88 2.08 2.25 2.41 2.56 2.68 2.70 2.72 2.76 2.84 2.92 3.05 3.10 3.20 3.25 3.30 3.30 AEO 1993 1.79 2.08 2.35 2.49 2.61 2.74 2.89 2.95 3.00 3.05 3.10

213

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00 26.63 AEO 1997 22.15 22.75 23.24 23.64 23.86 24.13 24.65 25.34 25.82 26.22 26.52 27.00 27.35 27.70 28.01 28.47 AEO 1998 21.84 23.03 23.84 24.08 24.44 24.81 25.33 25.72 26.22 26.65 27.22 27.84 28.35 28.84 29.17 AEO 1999 21.35 22.36 22.54 23.18 23.65 24.17 24.57 25.19 25.77 26.41 26.92 27.42 28.02 28.50

214

2Q CY2009, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ Http//www.hss.energy.gov/deprep/facrep/ OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (2QCY2009) Field or Ops Office * Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time ** % Oversight Time *** CBFO 3 3 2 67 0 50 50 46 76 ID 13 13 11 85 0 100 100 49 90 OR 19 18 17 89 1 71 71 42 57 ORP 15 15 15 100 0 73 73 53 77 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 67 67 42 70 RL 19 19 19 100 0 84 84 45 69 SR 32 28 28 88 0 64 64 47 73 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 70 EM Totals 109 104 100 92 1 74 74 46 72 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office; ID = Idaho Operations Office; OR = Oak Ridge Office; ORP = Office of River Protection; PPPO = Portsmouth/Paducah

215

The Actuality and Prospect of Solar Collector Technology in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development tendency and the future of the solar heater utilization product are going to determine the solar energy collector technology development. The vacuum tube solar water heater development direction i...

Luo Yunjun; Liu Airong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Energy Indicators for Sustainable Development: Guidelines and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FactsheetsEnglishindicators.pdf Country: Brazil, Cuba, Lithuania, Mexico, Russia, Slovakia, Thailand UN Region: South-Eastern Asia, "Latin America and Caribbean" is...

217

General Indicators: Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Completed in 1 business day 81% -1% 100% - 78% 100% 80% Quality Inspections Completed 95% - - - - Utilities: See Definitions Document for descriptions of performance measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes from the prior month: Steam/Chilled Water

Webb, Peter

218

Indicators: Performance Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-82 100 10 7 8 0 10 Completed in 1 business day 74% -14% 100% 60% 71% 63% 100% 100% Quality of performance measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes Breakdown All Zones Combined Zone Breakdown Steam/Chilled Water Electric 17% 20% 0 100% 100% 1 Improvement

Webb, Peter

219

Indicators: Performance Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% Quality Inspections Completed 66% +12% 95% 86% 95% 52% 81% 51% 76% Utilities: Performance Statistics of performance measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes from the prior month: Key: - 54% Electric - 0% All Zones Combined Zone Breakdown Steam/Chilled Water 0

Webb, Peter

220

General Indicators: Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

100 4 11 2 75 Completed in 1 business day 92% -5% 100% 100% 100% 100% 91% Quality Inspections measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes from the prior month: 100% 50% 70% - All Districts Combined 0 Electric 0 District Breakdown Steam/Chilled Water

Webb, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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221

General Indicators: Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

100 0 5 3 84 Completed in 1 business day 97% +16% 100% - 100% 100% 96% Quality Inspections Completed-FLS 86% -7% 70% Key: See Definitions Document for descriptions of performance measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes from the prior month: Steam

Webb, Peter

222

Indicators: Performance Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% 75% 100% 80% 100% 93% Quality Inspections Completed 54% +2% 95% 40% 34% 57% 88% 60% 54% Utilities for descriptions of performance measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes from the prior month: Key: 0% 43% Electric 0% 11% All Zones Combined Zone Breakdown Steam

Webb, Peter

223

Indicators: Performance Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's): Quantity 117 -97 100 13 14 9 4 77 Completed in 1 business day 88% -8% 100% 77% 43% 78% 100% 99% Quality measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes from the prior month: Steam 100% 58% 0 - Electric 26% 0 UNIVERSITY SERVICES ­ FACILITIES MANAGEMENT MONTHLY

Webb, Peter

224

Indicators: Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% 69% 100% 98% Quality Inspections Completed 52% +21% 95% 25% 100% 82% 0% Utilities: Performance for descriptions of performance measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators OPERATIONS SCORECARD All Districts Combined District Breakdown Steam/Chilled Water February 2008 All

Webb, Peter

225

General Indicators: Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

100 8 14 5 119 Completed in 1 business day 97% +17% 100% 88% 93% 100% 98% Quality Inspections measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes from the prior month: All Districts Combined 0 Electric 2 District Breakdown Steam/Chilled Water - 55% 39

Webb, Peter

226

General Indicators: Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's): Quantity 10 No Change 100 1 1 3 5 Completed in 1 business day 70% -10% 100% 100% 0% 100% 60% Quality measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes from the prior month: Steam/Chilled Water Electric 84% 84% 4 3 - - Met Target Requires ReviewMissed Target

Webb, Peter

227

Indicators: Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% Quality Inspections Completed 99% No Change 95% 100% 100% 99% 100% Utilities: Performance Statistics of performance measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes SCORECARD All Districts Combined District Breakdown Steam/Chilled Water June 2008 All Districts Combined All

Webb, Peter

228

Indicators: Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's): Quantity 207 -39 100 16 24 5 5 157 Completed in 1 business day 84% -9% 100% 88% 100% 80% 100% 81% Quality measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes from the prior month: Key: 50% 52% Electric - 26% All Zones Combined Zone Breakdown Steam/Chilled Water 3 0 All

Webb, Peter

229

Indicators: Change from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% Quality Inspections Completed 99% +3% 95% 100% 98% 99% 100% Utilities: Performance Statistics Current of performance measures and specific color code target values. Trend status color indicators ­ identifies changes Combined District Breakdown Steam/Chilled Water May 2008 All Districts Combined All Districts Combined

Webb, Peter

230

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. Schaeffer, 1997, “Energy Intensity in the Iron and Steelwhich is the ratio of the actual energy intensity to thebest practice energy intensity, where the best practice

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and Weather for a Medium between predicted and actual building energy consumption can be attributed to uncertainties introduced in energy consumption due to actual weather and building operational practices, using a simulation

232

Energy Audit of Ludvigsbergsskolan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Students of Ludvigsbergsskolan have complained that it was cold in classrooms during winters, but actually the energy consumption (electricity and district heating) of the… (more)

Li, Liang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use CO 2 /GDP Primary Energy Consumption/capita Final Energylevel indicators Primary Energy Consumption/GDP Final Energyavg-unweighted Primary Energy Consumption/GDP kgce/RMB

Price, Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales relacionadas con Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: actuales relacionadas con Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Departamento de Fsica (EPS) Universidad Carlos III de Madrid Summary: fsica relacionada con la implosin de los...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales clasificaciones del Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 30 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - actuales del sector Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Engineering 60 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

238

Matter & Energy Wind Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

See Also: Matter & Energy Wind Energy Energy Technology Physics Nuclear Energy Petroleum 27, 2012) -- Energy flowing from large-scale to small-scale places may be prevented from flowing, indicating that there are energy flows from large to small scale in confined space. Indeed, under a specific

Shepelyansky, Dima

239

residential sector key indicators | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential sector key indicators residential sector key indicators Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2009 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption, part of the Source EIA Date Released March 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO consumption EIA energy residential sector key indicators Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2009 Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (xls, 55.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

240

Sustainability Indicators for Discrete Manufacturing Processes Applied to Grinding Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study, the indicatorEnergy intensity” measures the energylabor intensity, energy intensity, water intensity, andand we consider the energy intensity. Number, Weight, or

Linke, Barbara S.; Corman, Gero J.; Dornfeld, David A.; Tönissen, Stefan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy newsroomassetsimagesenergy-icon.png Energy Research into alternative forms of energy, and improving and securing the power grid, is a major national security...

242

XAFS Study of Phase-Change Recording Material Using Actual Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of the interface layer to the local structure for atomic arrangement of a GeBiTe phase-change material was investigated by using XAFS on the actual rewritable HD DVD...

Nakai, Tsukasa; Yoshiki, Masahiko; Satoh, Yasuhiro

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del ultrasonido Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: : evolucin histrica y situacin actual. 8 l) Evaluacin de la capacidad de carga del Parque para los... Proyectos A lo largo del ao 2010 han estado vigentes 85...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - anciano consideraciones actuales Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mitigacin de los efectos del cambio climtico y con... polticas De proseguir las emisiones de GEI a una tasa igual o superior a la actual, el calentamiento Source: Binette,...

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del huemul Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 88 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del franciscanismo Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 75 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del control Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 30 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del tabaquismo Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 91 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del no-acceso Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 73 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del rabdomiosarcoma Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 74 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual del estreptococo Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 80 MTODO DE CENSO Y ESTIMA DE POBLACIN DEL PINZN AZUL DE GRAN CANARIA Summary: distribucin actual de la especie en Inagua, Ojeda y Pajonales. El...

252

Does a dynamical system lose energy by emitting gravitational waves?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We note that Eddington's radiation damping calculation of a spinning rod fails to account for the complete mass integral as given by Tolman. The missing stress contributions precisely cancel the standard rate given by the 'quadrupole formula'. This indicates that while the usual 'kinetic' term can properly account for dynamical changes in the source, the actual mass is conserved. Hence gravity waves are not carriers of energy in vacuum. This supports the hypothesis that energy including the gravitational contribution is confined to regions of non-vanishing energy-momentum tensor $T_{ik}$. PACS numbers: 04.20.Cv, 04.30.-w

F. I. Cooperstock

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Exergy indicators in the building environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this work is the application of the exergy analysis to the building sector and the introduction of suitable exergy indicators. The indicators are tools which are representative of the system under study and provide reliability over time, information to policy makers and awareness of potential environmental problems arising from human activities. The application of the exergy analysis of a new office building's life cycle in Greece constitutes a big part of this work. A hypothetical case involving the application of renewable energy sources in a range of 10-50% of the overall exergy needs is examined.

C. Koroneos; I. Kalemakis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Performance indicators, third quarter CY-1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN-29-91) directed that a Department- wide uniform system of Performance Indicators (PI's) for trending and analyzing operational data to help assess and support progress in improving performance and in strengthening line management control of operations relating to environmental safety, and health activities'' be developed. This Performance Indicator Report represents a compilation of data for the third quarter of calendar year 1991 for the following Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) facilities: (1) Bevalac, (2) 88-Inch Cyclotron, (3) Materials Sciences Division.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Performance indicators, third quarter CY-1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN-29-91) directed that a Department- wide ``uniform system of Performance Indicators (PI`s) for trending and analyzing operational data to help assess and support progress in improving performance and in strengthening line management control of operations relating to environmental safety, and health activities`` be developed. This Performance Indicator Report represents a compilation of data for the third quarter of calendar year 1991 for the following Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) facilities: (1) Bevalac, (2) 88-Inch Cyclotron, (3) Materials Sciences Division.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

National Climate Assessment: Indicators System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indicators System Print E-mail Indicators System Print E-mail What are the goals for the NCA indicators? The vision for the National Climate Assessment (NCA) is to create a system of indicators that will help inform policy-makers and citizens understand key aspects of our changing climate. Scientific information about physical climate conditions, climate impacts, vulnerabilities, and preparedness will be tracked and compiled. These measures are called indicators. The goals of the Indicators System are to: Provide meaningful, authoritative climate-relevant measures about the status, rates, and trends of key physical, ecological, and societal variables and values Inform decisions on management, research, and education at regional to national scales Identify climate-related conditions and impacts to help develop effective mitigation and adaptation measures

257

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review Table 2. Summary of the number o fover-estimated results between AEO Reference cases and realized Outcomes All AEOs NEMS AEOs Percent of Projections Over-Estimated Percent of Projections Over-Estimated Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, (Average Cumulative Growth) Actual vs. Projected 24% 37% Table 4. World Oil Prices, Actual vs. Projected 52% 24% Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Actual vs. Projected 44% 61% Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Actual vs. Projected 59% 65% Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Actual vs. Projected 56% 61% Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Projected 54% 23% Table 9. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Actual vs. Projected

258

Engagement Indicators CUNY Queens College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indicators Report Theme Engagement Indicator Higher-Order Learning Reflective & Integrative Learning Learning of at least .3 in magnitude (before rounding) are highlighted in the Overview (p. 3). EIs vary more among in a given EI are displayed for your institution and comparison groups. Box-and-whisker charts show

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

259

Gasoline direct injection: Actual trends and future strategies for injection and combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent developments have raised increased interest on the concept of gasoline direct injection as the most promising future strategy for fuel economy improvement of SI engines. The general requirements for mixture preparation and combustion systems in a GDI engine are presented in view of known and actual systems regarding fuel economy and emission potential. The characteristics of the actually favored injection systems are discussed and guidelines for the development of appropriate combustion systems are derived. The differences between such mixture preparation strategies as air distributed fuel and fuel wall impingement are discussed, leading to the alternative approach to the problem of mixture preparation with the fully air distributing concept of direct mixture injection.

Fraidl, G.K.; Piock, W.F.; Wirth, M.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy ... “Scientific Challenges in Sustainable Energy Technology,” by Nathan S. Lewis of the California Institute of Technology, summarizes data on energy resources and analyses the implications for human society. ... ConfChem Conference on Educating the Next Generation: Green and Sustainable Chemistry—Solar Energy: A Chemistry Course on Sustainability for General Science Education and Quantitative Reasoning ...

John W. Moore

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Buildings Success Stories | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Project Decision Making EERE's Buildings Performance Database, launched in June 2013, provides access to empirical data on the actual energy performance, as well as...

262

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standarf 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January-March 2012 More Documents & Publications 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

263

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2011 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

264

A COGNITIVE-SYSTEMIC RECONSTRUCTION OF MASLOW'S THEORY OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COGNITIVE-SYSTEMIC RECONSTRUCTION OF MASLOW'S THEORY OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION by Francis Heylighen1-order, cognitive-sys- temic framework. A hierarchy of basic needs is derived from the ur- gency of perturbations: material, cognitive and subjective. Material and/or cognitive incompetence during child- hood create

Toint, Philippe

265

SAMPLE GENERAL TERMS WHEN PURCHASING SERVICES* ACTUAL TERMS REQUIRED WILL BE DETERMINED BY CONTRACTS &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 SAMPLE GENERAL TERMS WHEN PURCHASING SERVICES* ACTUAL TERMS REQUIRED WILL BE DETERMINED Contracts and Procurement (x4532) if you have questions regarding purchasing services. 1. Independent Status in an independent capacity and not as officers or employees or agents of the State of California. While Contractor

de Lijser, Peter

266

Economic evaluation of a residential photovoltaic system based on a probability model using actual meteorological data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To design a photovoltaic (PV) generation system economically, it is necessary to use date of the total insolation on a horizontal surface. However, such data is only the total daily values and does not represent the power variation caused by the cloud cover. This paper presents the probability method which represents not only the average but also the variance of the PV generation power, and shows simulated results using this methodology. This study's results indicate that the distribution of the PV power divided by the estimated value of the total insolation on a tilted surface is similar to a normal distribution and that a residential (privately-owned) system without storage, whose PV capacity is more than 2 kWp, has little effect upon the reduction of the energy of an average Japanese household.

Sutoh, T.; Suzuki, H.; Sekine, Y.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Behavioral strategies to bridge the gap between potential and actual savings in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. American CouncilStudy on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. American CouncilStudy on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. American Council

Moezzi, Mithra; Hammer, Christine; Goins, John; Meier, Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Update to ENERGY STAR Ratings for Hotels, FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Update to ENERGY STAR Ratings for Hotels Update to ENERGY STAR Ratings for Hotels May 2009 Frequently Asked Questions EPA's energy performance rating system evaluates actual, as-billed energy data to create a whole building indicator of energy performance and compare a building to its national peer group. EPA analyzes national survey data, develops regression models to predict energy use based on operation, and assigns a 1-to-100 rating to a building. Each point on the performance scale represents one percentile of buildings. A full overview of this process and specific details on the hotel model are available online. 1 A revised rating model for hotels was released into Portfolio Manager on February 23, 2009. How was the Hotel Model Updated? The new hotel model incorporates several updates to the original model, as described below. All of the changes have

269

Developing indicators for European birds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resources, which is a central pillar of the Convention on Biological...birds forms one part of a three-pronged approach to delivering indicators for sustainability in Europe based on birds...a historical study over three decades. J. Appl. Ecol...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Representation of Energy Use in the Food Products Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional representations of energy in the manufacturing sector have tended to represent energy end-uses rather than actual energy service demands. While this representation if quite adequate for understanding how energy is used today...

Elliott, N. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

EIA Data: 2011 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Sector Key Indicators and Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2011 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption, part of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. Source EIA Date Released December 16th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords consumption EIA energy residential sector key indicators Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (xls, 62.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm

272

Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4%

273

The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics, Professor and Extension Economist? Management, The Texas A&M System; and Extension Agricultural Economist, Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service. The U.S. Dept. of Agriculture?s (USDA) Risk..., levels of coverage, price elections, applicable premium rates and subsidy amounts. The special provisions list program calendar dates and contain general and special statements that may further define, limit or modify coverage. MPCI?s Actual...

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

Leadership and Leading Indicators Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leadership Leadership and Leading Indicators Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D., Member Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Thanks to Matt Moury and Doug Minnema August 28, 2008 Objectives * A few thoughts about leadership * Actions taken by leaders * Role of leading indicators * Consider the future August 28, 2008 2 3 Safety Culture Safety culture is an organization's values and behaviors - modeled by its leaders and internalized by its members - that serve to make nuclear safety an overriding priority.* - Dating back to SEN-35-91, it's DOE Policy; - It's perishable; - EFCOG/DOE ISMS Safety Culture Task Team. *INPO, Principles for a Strong Nuclear Safety Culture, November 2004. August 28, 2008 4 Leadership & Mission Top 10 Ways To Know You Have A Safety Culture: * #1 is Leadership - the talk and the walk

275

Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Federal, State, local, and foreign governments, EIA survey respondents, and the media. For further information, and for answers to questions on energy statistics, please...

276

Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Energy Express Licensing Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Of Spent Fuel Elements Express Licensing Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes Express Licensing Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Express Licensing Aligned Crystalline Semiconducting Film On A Glass Substrate And Method Of Making Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Apparatus for Producing Voltage and Current Pulses Express Licensing Biaxially oriented film on flexible polymeric substrate Express Licensing Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates Express Licensing Device for hydrogen separation and method Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Energy Efficient Synthesis Of Boranes Express Licensing

277

Dark energy from cosmological fluids obeying a Shan-Chen non-ideal equation of state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe with a fluid source obeying a non-ideal equation of state with "asymptotic freedom," namely ideal gas behavior (pressure changes directly proportional to density changes) both at low and high density regimes, following a fluid dynamical model due to Shan and Chen. It is shown that, starting from an ordinary energy density component, such fluids naturally evolve towards a universe with a substantial "dark energy" component at the present time, with no need of invoking any cosmological constant. Moreover, we introduce a quantitative indicator of darkness abundance, which provides a consistent picture of the actual matter-energy content of the universe.

Bini, Donato; Gregoris, Daniele; Succi, Sauro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Dark energy from cosmological fluids obeying a Shan-Chen non-ideal equation of state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe with a fluid source obeying a non-ideal equation of state with "asymptotic freedom," namely ideal gas behavior (pressure changes directly proportional to density changes) both at low and high density regimes, following a fluid dynamical model due to Shan and Chen. It is shown that, starting from an ordinary energy density component, such fluids naturally evolve towards a universe with a substantial "dark energy" component at the present time, with no need of invoking any cosmological constant. Moreover, we introduce a quantitative indicator of darkness abundance, which provides a consistent picture of the actual matter-energy content of the universe.

Donato Bini; Andrea Geralico; Daniele Gregoris; Sauro Succi

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

279

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

.A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

280

Treatability studies of actual listed waste sludges from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are investigating vitrification for various low-level and mixed wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Treatability studies have included surrogate waste formulations at the laboratory-, pilot-, and field-scales and actual waste testing at the laboratory- and pilot-scales. The initial waste to be processing through SRTC`s Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is the K-1407-B and K-1407-C (B/C) Pond sludge waste which is a RCRA F-listed waste. The B/C ponds at the ORR K-25 site were used as holding and settling ponds for various waste water treatment streams. Laboratory-, pilot-, and field- scale ``proof-of-principle`` demonstrations are providing needed operating parameters for the planned field-scale demonstration with actual B/C Pond sludge waste at ORR. This report discusses the applied systems approach to optimize glass compositions for this particular waste stream through laboratory-, pilot-, and field-scale studies with surrogate and actual B/C waste. These glass compositions will maximize glass durability and waste loading while optimizing melt properties which affect melter operation, such as melt viscosity and melter refractory corrosion. Maximum waste loadings minimize storage volume of the final waste form translating into considerable cost savings.

Jantzen, C.M.; Peeler, D.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Gilliam, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Spence, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Laboratory stabilization/solidification of surrogate and actual mixed-waste sludge in glass and grout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grouting and vitrification are currently the most likely stabilization/solidification technologies for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level waste for decades. Vitrification has long been developed as a high-level-waste alternative and has been under development recently as an alternative treatment technology for low-level mixed waste. Laboratory testing has been performed to develop grout and vitrification formulas for mixed-waste sludges currently stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to compare these waste forms. Envelopes, or operating windows, for both grout and soda-lime-silica glass formulations for a surrogate sludge were developed. One formulation within each envelope was selected for testing the sensitivity of performance to variations ({+-}10 wt%) in the waste form composition and variations in the surrogate sludge composition over the range previously characterized in the sludges. In addition, one sludge sample of an actual mixed-waste tank was obtained, a surrogate was developed for this sludge sample, and grout and glass samples were prepared and tested in the laboratory using both surrogate and the actual sludge. The sensitivity testing of a surrogate tank sludge in selected glass and grout formulations is discussed in this paper, along with the hot-cell testing of an actual tank sludge sample.

Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Low latency counter event indication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid counter array device for counting events with interrupt indication includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each for counting signals representing event occurrences and providing a first count value representing lower order bits. An overflow bit device associated with each respective counter device is additionally set in response to an overflow condition. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits. An operatively coupled control device monitors each associated overflow bit device and initiates incrementing a second count value stored at a corresponding memory location in response to a respective overflow bit being set. The incremented second count value is compared to an interrupt threshold value stored in a threshold register, and, when the second counter value is equal to the interrupt threshold value, a corresponding "interrupt arm" bit is set to enable a fast interrupt indication. On a subsequent roll-over of the lower bits of that counter, the interrupt will be fired.

Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

284

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative domestic energy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of alternative energy sources, their actual... products (except for some oil shale and natural gas) to meet domestic energy demand required for its... significant...

285

Organization design for the deployment of geothermal energy initiatives in the Netherlands:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Geothermal energy has rapidly increased its attractiveness in the Netherlands. However, many geothermal energy initiatives seem to hamper between the feasibility phase and the actual… (more)

Bannouh, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The industrial sector consumes nearly 40% of annual global primary energy use and is responsible for a similar share of global energy?related carbon dioxide ( CO 2 ) emissions. Many studies and actual experience indicate that there is considerable potential to reduce the amount of energy used to manufacture most commodities concurrently reducing CO 2 emissions. With the support of strong policies and programs energy?efficient technologies and measures can be implemented that will reduce global CO 2 emissions. A number of countries including the Netherlands the UK and China have experience implementing aggressive programs to improve energy efficiency and reduce related CO 2 emissions from industry. Even so there is no silver bullet and all options must be pursued if greenhouse gas emissions are to be constrained to the level required to avoid significant negative impacts from global climate change.

Lynn Price

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A comparative study on conventional and advanced exergetic analyses of geothermal district heating systems based on actual operational data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper comparatively evaluates exergy destructions of a geothermal district heating system (GDHS) using both conventional and advanced exergetic analysis methods to identify the potential for improvement and the interactions among the components. As a real case study, the Afyon GDHS in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey, is considered based on actual operational data. For the first time, advanced exergetic analysis is applied to the GDHSs, in which the exergy destruction rate within each component is split into unavoidable/avoidable and endogenous/exogenous parts. The results indicate that the interconnections among all the components are not very strong. Thus, one should focus on how to reduce the internal inefficiency (destruction) rates of the components. The highest priority for improvement in the advanced exergetic analysis is in the re-injection pump (PM-IX), while it is the heat exchanger (HEX-III) in the conventional analysis. In addition, there is a substantial influence on the overall system as the total avoidable exergy destruction rate of the heat exchanger (HEX-V) has the highest value. On the overall system basis, the value for the conventional exergetic efficiency is determined to be 29.29% while that for the modified exergetic efficiency is calculated to be 34.46% through improving the overall components.

Arif Hepbasli; Ali Keçeba?

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

ACTUAL WASTE TESTING OF GYCOLATE IMPACTS ON THE SRS TANK FARM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glycolic acid is being studied as a replacement for formic acid in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. After implementation, the recycle stream from DWPF back to the high-level waste Tank Farm will contain soluble sodium glycolate. Most of the potential impacts of glycolate in the Tank Farm were addressed via a literature review and simulant testing, but several outstanding issues remained. This report documents the actual-waste tests to determine the impacts of glycolate on storage and evaporation of Savannah River Site high-level waste. The objectives of this study are to address the following: ? Determine the extent to which sludge constituents (Pu, U, Fe, etc.) dissolve (the solubility of sludge constituents) in the glycolate-containing 2H-evaporator feed. ? Determine the impact of glycolate on the sorption of fissile (Pu, U, etc.) components onto sodium aluminosilicate solids. The first objective was accomplished through actual-waste testing using Tank 43H and 38H supernatant and Tank 51H sludge at Tank Farm storage conditions. The second objective was accomplished by contacting actual 2H-evaporator scale with the products from the testing for the first objective. There is no anticipated impact of up to 10 g/L of glycolate in DWPF recycle to the Tank Farm on tank waste component solubilities as investigated in this test. Most components were not influenced by glycolate during solubility tests, including major components such as aluminum, sodium, and most salt anions. There was potentially a slight increase in soluble iron with added glycolate, but the soluble iron concentration remained so low (on the order of 10 mg/L) as to not impact the iron to fissile ratio in sludge. Uranium and plutonium appear to have been supersaturated in 2H-evaporator feed solution mixture used for this testing. As a result, there was a reduction of soluble uranium and plutonium as a function of time. The change in soluble uranium concentration was independent of added glycolate concentration. The change in soluble plutonium content was dependent on the added glycolate concentration, with higher levels of glycolate (5 g/L and 10 g/L) appearing to suppress the plutonium solubility. The inclusion of glycolate did not change the dissolution of or sorption onto actual-waste 2H-evaporator pot scale to an extent that will impact Tank Farm storage and concentration. The effects that were noted involved dissolution of components from evaporator scale and precipitation of components onto evaporator scale that were independent of the level of added glycolate.

Martino, C.

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Indicators for resources and resource-efficiency: a Danish perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The specific material flows and use of energy and land, which cause severe environmental and health problems in Denmark, are delimited by a risk assessment. Resource-efficiency is defined in terms of material flows and is estimated to be 0.07 without unused flows and 0.04 with unused flows for Denmark, 1990. It is shown that the path to both a global sustainable environment and welfare goes through increasing resource-efficiency, increasing lifetime of products, detoxification, dematerialisation of welfare and increasing quality and quantity of ecosystems. An indicator system for Denmark consisting of a pyramid structured by formal indicators is proposed. At the top of the indicator pyramid are indicators for aggregated material and energy flows, almost unaffected nature and the flows of dangerous substances. The formal indicators represent flows of resources and emissions, resources and emissions related to ecological space, economic turnover and number of inhabitants as well as resource efficiency, lifetime of materials and material welfare.

Karsten Krogh Andersen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Energy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

..) ".. ..) ".. _,; ,' . ' , ,; Depar?.me.nt ,of.' Energy Washington; DC 20585 : . ' , - $$ o"\ ' ~' ,' DEC ?;$ ;y4,,, ~ ' .~ The Honorable John Kalwitz , 200 E. Wells Street Milwaukee, W~isconsin 53202, . . i :. Dear,Mayor 'Kalwitz: " . " Secretary of Energy Hazel' O'Leary has announceha new,approach 'to,openness in " the Department of Ene~rgy (DOE) and its communications with'the public. In -. support of~this initiative, we areipleased to forward the enclosed information related to the Milwaukee Ai.rport site in your jurisdiction that performed work, for DOE orits predecessor agencies. information; use, and retention. ., This information .is provided for your '/ ,' DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial:'Action~'Prog&is responsible for ,"'

291

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2010 3, 2010 Recycling Energy Yields Super Savings One company is actually recycling energy that has already been used to power manufacturing plants, which is helping facilities cut their energy expenses by up to 20 percent. April 23, 2010 Franz Bakery: Model for Sustainability What a Portland bakery did to earn an Energy Champion Award. April 23, 2010 Lab Helps FAA Build Energy-Efficient Control Towers With help from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its subcontractor, Redhorse Corporation, the agency that keeps our country's airports running is bolstering its energy efficiency. April 23, 2010 Students, Professors Demonstrating Virginia's Potential Peter enjoys solving complex problems, including one thing he sees as an urgent situation that is vastly important - energy creation.

292

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

293

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

294

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

295

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

296

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Literature Survay in the Field of Primary and Secondary Concentrating Solar Energy Systems Concerning the Choice and Manufacturing Process of Suitable Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The following report summarizes the actual knowledge concerning aspects of solar energy, that had been specified in the convocation.

A. Grychta; J. Kaufmann; P. Lippert; G. Lensch

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONFERENCE ON ENERGY RESEARCH AT HISTORICALLY BLACK UNIVERSITIES, JUNE 17-19, 1980, SHERATON PATRIOT INN, WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy availability (gas, oil, electricity), unit cost and alternatives, actual usage, and detailed measurement and adjustments of principal units.

Authors, Various

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Domestic Health Studies and Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

energy-policy decision-makers about actual human experience of negligible risk to human health from well-regulated occupational and environmental exposures to plutonium and other...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITES Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (3QCY2007) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 1 2 2 200 0 100 50 66 86 ID (ICP) 13 12 11 85 1 100 100 40 65 OR (EM) 19 17 16 84 0 94 88 47 71 ORP 14 14 14 100 0 100 93 46 74 PPPO 4 4 4 100 0 100 100 42 75 RL 19 19 19 100 0 100 95 73 69 SR 31 31 25 81 2 88 80 40 79 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 43 65 EM Totals 103 101 93 90 3 96 89 50 73 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * % Field Time is defined as the number of hours spent in the plant/field divided by the number of available work hours in the quarter. The number of

302

1Q CY2010, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Http: Http: OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (1QCY2010) Field or Ops Office Staffing Analysis FTEs Actual Staffing % Staffing Attrition % Core Qualified % Fully Qualified % Field Time * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 3 100 0 100 33 50 78 ID (EM) 13 13 12 92 0 100 100 50 91 OR (EM) 18 17 18 100 0 100 81 45 67 ORP 15 15 14 93 1 93 80 51 81 PPPO 6 6 6 100 0 100 100 43 68 RL 19 19 19 100 0 95 95 43 69 SPRU 1 1 1 100 0 100 0 50 75 SR 32 29 29 91 1 69 69 43 76 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 50 50 37 60 EM Totals 109 105 104 95 2 89 81 45 75 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >40 >65 * Field or Ops Office Key:

303

The advanced flame quality indicator system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By combining oil tank monitoring, systems diagnostics and flame quality monitoring in an affordable system that communicates directly with dealers by telephone modem, Insight Technologies offers new revenue opportunities and the capability for a new order of customer relations to oil dealers. With co-sponsorship from New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, we have incorporated several valuable functions to a new product based on the original Flame Quality Indicator concept licensed from the US DOE`s Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new system is the Advanced Flame Quality Indicator, or AFQI. As before, the AFQI monitors and reports the intensity of the burner flame relative to a calibration established when the burner is set up at AFQI installation. Repairs or adjustments are summoned by late-night outgoing telephone calls when limits are exceeded in either direction, indicating an impending contamination or other malfunction. A independently, a pressure transducer for monitoring oil tank level and filter condition, safety lockout alarms and a temperature monitor; all reporting automatically at instructed intervals via an on-board modem to a central station PC computer (CSC). Firmware on each AFQI unit and Insight-supplied software on the CSC automatically interact to maintain a customer database for an oil dealer, an OEM, or a regional service contractor. In addition to ensuring continuously clean and efficient operation, the AFQI offers the oil industry a new set of immediate payoffs, among which are reduced outages and emergency service calls, shorter service calls from cleaner operation, larger oil delivery drops, the opportunity to stretch service intervals to as along as three years in some cases, new selling features to keep and attract customers, and greatly enhanced customer contact, quality and reliability.

Oman, R.; Rossi, M.J.; Calia, V.S.; Davis, F.L.; Rudin, A. [Insight Technologies, Inc., Bohemia, NY (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representative and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for July - September 2010 More Documents & Publications 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

305

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE-STD-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR program. A summary of this quarter 's data concluded: 3Q CY2007, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators More Documents & Publications 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

306

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This report reflects changes in DOE STD 1063-2011 that deleted one indicator and changed the way two others are calculated. The changes are discussed below. Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for January - March

307

Superior Energy Performance FAQs (Sept. 2014)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

... 8 What is the difference between energy intensity, and energy performance and the SEP energy performance indicator (SEnPI)...

308

Energy Demand Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the end of World War II until the early 1970s there was a strong and steady increase in the demand for energy. The abundant supplies of fossil and other ... an actual fall in the real price of energy of abou...

S. L. Schwartz

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Predicted and actual productions of horizontal wells in heavy-oil fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the comparison of predicted and actual cumulative and daily oil production. The predicted results were obtained from the use of Joshi's equation, wherein, the effects of anisotropy and eccentricity were included. The cumulative production obtained from the use of equations developed by Borisov, Giger, Renard and Dupuy resulted in errors in excess of 100%, thus, they were not considered applicable for predicting cumulative and daily flows of heavy oils in horizontal wells. The wells considered in this analysis varied from 537 to 1201 metres with corresponding well bores of 0.089 to. 0.110 m. Using Joshi's equation, the predicted cumulative oil-production was within a 20% difference for up to 12 months of production for long wells and up to 24 months for short wells. Short wells were defined as those being under 1000 m.

Peter Catania

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

PROGRAMME GROUP RESEARCH UPDATE: Biodiversity indicators &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PROGRAMME GROUP RESEARCH UPDATE: Biodiversity indicators & knowledge management programme group Introduction Duncan Ray The programme group Biodiversity Indicators and Knowledge Management (BIKM) was established by the merger of the Biodiversity Indicators & Evaluation Programme and the Decision Support

311

9/18/09 2:58 PMDark energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 4http://blog.taragana.com/n/dark-energy-may-not-actually-exist-142560/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rules Ascorbic acid, sugar with green tea helps absorb antioxidants Related News Type 1a superno Australian green lacewing toughest: Study Cell isolated from bio-clock can still keep time Robot trawls

Temple, Blake

312

Submitted to ApJ Letters, June 29, 2005 Are Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from Novae Actually from Supernovae?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submitted to ApJ Letters, June 29, 2005 Are Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from Novae Actually stellar nucleosynthesis and mixing. The best-studied presolar phase, silicon carbide (SiC), exhibits

Nittler, Larry R.

313

Modeling Windows in Energy Plus with Simple Performance Indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that window U-factors include the interior and exterior filmwindows however, Steps 1 and 5 which use interior filmthese film coefficients to a resistance for the solid window

Arasteh, Dariush

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4003 China Lake, CA 93555-6100 timothy.h.fox@navy.mil County of Kings Johannah Hartley 1400 W. Lacey Boulevard Hanford, CA 93230 johannah.hartley@co.kings.ca.us County of San Luis Obispo Warren R. Jensen County Counsel County Government Center Room D320 San Luis Obispo, CA 93408 wjensen@co.slo.ca.us County

315

Modeling Windows in Energy Plus with Simple Performance Indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clear. Primarily residential. SHGC>.55 for 3mm clear.Commercial products will be SHGC>.45 for few – angular Lowsimilar. (Angular Curve A. ) .6SHGC<.45 Single Glazing. for

Arasteh, Dariush

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

*indicates change 1 BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gannon Camarin Madigan Bingham McCutchen LLP Three Embarcadero Center San Francisco, CA 94111-4067 ella.gannon@bingham.com camarin.madigan@bingham.com INTERVENORS Roslind Varghese 9360 Leticia Drive Santee, CA 92071 roslindv@allenmatkins.com Preserve Wild Santee Van Collinsworth 9222 Lake Canyon Road Santee, CA 92071 savefanita@cox.net Center

317

*indicates change BEFORE THE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.knox@tesserasolar.com CONSULTANT Angela Leiba, Sr. Project Manager URS Corporation 1615 Murray Canyon Rd., Suite 1000 San Diego, CA #314 Orinda, CA 94563 allanori@comcast.net Ella Foley Gannon, Partner Bingham McCutchen, LLP Three Embarcadero Center San Francisco, CA 94111 ella.gannon@bingham.com INTERESTED AGENCIES California ISO e

318

Compilation of Diversity Factors and Schedules for Energy and Cooling Load Calculations, ASHRAE Research Project 1093, Preliminary Report, Literature Review and Database Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies about classifications of commercial buildings. In the literature on diversity factors and load shapes, we covered papers reporting the existence of databases of monitored end-uses in commercial building, methods used in developing the daytypes... Report Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University Our review of the literature has indicated that there are several useful studies that present actual diversity factors, and provide the algorithms...

Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

319

State of the States 2010: The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This report uses statistical methods to better quantify the connection between a broad array of energy efficiency and renewable energy (collectively known as clean energy) policy and actual reductions in energy use and increases in renewable resource development.

320

China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial and Biomass Energy Table 4B.2. Actual PrimaryCommercial and Biomass Energy Figure 4B.2. Energy IntensityEnd Use, Commercial and Biomass Energy Figure 9B.10. Shares

Fridley, Ed., David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Relationships between Carcinogenicity and Theoretical Reactivity Indices in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...usually several alternatives are available for...meso-9,10-car bon atoms of anthracene...molecular orbital energies are , @= a + mj3...de localization energy @Edel@/f3...led us to examine alternative indices. One such...Table 10. Composite Energy Indices Transformation...

Iden A. Smith; Gregory D. Berger; Paul G. Seybold; and M. P. Servé

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - actual car fleet Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

potential for misidentifying the ... Source: Denver, University of - Fuel Efficiency Automobile Test Data Center Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 15 Smog...

323

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October - December 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: ANDREW C. LAWRENCE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF NUCLEAR SAFETY, QUALITY ASSURANCE AND ENVIRONMENT OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October-December (Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2010) This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below:

324

Annual Energy Review, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

None

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

326

Actual Versus Estimated Utility Factor of a Large Set of Privately Owned Chevrolet Volts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to determine the overall fuel economy of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), the amount of operation in charge depleting (CD) versus charge sustaining modes must be determined. Mode of operation is predominantly dependent on customer usage of the vehicle and is therefore highly variable. The utility factor (UF) concept was developed to quantify the distance a group of vehicles has traveled or may travel in CD mode. SAE J2841 presents a UF calculation method based on data collected from travel surveys of conventional vehicles. UF estimates have been used in a variety of areas, including the calculation of window sticker fuel economy, policy decisions, and vehicle design determination. The EV Project, a plug-in electric vehicle charging infrastructure demonstration being conducted across the United States, provides the opportunity to determine the real-world UF of a large group of privately owned Chevrolet Volt extended range electric vehicles. Using data collected from Volts enrolled in The EV Project, this paper compares the real-world UF of two groups of Chevrolet Volts to estimated UF's based on J2841. The actual observed fleet utility factors (FUF) for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups studied were observed to be 72% and 74%, respectively. Using the EPA CD ranges, the method prescribed by J2841 estimates a FUF of 65% and 68% for the MY2011/2012 and MY2013 Volt groups, respectively. Volt drivers achieved higher percentages of distance traveled in EV mode for two reasons. First, they had fewer long-distance travel days than drivers in the national travel survey referenced by J2841. Second, they charged more frequently than the J2841 assumption of once per day - drivers of Volts in this study averaged over 1.4 charging events per day. Although actual CD range varied widely as driving conditions varied, the average CD ranges for the two Volt groups studied matched the EPA CD range estimates, so CD range variation did not affect FUF results.

John Smart; Thomas Bradley; Stephen Schey

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2010 8, 2010 Energy Pyramids: Useful Concepts, Not More Pyramid Schemes The Energy Use Pyramid is a valuable resource, especially for new building design. February 4, 2010 How Has Saving Energy Affected Your Health? We don't often speak of it in these terms, but saving energy can sometimes have a positive influence on your health. February 2, 2010 Sites I Thought About Last Wednesday While President Obama was talking about his plans and goals for the future, it made me think of a lot of the work that EERE is already doing. February 1, 2010 Photo by Kelly Shimoda Lumenhaus Shows Off Solar in Times Square Solar Decathlon gets a spotlight! January 28, 2010 Cooper Union's building is a towering, unique building that actually saves a lot of energy. | Photo courtesy Cooper Union

328

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2013 9, 2013 Workers repair power lines in the Mid-Atlantic shortly after Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient Communities The Energy Department continues to take actions to protect our energy infrastructure, adapt to climate change and build partnerships to make communities across the country stronger and more resilient. October 28, 2013 Max Schreck in Nosferatu, presumably climbing the stairs to plug in some unused appliances. | Photo from Wikipedia, Public Domain in the U.S. Are Energy Vampires Sucking You Dry? On Halloween, ghosts, ghouls and goblins will emerge to walk the streets -- but an actual terror may already be lurking in your home, leeching off your energy supply.

329

Power Law Distributions of Patents as Indicators of Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The total number of patents produced by a country (or the number of patents produced per capita) is often used as an indicator for innovation. Here we present evidence that the distribution of patents amongst applicants within many OECD countries is well-described by power laws with exponents that vary between 1.66 (Japan) and 2.37 (Poland). Using simulations based on simple preferential attachment-type rules that generate power laws, we find we can explain some of the variation in exponents between countries, with countries that have larger numbers of patents per applicant generally exhibiting smaller exponents in both the simulated and actual data. Similarly we find that the exponents for most countries are inversely correlated with other indicators of innovation, such as R&D intensity or the ubiquity of export baskets. This suggests that in more advanced economies, which tend to have smaller values of the exponent, a greater proportion of the total number of patents are filed by large companies than in...

O'Neale, D R J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China Title Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Price, Lynn K., Nan Zhou, David Fridley, Stephanie Ohshita, Hongyou Lu, Nina Zheng, and Cecilia Fino-Chen Journal Habitat International Date Published 01/2012 Keywords china, china energy, china energy group, co2 emissions, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy consumption, indicator, low carbon, policy studies Abstract In 2009, China committed to reducing its carbon dioxide intensity (CO2/unit of gross domestic product, GDP) by 40 to 45 percent by 2020 from a 2005 baseline and in March 2011, China's 12th Five-Year Plan established a carbon intensity reduction goal of 17% between 2011 and 2015. The National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) of China then established a Low Carbon City policy and announced the selection of five provinces and eight cities to pilot the low carbon development work. How to determine if a city or province is "low carbon" has not been defined by the Chinese government.

331

Performance indicators for 4th quarter CY 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has established a Department-wide Performance Indicator (PI) Program for trending and analysis of operational data as directed by DOE Order 5480.26. The PI Program was established to provide a means for monitoring the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) performance of the DOE at the Secretary and other management levels. This is the twelfth in a series of quarterly reports generated for the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) by EG&G Idaho, Inc., to meet the requirements of the PI Program as directed by the DOE Standard (DOE-STD-1048-92). The report format and content adhere to the guidelines established in DOE Order 5480.26, Trending and Analysis of Operations Information Using Performance Indicators, and DOE-STD-1048-92, DOE Performance Indicators Guidance Document.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

4Q CY2000, Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 26,2001 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: seph Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager (S-3.1) SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback in order to improve the Facility Representative Program. The definitions of the PIs from the Standard are also attached for your use in evaluating the data. I intend to continue to provide this summary information to you quarterly. These provide

333

Thermal energy conversion to motive power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance evaluations of both ideal and actual organic Rankine cycle (ORC) and steam Rankine cycles (SRC) are presented for systems that may be candidates for Solar Total Energy Systems (STES). Many organic fluids and heat engines (turbines or expanders) are being developed; therefore, performance of a few representative ORCs are evaluated. The electrical power outputs range from several kW to <10 MW with maximum cycle temperatures of 482/sup 0/C (900 F). Conclusions from basic Rankine cycle analyses are that the Carnot cycle concept should not be used as a standard of comparison for different cycle fluids, even when they are operating at the same inlet and exhaust temperatures. The ideal Rankine cycle with the maximum conversion efficiency, when based on exact physical properties of fluids, should provide a better standard for actual cycles. Three sets of maximum (ideal) Rankine cycle efficiency (n/sub r/) curves are estimated for steam and several organic fluids for exhaust temperatures of 38/sup 0/C, 100/sup 0/C, and 149/sup 0/C (100 F, 212 F, and 300F). These curves of n/sub r/ versus peak temperature at the expander inlet are referred to as Criterion Curves for basic Rankine cycles, in which corresponding inlet pressures are selected such that n/sub r/ will be a maximum. Basic cycle efficiencies indicate some fluids preferred for solar total energy applications.

Meador, J.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Correction/Update July 27th A stray "2010" was left in the middle of Figure 1. August 1st Figure title changes (PDF only): Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 2010-2040 (billion metric tons) This should actually be: Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2040 (billion metric tons) Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons carbon dioxide emitted per million 2010 dollars of gross domestic product) This should actually be: Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons

335

Proportional structural effects of formative indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formative constructs must influence two or more distinct outcome variables for meaningful tests of the formative conceptualization. Because the construct mediates the effects of its indicators, the indicators must have ...

Franke, George R.; Preacher, K. J.; Rigdon, Ed E.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

337

DOE Releases Climate VISION Progress Report 2007 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

VISION Progress Report 2007 VISION Progress Report 2007 DOE Releases Climate VISION Progress Report 2007 February 11, 2008 - 11:29am Addthis Outlines Industry Progress in Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Intensity through Climate VISION Partnership WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released the Climate VISION Progress Report 2007, which reports on the actions taken by energy-intensive industries to improve greenhouse gas emissions intensity of their operations from 2002 to 2006. The report indicates that the power and energy-intensive industrial sectors improved their combined emissions intensity by 9.4 percent over this four year period, and in 2006, actual greenhouse gas emissions for these sectors fell a combined 1.4 percent. Climate VISION-Voluntary Innovative Sector Initiatives: Opportunities

338

Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program Specification Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

Hewes, T.; Peeks, B.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ocean indicators Current knowledge and future directions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean indicators Current knowledge and future directions Brian Burke, NOAA Fisheries Brian.Burke@noaa.gov #12;· Review of ocean indicator work · Forecasting · Indicator gaps and the importance of mechanistic understanding · Plugging in to management #12;Haeseker et al. 2012 Ocean survival is low and variable #12;-10 -5

340

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data: * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). Four FRs left due to transfer,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

342

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 176 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 95 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent). This staff reflects a

343

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report are presented below: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 184 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) which is 92

344

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per DOE-STD- 1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. A summary of this quarter's data concluded: 76% Fully Qualified ( last Quarter was 80%) 89% Staffing Level (last Quarter was 89%) 44% Time Spent in the Field ( Department of Energy)(DOE) goal is > 40%) 73% Time Spent in Oversight Activites (DOE Goal is> 65%)"

345

Comments on the report "Indications of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device containing hydrogen loaded nickel powder" [arXiv:1305.3913] by G.Levi, E.Foschi, T.Hartman, B.Höistad, R.Pettersson, L.Tegnér, H.Essén  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a recent report titled "Indications of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device containing hydrogen loaded nickel powder" and published on arXiv, G. Levi and co-workers put forth several claims concerning the operations and performance of the so-called E-Cat of inventor Andrea Rossi. We note first of all that the circumstances and people involved in the test make it far from being an independent one. We examine the claims put forth by the authors and note that in many cases they are not supported by the facts given in the report. We present results from thermal calculations showing that alternative explanations are possible were the authors seem to jump to conclusions fitting pre-conceived ideas. In general we find that much attention is drawn to trivialities, while important pieces of information and investigation are lacking and seem not to have been conducted or considered. We also note that the proposed claims would require new physics in not only one but several areas. Besides a cold-fusion like process without production of any radiation also extreme new material properties would be needed to explain what rather seems to be a problem of correct measurement. Therefore, it is clear to us that a truly independent and scientific investigation of the so called E-Cat device, convincingly demonstrating an "anomalous heat energy production" has not been presented in the arXiv report and is thus, to-date, still lacking.

Göran Ericsson; Stephan Pomp

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

346

Renewable Energy Certificates | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Certificates Renewable Energy Certificates Renewable Energy Certificates October 16, 2013 - 5:15pm Addthis Image of a red balloon reading 'Electricity' plus a green balloon reading 'REC' equals a purple balloon reading 'Renewable Power' Components of a Renewable Energy Certificate Two separate products exist from electricity produced by renewable energy projects that can be sold together or treated separately. One is the actual electrons produced, which can either be transferred through the power grid to provide power to utility customers or used off-grid or at a customer site. Although they are not common in the market, Federal renewable energy policy recognizes renewable energy certificates (RECs) from thermal renewable energy projects. For thermal RECs the energy product is British

347

Estimating actual evapotranspiration for a coupled human environment system: sensitivity to drought  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the overall aim of this study is to quantify regional water consumption using remote sensing. More Remote sensing can estimate ET as a residual of the energy balance: Friction Velocity Roughness Length Aerodynamic Resistance Net radiation (Rn) Soil Heat Flux (G) T Hot & Cold Pixels Sensible Heat Flux (H

Hall, Sharon J.

348

Energy Consumption Patterns of the Rural Photovoltaic Market In Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the energy consumption of photovoltaic-powered rural dwellings in a representative region of Spain. We have measured the actual consumed electrical energy in several dwelling...

A. Krenzinger; M. Montero

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers...

Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A perfect match: Nuclear energy and the National Energy Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the course of developing the National Energy Strategy, the Department of Energy held 15 public hearings, heard from more than 375 witnesses and received more than 1000 written comments. In April 1990, the Department published an Interim Report on the National Energy Strategy, which compiles those public comments. The National Energy Strategy must be based on actual experience and factual analysis of our energy, economic and environmental situation. This report by the Nuclear Power Oversight committee, which represents electric utilities and other organizations involved in supplying electricity from nuclear energy to the American people, provides such an analysis. The conclusions here are based on hard facts and actual worldwide experience. This analysis of all the available data supports -- indeed, dictates -- expanded reliance on nuclear energy in this nation's energy supply to achieve the President's goals. 33 figs.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

PREDICTING RANGES FOR PULSARS' BRAKING INDICES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical determination of braking indices of pulsars is still an open problem. In this paper we report results of a study concerning such determination based on a modification of the canonical model, which admits that pulsars are rotating magnetic dipoles, and on data from the seven pulsars with known braking indices. In order to test the modified model, we predict ranges for the braking indices of other pulsars.

Magalhaes, Nadja S.; Miranda, Thaysa A. [Federal University of Sao Paulo, DCET, Rua Sao Nicolau 210, Diadema, SP 09913-030 (Brazil); Frajuca, Carlos, E-mail: nadjasm@gmail.com [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sao Paulo, R. Pedro Vicente 625, Sao Paulo, SP 01109-010 (Brazil)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS FOR CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY:  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

is to use stormwater retention basins. The number of stormwater detention and storage tanks and basins and the capacity of these areas are indicators of the capacity for...

353

Bicycle Generator Lightbar Indicator ----- Inventors William...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bicycle Generator Lightbar Indicator ----- Inventors William Evans (Princeton University), Andrew Zwicker, and Shana Weber (Princeton University) This invention is a series of...

354

Class Patent Waiver W(C)2011-004 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by PHOTOVOLTAIC (PV) MANUFACTURING under agreement DE-FOA-0000259, as the DOE has determined that...

355

Class Patent Waiver W(C)2009-019 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION under agreement DE-FOA-0000015, as the DOE has determined...

356

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-060 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by SHELL SOLAR INDUSTRIES, LP under agreement...

357

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2006-032 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC. under agreement UNKNOWN, as the DOE has determined that granting...

358

Characterization of HVAC operation uncertainty in EnergyPlus AHU modules.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study addresses 5 uncertainties that exist in the operation of HVAC systems, which will presumably affect the actual energy consumption of the HVAC system… (more)

Sui, Di

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

New solar cell technology captures high-energy photons more efficientl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spectrum inefficiently. This is because blue photons - incoming particles of light that strike the solar cell - actually have excess energy that a conventional solar...

360

Temperatures Indicated by Intensity Distributions in Band Spectra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is generally supposed that the intensity of any particular line in a band spectrum may be calculated from the Maxwell-Boltzmann law, assuming the gas to be in temperature equilibrium. From the results of this experimental work, it appears that under some conditions of excitation other factors than the temperature of the gas govern the intensity distribution. Measurements on the negative bands of N2+ excited in low voltage arcs in the pure gas show that at 1100°K and 2800°K the distribution of intensities among the rotational lines is exactly the same, whilst the admixture of helium with nitrogen alters the distribution completely and gives a much lower indicated temperature. Similar results are found with the first negative bands of CO+. The differences are accounted for by the conversion of translational energy of the electrons into rotational energy of the molecules when the bands are excited by electron impacts in the pure gas. When the bands are excited by impacts of the second kind in gas mixtures, no change in rotational energy occurs and thus the indicated temperature is much lower. The distribution of intensity among the vibrational states of the molecules has been examined for the complete system of negative bands of N2+. While almost all of the energy is concentrated in the low vibration states when the bands are excited by electron impacts, the energy is spread out towards the higher vibration states when the excitation is by collisions of the second kind with metastable helium atoms.

O. S. Duffendack; R. W. Revans; A. S. Roy

1934-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Whole Building Energy Simulation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Simulation Energy Simulation Whole Building Energy Simulation October 16, 2013 - 4:39pm Addthis Whole building energy simulation, also referred to as energy modeling, can and should be incorporated early during project planning to provide energy impact feedback for which design considerations may be pursued. Whole building energy simulation software adequately assesses the interactions between complex building systems and equally complex schedules and utility rates structures for projects in specific locations throughout the world. Energy models incorporate actual building construction, internal load sources, and associated schedules using annual hourly weather data specific to the project location. These models can be used early in the design process when little information is known and updated, continually

362

Towards a Sustainable Energy Balance: Progressive Efficiency and the Return of Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PNNL). 2005. “Indicators of Energy Intensity in the Unitedan extensive variable; the energy intensity of the economy,cited most often, site energy intensity (energy per unit of

Harris, Jeffrey; Diamond, Rick; Iyer, Maithili; Payne, Christopher; Blumstein, Carl; Siderius, Hans-Paul

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Energy considerations in real estate appraising  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purposes of the seminar on the subject, the basis of this report, include the following: (1) to provide the appraiser an opportunity to learn how to identify and analyze the actual physical consumption of energy as well as the energy-saving improvements in properties under appraisal and in comparable sale and lease properties; (2) to help the appraiser in developing methods to keep meaningful records on the energy consumption of subject and comparable properties so as to observe in an orderly way the behavior of buyers, sellers, tenants, landlords, borrowers, and lenders with respect to energy efficiency; and (3) to assist the appraiser in learning to measure the relative sensitivities of the various segments of the market to energy considerations as indicated by differences in sale prices and rentals. To achieve these goals, the seminar employed two case studies, one for a angle-family residence and one for a multi-family building, both in Topeka, Kansas. The case studies are for illustrative purposes only; in applying the lessons of the seminar to their own daily work, students should be careful to develop information that is pertinent to their subject properties and subject areas and not rely on any of the particulars laid out in the cases.

None

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Indicators Of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources In Northern Louisiana  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indicators Of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources In Northern Louisiana Indicators Of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources In Northern Louisiana And Central Mississippi Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Indicators Of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources In Northern Louisiana And Central Mississippi Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurements of heat flow and near-surface (< 500 m) geothermal gradients in the Gulf Coastal Plain suggest a zone of low-grade geothermal resources extending from northern Louisiana across south-central Mississippi. Subsurface temperatures exceeding 50°C, suitable for space-heating use, seem probable at depths of 1 km. Thermal conditions within the zone are comparable to those known for areas having attractive thermal energy prospects on the Atlantic Coastal Plain.

365

2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1063-2006, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. This memorandum also announces that Mr. James Heffner has turned over FR Program Manager duties to Mr. Earl Huges. Mr. Heffner is assuming expanded team leader duties over several additional programs within the

366

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for October-December 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2012 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN DIRECTOR ~ OFFICE OF :-IDC~AR AFETY OFFICE OF HEAL 'l;H, AFETY AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, October- December 20 ll This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered by field elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard 1063-2011 , Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters program offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report include: FR Staffing/Qualification/Oversight Data * DOE was staffed at 179 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTE), which is 92 percent of the full

367

Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators for April - June 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0 , 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM: JAMES B. O'BRIEN SUBJECT: Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report, April - June 20 1 I This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered by Field Elements per Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standard (STD) 1063-20 1 1, Facility Representatives, and reported to Headquarters Program Offices for evaluation and feedback to improve the FR Program. Highlights from this report: FR Staffin~/Qualification/Oversi~ht Data DOE was staffed at 180 FR Full Time Equivalents (FTEs), which is 9 1 percent of the full staffing level (DOE goal is 100 percent).

368

New York building stands out, saves energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

York building stands out, saves energy York building stands out, saves energy New York building stands out, saves energy January 28, 2010 - 11:29am Addthis Cooper Union's building is a towering, unique building that actually saves a lot of energy. | Photo courtesy Cooper Union Cooper Union's building is a towering, unique building that actually saves a lot of energy. | Photo courtesy Cooper Union Joshua DeLung A new energy-efficient building in New York is raising eyebrows and inspiring creativity, but its unique design and innovative features are helping the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art save energy, help the environment and keep its students' imaginations fresh. Thom Mayne's architectural masterpiece is shocking at first, rising amidst the city's traditional buildings like Superman's Fortress of

369

Marketing Quality Energy Awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Production Units Electricity Chilled Water Steam Compressed Air Water Fig. 2. Measurement, Monitoring &Reporting Cost savings resulted when Business Unit 0 forecasted a $30,OOO/month drop in energy costs due to production line changes and actual... within process limits. They produced the same quality and quantity of product. Measurements revealed Unit 1 operated within the energy requirements, Unit 2 was above the acceptabl range and Unit 3 was under the requirements. Standards were reviewed...

Fortier, L. J.

370

Addressing the effectiveness of industrial energy efficiency incentives in overcoming investment barriers in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An attempt to improve energy efficiency in China. ” EnergyControls. 2011. “Energy Efficiency Indicator: 2011 Chinawww.institutebe.com/Energy-Efficiency-Indicator/2011-china-

Romankiewicz, John

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Redshift indicators for gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measure of the distances and luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) led to the discovery that many GRB properties are strongly correlated with their intrinsic luminosity, leading to the construction of reliable luminosity indicators. These GRB luminosity indicators have quickly found applications, like the construction of 'pseudo-redshifts', or the measure of luminosity distances, which can be computed independently of the measure of the redshift. In this contribution I discuss various issues connected with the construction of luminosity-redshift indicators for gamma-ray bursts.

J-L. Atteia

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

372

Comments on the report "Indications of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device containing hydrogen loaded nickel powder" [arXiv:1305.3913] by G.Levi, E.Foschi, T.Hartman, B.H\\"oistad, R.Pettersson, L.Tegn\\'er, H.Ess\\'en  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a recent report titled "Indications of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device containing hydrogen loaded nickel powder" [arXiv:1305.3913], G. Levi and co-workers put forth several claims concerning the operations and performance of the so-called E-Cat of Andrea Rossi. We note first of all that the circumstances and people involved in the test make if far from being an independent one. We examine the claims put forth by the authors and note that in many cases they are not supported by the facts given in the report. The authors seem to jump to conclusions fitting pre-conceived ideas where alternative explanations are possible. In general we find that much attention is drawn to trivialities while important pieces of information and investigation are lacking and seem not to have been conducted or considered. These are characteristics more typically found in pseudo-scientific texts and have no place in a technical/scientific report on this level. We also note that the proposed claims would require...

Ericsson, Göran

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Actual Crimes Reported For: Offense Type (includes attempts) 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012 2010 2011 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 0 0 0 0 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Drug Law Violations Arrest 0 3 4 0 1 0 0 4 4 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Liquor Law Violations Arrest 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Referral 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 OSU-Tulsa Campus Crime Statistics Act. Number of Arrests/Referrals for Select Offenses #12;Actual Crimes Reported For

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

374

Energy Service Companies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Service Companies Service Companies Energy Service Companies October 7, 2013 - 1:43pm Addthis Energy service companies (ESCOs) develop, install, and fund projects designed to improve energy efficiency and reduce operation and maintenance costs in their customers' facilities. ESCOs generally act as project developers for a wide range of tasks and assume the technical and performance risk associated with the project. ESCOs are set apart from other firms that offer energy-efficiency improvements by performance-based contracting. When an ESCO undertakes a project, the company's compensation is directly linked to the cost savings from energy actually saved. The comprehensive energy-efficiency retrofits inherent in energy service company projects typically require a large initial capital investment and

375

Benchmarking Sustainability: the use of Indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmarking Sustainability: the use of Indicators Introduction The concept of sustainable development is both very popular and elusive. The overwhelming appeal of sustainability is situated to build a generally shared perception of sustainable development (Butler, 1998). For many people

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

376

Societal health and urban sustainability indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Without the social will, no city can successfully Undertake the planning and programs necessary for meaningful progress toward sustainability. Social will derives from wellsprings of vital societal health. This paper presents an approach to helping cities in APEC member economies initiate a program for developing indicators of sustainability. Representative indicators of social capital and other aspects of civic engagement, as proxies for societal health, are presented.

Petrich, C.H.; Tonn, B.E.

1996-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

377

Optical temperature indicator using thermochromic semiconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reversible optical temperature indicator utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to various temperature levels. The thermochromic material is enclosed in an enamel which provides protection and prevents breakdown at higher temperatures. Cadmium sulfide is the preferred semiconductor material. The indicator may be utilized as a sign or in a striped arrangement to clearly provide a warning to a user. The various color responses provide multiple levels of alarm.

Kronberg, J.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

H-delta in the Integrated Light of Galaxies: What Are We Actually Measuring?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a cautionary study exploring the reliability of the H-delta line in the integrated spectra of galaxies for determining galaxy ages. Our database consists of the observed integrated spectra of ~120 early-type galaxies, of 7 metal-rich globular clusters in M31 and the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tuc, and of the open cluster M67. We have measured H-delta using index definitions designed to assess contamination from the CN molecule in and around H-delta by choosing combinations of bandpasses that both avoid and include a region of CN molecular lines redward of H-delta. We find systematic differences in the ages derived from H-delta measurements among the various definitions when extracting ages from H-delta in old stellar populations with enhanced CN bands due to non-solar abundance ratios. We propose that neighboring CN lines have a strong effect on pseudocontinuum and central bandpass levels. For stellar populations which have non-solar abundance ratios in C and/or N, population synthesis models that do not account for abundance ratio variations cannot reproduce accurately the CN 4216 \\AA band, which leads to a corresponding inaccuracy in reproducing the various H-delta indices. Hence, caution must be used when extracting galaxy ages from the H-delta line in old stellar populations with significant non-solar abundance ratios.

L. C. Prochaska; J. A. Rose; N. Caldwell; B. V. Castilho; K. Concannon; P. Harding; H. Morrison; R. P. Schiavon

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

379

A Phenomenological Cost Model for High Energy Particle Accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerator-based high-energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the colliders has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size, and cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. In this paper we derive a simple scaling model for the cost of large accelerators and colliding beam facilities based on costs of 17 big facilities which have been either built or carefully estimated. Although this approach cannot replace an actual cost estimate based on an engineering design, this parameterization is to indicate a somewhat realistic cost range for consideration of what future frontier accelerator facilities might be fiscally realizable.

Vladimir Shiltsev

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Construction Strategies of Public Rental Housing Based on Energy Efficiency Mechanism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency is the indispensable investment factor in the social economic growth. As a macroscopic direction to evaluate the energy effect, the energy efficiency mechanism is integrating into the actual operation of our urban development gradually ... Keywords: energy efficiency mechanism, Public Rental Housing, existed residential renewal, social energy efficiency, economic energy efficiency, environmental energy efficiency, Construction strategy

Xu Yuhui; Lv Yanke

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Cities in China Title Development of an End-Use Sector- Based Low-Carbon Indicator System for Cities in China Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2012 Authors Price, Lynn K., Nan Zhou, David Fridley, Hongyou Lu, Nina Zheng, Cecilia Fino-Chen, and Stephanie Ohshita Conference Name the ACEEE's 2012 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 08/2012 Publisher the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Conference Location Pacific Grove, California, U.S.A. Keywords 12th five year plan, buildings, china, china energy, china energy group, co2 emissions, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, low carbon indicator, policy studies

382

A preliminary study on potential indicators of technical efficiency in a grain export marketing system: the Argentine case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of performance of the system. Actual measures of technical efficiency are not utilized due to data constraints, but some potential indicators of technical effi- ciency in the system are examined. 'The grain marketing system of Argentina is the case under in... and helped me in many ways. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION Background and Literature Review . Objectives Description of the Argentine Grain Sector ARGENTINA'S ECONOMIC AND AGRICULTURAL POLICY: AN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE UP TO THE PRESENT 3 13...

Wilson, Shasi Cheryl Ruth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

383

Reducing Energy Use in Existing Homes by 30%: Learning From Home Performance with ENERGY STAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The improvement of existing homes in the United States can have a much greater impact on overall residential energy use than the construction of highly efficient new homes. There are over 130 million existing housing units in the U.S., while annually new construction represents less than two percent of the total supply (U.S. Census Bureau, 2013). Therefore, the existing housing stock presents a clear opportunity and responsibility for Building America (BA) to guide the remodeling and retrofit market toward higher performance existing homes. There are active programs designed to improve the energy performance of existing homes. Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) is a market-rate program among them. BARA's research in this project verified that the New Jersey HPwES program is achieving savings in existing homes that meet or exceed BA's goal of 30%. Among the 17 HPwES projects with utility data included in this report, 15 have actual energy savings ranging from 24% to 46%. Further, two of the homes achieved that level of energy savings without the costly replacement of heating and cooling equipment, which indicates that less costly envelope packages could be offered to consumers unable to invest in more costly mechanical packages, potentially creating broader market impact.

Liaukus, C.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

Beitz, James V. (Hinsdale, IL); Williams, Clayton W. (Chicago, IL)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Federal Technical Capability Program - Quarterly Performance Indicator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 16, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability June 5, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 20, 2013 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 20, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 8, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 30, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability March 6, 2012 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 10, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 24, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 18, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 23, 2011

386

Reusable tamper-indicating security seal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reusable tamper-indicating mechanical security seal for use in safeguarding nuclear material has been developed. The high-security seal displays an unpredictable, randomly selected, five-digit code each time it is used. This five digit code serves the same purpose that the serial number does for conventional non-reusable seals - a unique identifier for each use or application. The newly developed reusable seal is completely enclosed within a seamless, tamper-indicating, plastic jacket. The jacket is designed to reveal any attempts to penetrate, section or to chemically remove and replace with a counterfeit for surreptitious purposes.

Ryan, M.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

State Energy Program | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and energy efficiency indicators for each state. Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency Search a list of incentives and policies that support renewables and...

388

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 31, 2013 May 31, 2013 What may appear to be a jumble of wires is actually the CDC 7600, one of the fastest supercomputers in the world between 1969 and 1975. With its first installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the CDC 7600 continued to lead in computing and custom-software development for nuclear design and plasma simulations. It had 5,000 times the computing power of the UNIVAC, and connected researchers at remote workstations to the CDC 6600s and 7600s, creating one of the first -- and the largest -- such networking systems. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Photo of the Week: 70s Supercomputer Style Check out our favorite energy-related photos! May 31, 2013 Women at the White House Talk Climate and Energy Solutions

389

Energy Saver Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

24, 2010 24, 2010 Green Means Go for Hybrid and Alternative Fuel Taxis The taxi, the icon of the bustling city, is getting a makeover. Cities nationwide are encouraging taxi fleets to turn over a new leaf and reduce their petroleum consumption. August 23, 2010 Apartment Hunting - Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down In the second of two entries on apartment hunting, I discuss things to look for that might help keep your energy bills low. August 23, 2010 New Energy Basics Site: Check It Out! Interested in energy efficiency and renewable energy but a little confused by all the terms? Wondering how the technologies actually work? Maybe you're doing some research or working on a paper and just need a little background info. August 19, 2010 How Do You Save Energy and Stay Cool While Cooking in the Summer?

390

ENERGY STAR Focus on Energy Efficiency in Metalcasting | ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Metalcasting Metalcasting Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Tools for benchmarking energy management practices Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants

391

Monitoring change in biodiversity through composite indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring change in biodiversity through composite indices S.T. Buckland1,*, A.E. Magurran2 , R Zealand The need to monitor trends in biodiversity raises many technical issues. What are the features of a good biodiversity index? How should trends in abundance of individual species be estimated? How should

Buckland, Steve

392

Targets and indicators for gene level biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Targets and indicators for gene level biodiversity Resilience and future adaptation in forests, inland waters and marine environments depend on genetic variation Welcome to the Side-event on Lunch.weibull@naturvardsverket.se BaltGene­BalticSeaGeneticBiodiversity www.tmbl.gu.se:16080/baltgene GeneticMonitoring http

393

SRR Ecological Assessment Indicators: Selection and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Soil aggregate stability · Water - Surface water frequency, Volume · Plants - Key species, Invasives, Pounds of domestic meat produced, Pounds of harvestable materials produced #12;Why these indicators in cover or stability is expected from better management. #12;Surface Water Availability · Water is vital

Wyoming, University of

394

INDICES OF MEAN MONTHLY GEOSTROPHIC WIND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

323 '*'-'· INDICES OF MEAN MONTHLY GEOSTROPHIC WIND OVER THE NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN Marine Biological OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;Explanatory Note The series embodies results of investigations;United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J

395

Oxygen Detection via Nanoscale Optical Indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen Detection via Nanoscale Optical Indicators Ruby N. Ghosh Dept. of Physics Michigan State University East Lansing, MI, USA weekschr@msu.edu Abstract--Oxygen plays a ubiquitous role in terrestrial developed an optical technique for monitoring oxygen in both gas and liquid phases utilizing nanoscale metal

Ghosh, Ruby N.

396

Approximated Distributions of Sampling Inequality Indices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Often, in finite samples, the true level of the confidence intervals for natural estimators of inequality indices belonging to the Gini family differs greatly from their nominal level, which is based on the asymptotic confidence limits. This paper ... Keywords: Gini index family, Gram-Charlier approximation, Monte Carlo experiment, algebraic computer software, income distribution

Paola Palmitesta; Corrado Provasi; Cosimo Spera

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

New fuzzy indices for multidimensional poverty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Poverty is a complex phenomenon that cannot be reduced solely to monetary dimension. This leads to the need for a multidimensional approach that consists in extending the analysis to a variety of non-monetary indicators of living conditions. The axiomatic ... Keywords: Fuzzy Sets, Membership Function, Poverty, Poverty Line, Weighted Mean, Weights

Besma Belhadj

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Experimental evaluation of actual delivered dose using mega-voltage cone-beam CT and direct point dose measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation therapy in patients is planned by using computed tomography (CT) images acquired before start of the treatment course. Here, tumor shrinkage or weight loss or both, which are common during the treatment course for patients with head-and-neck (H and N) cancer, causes unexpected differences from the plan, as well as dose uncertainty with the daily positional error of patients. For accurate clinical evaluation, it is essential to identify these anatomical changes and daily positional errors, as well as consequent dosimetric changes. To evaluate the actual delivered dose, the authors proposed direct dose measurement and dose calculation with mega-voltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT). The purpose of the present study was to experimentally evaluate dose calculation by MVCBCT. Furthermore, actual delivered dose was evaluated directly with accurate phantom setup. Because MVCBCT has CT-number variation, even when the analyzed object has a uniform density, a specific and simple CT-number correction method was developed and applied for the H and N site of a RANDO phantom. Dose distributions were calculated with the corrected MVCBCT images of a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom. Treatment processes from planning to beam delivery were performed for the H and N site of the RANDO phantom. The image-guided radiation therapy procedure was utilized for the phantom setup to improve measurement reliability. The calculated dose in the RANDO phantom was compared to the measured dose obtained by metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. In the polymethyl methacrylate phantom, the calculated and measured doses agreed within about +3%. In the RANDO phantom, the dose difference was less than +5%. The calculated dose based on simulation-CT agreed with the measured dose within±3%, even in the region with a high dose gradient. The actual delivered dose was successfully determined by dose calculation with MVCBCT, and the point dose measurement with the image-guided radiation therapy procedure.

Matsubara, Kana, E-mail: matsubara-kana@hs.tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Ryosuke [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chiba (Japan); Nishioka, Shie; Shibuya, Toshiyuki; Ariji, Takaki; Akimoto, Tetsuo [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Saitoh, Hidetoshi [Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Arakawa-ku Tokyo (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Computer Simulations Indicate Calcium Carbonate Has a Dense Liquid Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Simulations Computer Simulations Indicate Calcium Carbonate Has a Dense Liquid Phase Computer Simulations Indicate Calcium Carbonate Has a Dense Liquid Phase Berkeley Lab research could help scientists predict how carbon is stored underground August 22, 2013 | Tags: Earth Sciences, Geosciences Dan Krotz 510-486-4019 dakrotz@lbl.gov red2.jpg Artistic rendition of liquid-liquid separation in a supersaturated calcium carbonate solution. New research suggests that a dense liquid phase (shown in red in the background and in full atomistic detail based on computer simulations in the foreground) forms at the onset of calcium carbonate crystallization. (Credit: Berkeley Lab) Computer simulations conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) could help scientists

400

Facility Representative Performance Indicator Report for for Jan-Mar 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Facility Representative Performance Indicators January-March 2013 Staffing, Qualification, and Utilization Data OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT (EM) Location Analysis FTE Approved FTE Actual Staff % Staff * Gains / Losses % Core Qualified * % Fully Qualified * % Oversight Time ** CBFO 3 3 4 100 0 100 100 63 ID (EM) 1 7 7 6 86 0 71 71 90 OR (EM) 14 14 13 93 0 86 86 75 ORP 13 13 13 100 0 100 100 90 PPPO 2 6 6 6 100 ±1 100 100 74 RL 17 15 15 88 0 88 82 70 SPRU 3 2 2 2 100 0 100 0 90 SR 4 31 31 27 87 -1 87 87 86 WVDP 2 2 2 100 0 100 100 75 EM Totals 95 93 88 93 +1, -2 89 86 79 DOE GOALS - - - 100 - - >80 >65 Location Key: CBFO = Carlsbad Field Office ORP = Office of River Protection SPRU = Separations Process Research Unit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

E-Print Network 3.0 - air position indicators Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data supplied by Ingersoll Rand (Figure 8) indicate... Page 1 of 8 2011-xx-xxxx Improving Compressed Air Energy Efficiency in Automotive Plants Nasr... are typically large users of...

402

National Climate Assessment Indicators: Background, Development, & Examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indicators are usually thought of as measurements or calculations that represent important features of the status, trend, or performance of a system of interest (e.g. the economy, agriculture, air quality). They are often used for the most practical of reasons – one cannot measure everything important about systems of interest, so there is a practical need to identify major features that can be reported periodically and used to guide both research and decisions (NRC 2000).

Janetos, Anthony C.; Chen, Robert; Arndt, Deke; Kenney, Melissa A.; Abbasi, Daniel; Armstrong, Tom; Bartuska, Ann; Blair, Maria; Buizer, Jim; Dietz, Tom; Easterling, Dave; Kaye, Jack; Kolian, Michael; McGeehin, Michael; O'Connor, Robert; Pulwarty, Roger; Running, Steve; Schmalensee, Dick; Webb, Robert; Weltzin, Jake; Baptista, Sandra; Enquist, Carolyn A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Chen, Robert; Arndt, Deke; Hatfield, Jerry; Hayes, Mark L.; Jones, K. Burce; McNutt, Chad; Meier, Wayne R.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Svoboda, Mark

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

403

Drill bit having a failure indicator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A lubrication system is described to indicate a decrease in lubricant volume below a predetermined level in a rotary drill bit having a bit body adapted to receive drilling fluid at a high first pressure from a suspended drill string, and adapted to discharge the drilling fluid therefrom in a void space between the bit body and an associated well bore with the drilling fluid in the space being at a low second pressure.

Daly, J.E.; Pastusek, P.E.

1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

404

Ecological indicators for stream restoration success  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exploitation of freshwater resources is essential for sustenance of human existence and alteration of rivers, lakes and wetlands has facilitated economic development for centuries. Consequently, freshwater biodiversity is critically threatened, with stream ecosystems being the most heavily affected. To improve the status of freshwater habitats, e.g. in the context of the European Water Framework Directive and the US Clean Water Act, it is essential to implement the most effective restoration measures and identify the most suitable indicators for restoration success. Herein, several active and passive bioindication approaches are reviewed in light of existing legal frameworks, current targets and applicable implementation of river restoration. Such approaches should move from the use of single biological indicators to more holistic ecological indicators simultaneously addressing communities, multiple life stages and habitat properties such as water quality, substrate composition and stream channel morphology. The proposed Proceeding Chain of Restoration (PCoR) can enable the integration of natural scientific, political and socioeconomic dimensions for restoration of aquatic ecosystems and associated services. Generally, an analysis that combines target species-based active bioindication with community-based passive bioindication and multivariate statistics seems to be most suitable for a holistic evaluation of restoration success, as well as for the monitoring of stream ecosystem health. Since the response of biological communities to changing environmental conditions can differ between taxonomic groups and rivers, assessments at the ecosystem scale should include several levels of biological organisation. A stepwise evaluation of the primary factors inducing disturbance or degradation is needed to integrate increasing levels of complexity from water quality assessments to the evaluation of ecological function. The proposed \\{PCoR\\} can provide a step-by-step guide for restoration ecologists, comprising all planning steps from the determination of the conservation objectives to the use of ecological indicators in post-restoration monitoring.

Joachim Pander; Juergen Geist

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Energy Use and Savings in the Canadian Industrial Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The changing role of energy as a production input in the industrial sector in Canada is examined. Energy use patterns are reviewed in terms of the energy input types, both purchased and self-produced, the actual energy form and quality requirements...

James, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Analysis of TCP's Computational Energy Cost for Mobile [Extended Abstract  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a wire- less link. Our primary goal was on obtaining a breakdown of the computational energy cost of TCP this cost in actual systems. We analyzed the energy consumption of TCP in FreeBSD 5 running on a wireless the energy consumed by TCP. Prior work in this do- main has has looked at the energy consumption of various

Singh, Suresh

407

Energy Measurement for the Cloud Yi Yu, Saleem Bhatti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Measurement for the Cloud Yi Yu, Saleem Bhatti School of Computer Science, University of St energy- efficient use of cloud systems? Clearly, being able to measure actual energy usage will allow a prototype for such an energy measurement system. I. INTRODUCTION Today, cloud services are widely used

Bhatti, Saleem N.

408

Home Energy Score | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings » Home Energy Score Residential Buildings » Home Energy Score Home Energy Score The Home Energy Score is similar to a vehicle's mile-per-gallon rating. The Home Energy Score allows homeowners to compare the energy performance of their homes to other homes nationwide. It also provides homeowners with suggestions for improving their homes' efficiency. The process starts with a Home Energy Score Qualified Assessor collecting energy information during a brief home walk-through. Using the Home Energy Scoring Tool, developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the Qualified Assessor then scores the home on a scale of 1 to 10. A score of 10 indicates that the home has excellent energy performance. A score of 1 indicates the home needs extensive energy improvements. In addition to

409

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-006 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by HYDROGEN ENERGY OF CALIFORNIA under agreement DE-FE0000663, as the DOE has determined that...

410

Energy Economy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adam Sieminski (202) 662-1624 April 2010 Adam Sieminski (202) 662-1624 April 2010 Energy and the Economy US EIA & JHU SAIS 2010 Energy Conference April 6, 2010 All prices are those current at the end of the previous trading session unless otherwise indicated. Prices are sourced from local exchanges via Reuters, Bloomberg and other vendors. Data is sourced from Deutsche Bank and subject companies. DISCLOSURES AND ANALYST CERTIFICATIONS ARE LOCATED IN APPENDIX 1. Adam Sieminski, CFA Chief Energy Economist adam.sieminski@db.com +1 202 662 1624 Adam Sieminski (202) 662-1624 April 2010 1 Energy Demand Simplified Population, economic growth, and energy intensity Source: Deutsche Bank Global Energy Demand = Population X Per Capita Income X Energy Demand / Dollar of Output Adam Sieminski (202) 662-1624 April 2010

411

Energy-oriented models for WDM networks Abstract--A realistic energy-oriented model is necessary to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[4]. Recent initiatives gathering major IT companies started to explore the energy savings and greenEnergy-oriented models for WDM networks Abstract-- A realistic energy-oriented model is necessary to formally characterize the energy consumption and the consequent carbon footprint of actual and future high

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

412

Ohio | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 16, 2013 October 16, 2013 Air Pollution Control Fees (Ohio) Facilities with a potential to emit any one regulated air pollutant of a quantity greater than or equal to 100 tons per year, or any one hazardous air pollutant (HAP) greater than or equal to 10 tons per year, or any combination of hazardous air pollutants greater than 25 tons per year, must submit, in a form and manner prescribed by the director, a fee emission report that quantifies the actual emission data for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, and lead. The owner or operator of a facility shall pay fees on the facility's actual emissions. October 16, 2013 Advanced Energy Job Stimulus Program This bond-funded program creates an Advanced Energy Job Stimulus Fund that

413

Cosmological data and indications for new physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and the South Pole Telescope (SPT), combined with the nine-year data release from the WMAP satellite, provide very precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular anisotropies down to very small angular scales. Augmented with measurements from Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations surveys and determinations of the Hubble constant, we investigate whether there are indications for new physics beyond a Harrison-Zel'dovich model for primordial perturbations and the standard number of relativistic degrees of freedom at primordial recombination. All combinations of datasets point to physics beyond the minimal Harrison-Zel'dovich model in the form of either a scalar spectral index different from unity or additional relativistic degrees of freedom at recombination (e.g., additional light neutrinos). Beyond that, the extended datasets including either ACT or SPT provide very different indications: while the extended-ACT (eACT) dataset is perfectly consistent with the predictions of standard slow-roll inflation, the extended-SPT (eSPT) dataset prefers a non-power-law scalar spectral index with a very large variation with scale of the spectral index. Both eACT and eSPT favor additional light degrees of freedom on top of the Harrison-Zel'dovich model. eACT is consistent with zero neutrino masses, while eSPT favors nonzero neutrino masses at more than 95% confidence.

Benetti, Micol [Physics Department and ICRA, Università di Roma ''La Sapienza'', Ple. Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy); Gerbino, Martina; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca [Physics Department and INFN, Università di Roma ''La Sapienza'', Ple Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy); Kinney, William H. [Department of Physics, University at Buffalo, the State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260-1500 (United States); Kolb, Edward W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Enrico Fermi Institute, and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637-1433 (United States); Lattanzi, Massimiliano [Dipartimento di Fisica e Science della Terra, Università di Ferrara and INFN, sezione di Ferrara, Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico - Edificio C Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara Italy (Italy); Riotto, Antonio, E-mail: micol.benetti@roma1.infn.it, E-mail: martina.gerbino@roma1.infn.it, E-mail: whkinney@buffalo.edu, E-mail: Rocky.Kolb@uchicago.edu, E-mail: lattanzi@fe.infn.it, E-mail: alessandro.melchiorri@roma1.infn.it, E-mail: luca.pagano@roma1.infn.it, E-mail: antonio.riotto@unige.ch [Department of Theoretical Physics and Center for Astroparticle Physics (CAP) 24 quai E. Ansermet, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

DOE performance indicators for 2nd quarter CY 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has established a Department-wide Performance Indicator (PI) Program for trending and analysis of operational data as directed by DOE Order 5480.26. The PI Program was established to provide a means for monitoring the environment, safety, and health (ES&H) performance of the DOE at the Secretary and other management levels. This is the tenth in a series of quarterly reports generated for the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) by EG&G Idaho, Inc. to meet the requirements of the PI Program as directed by the DOE Standard (DOE-STD-1048-92). The information in this tenth quarterly report, while contributing to a historical database for supporting future trending analysis, does not at this time provide a sound basis for developing trend-related conclusions. In the future, it is expected that trending and analysis of operational data will enhance the safety culture in both DOE and contractor organizations by providing an early warning of deteriorating environment, safety, and health conditions. DOE-STD-1048-92 identifies four general areas of PIs. They are: Personnel Safety, Operational Incidents, Environment, and Management. These four areas have been subdivided into 26 performance indicators. Approximately 115 performance indicator control and distribution charts comprise the body of this report. A brief summary of PIs contained in each of these general areas is provided. The four EG&G facilities whose performance is charted herein are as follows: (1) The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), (2) The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), (3) The Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF), and (4) The Test Reactor Area (TRA) Hot Cells.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy usage characteristics for each of the 77 nationally representative buildings (determined from the computer modeling analysis) to actual modeled commercial

Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Strategies Used to Achieve Energy Savings for Marshall ISD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marshall Independent School District has documented more than a half million dollars in actual energy savings during the past four years, while increasing total building area by 61,190 square feet. This paper will describe the many strategies...

Jones, W. E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

High Performance Computing in Electrical Energy Systems Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents a review of the main application areas of high performance computing in electrical energy systems and introduces some results obtained with ... obtained with tests conducted using actual mod...

Djalma M. Falcao; Carmen L. T. Borges…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Group, directing it to "develop a national energy policy designed to help the private sector, and felt these problems most acutely. California actually began the 1990s with a surplus of electricity

419

Commercial Building HVAC Energy Usage in Semi-Tropical Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirements for commercial buildings. It is then suggested that this computer program would be valuable in determining the changes one could expect in annual energy usage by varying certain building design parameters. Secondly, a small office building actually...

Worbs, H. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy loss of light ions in polypropylene absorber foils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy loss of Li, C and O ions in polypropylene absorber foils has been measured using 15 UD Pelletron Accelerator facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi, India. The actual expe...

Vishal Sharma; P. K. Diwan; Pratibha; Tanu Sharma; Shyam Kumar…

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

New Energy Basics Site: Check It Out! | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Energy Basics Site: Check It Out! New Energy Basics Site: Check It Out! New Energy Basics Site: Check It Out! August 23, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL Interested in energy efficiency and renewable energy but a little confused by all the terms? Wondering how the technologies actually work? Maybe you're doing some research or working on a paper and just need a little background info. EERE's new Energy Basics site is the place for you. There you can learn things like how a wind turbine works and all about the different types of fuel cells. If you just need a quick definition of a term you've heard, check out the glossary. Energy Basics is not meant to replace Energy Savers or any of the program sites throughout the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

422

The Source of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... not know the rate by actual observation. We know, however, what amount of mechanical energy the sun parts with in a given time, and we know the size and ... in a given time, and we know the size and the specific gravity of the solar mass. Demonstration is not needed to prove that motion of the particles within a ...

J. ERICSSON

1872-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Making appropriate comparisons of estimated and actual costs of reducing SO{sub 2} emissions under Title IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A current sentiment within some parts of the environmental policy community is that market-based regulatory approaches such as emissions trading have proven so effective that actual costs will be only a small fraction of what ex ante cost estimation procedures would project. With this line of reasoning, some have dismissed available cost estimates for major proposed new regulations, such as the new PM and ozone NAAQS, as not meaningful for policy decisions. The most commonly used evidence in support of this position is the experience with SO{sub 2} reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. In Title IV, a market for emissions allowances has been used to achieve reductions in sulfur dioxides (SO{sub 2}) to ameliorate acid rain. It is commonly asserted today that the cost of achieving the SO{sub 2} emissions reductions has been only one-tenth or less of what Title IV was originally expected to cost. This paper demonstrates that, to the contrary, actual costs for SO{sub 2} reductions remain roughly in line with original estimates associated with Title IV. Erroneous conclusions about Title IV`s costs are due to inappropriate comparisons of a variety of different measures that appear to be comparable only because they are all stated in dollars per ton. Program cost estimates include the total costs of a fully-implemented regulatory program. The very low costs of Title IV that are commonly cited today are neither directly reflective of a fully implemented Title IV, (which is still many years away) nor reflective of all the costs already incurred. Further, a careful review of history finds that the initial cost estimates that many cite were never associated with Title IV. Technically speaking, people are comparing the estimated control costs for the most-costly power plant associated with earlier acid rain regulatory proposals with prices from a market that do not directly reflect total costs.

Smith, A.E. [DFI/Aeronomics Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

Why E-government Usage Lags Behind: Explaining the Gap Between Potential and Actual Usage of Electronic Public Services in the Netherlands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the EU-15 countries illustrate a gap between potential usage and actual usage of electronic public services. Using a model ... the case of current Dutch electronic governmental service usage. Motivational...

Alexander van Deursen; Jan van Dijk; Wolfgang Ebbers

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Review of recycling performance indicators: A study on collection rate in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (Taiwan EPA) launched a national Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) system after integrating eight private recycling organizations in 1998. After that, the environmental performance of the EPR system brought a lot of attention to policy makers. Many studies show positive environmental effects of the EPR system in Taiwan. However, there are controversial questions remained, such as whether the performance indicators used are the right choice to estimate the environmental effects of the recycling policy? Can those estimated results really reflect the performance of the system? This paper would therefore like to more accurately evaluate the performance indicators of the EPR system based on data observed over the past decade in Taiwan. In the process of evaluating the performance indicators, we have found that the collection rates for durable goods are often ignored in countries that pursue a zero waste policy. This may affect the actual recycling outcome and resource direction targeted by producers. However, in order for the collection rate to be adopted as a policy indicator, how to estimate the amounts of retired or waste products during a period is critical. In this paper, we estimate the collection rate for electrical and electronic waste by using the survival analysis and ownership data analysis approaches. We also provide a comparison of both approaches and put forward suggestions for directions in the future in solid waste management.

Wen Lihchyi [Chung-Hua Institution for Economic Research, Energy and Environmental Research Center, 75 Chang-Hsing Street, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: lihchyi@cier.edu.tw; Lin Chunhsu [Chung-Hua Institution for Economic Research, Energy and Environmental Research Center, 75 Chang-Hsing Street, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chlin@cier.edu.tw; Lee, Soo-cheol [Meijo University, Dept. of Economics, Nagoya (Japan)], E-mail: slee@ccmfs.meijo-u.ac.jp

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Sustainability indicator systems within urban governance: Usability analysis of sustainability indicator systems as boundary objects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract While sustainability indicator systems (SIs) have proven to be valuable rational tools for improving the availability of information related to the relationship of cities and communities to natural limits, the indicators movement has achieved limited instrumental uptake in policy. This paper begins from a recognition that instrumental use of sustainability indicator systems is rare. Greater potential impact exists for \\{SIs\\} designed to be much more attentive to their conceptual and political values within their particular social and political context. In other words, greater attention to what has been called the governance of indicator systems, or the ways in which \\{SIs\\} fit as policy tools within a multilevel and multiactor governance context, is key to increasing their utility. This is particularly true given the need for decisive policy change, or even the introduction of a new development path, which is asserted within the sustainability agenda. Understanding the real and potential utility of indicator systems within multiactor governance processes, in which their roles are primarily rhetorical, conceptual and political, is facilitated by thinking about indicator systems as boundary objects, tools which open up dialogue, information sharing, learning and consensus-building across different policy boundaries: between experts and nonexperts, formal government and different nongovernment actors, higher-order governments and lower-order governments. This paper offers a comparative analysis of three sustainability indicator systems in the North American context – Vancouver's Vital Signs (Vancouver Foundation), Seattle's Happiness Initiative, and LEED-ND (US Green Building Council) – all of which have shown some success in operationalizing a new policy boundary as a means of making conceptual and political contributions to governance practices. The specific boundaries operationalized, the different approach taken by each project, and the usability demonstrated by each project at that boundary in terms of salience, legitimacy and credibility, are assessed comparatively. In general, the trajectory in design and use of ecological and sustainability indicators demonstrates an increase in appetite, aptitude and numbers of channels for use in processes of governance; however, these factors vary with the local social–political opportunity structure. This analysis presents the advances made as well as the tradeoffs evident in these cases across the gamut of different forms of usability of nongovernmental indicator systems designed for use as boundary objects, and suggests a path forward for indicator work which aims to change policy, from a governance perspective.

Meg Holden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Researching Energy Use in Hospitals | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Researching Energy Use Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Researching Energy Use in Hospitals Researching Energy Use in Hospitals The Building Technologies Office (BTO) is monitoring hospitals to help facility and energy managers identify ways to save energy. Hospital professionals find it challenging to identify "energy hogs" in their buildings because the industry lacks actual energy use data for mechanical systems and devices. Professionals have asked for real-world information to identify cost-effective energy saving opportunities. This research ultimately will help hospitals improve energy efficiency, freeing up funding to improve healthcare services. Photo of a radiology technician assisting a patient into a 64-slice CT Scanner for diagnostic testing.

428

EVSE Features Charge Delay Option Power Light Indicator Eight-segment Progress Indicator Auto-restart  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Charge Delay Option Power Light Indicator Charge Delay Option Power Light Indicator Eight-segment Progress Indicator Auto-restart EVSE Specifications Grid connection Plug and cord NEMA 6-50 Connector type J1772 Test lab certifications UL Listed Approximate size (H x W x D inches) 10 x 13 x 4 Charge level AC Level 2 Input voltage 240 VAC Maximum input current 30 Amp Circuit breaker rating 40 Amp Test Conditions 1 Test date 10/30/2012 Nominal supply voltage (Vrms) 209.04 Supply frequency (Hz) 59.99 Initial ambient temperature (°F) 64 Test Vehicle 1,3 Make and model 2012 Chevrolet Volt Battery type Li-ion Steady state charge power (AC kW) 3.09 Maximum charge power (AC kW) 3.20 EVSE Test Results 1,2,4

429

Programming | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Programming Programming Programming October 16, 2013 - 5:13pm Addthis Key Actions in Programming Commission a renewable energy screening to assess the options and economics of various technologies. Conduct a planning charrette to bring disciplines together to identify project needs and energy opportunities. Define and prioritize specific energy- related goals and include them in the building program and requirements for the design team. Renewable energy is a key consideration during project programming. As more information about the actual function and needs of the facility becomes available, further decisions can be made about the most appropriate types of renewable energy technologies for the project. The end of this phase results in the creation of the building program,

430

Physics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Physics Physics Physics On January 13, 2012, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory senior scientist Dr. Saul Perlmutter spoke with Energy Department staff about his research that earned him a 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics. Featured Dark Energy Cam: Fermilab Expands Understanding of Expanding Universe Researchers at Fermi National Lab team stand beside the 570-megapixels, five-ton Dark Energy camera, which will be capable of measuring the expansion of the universe - and developing better models about how dark energy works. | Photo by Reidar Hahn, Fermi National Lab In Dark Energy science, scientists have found flaws in accepted theories using them to build even better models of how nature actually works. Higgs Boson May Be Within Sight

 Physicists from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)

431

Oncor Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal Use Only 2 ESL-KT-14-11-04 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 2012 – 2015 Energy Efficiency Goals Year Demand Goal MW Energy Goal MWh Basis 2012 53.1 93,031 25% of Average Load Growth 2013 54.6 95...,659 30% of Average Load Growth 2014 68.1 119,311 30% of Average Load Growth 2015* 87.0 152,424 30% of Average Load Growth • The Demand Goal is based on a five year rolling average of actual demand growth, provided by Oncor Revenue Forecasting • Goal...

Betts, C.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Review of sustainability indices and indicators: Towards a new City Sustainability Index (CSI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to discuss conceptual requirements for a City Sustainability Index (CSI) and to review existing major sustainability indices/indicators in terms of the requirements. The following indices are reviewed: Ecological Footprint (EF), Environmental Sustainability Index (ESI), Dashboard of Sustainability (DS), Welfare Index, Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI), Index of Sustainable Economic Welfare, City Development Index, emergy/exergy, Human Development Index (HDI), Environmental Vulnerability Index (EVI), Environmental Policy Index (EPI), Living Planet Index (LPI), Environmentally-adjusted Domestic Product (EDP), Genuine Saving (GS), and some applications of composite indices or/and multivariate indicators to local or regional context as case studies. The key conceptual requirements for an adequate CSI are: (i) to consider environmental, economic and social aspects (the triple bottom line of sustainability) from the viewpoint of strong sustainability; (ii) to capture external impacts (leakage effects) of city on other areas beyond the city boundaries particularly in terms of environmental aspects; (iii) to create indices/indicators originally for the purpose of assessing city sustainability; and (iv) to be able to assess world cities in both developed and developing countries using common axes of evaluation. Based on the review, we conclude that it is necessary to create a new CSI that enables us to assess and compare cities' sustainability performance in order to understand the global impact of cities on the environment and human life as compared with their economic contribution. In the future, the CSI will be able to provide local authorities with guidance toward sustainable paths. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We derive the four key requirements for a new City Sustainability Index (CSI) system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First, the triple bottom line must be considered in terms of strong sustainability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Second, environmental leakage effects beyond city boundaries should be captured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Third, 'city sustainability' should be originally considered when CSI is created. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fourth, cities in developed and developing countries can be evaluated without bias.

Mori, Koichiro, E-mail: kmori@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); Christodoulou, Aris, E-mail: aris.christodoulou@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Transport Studies, University College London (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Tamper-indicating seals : practices, problems, and standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tamper-indicating seals have been used by customs officials for over 7,000 years. Today, seals are widely used to help counter theft, smuggling, sabotage, vandalism, terrorism, and espionage. Despite their antiquity and modern widespread use, however, there remains considerable confusion about seals, as well as a lot of misconceptions, wishful thinking, sloppy terminology, and poor practice. The absence of meaningful norms and standards, together with the surprisingly limited amount of research and development (R&D) in the field of tamper detection, has also hindered the effective use of seals. The Vulnerability Assessment Team (VAT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has intensively studied tamper-indicating seals for the last 12 years. We have engaged in vulnerability assessments, R&D, consulting, and training for over two dozen United States government agencies and private companies, as well as for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Euratom. The VAT has also analyzed over 200 different types of seals in detail. This paper summarizes some of our conclusions, recommendations, and warnings regarding seals and tamper detection.

Johnston, R. G. (Roger G.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Broad-basing 'green' stock market indices: a concept note  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sustainability ('green') stock market indices are intended to focus attention on environmental credentials, to reward superior performance and to help channel investments. Such indices often incorporate clean energy, waste, water and waste water treatment, recycling and other 'pure play enviro' companies. This paper contends that in keeping with the philosophy of Green Economics, which advocates an expansive view of humankind's interaction with the environment, true environmental performance ('greenness') is indexed by the eco-sensitivity of mainstream businesses, by the level of stakeholder involvement and by the extent of information readily made available to society. Effective enforcement of environmental regulation requires contributions from all stakeholders concerned. With voluntary participation from businesses not readily forthcoming, and given the price-sensitivity of consumers, investors, through the incentive structures they face, could contribute to better enforcement of regulatory standards. Broad-basing the green index could be interpreted as recognising and rewarding the superior environmental performance of mainstream businesses and/or ensuring adequate representation in emerging markets, where a large number of 'pure play enviro' related instruments are unlikely to be listed.

Srinivasan Sunderasan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

final energy per /industrial share of regional GDP (NBSfinal energy use per unit of industrial GDP produced. Evenbuildings, energy use per unit of industrial GDP, and CO 2

Price, Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Calculating center-glass performance indices of windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building envelope performance is strongly influenced by solar gain and heat transfer through windows. The majority of this energy gain or loss passes through the center-glass area of the glazing system. Various methods have been devised to calculate the corresponding center-glass performance indices. Solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) and U-factor are the quantities most frequently sought. Hand calculations have given way to computer-based techniques. Computer simulation offers the opportunity to employ more detailed models plus the ability to model the large number of glazing systems made possible by design options, such as low-emissivity or solar-control coatings, selective glass tints, substitute fill gases, and glazing layers, that partially transmit longwave radiation. A new, more accurate method is presented in this paper for manipulating spectral optical data while calculating the energy related optical properties of glazing layers and glazing systems. The use of the same technique to track visible and ultraviolet radiation is also demonstrated. In addition, more refined methods are documented for calculating SHGC and U-factor while accounting for the thermal resistance of individual glazings.

Wright, J.L. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

BP Statistical Review of World Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Review of World Energy Review of World Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name BP Statistical Review of World Energy Data Format Excel Spreadsheet Geographic Scope Earth TODO: Import actual dataset contents into OpenEI The BP Statistical Review of World Energy is an Excel spreadsheet which contains consumption and production data for Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, Oil, and Hydroelectric energy. It is produced annually by British Petroleum.[1] Data from the BP Statistical Review is used in various tools, including the Energy Export Databrowser.[1] External links 2009 Data 2008 Data 2007 Data 2006 Data 2005 Data 2004 Data 2003 Data 2002 Data References ↑ 1.0 1.1 "Sources of data used in the Energy Export Databrowser" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=BP_Statistical_Review_of_World_Energy&oldid=272979"

438

Dark Energy in Light of the Cosmic Horizon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on dramatic observations of the CMB with WMAP and of Type Ia supernovae with the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based facilities, it is now generally believed that the Universe's expansion is accelerating. Within the context of standard cosmology, the Universe must therefore contain a third `dark' component of energy, beyond matter and radiation. However, the current data are still deemed insufficient to distinguish between an evolving dark energy component and the simplest model of a time-independent cosmological constant. In this paper, we examine the role played by our cosmic horizon R0 in our interrogation of the data, and reach the rather firm conclusion that the existence of a cosmological constant is untenable. The observations are telling us that R0=c t0, where t0 is the perceived current age of the Universe, yet a cosmological constant would drive R0 towards ct (where t is the cosmic time) only once, and that would have to occur right now. In contrast, scaling solutions simultaneously eliminate several conundrums in the standard model, including the `coincidence' and `flatness' problems, and account very well for the fact that R0=c t0. We show here that for such dynamical dark energy models, either R0=ct for all time (thus eliminating the apparent coincidence altogether), or that what we believe to be the current age of the universe is actually the horizon time th=R0/c, which is always shorter than t0. Our best fit to the Type Ia supernova data indicates that t0 would then have to be ~16.9 billion years. Though surprising at first, an older universe such as this would actually eliminate several other long-standing problems in cosmology, including the (too) early appearance of supermassive black holes (at a redshift > 6) and the glaring deficit of dwarf halos in the local group.

Fulvio Melia

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as well as the total energy consumption of these travelas well as the total energy consumption of these travelPrimary energy: total end-use energy consumption of each

Price, Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Retail Supplier Retail Supplier Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission Maine's original Renewable Resource Portfolio Requirement was passed as part of the state's 1997 electric-utility restructuring law. In 1999, Maine's Public Utility Commission (PUC) adopted rules requiring each electricity provider to supply at least 30% of their total electric sales using electricity generated by eligible renewable and certain energy efficiency resources. Actually, at the time of passage, the required percentage of renewables was actually lower than the existing percentage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Systems Engineering Leading Indicators Guide, Version 1.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Systems Engineering Leading Indicators guide set reflects the initial subset of possible indicators that were considered to be the highest priority for evaluating effectiveness before the fact. A leading indicator is ...

Lean Advancement Initiative

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Development of a Low-Carbon Indicator System for China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon” cities because their energy use and emissions percarbon development, such as energy use or CO 2 emissions per

Price, Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Energy 101: Wind Turbines | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Turbines Wind Turbines Energy 101: Wind Turbines July 30, 2010 - 10:47am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs On Tuesday, the Department announced a $117 million loan guarantee through for the Kahuku Wind Power Project in Hawaii. That's a major step forward for clean energy in the region, as it's expected to supply clean electricity to roughly 7,700 households per year, and it also invites a deceptively simple question: how exactly do wind turbines generate electricity? One thing you might not realize is that wind is actually a form of solar energy. This is because wind is produced by the sun heating Earth's atmosphere, the rotation of the earth, and the earth's surface irregularities. Wind turbines are the rotary devices that convert the

444

Production-ecological modelling explains the difference between potential soil N mineralisation and actual herbage N uptake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We studied two different grassland fertiliser management regimes on sand and peat soils: above-ground application of a combination of organic N-rich slurry manure and solid cattle manure (SCM) vs. slit-injected, mineral N-rich slurry manure, whether or not supplemented with chemical fertiliser (non-SCM). Measurements of field N mineralisation as estimated from herbage N uptake in unfertilised plots were compared with (i) potential N mineralisation as determined from a standard laboratory soil incubation, (ii) the contribution of groups of soil organisms to N mineralisation based on production-ecological model calculations, and (iii) N mineralisation calculated according to the Dutch fertilisation recommendation for grasslands. Density and biomass of soil biota (bacteria, fungi, enchytraeids, microarthropods and earthworms) as well as net plant N-uptake were higher in the SCM input grasslands compared to the non-SCM input grasslands. The currently used method in Dutch fertilisation recommendations underestimated actual soil N supply capacity by, on average, 102 kg N ha?1 (202 vs. 304 kg ha?1 = 34%). The summed production-ecological model estimate for N mineralisation by bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and enchytraeids was 87–120% of the measured potential soil N mineralisation. Adding the modelled N mineralisation by earthworms to potential soil N mineralisation explained 98–107% of the measured herbage N uptake from soil. For all grasslands and soil biota groups together, the model estimated 105% of the measured net herbage N uptake from soil. Soil biota production-ecological modelling is a powerful tool to understand and predict N uptake in grassland, reflecting the effects of previous manure management and soil type. The results show that combining production ecological modelling to predict N supply with existing soil N tests using aerobic incubation methods, can add to a scientifically based improvement of the N fertilisation recommendations for production grasslands.

Muhammad Imtiaz Rashid; Ron G.M. de Goede; Lijbert Brussaard; Jaap Bloem; Egbert A. Lantinga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Computer Simulations Indicate Calcium Carbonate Has a Dense Liquid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computer Simulations Indicate Calcium Carbonate Has a Dense Liquid Phase Computer Simulations Indicate Calcium Carbonate Has a Dense Liquid Phase Berkeley Lab research could help...

446

Sustainability Indicators for Discrete Manufacturing Processes Applied to Grinding Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the data into three sustainability indicators for eachor into one total sustainability indicator. The weighting isAn overview of sustainability assessment methodologies,

Linke, Barbara S.; Corman, Gero J.; Dornfeld, David A.; Tönissen, Stefan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

448

Application of Target Value Design to Energy Efficiency Investments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Examples. ” Energy Efficiency, 2(2), 139-163. Horman, M.288 pp. IBEF (2011). “Energy Efficiency Indicator: GlobalInstitute for Building Energy Efficiency (IBEF), Washington

Lee, Hyun Woo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. , 2001. “Changing Energy Intensity in Chinese Industry”,M. ,1994. “Changing Energy Intensity in Chinese Industry”,2006. Indicators of Energy Intensity in the Unites States,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inaccuracies. However, we do waste energy when a vacant roombuildings, thus indicating energy waste. In order to makein each room. The energy waste information gives feedback to

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Home Energy Saver  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hidden Cost of Home Energy Use Hidden Cost of Home Energy Use By improving your home's energy efficiency, you can profit in three ways: save money, improve your life, and help the earth, and making your home safer and more comfortable. Annual Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Average House vs. the Average Car: Each year the average house releases over twice as much greenhouse gases as the typical car. House: 22,000 lbs/CO2 Car: 10,000 lbs/CO2 Many people believe that their car is the largest single source of air pollution for which they are personally responsible. But in fact, the average home causes the emission of more than twice as much carbon dioxide-the principal greenhouse gas-as the average car. This is because most of the energy consumed in our homes is produced by burning fossil fuels like coal, oil, and natural gas. This pollution is actually a

452

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

24, 2013 24, 2013 Your basement no longer has to be scary. We are sharing tips and tricks to make it more comfortable and energy efficient. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/spxChrome. Taking on Scary Basements Some tricks and treats to help make home energy costs less spooky this Halloween season. October 23, 2013 James Edward Westcott was one of the only people permitted to have a camera at the Oak Ridge site during the Manhattan Project and the Cold War. He documented the lives of many of the residents and workers in the "Atomic City," in the days before Oak Ridge National Laboratory was actually Oak Ridge National Lab. In this February 1945 photo, a young woman is welding in the prefabrication shop building, part of the K-25 uranium separation facilities, one of three Manhattan Project sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Many of the men and women who worked on these projects still live in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, today. | Photo by James Edward Westcott, courtesy of DOE & the National Archives.

453

Recycling Energy Yields Super Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recycling Energy Yields Super Savings Recycling Energy Yields Super Savings Recycling Energy Yields Super Savings April 23, 2010 - 4:34pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Recycling has been part of going green for a long time, but one company is going a step further by actually recycling energy that has already been used to power manufacturing plants. How do they do it? Recycled Energy Development implements proven technologies that help capture wasted heat and increase their energy efficiency. Dick Munson, senior vice president for public affairs at RED, says facilities that undertake such projects are generally able to cut their energy expenses by up to 20 percent. West Virginia Alloys, in Alloy, W.Va., is a silicon manufacturing plant that makes materials that end up in products such as solar cells and computer chips. In 2013, with help from

454

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

changes of HVAC source EUI between AMY and TMY3. (a) largeof total building source EUI. (a) large office, 90.1-2004a) changes in HVAC source EUI; (b) changes in total source

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Development of Eco-efficiency Indicators for Rubber Glove Product by Material Flow Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rubber glove product Thailand shows the trend of higher growth. Currently, the average export value of rubber glove product is 826.72 US$/year. Thus, the development guideline of this product for Thailand should be concerned. However, rubber glove process caused the environmental and human impacts. Hence, the eco-efficiency concept of rubber glove product was interested. Initial important step of eco-efficiency concept was indicator development. Therefore, this research developed the eco efficiency indicators including economic and environmental indicators of rubber glove product based on the eco-efficiency theory and material flow analysis. The result showed that economic indicators consisted of quantity product and net sale and environmental indicators consisted of material consumption, energy consumption, water consumption, wastewater production, solid waste production, greenhouse gas emission, were selected to eco-efficiency indicators based on eco-efficiency theory and material flow analysis. These eco-efficiency indicators would help to discover more economic and effective ways to improve productivity process and to enhance recyclability or reducing energy and material intensity.

Cheerawit Rattanapan; Thunwadee Tachapattaworakul Suksaroj; Weerawat Ounsaneha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Energy Audit Practices in China: National and Local Experiences and Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Evaluation of Energy Intensity per GDP Indicators (???and Evaluation of Energy Intensity Reduction and Pollutionto improve its energy intensity. In China, industrial energy

Shen, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Susan H. Holte In this paper, the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluates the projections published in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), (1) by comparing the projections from the Annual Energy Outlook 1982 through the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 with actual historical values. A set of major consumption, production, net import, price, economic, and carbon dioxide emissions variables are included in the evaluation, updating similar papers from previous years. These evaluations also present the reasons and rationales for significant differences. The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an

459

Energy Signal Tool for Decision Support in Building Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype energy signal tool is demonstrated for operational whole-building and system-level energy use evaluation. The purpose of the tool is to give a summary of building energy use which allows a building operator to quickly distinguish normal and abnormal energy use. Toward that end, energy use status is displayed as a traffic light, which is a visual metaphor for energy use that is either substantially different from expected (red and yellow lights) or approximately the same as expected (green light). Which light to display for a given energy end use is determined by comparing expected to actual energy use. As expected, energy use is necessarily uncertain; we cannot choose the appropriate light with certainty. Instead, the energy signal tool chooses the light by minimizing the expected cost of displaying the wrong light. The expected energy use is represented by a probability distribution. Energy use is modeled by a low-order lumped parameter model. Uncertainty in energy use is quantified by a Monte Carlo exploration of the influence of model parameters on energy use. Distributions over model parameters are updated over time via Bayes' theorem. The simulation study was devised to assess whole-building energy signal accuracy in the presence of uncertainty and faults at the submetered level, which may lead to tradeoffs at the whole-building level that are not detectable without submetering.

Henze, G. P.; Pavlak, G. S.; Florita, A. R.; Dodier, R. H.; Hirsch, A. I.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

The Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.8% energy on average, and actually increases energy consumption in 4 of the 8 households. Categories higher energy consumption on average than those with manual con- trols because users program themThe Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes Jiakang Lu, Tamim Sookoor

Whitehouse, Kamin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Type Ia Supernova Spectral Line Ratios as Luminosity Indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crucial role in the discovery of the dark energy, v i a theled to the discovery of the "dark energy" (Riess et al.

Bongard, Sebastien; Baron, E.; Smadja, G.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Table A5. Commercial sector indicators and consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

based on: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Monthly Energy Review, DOEEIA-0035(201309) (Washington, DC, September 2013). 2011 and 2012 degree days based on...

463

KEY DASHBOARD INDICATORS OF PROGRESS TOWARD Goals Human Resources, FY 09-10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in alignment with our service approach, technical Progress Indication capability, and regulatory requirements 2Q 3Q 4Q measuring performance, and increasing transparency · Identify, review, and enhance the top plan to reduce energy costs Supports Strategic Directions 1, 5, & 7 #12;

New Mexico, University of

464

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech, though the 2020s is a likely turning point for both emission trajectories. Both emission pathways must meet all announced and planned policies, targets and non-fossil generation targets, or an even wider efficiency gap will exist. The savings potential under Max Tech varies by sector, but the industrial sector appears to hold the largest energy savings and emission reduction potential. The primary source of savings is from electricity rather than fuel, and electricity savings are magnified by power sector decarbonization through increasing renewable generation and coal generation efficiency improvement. In order to achieve the maximum energy savings and emission reduction potential, efficiency improvements and technology switching must be undertaken across demand sectors as well as in the growing power sector. From an economic perspective, the cost of conserved energy analysis indicates that nearly all measures for the iron and steel and cement industry are cost-effective. All 23 efficiency measures analyzed for the cement industry are cost-effective, with combined CO2 emission reduction potential of 448 Mt CO2. All of the electricity savings measures in the iron and steel industry are cost-effective, but the cost-effective savings potential for fuel savings measures is slightly lower than total technical savings potential. The total potential savings from these measures confirm the magnitude of savings in the scenario models, and illustrate the remaining efficiency gap in the cement and iron and steel industries.

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

465

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. 0. Number of Establishments that Actually Switched Fuels from Natural Gas to Residual Fuel Oil, by Industry Group and Selected Industries, 1994 369 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 SIC Residual Fuel Oil Total Code Industry Group and Industry (billion cu ft) Factors (counts) (counts) (percents) (counts) (percents) a Natural Gas Switchable to Establishments RSE Row Able to Switch Actually Switched RSE Column Factors: 1.3 0.1 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.8 20 Food and Kindred Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 14,698 702 4.8 262 1.8 5.6 2011 Meat Packing Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 759 23 3.0 10 1.3 9.0 2033 Canned Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 531 112 21.2 33 6.2 11.6 2037 Frozen Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 232 Q 5.3

466

Quantifying the Value that Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Provide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantifying the Value that Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Provide Quantifying the Value that Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Provide as a Hedge Against Volatile Natural Gas Price Speaker(s): Mark Bolinger Date: August 13, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Advocates of renewable energy and energy efficiency have long argued that such technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a utility's generation portfolio. These arguments - made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas and wholesale electricity price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001 - have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that renewables and efficiency provide. In evaluating this benefit, it is important to recognize that alternative price hedging instruments are

467

Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2011-004 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by LASER APPARATUS under agreement DE-AC04-04AL85000, as the DOE has determined that granting...

468

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-015 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by BP SOLAR LTD. under agreement DE-FC36-GO17049, as...

469

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-021 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by USEC, INC. under agreement DE-NE0000488, as the DOE has determined that granting such a...

470

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-029 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by AIR PRODUCTS AND CHEMICALS, INC under agreement DE-FC36-05GO15015, as the DOE has...

471

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2005-005 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by HONEYWELL, INC. under agreement DE-FC26-00OR22809, as the DOE has determined that granting...

472

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2007-002 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC. under agreement DE-FC26-06NT42947, as the DOE has determined...

473

Class Patent Waiver W(C)2012-005 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

12-005 Class Patent Waiver W(C)2012-005 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice...

474

Energy consumption characterization as an input to building management and performance benchmarking - a case study PPT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance characterization of each of its buildings, looking specifically at the typology of canteen. Developing building energy performance benchmarking systems enables the comparison of actual consumption of individual buildings against others of the same...

Bernardo, H.; Neves, L.; Oliveira, F.; Quintal, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Norwegian National Program for Lifetime Commissioning and Energy Efficient Operation of Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The project “Life-Time Commissioning for Energy Efficient Operation of Buildings” is actually a network of industrial companies, private and public entities, and R&D organizations. The overall objective of the project is to contribute...

Novakovic, V.; Djuric, N.; Holst, J.; Frydenlund, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-011 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by DSM lnnovation, Inc. under agreement DE-PS36-06GO97034, as the DOE has determined that...

477

Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN SOLAR, WIND, AND FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS. Unit: g/$1000OF FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS. Wind Turbine Height (m) Windwind energy density (Slaymaker where W: actual output of the solar power plant,

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Database Aids Building Owners and Operators in Energy-Efficiency Project Decision Making  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EERE's Buildings Performance Database, launched in June 2013, provides access to empirical data on the actual energy performance, as well as physical and operational characteristics of commercial and residential buildings.

479

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2007-012 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by BOEING under agreement DE-FC36-06GO17052, as the DOE has determined that granting such a...

480

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-027 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by JOHNSON CONTROLS, INC. under agreement DE-EE0002858, as the DOE has determined that granting...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual energy indicators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2009-002 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by JOHNSON MATTNEY FUEL CELLS INC. under agreement DE-FG36-07GO17019, as the DOE has determined...

482

Slide05 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

13 depict actual searches of the ETDEWEB database on a number of highly relevant, current energy topics and the breadth and depth of ETDWEB's rich content responsive to queries in...

483

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-030 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by SRI INTERNATIONAL under agreement DE-FE0000896, as the DOE has determined that granting...

484

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2012-031 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by SRI INTERNATIONAL under agreement DE-NT0005578, as the DOE has determined that granting...

485

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2010-026 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by INEOS USA LLC under agreement DE-EE0002883, as the DOE has determined that granting such a waiver...

486

Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-028 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice by INEOS USA LLC under agreement DE-FG36-04GO14315, as the DOE has determined that granting such a...

487

Grants | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 6, 2010 August 6, 2010 With sintered rare earth magnets a $4 billion worldwide market, the U.S. could be a bigger producer of these magnets - which are not actually rare - and are used in hybrid vehicle motors and wind turbine generators. | Illustration Courtesy of of Electron Energy Corporation | Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common Sintered rare earth magnets - which are vital components in hybrid vehicle motors and wind turbine generators - are a $4 billion worldwide industry. Landisville, Pa.-based Electron Energy Corporation is hoping to bring a share of that market (and jobs) to the U.S. with their sintered rare earth magnet innovation. August 3, 2010 The Kane County Judicial Center is one building that received retrofits to save the county energy with a Recovery Act-funded block grant. | Photo courtesy of Kane County

488

DepartmentofEnergy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DepartmentofEnergy DepartmentofEnergy Washingtor1,D.C. 20545 June 12, 1978 William E. Mott, Director Division of Environmental Control Technology ATOMIC ENERGY R&D SITES From February 1944 to May 1944, I was employed by Columbia University, Division of War Research. This was a part of the secret MED operation in New York City. The Pupin Laboratory on campus was the headquarters for the operation but actual operations were carried out at the so-called Nash Building on Broadway above 125th Street. We were working on a pilot plant, gaseous diffusion barriers appeared from time to time, and a certain section was involved in work on Process Gas. I have never seen this facility listed as one that has been checked out for possible residual contamination. Therefore, I am calling it to your attention, in accordance

489

Identification of performance indicators for nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance indicators have been assuming an increasingly important role in the nuclear industry. An integrated methodology is proposed in this research for the identification and validation of performance indicators for ...

Sui, Yu, 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Optimal fuzzy multi-objective design of a renewable energy system with economics, reliability, and environmental emissions considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Besides economical issues reliability and environmental emissions have become major concerns whenever an energy system is designed. The objective of this study is to design both an autonomous and non-autonomous hybrid green power system (HGPS) to supply a specific load demand considering economics reliability indices and environmental emissions. The HGPS includes wind turbine (WT) photovoltaic (PV) array fuel cell and the actual data used for simulation which are annual solar irradiation and wind speed for the state of Illinois. For reliability analysis it is assumed that only WT PV DC/AC convertor and electrical network might have failure in supplying power. To evaluate the actual reliability level of the HGPS equipments all possible conditions should be considered and for each one of them the reliability indices are estimated by determining the quantity and probability of load demands not supplied. However in this study an approximate model is utilized to examine the reliability indices. In the approximate model the average power generation of WT units and PV array is utilized (instead of considering the outage of each WT unit and PV array separately) and then the mathematical expectation of reliability indices is calculated. The results show that the reliability indices are activated when there is no backup (electrical network) for the HGPS. The utilization of HGPS in parallel with electrical network when cost is given the highest importance leads to the purchase of all power from the electrical network. However when emission is considered as the second objective function in the fuzzy multi-objective problem; the degree of importance given to each function (total cost and emission) plays a major role in the optimal design of HGPS.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Energy savings through hot pressing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical considerations indicate that the hot-pressing process can provide energy savings. Several selected results demonstrate that, under favorable conditions, practical results exceed theoretical predictions.

Cutshall, K.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

New York | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 28, 2010 January 28, 2010 Cooper Union's building is a towering, unique building that actually saves a lot of energy. | Photo courtesy Cooper Union New York building stands out, saves energy A new energy-efficient building in New York is raising eyebrows and inspiring creativity, but its unique design and innovative features are helping the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art save energy, help the environment and keep its students' imaginations fresh. January 22, 2010 CX-000737: Categorical Exclusion Determination Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 01/22/2010 Location(s): Ithaca, New York Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 21, 2010 Union Helps Produce Women Workers

493

Indiana Energy Energy Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indiana Energy Conference Energy Challenges And Opportunities November 5, 2013 ­ 9:00 a.m. ­ 5:00 p spectrum of business sectors including: Energy Community Manufacturing Policymakers Finance Engineering of Energy & Water: A Well of Opportunity Our water and energy systems are inextricably linked. Energy

Ginzel, Matthew

494

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Energy Consumption U.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector Share of Energy Consumed byEnergy Efficiency & Renewable Energy 2010 Fuel Cell Project Kick-off Dr. Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Fuel Cells Team Leader U.S. Department of Energy gy Fuel Cell Technologies Program September 28

495

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2011 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), Califo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Figure 1 Southern California and US Leading Indicators U.S. economic activity, often measured by real GDP California (Figure 2). Figure 2 Leading Indicators and Real GDP 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 91.3 92.2 93.1 93 one to two quarters before SC employment changes (Figure 4). The SC indicator currently projects

de Lijser, Peter

496

Calculation of probabilities of transfer, recurrence intervals, and positional indices for linear compartment models. Environmental Sciences Division Publication no. 1544  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six indices are presented for linear compartment systems that quantify the probable pathways of matter or energy transfer, the likelihood of recurrence if the model contains feedback loops, and the number of steps (transfers) through the system. General examples are used to illustrate how these indices can simplify the comparison of complex systems or organisms in unrelated systems.

Carney, J.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Gardner, R.H.; Mankin, J.B.; Post, W.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

A Case Study in Developing Process Unit Energy Metrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At the 2005 IETC Conference, KBC (Davis and Knight) submitted a paper on Integrating Process Unit Energy Metrics into a Plant Energy Managemenet System. For the 2006 conference, KBC wishes to submit a paper that details an actual case study where...

Davis, J. L.; Van Atta, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 35% energy usage in the United States. Currently, most modern buildings still condition rooms assuming maximum occupancy rather than actual usage. As a result, rooms are often over-conditioned needlessly. ... Keywords: HVAC, Occupancy, demand response, energy savings, machine learning, ventilation

Varick L. Erickson, Miguel Á. Carreira-Perpiñán, Alberto E. Cerpa

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Energy Conservation R. D. & D. Programs in High Temperature Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy is actually required to produce the product. This broad sweeping statement covers many sins and many virtues. The blast furnace, for example, is the largest user of energy per net ton of steel produced and operates at approximately 67...

Sheneman, R. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Energy and economic savings using geothermal heat pumps in different climates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A technical and economic feasibility study is performed on residential buildings, heated and cooled by geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) equipped with energy piles. The analysis is carried out for two different climate locations and building energy needs, which have been evaluated following the current European standard ISO 13790. The energy pile system performance coupled with the GHP has been numerically calculated by using the PILESIM2 software over 20 years of operation. The Primary Energy Saving (PES) indices were calculated comparing the actual \\{GHPs\\} systems with traditional cooling and heating systems, together with their sensitivity to thermal and cooling loads for two different climate locations. Also, economic savings and greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction have been calculated resulting from the \\{GHPs\\} use. The results show that in mild climates, where the \\{GHPs\\} are mainly used as HP, the annual average temperature of the ground around the energy piles can increase up to about 10 °C after many years of operation, whereas in cold climates the increase is nearly negligible. Thus, the economical profit of \\{GHPs\\} is more difficult to achieve in mild climates than in cold ones. Conversely, GHG emission reduction is found to be larger in mild climates than in cold ones.

Biagio Morrone; Gaetano Coppola; Vincenzo Raucci

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z