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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rising steam costs and a high failure rate on the Joliet Plants standard steam trap, a testing and evaluation program was begun to find a steam trap that would work at Olin-Joliet. The basis was to conduct the test on the actual process equipment and that a minimum life be achieved. This paper deals with the history of the steam system/condensate systems, the setting up of the testing procedure, which traps were and were not tested and the results of the testing program to date.

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Satellite-Based Actual Evapotranspiration over Drying Semiarid Terrain in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple satellite-based algorithm for estimating actual evaporation based on Makkink’s equation is applied to a seasonal cycle in 2002 at three test sites in Ghana, West Africa: at a location in the humid tropical southern region and two in the ...

D. Schüttemeyer; Ch Schillings; A. F. Moene; H. A. R. de Bruin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran, Davis Introduction · The Iran Oil Project, initiated in 2007, aims to find the inefficiencies and their possible sources in Iranian oil and gas policies. Background Information Assumptions · Perfect Competition

California at Davis, University of

4

Base isolation case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary objective of this thesis is the introduction of the current code, ASCE 7-05 into the base isolation design and the analysis of base isolation response due to seismic forces. An eight story irregular structure ...

Ching, Kenneth A. (Kenneth Apostol)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Base case and perturbation scenarios  

SciTech Connect

This report describes fourteen energy factors that could affect electricity markets in the future (demand, process, source mix, etc.). These fourteen factors are believed to have the most influence on the State? s energy environment. A base case, or most probable, characterization is given for each of these fourteen factors over a twenty year time horizon. The base case characterization is derived from quantitative and qualitative information provided by State of California government agencies, where possible. Federal government databases are nsed where needed to supplement the California data. It is envisioned that a initial selection of issue areas will be based upon an evaluation of them under base case conditions. For most of the fourteen factors, the report identities possible perturbations from base case values or assumptions that may be used to construct additional scenarios. Only those perturbations that are plausible and would have a significant effect on energy markets are included in the table. The fourteen factors and potential perturbations of the factors are listed in Table 1.1. These perturbations can be combined to generate internally consist.ent. combinations of perturbations relative to the base case. For example, a low natural gas price perturbation should be combined with a high natural gas demand perturbation. The factor perturbations are based upon alternative quantitative forecasts provided by other institutions (the Department of Energy - Energy Information Administration in some cases), changes in assumptions that drive the quantitative forecasts, or changes in assumptions about the structure of the California energy markets. The perturbations are intended to be used for a qualitative reexamination of issue areas after an initial evaluation under the base case. The perturbation information would be used as a ?tiebreaker;? to make decisions regarding those issue areas that were marginally accepted or rejected under the base case. Hf a quantitative scoring system for issue areas were applied under the base case, a tractable quantitative decision model incorporating scenarios and their likelihoods could be developed and appli& in the decision process. LLNL has developed four perturbation scenarios that address the following issues: l} low economic growth, 2) high natural gas prices, 3) dysfunctional markets, and 4) a preference for green power. We have proposed a plausible scenario that addresses each issue for discussion and consideration by the CEC. In addition, we have provided an example application of the four perturbation scenarios in a qualitative framework for evaluation of issue areas developed for the PIEPC program. A description of each of the perturbation scenarios and a discussion of how they could effect decisions about today? s R&D funding is included. The scenarios attempt to cover a broad spectrum of plausible outcomes in a deregulated market environment. Nowever, Vhey are not a comprehensive and rigorously defined list of the most probable scenarios, but rather a qualitative inference based upon knowledge and expertise in the energy field.

Edmunds, T

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Supporting use case based requirements engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use Cases that describe possible interactions involving a system and its environment are increasingly being accepted as effective means for functional requirements elicitation and analysis. In the current practice, informal definitions of use cases are used and the analysis process is manual. In this paper, we present an approach supported by a tool for use cases based requirements engineering. Our approach includes use cases formalization, a restricted form of natural language for use cases description, and the derivation of an executable specification as well as a simulation environment from use cases. Key words: Use cases, domain modeling, UML, requirements engineering, prototyping

Stéphane S. Somé

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Integrating both Wikis and XML with case bases to facilitate case base development and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case-based reasoning (CBR), as a promising technology for problem solving and decision support, has drawn considerable attention during the last 20years. As CBR systems become more frequently deployed in real-world situations and as large-scale case-bases ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Integration, Open XML, Wikis

Wu He; Lida Xu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Maintaining Footprint-Based Retrieval for Case Deletion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness and efficiency of case-based reasoning (CBR) systems depend largely on the success of case-based retrieval. The case-base maintenance (CBM) issues become imperative and important especially for modern societies. This paper proposes ... Keywords: case-based maintenance, case-based reasoning, competence models, footprint-based retrieval

Ning Lu; Jie Lu; Guangquan Zhang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

1980 Base case and feasibility analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a task of documenting a base case'' and performing a feasibility analysis for a national residential energy efficiency program for new homes, The principal objective of the task wasto estimate the energy consumption of typical homes built in 1980 and then to identify and assess the feasibility of methods to reduce that consumption by 50%. The goal of the program by the year 2000 is to reduce heating and cooling energy use in new homes built under the program to one-half of the energy use in typical new homes built in 1980. The task also calls for determining whether the program goal should be revised, based on the analysis.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

1980 Base case and feasibility analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a task of documenting a ``base case`` and performing a feasibility analysis for a national residential energy efficiency program for new homes, The principal objective of the task wasto estimate the energy consumption of typical homes built in 1980 and then to identify and assess the feasibility of methods to reduce that consumption by 50%. The goal of the program by the year 2000 is to reduce heating and cooling energy use in new homes built under the program to one-half of the energy use in typical new homes built in 1980. The task also calls for determining whether the program goal should be revised, based on the analysis.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Using case-based tests to detect gray cygnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Black Swans are surprising, exceptional, provocative cases that instigate major change. Gray Cygnets follow a Black Swan, are highly similar to it, are also exceptional in outcome, and continue to provoke change. We discuss experiments with a family ... Keywords: black swans, case similarity, case-based reasoning, classification tests, gray cygnets, supreme on-point case (sopc), surprising cases

Edwina L. Rissland; Xiaoxi Xu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A Model for Personalized Web-Scale Case Base Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growing use of case-based reasoning (CBR) systems on the Web has brought with it increased awareness of the Web-scale case base maintenance (CBM). While most existing CBM policies and approaches, which were designed for smaller case bases with sizes ...

Jingyu Sun; Xueli Yu; Ruizhi Wang; Ning Zhong

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fuzzy case-based reasoning for facial expression recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy logic (FL) and case-based reasoning (CBR) are two well-known techniques for the implementation of intelligent classification systems. Each technique has its own advantages and drawbacks. FL, for example, provides an intuitive user interface, simplifies ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Fuzzy case-based reasoning, Fuzzy logic, Human computer interaction, Intelligent systems

Aasia Khanum; Muid Mufti; M. Younus Javed; M. Zubair Shafiq

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Learning adaptation knowledge to improve case-based reasoning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case-Based Reasoning systems retrieve and reuse solutions for previously solved problems that have been encountered and remembered as cases. In some domains, particularly where the problem solving is a classification task, the retrieved solution can ... Keywords: Adaptation knowledge, Case-based reasoning, Introspective learning, Knowledge acquisition, Machine learning

Susan Craw; Nirmalie Wiratunga; Ray C. Rowe

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Combining Case-Based and Model-Based Reasoning for the Diagnosis of Complex Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel approach to integrating case-based reasoning with model-based diagnosis is presented. This approach, called Experience Aided Diagnosis (EAD), uses the model of the device and the results of diagnostic tests to index and match cases representing past ... Keywords: case-based reasoning, hybrid problem-solving methods, model-based diagnosis

M. P. Féret; J. I. Glasgow

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, December 2000. Projections

17

Process Engineering Division Texaco Gasifier IGCC Base Cases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Division Engineering Division Texaco Gasifier IGCC Base Cases PED-IGCC-98-001 July 1998 Latest Revision June 2000 PREFACE This report presents the results of an analysis of three Texaco Gasifier IGCC Base Cases. The analyses were performed by W. Shelton and J. Lyons of EG&G. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. Process Descriptions 1.1 Texaco Gasifier 1.2 Air Separation Plant (ASU) 1.3 Gas Cooling/Heat Recovery/Hydrolysis/Gas Saturation (Case 1 and Case 2) 1.4 Cold Gas Cleanup Unit (CGCU) (Case 1 and Case 2) 1.5 Fine Particulate Removal/ Chloride Guard Bed - Case 3 1.6 Transport Desulfurization HGCU - Case 3 1.7 Sulfuric Acid Plant - Case 3 1.8 Gas Turbine 1.9 Steam Cycle 1.10 Power Production 2. Simulation Development 3. Cost of Electricity Analysis

18

Search and Adaptation in a Fuzzy Object Oriented Case Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose to represent a case using an object oriented model that enables the description of imprecise knowledge using possibility distributions. The proposed search process is based on this modeling and a fuzzy similarity measure is defined. ...

Magali Ruet; Laurent Geneste

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Applying Case-Based Reasoning to Mechanical Bearing Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) provides a promising methodology for solving many complex engineering design problems. CBR is based on the idea that past problem-solving experiences can be reused and learned from in solving new problems. This paper presents an overview of a CBR design system to assist human engineers in performing mechanical bearing design. It retrieves previously designed cases from a case-base and uses adaptation techniques to adapt them to satisfy the current problem requirements. Our approach combines parametric adaptations and constraint satisfaction adaptations. The technique of parametric adaptation considers not only parameter substitution, but also the interrelationships between the problem definition and its solution. The technique of constraint satisfaction adaptation provides a method to globally check the design requirements to assess case adaptability. Currently, our system has been tested in the rolling bearing domain.

Xiaoli Qin; William C. Regli

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Ontology-Based Network Management: Study Cases and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ontology based network management has recently evolved from a theoretical proposal to a more mature technology. As such, it is now being applied in many research projects in a number of different network management and security scenarios. This application ... Keywords: Autonomic management, Lessons learned, Network monitoring, Network security, OWL, Ontology-based network management, SWRL, Study case

Jorge E. López De Vergara; Antonio Guerrero; Víctor A. Villagrá; Julio Berrocal

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

WCOID-DG: An approach for case base maintenance based on Weighting, Clustering, Outliers, Internal Detection and Dbsan-Gmeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The success of the Case Based Reasoning system depends on the quality of the case data and the speed of the retrieval process that can be costly in time, especially when the number of cases gets bulky. To guarantee the system@?s quality, maintaining ... Keywords: Case base maintenance, Case based reasoning, Density based clustering, Gaussian-Means clustering, Outliers detection

Abir Smiti, Zied Elouedi

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Hybrid intelligent parameter estimation based on grey case-based reasoning for laminar cooling process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a hybrid intelligent parameter estimation algorithm is proposed for predicting the strip temperature during laminar cooling process. The algorithm combines a hybrid genetic algorithm (HGA) with grey case-based reasoning (GCBR) in order ... Keywords: Grey case-based reasoning, Hybrid genetic algorithm, Laminar cooling process, Parameter estimation

Guishan Xing; Jinliang Ding; Tianyou Chai; Puya Afshar; Hong Wang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Combining rough set and case based reasoning for process conditions selection in camshaft grinding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case Based Reasoning (CBR) is a novel paradigm that uses previous cases to solve new, unseen and different problems. However, redundant features may not only dramatically increase the case memory, but also make the case retrieval more time-consuming. ... Keywords: Camshaft grinding, Case based reasoning, Case evaluation, Case reclassify, Feature reduction, Genetic algorithm, Rough set

X. H. Zhang; Z. H. Deng; W. Liu; H. Cao

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

A Case-Based Reasoning View of Automated Collaborative Filtering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From some perspectives Automated Collaborative Filtering (ACF) appears quite similar to Case-Based Reasoning (CBR). It works on data organised around users and assets that might be considered case descriptions. In addition, in some versions of ACF, much of the induction is deferred to run time -- in the lazy learning spirit of CBR. On the other hand, because of its lack of semantic descriptions it seems to be the antithesis of case-based reasoning -- a learning approach based on case representations. This paper analyses the characteristics shared by ACF and CBR, it highlights the differences between the two approaches and attempts to answer the question "When is it useful or valid to consider ACF as CBR?". We argue that a CBR perspective on ACF can only be useful if it offers insights into the ACF process and supports a transfer of techniques. In conclusion we present a case retrieval net model of ACF and show how it allows for enhancements to the basic ACF idea.

Conor Hayes; Padraig Cunningham; Barry Smyth

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Improved Efficiency of Oil Well Drilling through Case Based Reasoning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system that applies a method of knowledge-intensive case-based reasoning, for repair and prevention of unwanted events in the domain of offshore oil well drilling, has been developed in cooperation with an oil company. From several reoccurring problems during oil well drilling the problem of "lost circulation", i.e. loss of circulating drilling fluid into the geological formation, was picked out as a pilot problem. An extensive general knowledge model was developed for the domain of oil well drilling. About fifty different cases were created on the basis of information from one North Sea operator. When the completed CBR-system was tested against a new case, five cases with descending similarity were selected by the tool. In an informal evaluation, the two best fitting cases proved to give the operator valuable advise on how to go about solving the new case. Introduction Drilling of oil wells is an expensive operation, costing around 150 000 US $ pr. day, and any loss of time caused...

Paal Skalle; Jostein Sveen; Agnar Aamodt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Case-Based Design Support: A Case Study in Architectural Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archie, a small computer-based library of architectural design cases, is described. Archie helps architects in the high-level task of conceptual design as opposed to low-level tasks such as drawing and drafting, numerical calculations, and constraint ...

Michael Pearce; Ashok K. Goel; Janet L. Kolodner; Craig Zimring; Lucas Sentosa; Richard Billington

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hill Air Force Base, Utah Hill Air Force Base, Utah Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah October 7, 2013 - 2:00pm Addthis Overview Energy savings performance contracting at Hill Air Force Base generated much interest during a recent training session on energy management that downlinked 12 Department of Defense sites. Energy systems in 940 buildings on the Base will be upgraded under an 18-year ESPC between the Government and the energy service company, CES/Way. Improvements are distributed over five task orders that will be completed in five years, with CES/Way providing $2.5 million in up-front costs for the first two task orders. Utah Power & Light will provide $8 million in rebates to help cover the contractor's initial investment, maintenance services, and interest costs.

29

Case-based reasoning ensemble and business application: A computational approach from multiple case representations driven by randomness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case-based reasoning (CBR) holds the unique capability of making predictions as well as suggestions to corporate executives and organizational decision-makers. How to improve its predictive performance is critical. This research aims to explore an ensemble ... Keywords: Business failure prediction, Case-based reasoning ensemble, Multiple case representations

Hui Li; Jie Sun

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A Case Based System for Oil and Gas Well Design with Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case base system for a complex problem like oil field design needs to be richer than the usual case based reasoning system. Genesis, the system described in this paper contains large heterogeneous cases with metalevel knowledge. A multi-level indexing ... Keywords: case based systems, information extraction, knowledge sharing, oil well design, risk assessment

Simon Kravis; Rosemary Irrgang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Unifying weighting and case reduction methods based on rough sets to improve retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case-Based Reasoning systems usually retrieve cases using a similarity function based on K-NN or some derivatives. These functions are sensitive to irrelevant or noisy features. Weighting methods are used to extract the most important information ...

Maria Salamó; Elisabet Golobardes

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Case study data base companion report 3 to simulation of geothermal subsidence (LBL-10571)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data base developed for selection and evaluation of geothermal subsidence case studies is presented. Data from this data base were used in case studies of Wairakei, The Geysers, and Austin Bayou Prospect (Report LBL 10571).

Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K.; Schauer, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Case study: Improving debt collection processes using rule-based decision engines: A case study of Capital One  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case assesses the plethora of issues related to rule-based decision engine technology, and in particular, its role in complex and dynamic organizational processes. This paper argues rule-based engines can effectively be implemented for good organizational ... Keywords: Capital One, Debt collection, Project Edison, Rule-based decision, Rule-based engine

Amita Goyal Chin; Hiren Kotak

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Student Summer Project Speci cation -Session 2002 Case-Based Reasoning for Smart Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Techniques #15; Case-Based Reasoning #15; Machine Learning #15; Weka using Java or Recall shell using TCL/TK

Wiratunga, Nirmalie

35

CBM-Gen+: An Algorithm for Reducing Case Base Inconsistencies in Hierarchical and Incomplete Domains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formulated case base maintenance (CBM) policies for reducing the size of the case base without losingCBM-Gen+: An Algorithm for Reducing Case Base Inconsistencies in Hierarchical and Incomplete Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA 18015,USA {kex2,hem4}@ lehigh.edu Abstract. We propose an algorithm, CBM

Muñoz-Avila, Héctor

36

Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Study - Hill Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Hill Air Force Base, Utah on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts Assistance & Contacts Resources Laws & Regulations Energy Service Companies Awarded Projects

37

Before Getting There: Potential and Actual Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the concepts of Actual and Potential Collaboration Spaces. The former applies to the space where collaborative activities are performed, while the second relates to the initial space where opportunities for collaboration are ... Keywords: Doc2U, PIÑAS, casual and informal interactions, potential and actual collaboration spaces, potential collaboration awareness

Alberto L. Morán; Jesús Favela; Ana María Martínez Enríquez; Dominique Decouchant

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Agent-Based vs. Equation-based Epidemiological Models:A Model Selection Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This paper is motivated by the need to design model validation strategies for epidemiological disease-spread models. We consider both agent-based and equation-based models of pandemic disease spread and study the nuances and complexities one has to consider from the perspective of model validation. For this purpose, we instantiate an equation based model and an agent based model of the 1918 Spanish flu and we leverage data published in the literature for our case- study. We present our observations from the perspective of each implementation and discuss the application of model-selection criteria to compare the risk in choosing one modeling paradigm to another. We conclude with a discussion of our experience and document future ideas for a model validation framework.

Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources failed to find much realization in actual stocks data. The idea that stocks are still languishing at below-normal levels is particularly persuasive when one views current levels (for key consuming regions) relative to "normal" values which account for the long-term trend in OECD stocks. We believe that monthly average WTI prices will stay around $30 per barrel for the first part of 2001. This is a noticeable upward shift in our projected average prices from even a month ago. The shift reflects greater emphasis on the lack of stock builds and less emphasis on the assumption that supply from OPEC and non-OPEC suppliers may be exceeding demand by 1-2

40

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Notes: Spot WTI prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Spot WTI crude oil prices broke $35 and even $36 per barrel in November as anticipated boosts to world supply from OPEC and other sources did not show up in actual stocks data. The recent decline in prices seems to be more the result of an unraveling of speculative pressures than a change in underlying fundamentals. Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, concern over the adequacy of distillate supplies, and expectations of Iraqi supply interruptions. But Mideast tensions seemed to ease in December and the market appeared to perceive a quick return of Iraqi crude oil supplies at full capacity. Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi

42

Optimisation-based scheduling: A discrete manufacturing case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents the development and implementation of a production scheduling system for an electrical appliance manufacturer. Based on recent advances in optimisation-based scheduling approaches, two different software architectures based on two ... Keywords: Discrete manufacturing, Electrical appliances, Mixed-integer linear programming, Optimization-based scheduling

Michael C. Georgiadis; Aaron A. Levis; Panagiotis Tsiakis; Ioannis Sanidiotis; Constantinos C. Pantelides; Lazaros G. Papageorgiou

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Two case studies in grammar-based test generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grammar-based test generation (GBTG) has seen extensive study and practical use since the 1970s. GBTG was introduced to generate source code for testing compilers from context-free grammars specifying language syntax. More recently, GBTG has been applied ... Keywords: Automated testing, Covering array, Grammar-based test generation, Really Simple Syndication (RSS), TCP, eXtended Markup Language (XML)

Daniel Hoffman; Hong-Yi Wang; Mitch Chang; David Ly-Gagnon; Lewis Sobotkiewicz; Paul Strooper

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Paraconsistent Case-Based Reasoning Applied to a Restoration of Electrical Power Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a connection of two techniques applied in Artificial Intelligence to solve problems of restoration of electrical power substations. The techniques are: Case-based Reasoning --- CBR and the Four-Valued Annotated Paraconsistent Logic ... Keywords: CBR, Case-based Reasoning, Decision Support System, Intelligent System, Paraconsistent Logic, Restoration of Electrical Power Substations

Helga Gonzaga Martins; Germano Lambert-Torres; Luiz Eduardo Borges Da Silva; Claudio Inácio Almeida Costa; Maurilio Pereira Coutinho

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Case-based Reasoning Enabling Database Mining for Cryo-Preserving Algae Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Case-based Reasoning's (CBR) origins were stimulated by a desire to understand how people remember information and are in turn reminded of information, and that subsequently it was recognized that people commonly solve problems by remembering how they ... Keywords: Case-based Reasoning, algal, cryopreservation, COBRA, CBR

Jun Wang; Huiqin Ren

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Supply chain trust diagnosis (SCTD) using inductive case-based reasoning ensemble (ICBRE): The case of general competence trust diagnosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General competence trust among supply chain partners, referring to the trust that a partner holds the general ability of fulfilling contracts, is a critical factor to ensure effective cooperation in a supply chain, especially in the current financial ... Keywords: General competence trust, Inductive case-based reasoning ensemble (ICBRE), Supply chain trust diagnosis (SCTD) service

Hui Li; Jie Sun; Jian Wu; Xian-Jun Wu

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

50

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

51

Improving Industrial Refrigeration System Efficiency - Actual Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses actual design and modifications for increased system efficiency and includes reduced chilled liquid flow during part load operation, reduced condensing and increased evaporator temperatures for reduced system head, thermosiphon cycle cooling during winter operation, compressor intercooling, direct refrigeration vs. brine cooling, insulation of cold piping to reduce heat gain, multiple screw compressors for improved part load operation, evaporative condensers for reduced system head and pumping energy, and using high efficiency motors.

White, T. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Usability evaluation of web-based GIS: case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dependency of the majority of mankind activities on information and communication technologies in general and on geographic information is increasing rapidly. This is one of the reasons why usability of specialized software tools (GIS) belongs today ... Keywords: computer-human interaction, usability, web-based GIS

Jitka Komarkova; Kamil Jakoubek; Miloslav Hub

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A case study: demands on component-based development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building software systems with reusable components brings many advantages. The development becomes more efficient, the realibility of the products is enhanced, and the maintenance requirement is significantly reduced. Designing, developing and maintaining ... Keywords: architecture, component-based development, development environment, reuse, standard components

Ivica Crnkovic; Magnus Larsson

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Load flow analysis: Base cases, data, diagrams, and results  

SciTech Connect

This report describes how an electric utility system is modeled by using load flow techniques to establish a validated power flow case suitable for simulating and evaluating alternative system scenarios. Details of the load flow model are supported by additional technical and descriptive information intended to correlate modeled electrical system parameters with the corresponding physical equipment that makes up the system. Pictures and technical specifications of system equipment from the utility, public, or vendor are provided to support this association for many system components. The report summarizes the load flow model construction, simulation, and validation and describes the general capabilities of an information query system designed to access load flow parameters and other electrical system information.

Portante, E.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Peerenboom, J.P.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...

56

Optical transitions in Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te-based quantum wells and their analysis with account for the actual band structure of the material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum-confinement levels in a Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te-based rectangular quantum well are calculated in the framework of the four-band Kane model taking into account mixing between the states of electrons and three types of holes (heavy, light, and spin-split holes). Comparison of the calculation results with experimental data on the photoluminescence of Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te-based quantum wells suggests that optical transitions involving the conduction and light-hole bands are possibly observed in the spectra.

Bazhenov, N. L., E-mail: bazhnil.ivom@mail.ioffe.ru; Shilyaev, A. V.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Zegrya, G. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ontology-supported case-based reasoning approach for intelligent m-Government emergency response services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a critical need to develop a mobile-based emergency response system (MERS) to help reduce risks in emergency situations. Existing systems only provide short message service (SMS) notifications, and the decision support is weak, especially in ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Emergency response systems, Information extraction, Mobile-based systems, Ontology, m-Government

Khaled Amailef, Jie Lu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fuel Cycle Analysis Framework Base Cases for the IAEA/INPRO GAINS Collaborative Project  

SciTech Connect

Thirteen countries participated in the Collaborative Project GAINS “Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle”, which was the primary activity within the IAEA/INPRO Program Area B: “Global Vision on Sustainable Nuclear Energy” for the last three years. The overall objective of GAINS was to develop a standard framework for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account sustainable development, and to validate results through sample analyses. This paper details the eight scenarios that constitute the GAINS framework base cases for analysis of the transition to future innovative nuclear energy systems. The framework base cases provide a reference for users of the framework to start from in developing and assessing their own alternate systems. Each base case is described along with performance results against the GAINS sustainability evaluation metrics. The eight cases include four using a moderate growth projection and four using a high growth projection for global nuclear electricity generation through 2100. The cases are divided into two sets, addressing homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios developed by GAINS to model global fuel cycle strategies. The heterogeneous world scenario considers three separate nuclear groups based on their fuel cycle strategies, with non-synergistic and synergistic cases. The framework base case analyses results show the impact of these different fuel cycle strategies while providing references for future users of the GAINS framework. A large number of scenario alterations are possible and can be used to assess different strategies, different technologies, and different assumptions about possible futures of nuclear power. Results can be compared to the framework base cases to assess where these alternate cases perform differently versus the sustainability indicators.

Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Role of Biomass Based Cogeneration: Case of an Italian Province  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Role of Biomass Based Cogeneration: Case of an Italian Province Speaker(s): Giuseppe Muliere Date: June 23, 2009 - 12:30pm Location: 90-3122 The aim of this work is to analyze...

60

FUTURA: Hybrid System for Electric Load Forecasting by Using Case-Based Reasoning and Expert System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of combining a numeric extrapolation of data with the methodology of case-based reasoning and expert systems in order to improve the electric load forecasting are presented in this contribution. Registers of power consumption are stored as ...

Raúl Vilcahuamán; Joaquim Meléndez; Josep Lluis de la Rosa

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

62

A Cognitive Bias Approach to Feature Selection and Weighting for Case-Based Learners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research in psychology, psycholinguistics, and cognitive science has discovered and examined numerous psychological constraints on human information processing. Short term memory limitations, a focus of attention bias, and a preference for the use of ... Keywords: case-based learning, feature set selection, feature weighting, instance-based learning, natural language learning

Claire Cardie

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Towards case-based parsing: are chunks reliable indicators for syntax trees?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to the question whether it is possible to construct a parser based on ideas from case-based reasoning. Such a parser would employ a partial analysis of the input sentence to select a (nearly) complete syntax tree and then ...

Sandra Kübler

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Free-Ridership in the Standards-Setting Process: The Case of 10BaseT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free-Ridership in the Standards-Setting Process: The Case of 10BaseT Martin B.H. Weiss Ronald T to their non-exclusionary nature, are subject to free riders. In this paper, we consider free ridership that free-ridership existed in the development of the 10BaseT standard and in the subsequent product market

65

Developing an energy-saving and case-based reasoning information agent with Web service and ontology techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web service and ontology techniques are presented herein for supporting an energy-saving and case-based reasoning information agent. The proposed system is the first energy-saving and case-based reasoning information agent with Web service and ontology ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning agents, Energy-saving information systems, Ontology, Web services

Sheng-Yuan Yang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

67

Direct quantum communication without actual transmission of the message qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently an orthogonal state based protocol of direct quantum communication without actual transmission of particles is proposed by Salih \\emph{et al.}{[}Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{110} (2013) 170502{]} using chained quantum Zeno effect. As the no-transmission of particle claim is criticized by Vaidman {[}arXiv:1304.6689 (2013){]}, the condition (claim) of Salih \\emph{et al.} is weaken here to the extent that transmission of particles is allowed, but transmission of the message qubits (the qubits on which the secret information is encoded) is not allowed. Remaining within this weaker condition it is shown that there exists a large class of quantum states, that can be used to implement an orthogonal state based protocol of secure direct quantum communication using entanglement swapping, where actual transmission of the message qubits is not required. The security of the protocol originates from monogamy of entanglement. As the protocol can be implemented without using conjugate coding its security is independent of non-commutativity.

Chitra Shukla; Anirban Pathak

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

2.0 Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate) Closed-Domain Hydrate Dissociation (Base Case w/ Hydrate) 2.1 Problem Description One half of a 20-m, one-dimensional horizontal domain, discretized using uniformly spaced 1-m grid cells (optionally 0.1-m grid cells) is initialized with aqueous-hydrate conditions; whereas, the other half of the domain is initialized with gas-aqueous conditions. As with the Base Case problem, a closed horizontal domain is used to eliminate gravitational body forces and boundary condition effects. The initial conditions are specified to yield complete dissociation of the hydrate, via the thermal capacitance of the domain-half initialized with gas-aqueous conditions. To initialize the aqueous-hydrate half of the domain, temperature, pressure, and hydrate saturation are

69

Case-based techniques used for dialogue understanding and planning in a human-robot dialogue system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe an approach to the use of case-based techniques for natural language understanding and for action planning in a system for dialogue between a human and a robot, which in our case is a UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle). A single case base and ...

Karolina Eliasson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

ONCO-i2b2: improve patients selection through case-based information retrieval techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Pavia (Italy) and the IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri hospital in Pavia have recently started an information technology initiative to support clinical research in oncology called ONCO-i2b2. This project aims at supporting translational ... Keywords: case-based reasoning, i2b2, oncology

Daniele Segagni; Matteo Gabetta; Valentina Tibollo; Alberto Zambelli; Silvia G. Priori; Riccardo Bellazzi

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Iron Age & Coal-based Coke: A Neglected Case of Fossil-fuel Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Iron Age & Coal-based Coke: A Neglected Case of Fossil-fuel Dependence by Vaclav Smil September share of their primary energies from renewable sources. Steel & Coal-Derived Coke Here is another important: steel's fundamental dependence on coal-derived coke with no practical substitutes on any rational

Smil, Vaclav

72

Community-Based Incentives for Environmental Protection: The Case of Green Electricity*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Connecticut Clean Energy Communities (CCEC) program that provides mostly symbolic rewards in the formCommunity-Based Incentives for Environmental Protection: The Case of Green Electricity* Grant the period of initial qualification. We also find that a change in the marginal incentive created

Kotchen, Matthew J.

73

Knowledge representation and case-based reasoning in a knowledge management system for ambient intelligence products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the theoretical background and realization of a KM system for the technically advanced customer and product support in the Ambient Intelligence (AmI) domain. Current products include more and more elements of AmI. AmI area is still ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, case-based reasoning, customer support system, diagnostics system, knowledge management system, knowledge representation

Ljubisa Urosevic; Sandor Kopacsi; Dragan Stokic; Ana Rita Campos; Geza Bognar

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Building a case-based diet recommendation system without a knowledge engineer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new approach to the effective development of menu construction systems that allow to automatically construct a menu that is strongly tailored to the individual requirements and food preferences of a client. In hospitals and other health ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Dietary menu construction, Knowledge acquisition, Ripple-down rules

Abdus Salam Khan; Achim Hoffmann

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

HBDR: a case-based tool for organizing architectural information on historic building designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learning about previous design projects is a very important part of the study of architecture as well as the process of design. Historic preservation, a branch of architecture, is not an exception to this rule. In the field of historic preservation, information regarding previous design projects is available in the form of historic photographs, measured drawings, details, descriptive text and notes. This information is currently available from different sources. It must be organized to enable effective use for the student community. Case-based representation and learning systems can be used to arrange and define the case study information. In this research, I have collected and categorized information about previous historic building designs. As a part of the research, I have developed software through which the information can be made available to students at one platform. The software also captures student's comments about each case, which may be beneficial to the student's learning experience. The software has been tested by graduate students in a historic presentation course. The tests show that the software aids students in obtaining answers more quickly and with greater accuracy than paper-based descriptions of cases.

Mulye, Leena

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)"...

77

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

78

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP results for the base case and scenarios.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NEMS-MP model generates numerous results for each run of a scenario. (This model is the integrated National Energy Modeling System [NEMS] version used for the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study [MP].) This appendix examines additional findings beyond the primary results reported in the Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses (Reference 1). These additional results are provided in order to help further illuminate some of the primary results. Specifically discussed in this appendix are: (1) Energy use results for light vehicles (LVs), including details about the underlying total vehicle miles traveled (VMT), the average vehicle fuel economy, and the volumes of the different fuels used; (2) Resource fuels and their use in the production of ethanol, hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and electricity; (3) Ethanol use in the scenarios (i.e., the ethanol consumption in E85 vs. other blends, the percent of travel by flex fuel vehicles on E85, etc.); (4) Relative availability of E85 and H2 stations; (5) Fuel prices; (6) Vehicle prices; and (7) Consumer savings. These results are discussed as follows: (1) The three scenarios (Mixed, (P)HEV & Ethanol, and H2 Success) when assuming vehicle prices developed through literature review; (2) The three scenarios with vehicle prices that incorporate the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program vehicle cost goals; (3) The three scenarios with 'literature review' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies; and (4) The three scenarios with 'program goals' vehicle prices, plus vehicle subsidies. The four versions or cases of each scenario are referred to as: Literature Review No Subsidies, Program Goals No Subsidies, Literature Review with Subsidies, and Program Goals with Subsidies. Two additional points must be made here. First, none of the results presented for LVs in this section include Class 2B trucks. Results for this class are included occasionally in Reference 1. They represent a small, though noticeable, segment of the 'LV plus 2B' market (e.g., a little more than 3% of today's energy use in that market). We generally do not include them in this discussion, simply because it requires additional effort to combine the NEMS-MP results for them with the results for the other LVs. (Where there is an exception, we will indicate so.) Second, where reference is made to E85, the ethanol content is actually 74%. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) assumes that, to address cold-starting issues, the percent of ethanol in E85 will vary seasonally. The EIA uses an annual average ethanol content of 74% in its forecasts. That assumption is maintained in the NEMS-MP scenario runs.

Plotkin, S. E.; Singh, M. K.; Energy Systems

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

79

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 999...

80

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,200...

82

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011...

83

Predicted vs. Actual Energy Savings of Retrofitted House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of actual energy savings and the predicted energy savings of retrofitted one-story house located in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The process started with modeling the house prior to retrofitting and after retrofitting. The monthly metered energy consumption is acquired from the electric company archives for seven years prior to retrofitting and recording the actual monthly energy consumption of the post retrofitting. The house model is established on DOE 2.1. Actual monthly energy consumption is used to calibrate and fine-tuning the model until the gap between actual and predicted consumption was narrowed. Then the Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) are entered into the modeled house according to the changes in thermo-physical properties of the envelope and the changes in schedules and number of users. In order to account for those differences, electrical consumption attributed to A/C in summer was isolated and compared. The study followed the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP) in assessing the impact of energy conservation measures on actual, metered, building energy consumption. The study aimed to show the predicted savings by the simulated building model and the actual utility bills' analysis in air conditioning consumption and peak at monthly load due to building envelope.

Al-Mofeez, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on orographic clouds and precipitation: a multi-sensor case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study is presented from the 2012 AgI Seeding Cloud Impact Investigation, an experiment conducted over the Sierra Madre in southern Wyoming to study the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on precipitation. In this case, on 21 ...

Binod Pokharel; Bart Geerts; Xiaoqin Jing

85

Ensemble-Based Exigent Analysis. Part I: Estimating Worst-Case Weather-Related Forecast Damage Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exigent analysis supplements an ensemble forecast of weather-related damage with a map of the worst-case scenario (WCS), a multivariate confidence bound of the damage. For multivariate Gaussian ensembles, ensemble-based exigent analysis uses a ...

Daniel Gombos; Ross N. Hoffman

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Agent-based simulation of pedestrian behaviour in closed spaces: a museum case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to analyse the behaviour of pedestrians at the very fine scale, while moving along the streets, in open spaces or inside a building, simulation modelling becomes an essential tool. In these spatial environments, in the presence of unusual demand flows, simulation requires the ability to model the local dynamics of individual decision making and behaviour, which is strongly affected by the geometry, randomness, social preferences, local and collective behaviour of other individuals. The dynamics of people visiting and evacuating a museum offers an excellent case study along this line. In this paper we realize an agent-based simulation of the Castello Ursino museum in Catania (Italy), evaluating its carrying capacity in terms of both satisfaction of the visitors in regime of normal fruition and their safety under alarm conditions.

Pluchino, Alessandro; Inturri, Giuseppe; Rapisarda, Andrea; Ignaccolo, Matteo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ANUDlSiTM-40 Load Flow Analysis: Base Cases, Data, Diagrams, and Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

ANUDlSiTM-40 ANUDlSiTM-40 Load Flow Analysis: Base Cases, Data, Diagrams, and Results by E.C. Portante, J.A. Kavicky, J.C. VanKuiken, and J.P. Peerenboom Decision and Information Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 October 1997 Work sponsored by Navy Engineering Logistics Office This report is printed on recycled paper. @ DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness. or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

88

An approach to model validation and model-based prediction -- polyurethane foam case study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced software methodology and improved computing hardware have advanced the state of simulation technology to a point where large physics-based codes can be a major contributor in many systems analyses. This shift toward the use of computational methods has brought with it new research challenges in a number of areas including characterization of uncertainty, model validation, and the analysis of computer output. It is these challenges that have motivated the work described in this report. Approaches to and methods for model validation and (model-based) prediction have been developed recently in the engineering, mathematics and statistical literatures. In this report we have provided a fairly detailed account of one approach to model validation and prediction applied to an analysis investigating thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. A model simulates the evolution of the foam in a high temperature environment as it transforms from a solid to a gas phase. The available modeling and experimental results serve as data for a case study focusing our model validation and prediction developmental efforts on this specific thermal application. We discuss several elements of the ''philosophy'' behind the validation and prediction approach: (1) We view the validation process as an activity applying to the use of a specific computational model for a specific application. We do acknowledge, however, that an important part of the overall development of a computational simulation initiative is the feedback provided to model developers and analysts associated with the application. (2) We utilize information obtained for the calibration of model parameters to estimate the parameters and quantify uncertainty in the estimates. We rely, however, on validation data (or data from similar analyses) to measure the variability that contributes to the uncertainty in predictions for specific systems or units (unit-to-unit variability). (3) We perform statistical analyses and hypothesis tests as a part of the validation step to provide feedback to analysts and modelers. Decisions on how to proceed in making model-based predictions are made based on these analyses together with the application requirements. Updating modifying and understanding the boundaries associated with the model are also assisted through this feedback. (4) We include a ''model supplement term'' when model problems are indicated. This term provides a (bias) correction to the model so that it will better match the experimental results and more accurately account for uncertainty. Presumably, as the models continue to develop and are used for future applications, the causes for these apparent biases will be identified and the need for this supplementary modeling will diminish. (5) We use a response-modeling approach for our predictions that allows for general types of prediction and for assessment of prediction uncertainty. This approach is demonstrated through a case study supporting the assessment of a weapons response when subjected to a hydrocarbon fuel fire. The foam decomposition model provides an important element of the response of a weapon system in this abnormal thermal environment. Rigid foam is used to encapsulate critical components in the weapon system providing the needed mechanical support as well as thermal isolation. Because the foam begins to decompose at temperatures above 250 C, modeling the decomposition is critical to assessing a weapons response. In the validation analysis it is indicated that the model tends to ''exaggerate'' the effect of temperature changes when compared to the experimental results. The data, however, are too few and to restricted in terms of experimental design to make confident statements regarding modeling problems. For illustration, we assume these indications are correct and compensate for this apparent bias by constructing a model supplement term for use in the model-based predictions. Several hypothetical prediction problems are created and addressed. Hypothetical problems are used because no guidance was provided concern

Dowding, Kevin J.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level

90

Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata  

SciTech Connect

There is an urgent need to capture metadata on the rapidly growing number of genomic, metagenomic and related sequences, such as 16S ribosomal genes. This need is a major focus within the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), and Habitat is a key metadata descriptor in the proposed 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) specification. The goal of the work described here is to provide a light-weight, easy-to-use (small) set of terms ('Habitat-Lite') that captures high-level information about habitat while preserving a mapping to the recently launched Environment Ontology (EnvO). Our motivation for building Habitat-Lite is to meet the needs of multiple users, such as annotators curating these data, database providers hosting the data, and biologists and bioinformaticians alike who need to search and employ such data in comparative analyses. Here, we report a case study based on semi-automated identification of terms from GenBank and GOLD. We estimate that the terms in the initial version of Habitat-Lite would provide useful labels for over 60% of the kinds of information found in the GenBank isolation-source field, and around 85% of the terms in the GOLD habitat field. We present a revised version of Habitat-Lite and invite the community's feedback on its further development in order to provide a minimum list of terms to capture high-level habitat information and to provide classification bins needed for future studies.

Kyrpides, Nikos; Hirschman, Lynette; Clark, Cheryl; Cohen, K. Bretonnel; Mardis, Scott; Luciano, Joanne; Kottmann, Renzo; Cole, James; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final July 01, 2010 Final July 01, 2010 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2010 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

92

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft July 9, 2009 Draft July 9, 2009 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2009 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

93

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

94

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884 7924 AEO 1998 6895 6906 7066 7161 7278 7400 7488 7597 7719 7859 7959 8074 8190 8286 8361 AEO 1999 6884 7007 7269 7383 7472 7539 7620 7725 7841 7949 8069 8174 8283 8351 AEO 2000 7056 7141 7266 7363 7452 7578 7694 7815 7926 8028 8113 8217 8288

95

Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2935 3201 3362 3504 3657 3738 3880 3993 4099 4212 4303 4398 4475 4541 4584 4639 4668 4672 AEO 1995 2953 3157 3281 3489 3610 3741 3818 3920 4000 4103 4208 4303 4362 4420 4442 4460 4460 AEO 1996 3011 3106 3219 3398 3519 3679 3807 3891 3979 4070 4165 4212 4260 4289 4303 4322 4325 AEO 1997 3099 3245 3497 3665 3825 3975 4084 4190 4285 4380 4464 4552 4617 4654 4709 4760 AEO 1998 3303 3391 3654 3713 3876 4053 4137 4298 4415 4556 4639 4750 4910 4992 5087 AEO 1999 3380 3442 3888 4022 4153 4238 4336 4441 4545 4652 4780 4888 4999 5073 AEO 2000 3599 3847 4036 4187 4320 4465 4579 4690 4780 4882 4968 5055 5113

96

Tropical Africa: Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Closed Forests (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Land Use Maximum Potential Biomass Density Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By Country) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1960 (By Administrative Unit)

97

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

98

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.983258692,2.124739238,2.26534793,2.409252566,2.585728477,2.727400662,2.854942053,2.980927152,3.13861755,3.345819536,3.591100993,3.849544702,4.184279801,4.510016556,4.915074503,5.29147351,5.56022351,5.960471854 "AEO 1995",,1.891706924,1.998384058,1.952818035,2.064227053,2.152302174,2.400016103,2.569033816,2.897681159,3.160088567,3.556344605,3.869033816,4.267391304,4.561932367,4.848599034,5.157246377,5.413405797,5.660917874 "AEO 1996",,,1.630674532,1.740334763,1.862956911,1.9915856,2.10351261,2.194934146,2.287655669,2.378991658,2.476043002,2.589847464,2.717610782,2.836870306,2.967124845,3.117719429,3.294003735,3.485657428,3.728419409

99

A hybrid approach using data envelopment analysis and case-based reasoning for housing refurbishment contractors selection and performance improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The refurbishment market has grown greatly in the last decade. Relevant projects are becoming increasingly more demanding in the construction industry due to the emphasis on sustainability. Most refurbishment works, however, involve a higher level of ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning (CBR), Contractors selection, Data envelopment analysis (DEA), Housing refurbishment, Performance improvement

Yi-Kai Juan

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Integrating gray system theory and logistic regression into case-based reasoning for safety assessment of thermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety assessment of thermal power plants (TPPs) is one of the important means to guarantee the safety of production in thermal power production enterprises. Due to various technical limitations, existing assessment approaches, such as analytic hierarchy ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Gray system theory, Intelligent decision support system, Logistic regression, Management safety assessment, Thermal power plants

Changyong Liang; Dongxiao Gu; Isabelle Bichindaritz; Xingguo Li; Chunrong Zuo; Wenen Cheng

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Measurements of aerosol properties from aircraft, satellite and ground-based remote sensing: a case-study from the Dust and Biomass-burning Experiment (DABEX)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of aerosol properties from aircraft, satellite and ground-based remote sensing: A case study from the Dust and Biomass burning Experiment (DABEX)

Johnson, B. T.; Christopher, S.; Haywood, J.; Osborne, S. R.; McFarlane, Sally; Hsu, C.; Salustro, C.; Kahn, Ralph

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2.02,2.4,2.66,2.74,2.81,2.85,2.89,2.93,2.95,2.97,3,3.16,3.31,3.5,3.57,3.63,3.74,3.85 "AEO 1995",,2.46,2.54,2.8,2.87,2.87,2.89,2.9,2.9,2.92,2.95,2.97,3,3.03,3.19,3.35,3.51,3.6 "AEO 1996",,,2.56,2.75,2.85,2.88,2.93,2.98,3.02,3.06,3.07,3.09,3.12,3.17,3.23,3.29,3.37,3.46,3.56 "AEO 1997",,,,2.82,2.96,3.16,3.43,3.46,3.5,3.53,3.58,3.64,3.69,3.74,3.78,3.83,3.87,3.92,3.97 "AEO 1998",,,,,2.95,3.19,3.531808376,3.842532873,3.869043112,3.894513845,3.935930967,3.976293564,4.021911621,4.062207222,4.107616425,4.164502144,4.221304417,4.277039051,4.339964867

103

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099 1104 AEO 1998 1009 1051 1044 1058 1087 1084 1090 1097 1112 1130 1142 1148 1160 1162 1180 AEO 1999 1040 1075 1092 1109 1113 1118 1120 1120 1133 1139 1150 1155 1156 1173 AEO 2000 1053 1086 1103 1124 1142 1164 1175 1184 1189 1194 1199 1195 1200 AEO 2001 1078 1112 1135 1153 1165 1183 1191 1220 1228 1228 1235 1240

104

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

105

Table 16. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual (billion kilowatt-hours) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2364 2454 2534 2626 2708 2811 AEO 1983 2318 2395 2476 2565 2650 2739 3153 AEO 1984 2321 2376 2461 2551 2637 2738 3182 AEO 1985 2317 2360 2427 2491 2570 2651 2730 2808 2879 2949 3026 AEO 1986 2363 2416 2479 2533 2608 2706 2798 2883 2966 3048 3116 3185 3255 3324 3397 AEO 1987 2460 2494 2555 2622 2683 2748 2823 2902 2977 3363 AEO 1989* 2556 2619 2689 2760 2835 2917 2994 3072 3156 3236 3313 3394 3473 AEO 1990 2612 2689 3083 3488.0 3870.0 AEO 1991 2700 2762 2806 2855 2904 2959 3022 3088 3151 3214 3282 3355 3427 3496 3563 3632 3704 3776 3846 3916 AEO 1992 2746 2845 2858 2913 2975 3030 3087 3146 3209 3276 3345 3415 3483 3552 3625 3699 3774 3847 3921 AEO 1993 2803 2840 2893 2946 2998 3052 3104 3157 3214 3271 3327

106

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

107

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO Dollar Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1992,1.9399,2.029,2.1099,2.1899,2.29,2.35,2.39,2.42,2.47,2.55,2.65,2.75,2.89,3.01,3.17,3.3,3.35,3.47 "AEO 1995",1993,,1.85,1.899,1.81,1.87,1.8999,2.06,2.14,2.34,2.47,2.69,2.83,3.02,3.12,3.21,3.3,3.35,3.39 "AEO 1996",1994,,,1.597672343,1.665446997,1.74129355,1.815978527,1.866241336,1.892736554,1.913619637,1.928664207,1.943216205,1.964540124,1.988652706,2.003382921,2.024799585,2.056392431,2.099974155,2.14731431,2.218094587

108

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 AEO 1996 1994 7.09 6.99 6.94 6.93 6.96 6.96 6.96 6.97 6.98 6.97 6.98 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.96 6.95 6.91 AEO 1997 1995 6.94 6.89 6.90 6.91 6.86 6.84 6.78 6.73 6.66 6.60 6.58 6.54 6.49 6.48 6.45 6.36

109

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO 1995",,6398.45,6544.45,6555.4,6675.85,6745.2,6821.85,6887.55,6964.2,7048.15,7146.7,7245.25,7336.5,7405.85,7471.55,7537.25,7581.05,7621.2 "AEO 1996",,,6489.7,6526.2,6606.5,6708.7,6781.7,6854.7,6942.3,7008,7084.65,7175.9,7259.85,7329.2,7383.95,7449.65,7500.75,7544.55,7581.05 "AEO 1997",,,,6635.7,6694.1,6825.5,6953.25,7073.7,7183.2,7267.15,7369.35,7460.6,7548.2,7643.1,7730.7,7792.75,7832.9,7884,7924.15

110

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

111

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",17.71,17.68,17.84,18.12,18.25,18.43,18.58,18.93,19.28,19.51,19.8,19.92,20.13,20.18,20.38,20.35,20.16,20.19 "AEO 1995",,18.28,17.98,17.92,18.21,18.63,18.92,19.08,19.2,19.36,19.52,19.75,19.94,20.17,20.28,20.6,20.59,20.88 "AEO 1996",,,18.9,19.15,19.52,19.59,19.59,19.65,19.73,19.97,20.36,20.82,21.25,21.37,21.68,22.11,22.47,22.83,23.36 "AEO 1997",,,,19.1,19.7,20.17,20.32,20.54,20.77,21.26,21.9,22.31,22.66,22.93,23.38,23.68,23.99,24.25,24.65 "AEO 1998",,,,,18.85,19.06,20.34936142,20.27427673,20.60257721,20.94442177,21.44076347,21.80969238,22.25416183,22.65365219,23.176651,23.74545097,24.22989273,24.70069313,24.96691322

112

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.94 2.03 2.11 2.19 2.29 2.35 2.39 2.42 2.47 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.89 3.01 3.17 3.30 3.35 3.47 AEO 1995 1993 1.85 1.90 1.81 1.87 1.90 2.06 2.14 2.34 2.47 2.69 2.83 3.02 3.12 3.21 3.30 3.35 3.39 AEO 1996 1994 1.60 1.67 1.74 1.82 1.87 1.89 1.91 1.93 1.94 1.96 1.99 2.00 2.02 2.06 2.10 2.15 2.22

113

A Malaysian Case Study on the Transmission Expansion/Investment Using Value-Based Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The introduction of Incentive Based Regulation as the tariff framework in Malaysia's Electricity Supply Industry calls for efficiency in the creation of a new asset while meeting the required reliability. In line with the new regulatory framework, Tenaga ... Keywords: asset management, incentive based regulation, life cycle cost, value-based approach, reliability

Joon Ibrahim, Nor Ziha Zainol Abidin

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Business Practices for Environmental Excellence: Guidelines: Based on Case Studies of Other Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As competition unfolds, electric companies can leverage the experience of other industries that have developed successful environmental programs under similar market conditions. The case studies and guidelines in this report offer valuable pointers -- both specific business practices and general organizational approaches -- to utilities seeking to manage environmental performance as a corporate asset.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

115

Developing Guidance and Tool Support for Rationale-based Use Case Specification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology System), a prototype augmented reality application for nuclear powerplant technicians. Three weeks (Fig. 4.). The students were provided with a nuclear powerplant maintenance scenario illustrating case step has a number, and actor and system steps have to alternate. This way, we hope to avoid

Bruegge, Bernd

116

Risk-Based Maintenance Application Case Study: Risk Evaluation and Prioritization at a Fossil Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an application of the use of risk-based maintenance prioritization at a fossil power plant. In 2002, EPRI issued a report titled "Risk Based Maintenance Guideline" (product number 1004382) for fossil power plants. That guideline described several risk-based methods, which are being used in other industries primarily within the United States. Since then, a method called Risk Evaluation and Prioritization (REaP) has been evaluated for its use in decision making at fossil power plants ...

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

117

Validation of PV performance models using satellite-based irradiance measurements : a case study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) system performance models are relied upon to provide accurate predictions of energy production for proposed and existing PV systems under a wide variety of environmental conditions. Ground based meteorological measurements are only available from a relatively small number of locations. In contrast, satellite-based radiation and weather data (e.g., SUNY database) are becoming increasingly available for most locations in North America, Europe, and Asia on a 10 x 10 km grid or better. This paper presents a study of how PV performance model results are affected when satellite-based weather data is used in place of ground-based measurements.

Stein, Joshua S.; Parkins, Andrew (Clean Power Research); Perez, Richard (University at Albany)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ReEDS Model Documentation: Base Case Data and Model Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/ electricity generated Utility emissions rates based on eGRID 2007 V1.1 data from U.S. EPA New Jersey New

119

Habitat-Lite: A GSC case study based on free text terms for environmental metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been assigned specific terms related to extreme habitatsstudy based on free text terms for environmental metadatato- use (small) set of terms (“Habitat-Lite”) that captures

Hirschman, Lynette

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nonlinear excitations in DNA: Aperiodic models vs actual genome sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of the sequence on the propagation of nonlinear excitations in simple models of DNA in which we incorporate actual DNA sequences obtained from human genome data. We show that kink propagation requires forces over a certain threshold, a phenomenon already found for aperiodic sequences [F. Dom\\'\\i nguez-Adame {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 52}, 2183 (1995)]. For forces below threshold, the final stop positions are highly dependent on the specific sequence. The results of our model are consistent with the stick-slip dynamics of the unzipping process observed in experiments. We also show that the effective potential, a collective coordinate formalism introduced by Salerno and Kivshar [Phys. Lett. A {\\bf 193}, 263 (1994)] is a useful tool to identify key regions in DNA that control the dynamical behavior of large segments. Additionally, our results lead to further insights in the phenomenology observed in aperiodic systems.

Sara Cuenda; Angel Sanchez

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Method and apparatus for distinguishing actual sparse events from sparse event false alarms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Remote sensing method and apparatus wherein sparse optical events are distinguished from false events. "Ghost" images of actual optical phenomena are generated using an optical beam splitter and optics configured to direct split beams to a single sensor or segmented sensor. True optical signals are distinguished from false signals or noise based on whether the ghost image is presence or absent. The invention obviates the need for dual sensor systems to effect a false target detection capability, thus significantly reducing system complexity and cost.

Spalding, Richard E. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Information systems continuance intention of web-based applications customers: The case of online banking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proliferation of the Internet has not only allowed businesses to offer their products and services through web-based applications, but it has also undermined their ability to retain their customers. It has reduced search costs, opened up barriers ... Keywords: Commitment, Commitment-Trust theory, End-user relationship, Relationship marketing, Retention, Trust, Web-based application

Banphot Vatanasombut; Magid Igbaria; Antonis C. Stylianou; Waymond Rodgers

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The influence of indoor temperature on the difference between actual and theoretical energy consumption for space heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Advice procedure (EAP) is developed to evaluate the energetic performance of "existing" dwellings to generate a useful advice for the occupants of the dwelling to invest in rational energy measures. The EAP is based on a theoretical calculation ... Keywords: actual energy consumption, consumer behaviour, indoor temperature, space heating, theoretical energy consumption

Amaryllis Audenaert; Katleen Briffaerts; Dries De Boeck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Estimation of daily actual evapotranspiration from remotely sensed data under complex terrain over the upper Chao river basin in North China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily actual evapotranspiration over the upper Chao river basin in North China on 23 June 2005 was estimated based on the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), in which the parameterization schemes for calculating the instantaneous solar ...

Yanchun Gao; Di Long; Zhao-Liang Li

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study: Selection Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment To Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification Reference 1 discussed key elements of the process for developing a margins-based "safety case" to support safe and efficient operation for an extended period. The present report documents (in Appendix A) a case study, carrying out key steps of the Reference 1 process, using an actual plant Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) model. In general, the margins-based safety case helps the decision-maker manage plant margins most effectively. It tells the plant decision-maker such things as what margin is present (at the plant level, at the functional

126

Rights-based evaluation of government responses to a given 'natural' disaster : Katrina as case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disaster impacts human mobility and a rights-based approach to disaster response is needed to protect the human rights of those who seek migration as an adaptation strategy. This paper deals with returning to a place after ...

Haeffner, Melissa (Melissa Ann)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

On the practice of artificial intelligence based predictive control scheme: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel artificial intelligence based predictive control scheme for the purpose of dealing with so many complicated systems. In the control scheme proposed here, the system has to be first represented through a multi-Takagi-Sugeno-Kang ... Keywords: Drum-type boiler-turbine system, GPC identifier, GPC scheme, Industrial tubular heat exchanger system, Linear model approximation, Multi-GPC scheme, Multi-TSK fuzzy-based model approach, NLGPC scheme, System operating points

A. H. Mazinan; M. Sheikhan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage - Jesse Wainright, Case Western Reserve  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy/Office of Electricity's Energy Storage Program. Iron Based Flow Batteries for Low Cost Grid Level Energy Storage J.S. Wainright, R. F. Savinell, P.I.s Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University Purpose Impact on Iron Based Batteries on the DOE OE Energy Storage Mission Recent Results Recent Results Develop efficient, cost-effective grid level storage capability based on iron. Goals of this Effort: * Minimize Cost/Watt by increasing current density - Hardware Cost >> Electrolyte Cost * Minimize Cost/Whr by increasing plating capacity * Maximize Efficiency by minimizing current lost to hydrogen evolution Electrochemistry of the all-Iron system:

129

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

130

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

131

Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production, Projected vs. Actual Production, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 14.74 14.26 14.33 14.89 15.39 15.88 AEO 1983 16.48 16.27 16.20 16.31 16.27 16.29 14.89 AEO 1984 17.48 17.10 17.44 17.58 17.52 17.32 16.39 AEO 1985 16.95 17.08 17.11 17.29 17.40 17.33 17.32 17.27 17.05 16.80 16.50 AEO 1986 16.30 16.27 17.15 16.68 16.90 16.97 16.87 16.93 16.86 16.62 16.40 16.33 16.57 16.23 16.12 AEO 1987 16.21 16.09 16.38 16.32 16.30 16.30 16.44 16.62 16.81 17.39 AEO 1989* 16.71 16.71 16.94 17.01 16.83 17.09 17.35 17.54 17.67 17.98 18.20 18.25 18.49 AEO 1990 16.91 17.25 18.84 20.58 20.24 AEO 1991 17.40 17.48 18.11 18.22 18.15 18.22 18.39 18.82 19.03 19.28 19.62 19.89 20.13 20.07 19.95 19.82 19.64 19.50 19.30 19.08 AEO 1992 17.43 17.69 17.95 18.00 18.29 18.27 18.51 18.75 18.97

132

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

133

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

134

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

135

Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 9.2 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 7.29 8.09 8.94 9.62 10.27 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 6.37 6.89 7.50 8.15 9.05 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30

136

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

137

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

138

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

139

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

140

Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 7.58 7.45 7.12 6.82 6.66 7.09 AEO 1983 5.15 5.44 5.73 5.79 5.72 5.95 6.96 AEO 1984 4.85 5.11 5.53 5.95 6.31 6.59 8.65 AEO 1985 4.17 4.38 4.73 4.93 5.36 5.72 6.23 6.66 7.14 7.39 7.74 AEO 1986 5.15 5.38 5.46 5.92 6.46 7.09 7.50 7.78 7.96 8.20 8.47 8.74 9.04 9.57 9.76 AEO 1987 5.81 6.04 6.81 7.28 7.82 8.34 8.71 8.94 8.98 10.01 AEO 1989* 6.28 6.84 7.49 7.96 8.53 8.83 9.04 9.28 9.60 9.64 9.75 10.02 10.20 AEO 1990 7.20 7.61 9.13 9.95 11.02 AEO 1991 7.28 7.25 7.34 7.48 7.72 8.10 8.57 9.09 9.61 10.07 10.51 11.00 11.44 11.72 11.86 12.11 12.30 12.49 12.71 12.91 AEO 1992 6.86 7.42 7.88 8.16 8.55 8.80 9.06 9.32 9.50 9.80 10.17 10.35 10.56 10.61 10.85 11.00 11.15 11.29 11.50 AEO 1993 7.25 8.01 8.49 9.06

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1.98 2.12 2.27 2.41 2.59 2.73 2.85 2.98 3.14 3.35 3.59 3.85 4.18 4.51 4.92 5.29 5.56 5.96 AEO 1995 1.89 2.00 1.95 2.06 2.15 2.40 2.57 2.90 3.16 3.56 3.87 4.27 4.56 4.85 5.16 5.41 5.66 AEO 1996 1.63 1.74 1.86 1.99 2.10 2.19 2.29 2.38 2.48 2.59 2.72 2.84 2.97 3.12 3.29 3.49 3.73 AEO 1997 2.03 1.82 1.90 1.99 2.06 2.13 2.21 2.32 2.43 2.54 2.65 2.77 2.88 3.00 3.11 3.24 AEO 1998 2.30 2.20 2.26 2.31 2.38 2.44 2.52 2.60 2.69 2.79 2.93 3.06 3.20 3.35 3.48 AEO 1999 1.98 2.15 2.20 2.32 2.43 2.53 2.63 2.76 2.90 3.02 3.12 3.23 3.35 3.47

142

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

143

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

144

Table 15. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual (nominal cents per kilowatt-hour) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.38 6.96 7.63 8.23 8.83 9.49 AEO 1983 6.85 7.28 7.74 8.22 8.68 9.18 13.12 AEO 1984 6.67 7.05 7.48 7.89 8.25 8.65 11.53 AEO 1985 6.62 6.94 7.32 7.63 7.89 8.15 8.46 8.85 9.20 9.61 10.04 AEO 1986 6.67 6.88 7.05 7.18 7.35 7.52 7.65 7.87 8.31 8.83 9.41 10.01 10.61 11.33 12.02 AEO 1987 6.63 6.65 6.92 7.12 7.38 7.62 7.94 8.36 8.86 11.99 AEO 1989* 6.50 6.75 7.14 7.48 7.82 8.11 8.50 8.91 9.39 9.91 10.49 11.05 11.61 AEO 1990 6.49 6.72 8.40 10.99 14.5 AEO 1991 6.94 7.31 7.59 7.82 8.18 8.38 8.54 8.73 8.99 9.38 9.83 10.29 10.83 11.36 11.94 12.58 13.21 13.88 14.58 15.21 AEO 1992 6.97 7.16 7.32 7.56 7.78 8.04 8.29 8.57 8.93 9.38 9.82 10.26 10.73 11.25 11.83 12.37 12.96 13.58 14.23 AEO 1993

145

Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 AEO 1983 1.08 1.16 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 AEO 1984 0.99 1.05 1.16 1.27 1.43 1.57 2.11 AEO 1985 0.94 1.00 1.19 1.45 1.58 1.86 1.94 2.06 2.17 2.32 2.44 AEO 1986 0.74 0.88 0.62 1.03 1.05 1.27 1.39 1.47 1.66 1.79 1.96 2.17 2.38 2.42 2.43 AEO 1987 0.84 0.89 1.07 1.16 1.26 1.36 1.46 1.65 1.75 2.50 AEO 1989* 1.15 1.32 1.44 1.52 1.61 1.70 1.79 1.87 1.98 2.06 2.15 2.23 2.31 AEO 1990 1.26 1.43 2.07 2.68 2.95 AEO 1991 1.36 1.53 1.70 1.82 2.11 2.30 2.33 2.36 2.42 2.49 2.56 2.70 2.75 2.83 2.90 2.95 3.02 3.09 3.17 3.19 AEO 1992 1.48 1.62 1.88 2.08 2.25 2.41 2.56 2.68 2.70 2.72 2.76 2.84 2.92 3.05 3.10 3.20 3.25 3.30 3.30 AEO 1993 1.79 2.08 2.35 2.49 2.61 2.74 2.89 2.95 3.00 3.05 3.10

146

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

147

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 23.36 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25 24.65 AEO 1998 18.85 19.06 20.35 20.27 20.60 20.94 21.44 21.81 22.25 22.65 23.18 23.75 24.23 24.70 24.97 AEO 1999 18.80 19.13 19.28 19.82 20.23 20.77 21.05 21.57 21.98 22.47 22.85 23.26 23.77 24.15

148

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

149

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00 26.63 AEO 1997 22.15 22.75 23.24 23.64 23.86 24.13 24.65 25.34 25.82 26.22 26.52 27.00 27.35 27.70 28.01 28.47 AEO 1998 21.84 23.03 23.84 24.08 24.44 24.81 25.33 25.72 26.22 26.65 27.22 27.84 28.35 28.84 29.17 AEO 1999 21.35 22.36 22.54 23.18 23.65 24.17 24.57 25.19 25.77 26.41 26.92 27.42 28.02 28.50

150

Comparison of Projections to Actual Performance in the DOE-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), Global Energy Concepts (GEC) worked with participating utilities to develop a set of performance projections for their projects based on historical site atmospheric conditions, turbine performance data, operation and maintenance (O and M) strategies, and assumptions about various energy losses. After a preliminary operation period at each project, GEC compared the actual performance to projections and evaluated the accuracy of the data and assumptions that formed the performance projections. This paper presents a comparison of 1999 power output, turbine availability, and other performance characteristics to the projections for TVP projects in Texas, Vermont, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Alaska. Factors that were overestimated or underestimated are quantified. Actual wind speeds are compared to projections based on long-term historical measurements. Turbine power curve measurements are compared with data provided by the manufacturers, and loss assumptions are evaluated for accuracy. Overall, the projects performed well, particularly new commercial turbines in the first few years of operation. However, some sites experienced below average wind resources and greater than expected losses. The TVP project owners successfully developed and constructed wind power plants that are now in full commercial operation, serving a total of approximately 12,000 households.

Rhoads, H.; VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Compton, A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

151

Judicial support systems: ideas for a privacy ontology-based case analyzer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, ontology is applied as an integral part of many applications in several domains, especially in the world of law. The ontology based judicial support system is believed as a useful tool to support, for example, the legal argumentation assistant ... Keywords: privacy directives, privacy ontology, privacy ontology structure, privacy principles, woolf reforms

Yan Tang; Robert Meersman

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Computers & Geosciences 29 (2003) 351359 A case against Kd-based transport models: natural attenuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)-based transport model. The study site is a contaminated groundwater aquifer underneath a uranium mill tailings prediction of the fate and transport of regulated metals and radionuclides in the subsurface of abandoned mining sites is critical to the assessment of environmental impact and to the development of effective

Polly, David

153

Agent-based collaborative product design engineering: an industrial case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globalization and rapid evolving of Internet and Web-based technologies have revolutionized the product development process. Engineering a product is a complex process involving the integration of distributed resources, such as human beings, engineering ... Keywords: collaboration, internet-aided design, product design engineering, software agents, workflow

Qi Hao; Weiming Shen; Zhan Zhang; Seong-Whan Park; Jai-Kyung Lee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Agent-based collaborative product design engineering: An industrial case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globalization and rapid evolving of Internet and Web-based technologies have revolutionized the product development process. Engineering a product is a complex process involving the integration of distributed resources, such as human beings, engineering ... Keywords: Collaboration, Internet-aided design, Product design engineering, Software agents, Workflow

Qi Hao; Weiming Shen; Zhan Zhang; Seong-Whan Park; Jai-Kyung Lee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Evaluation of a flowchart-based EHR query system: A case study of RetroGuide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provision of query systems which are intuitive for non-experts has been recognized as an important informatics challenge. We developed a prototype of a flowchart-based analytical framework called RetroGuide that enables non-experts to formulate query ... Keywords: Biomedical informatics, Data warehouse, Evaluation, Informatics, Mixed-method, Query system, RetroGuide, SQL

Vojtech Huser; Scott P. Narus; Roberto A. Rocha

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Verification & validation by docking: a case study of agent-based models of Anopheles gambiae  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, using the technique of docking, we perform verification & validation (V&V) of agent-based simulation models that simulate the life cycle of Anopheles gambiae, the primary vector for malaria transmission. Working with one ... Keywords: Anopheles gambiae, docking, malaria epidemiology, verification & validation

S. M. Niaz Arifin; Gregory J. Davis; Ying Zhou

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

158

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Feb-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Mar-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1

Johns, Russell Taylor

159

Ground-Based Remote Sensing of Cloud Particle Sizes during the 26 November 1991 FIRE II Cirrus Case: Comparisons with In Situ Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of retrieving characteristic particle sizes for the November 26 1991 FIRE II case using two methods that utilize ground-based remotes sensors. The size information for the complete vertical depth of the cloud was ...

S. Y. Matrosov; A. J. Heymsfield; J. M. Intrieri; B. W. Orr; J. B. Snider

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Wind Plant Capacity Credit Variations: A Comparison of Results Using Multiyear Actual and Simulated Wind-Speed Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter- annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

Milligan, Michael

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Building a Model Patient Room to Test Design Innovations With Actual Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfortable hospital environment SUMMARY Designing and constructing a new hospital is a complex and costly undertaking that involves experts from many disciplines both inside and outside the health care arena. But despite expending funds and time, hospital leaders often discover significant flaws once a hospital opens that can undermine the quality of patient care and staff effectiveness and efficiency. From 2010 to 2012, a team at the Princeton HealthCare System worked to devise an optimal design for inpatient rooms at a new hospital: the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The project entailed building a “functional model patient room.” This was a unique and innovative method to allow the team to test design innovations with actual patients, according to project director Susan Lorenz, DrNP, RN, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer for the Princeton HealthCare System. The project helped support the emerging field of evidence-based hospital design.

A Princeton; More Efficient; Key Results

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Preliminary analysis of the induced structural radioactivity inventory of the base-case aqueous accelerator transmutation of waste reactor concept  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accelerator Transmutation of (Nuclear) Waste (ATW) project is the substantial reduction in volume of long-lived high-level radioactive waste of the US in a safe and energy-efficient manner. An evaluation of the ATW concept has four aspects: material balance, energy balance, performance, and cost. An evaluation of the material balance compares the amount of long-lived high-level waste transmuted with the amount and type, of waste created in the process. One component of the material balance is the activation of structural materials over the lifetime of the transmutation reactor. A preliminary radioactivity and radioactive mass balance analysis has been performed on four structure regions of the reaction chamber: the tungsten target, the lead annulus, six tubing materials carrying the actinide slurry, and five reaction vessel structural materials. The amount of radioactive material remaining after a 100-yr cooling period for the base-case ATW was found to be 338 kg of radionuclides. The bulk of this material (313 kg) was generated in the zirconium-niobium (Zr-Nb) actinide tubing material. Replacement of the Zr-Nb tubing material with one of the alternative tubing materials analyzed would significantly reduce the short- and long-term radioactive mass produced. The alternative vessel material Al-6061 alloys, Tenelon, HT-9, and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo and the alternative actinide tubing materials Al-6061 alloy, carbon-carbon matrix, silicon carbide, and Ti-6 Al-4 V qualify for shallow land burial. Alternative disposal options for the base-case structural material Type 304L stainless steel and the actinide tubing material Zr-Nb will need to be considered as neither qualifies for shallow land burial.

Bezdecny, J.A.; Vance, K.M.; Henderson, D.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Pu speciation in actual and simulated aged wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Pu L{sub II/III} edge was used to determine the speciation of this element in (1) Hanford Z-9 Pu crib samples, (2) deteriorated waste resins from a chloride process ion-exchange purification line, and (3) the sediments from two Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Liter Scale simulant brine systems. The Pu speciation in all of these samples except one is within the range previously displayed by PuO{sub 2+x-2y}(OH){sub y}{center_dot}zH{sub 2}O compounds, which is expected based on the putative thermodynamic stability of this system for Pu equilibrated with excess H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} under environmental conditions. The primary exception was a near neutral brine experiment that displayed evidence for partial substitution of the normal O-based ligands with Cl{sup -} and a concomitant expansion of the Pu-Pu distance relative to the much more highly ordered Pu near neighbor shell in PuO{sub 2}. However, although the Pu speciation was not necessarily unusual, the Pu chemistry identified via the history of these samples did exhibit unexpected patterns, the most significant of which may be that the presence of the Pu(V)-oxo species may decrease rather than increase the overall solubility of these compounds. Several additional aspects of the Pu speciation have also not been previously observed in laboratory-based samples. The molecular environmental chemistry of Pu is therefore likely to be more complicated than would be predicted based solely on the behavior of PuO{sub 2} under laboratory conditions.

Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time News Featured Articles 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony...

165

The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Actual Production History insurance plan protects against crop losses from a number of causes. All aspects of this insurance are described, including reporting requirements for the producer.

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

166

Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Adapting a Beam-Based Rotordynamics Model to Accept a General Three-Dimensional Finite-Element Casing Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The subject of this thesis is an extension of a two-dimensional, axisymmetric, Timoshenko-beam finite-element rotordynamic code to include a three-dimensional non-axisymmetric solid-element casing model. Axisymmetric beams are sufficient to model rotors. Spring and damper forces provide the interface between the rotor and its casing and capture the dynamics of the full model. However, axisymmetric beams limit the modeling of real-case machine structures, where the casing is not axisymmetric. Axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric 3D finite element casing structures are modeled. These structures are then reduced using a technique called substructuring. Modal equations are developed for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric casing models. In a 3D non-axisymmetric model, structural dynamics modes can be modeled by lateral modes in two orthogonal planes. Modal information of the complex 3D casing structures are generated, and then incorporated into the 2D code after a series of pre-processing steps. A reduction method called Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) is used to reduce the large dimensionality involved in calculation of rotordynamic coefficients. The results from the casing structures are merged with the rotor model to create a combined rotor-casing model. The analysis of the combined structure shows that there is a difference in the natural frequencies and unbalance response between the model that uses symmetrical casing and the one that uses non-axisymmetric casing. XLTRC2 is used as an example of a two-dimensional axisymmetric beam-element code. ANSYS is used as a code to build three-dimensional non-axisymmetric solid-element casing models. The work done in this thesis opens the scope to incorporate complex non-axisymmetric casing models with XLTRC2.

James, Stephen M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Ensemble-Based Exigent Analysis. Part II: Using Ensemble Regression to Estimate Conditions Antecedent to Worst-Case Forecast Damage Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this series on ensemble-based exigent analysis, a Lagrange multiplier minimization technique is used to estimate the exigent damage state (ExDS), the “worst case” with respect to a user-specified damage function and confidence level. ...

Daniel Gombos; Ross N. Hoffman

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

170

Trends of Calculated and Simulated Actual Evaporation in the Yangtze River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actual evaporation in the Yangtze River basin is calculated by the complementary relationship approach—that is, the advection–aridity (AA) model with parameter validation from 1961 to 2007—and simulated by the general circulation model (GCM) ...

Yanjun Wang; Bo Liu; Buda Su; Jianqing Zhai; Marco Gemmer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Assessing Climate Information Use in Agribusiness. Part I: Actual and Potential Use and Impediments to Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project for the development of methodology to enable agribusiness decision makers to utilize more effectively climate information involved investigation of three agribusiness firms, as well as measurement of their actual and potential use. The ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Steven T. Sonka; Steven Hofing

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Use of Remotely Sensed Actual Evapotranspiration to Improve Rainfall–Runoff Modeling in Southeast Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), mounted on the polar-orbiting Terra satellite, to determine leaf area index (LAI), and use actual evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS LAI data combined ...

Yongqiang Zhang; Francis H. S. Chiew; Lu Zhang; Hongxia Li

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration from Satellite and Meteorological Data in Central Bolivia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial estimates of actual evapotranspiration are useful for calculating the water balance of river basins, quantifying hydrological services provided by ecosystems, and assessing the hydrological impacts of land-use practices. To provide this ...

Christian Seiler; Arnold F. Moene

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Date Published 05/2013 Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Traditional energy performance calculated using building simulation with the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data represents the energy performance in a typical year but not necessarily the average or typical energy performance of a building in long term. Furthermore, the simulated results do not provide the range of variations due to the change of weather, which is important in building energy management and risk assessment of energy efficiency investment. This study analyzes the weather impact on peak electric demand and energy use by building simulation using 30-year actual meteorological year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels across all 17 climate zones. The simulated results from the AMY are compared to those from TMY3 to determine and analyze the differences. It was found that yearly weather variation has significant impact on building performance especially peak electric demand. Energy savings of building technologies should be evaluated using simulations with multi-decade actual weather data to fully consider investment risk and the long term performance.

175

Physically based modeling of rainfall-triggered landslides: a case study in the Luquillo forest, Puerto Rico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the development of a rainfall-triggered landslide module within an existing physically based spatially distributed ecohydrologic model. The model, tRIBS-VEGGIE (Triangulated Irregular Networks-based ...

Arnone, E.

176

An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large scale water test facility and a commercial CFD computer program were used to investigate labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape found in aircraft engines. The 2-D test rig cases focused on the effect of tooth position and operating condition for the standard geometry. The computed cases considered tooth axial and radial position, different operating conditions, and several geometric dimensions. This investigation also compares the leakage of the standard geometry to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers and at nine different tooth positions. The discharge coefficient and a dimensionless pressure drop number were used to plot the leakage data to make it easier for seal designers to predict the leakage of labyrinth seals. The experimental visualization results show for a given Reynolds number that the closer the labryinth tooth gets to the step the deeper the throughflow jet penetrated into the seal cavity. The decrease of the tooth tip clearance also has a similar effect. Specifically the smaller the tooth tip clearance the deeper the flow path penetrated into the seal cavity. The experimental measurements show that the tooth tip axial position, as well as the minimum-tooth clearance, affect the leakage. A significant improvement in leakage was generally observed when the minimum-distance tooth clearance occurs across the entire tip of the tooth. This occurs only at the most upstream tooth position tested. Similarly, the computed results show that the tooth axial position affects the seal leakage. It was also found that the leakage of the modified convex wall geometry was significantly less than that of the standard geometry.

Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses - Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results Appendix E: Other NEMS-MP Results for the Base Case and Scenarios Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62

179

Demonstration of a SREX flowsheet for the partitioning of strontium and lead from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning {sup 90}Sr and Pb from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Previous countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process with simulated waste resulted in 99.98% removal of Sr and 99.9% removal of Pb. Based on the results of these studies, a demonstration of the SREX flowsheet was performed. The demonstration consisted of (1) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using simulated sodium-bearing waste spiked with {sup 85}Sr and (2) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using actual waste from tank WM-183. All testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0. 15 M 4`,4`(5)-di-(tert-butyldicyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L{reg_sign}), a 2.0 MHNO{sub 3} scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.1 M ammonium citrate strip section for the removal of Pb from the SREX solvent, and a 3.0 M HNO{sub 3} equilibration section. The behavior of {sup 90}Sr, Pb, Na, K, Hg, H{sup +}, the actinides, and numerous other non-radioactive elements was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted and selectively stripped Sr and Ph from the SBW simulant and the actual tank waste. For the testing with actual tank waste (WM - 183), removal efficiencies of 99.995 % and >94% were obtained for {sup 90}Sr and Pb, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Olson, L.G.; Todd, T.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Toward the regulation of ubiquitous mobile government: a case study on location-based emergency services in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile alerts, notifications and location-based emergency warning systems are now an established part of mobile government strategies in an increasing number of countries worldwide. In Australia the national emergency warning system (NEWS) was instituted ... Keywords: Emergency management, Location-based services, Mobile government, Regulation

Anas Aloudat; Katina Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Market-Based Valuation of New Coal-Fired Generation: Case Studies of Investment Risk and Profitability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas turbine technology has dominated new generation capacity additions in the United States, yet several years of unexpectedly high natural gas prices are driving interest in alternatives. This report uses case studies of new coal-fired generation to address the question of whether coal can be a good choice for the private investor. The studies give great detail on possible coal plants in Texas and some guidance on possible projects in Virginia, Ohio, and Indiana. The studies provide a comprehens...

2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

182

Mobility-supporting data management for location-based mobile systems: the special case of single category location repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Location-based mobile applications require timely generation of user-centric proximities from application-relevant repositories of business locations. The proximity generation requirement is poorly served by conventional query resolution methods which ...

James E. Wyse

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Bias Adjustment of Satellite Precipitation Estimation Using Ground-Based Measurement: A Case Study Evaluation over the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable precipitation measurement is a crucial component in hydrologic studies. Although satellite-based observation is able to provide spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation, the measurements tend to show systematic bias. This paper ...

Farid Ishak Boushaki; Kuo-Lin Hsu; Soroosh Sorooshian; Gi-Hyeon Park; Shayesteh Mahani; Wei Shi

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Radar-Based Quantitative Precipitation Estimation for the Cool Season in Complex Terrain: Case Studies from the NOAA Hydrometeorology Testbed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explores error sources of the National Weather Service operational radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) during the cool season over the complex terrain of the western United States. A new, operationally geared radar ...

Jian Zhang; Youcun Qi; David Kingsmill; Kenneth Howard

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Experiences from near-real-time satellite-based volcano monitoring in Central America: case studies at Fuego, Guatemala  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, remote sensing has been used increasingly in the study of active volcanoes and their associated hazards. Ground-based remote sensing techniques, such as those aimed at the analysis of volcanic gases or fumarole temperatures, are ...

P. W. Webley; M. J. Wooster; W. Strauch; J. A. Saballos; K. Dill; P. Stephenson; J. Stephenson; R. Escobar Wolf; O. Matias

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Feedback loops in educational environments using web-based survey tools : new technology development and three implementation case studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents lessons from the development of an on-line, web-based feedback system and preliminary analysis of the socio-technical interactions associated with the specification, design and use of this system. The ...

Spead, Benjamin, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Domains of competence of fuzzy rule based classification systems with data complexity measures: A case of study using a fuzzy hybrid genetic based machine learning method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of data complexity is a proper framework to characterize the tackled classification problem and to identify domains of competence of classifiers. As a practical outcome of this framework, the proposed data complexity measures may facilitate ... Keywords: Classification, Data complexity, Fuzzy rule based systems, Genetic fuzzy systems

Julián Luengo; Francisco Herrera

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.7% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

189

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.3% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas) #/Month

Johns, Russell Taylor

190

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 1.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

191

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1. 8.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

192

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 2.2% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

193

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.1% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas

Johns, Russell Taylor

194

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance. 1/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

195

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET

Johns, Russell Taylor

196

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance Shops Offices 6 OF REPORT DP Form #31 - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES

Johns, Russell Taylor

197

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Theft Total $280 $280 Total % Rcvd 0.4% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List

Johns, Russell Taylor

198

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared.1% DP Form #31 Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY Form #31 Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY

Johns, Russell Taylor

199

Extracting magnetic anomalies based on an improved BEMD method: A case study in the Pangxidong Area, South China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In bidimensional empirical mode decomposition, an appropriate stoppage criterion for the sifting process is important. To solve the problem of unstable convergence, a stepwise stop criterion was presented based on the Cauchy-type criterion. In one sifting ... Keywords: BEMD, Magnetic data, Mode mixing, Stepwise stop criterion

Weisheng Hou; Zhijun Yang; Yongzhang Zhou; Liping Zhang; Wenlong Wu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Internet-based 'social sharing' as a new form of global production: The case of SETI@home  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benkler (Sharing nicely: on shareable goods and the emergence of sharing as a modality of economic production, Yale Law Journal, 2004, vol. 114, pp. 273-358) has argued that 'social sharing' via Internet-based distributed computing is a new, so far under-appreciated ... Keywords: Digital divide, Distributed computing, Economic production, SETI@home, Shareable goods, Social sharing

Hans-Jürgen Engelbrecht

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Creating a specific domain ontology for supporting R&D in the science-based sector - The case of biosensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In science-based and technology-intensive projects, knowledge management challenges require a tentative and cautious review of the technological domains, as well as, venues to monitor and assess the way those domains evolve, emerge, mature, and decline. ... Keywords: Biosensor, Domain ontology, Engineering knowledge, Meta-modeling

Fragiskos A. Batzias; Christina G. Siontorou

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Agent-based algorithms for collaborative price search in electronic commerce: a case study and performance evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an architecture based on mobile agents to search for admissible prices of a specific item among many merchant sites over the Internet. To make the search more efficient, mobile agents collaborate by exchanging information. In this ... Keywords: collaboration, data retrieval, e-commerce, mobile agents, price search

Ali Chamam; Samuel Pierre; Roch H. Glitho

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A type-based approach to separating protocol from application logic: a case study in hybrid computer programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous programming models have been introduced to allow programmers to utilize new accelerator-based architectures. While OpenCL and CUDA provide low-level access to accelerator programming, the task cries out for a higher-level abstraction. Of the ...

Geoffrey C. Hulette; Matthew J. Sottile; Allen D. Malony

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

NUREG/CR-6695 PNNL-13375 Hydrologic Uncertainty Assessment for Decommissioning Sites: Hypothetical Test Case Applications Prepared by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report uses hypothetical decommissioning test cases to illustrate an uncertainty assessment methodology for dose assessments conducted as part of decommissioning analyses for NRC-licensed facilities. This methodology was presented previously in NUREG/CR-6656. The hypothetical test case source term and scenarios are based on an actual decommissioning case and the physical setting is based on the site of a field experiment carried out for the NRC in Arizona. The emphasis in the test case was on parameter uncertainty. The analysis is limited to the hydrologic aspects of the exposure pathway involving infiltration of water at the ground surface, leaching of contaminants, and transport of contaminants through the groundwater to a point of exposure. The methodology uses generic parameter distributions based on national or regional databases for estimating

P. D. Meyer; R. Y. Taira

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Using Adaptive Agent-Based Simulation Models to Assist Planners in Policy: The Case of Rent Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 2 Computer simulation modeling for policy development in planning has had difficulty gaining a consistent foothold. Reasons for this include bad experiences with large-scale, comprehensive models (e.g., Forrester, 1969) and the lack of theory that one can quantify (Batty, 1994). Batty (1994) has suggested that new types of computational models, based on the tenets of complexity theory (Bernard, under revision) may prove useful. One type of complexity theory model is an "adaptive agent based model" in which the actions, interactions, and adaptations of many autonomous, heterogeneous "agents" (households, firms, etc.) produce emergent, systemwide behavior. One can examine this emergent behavior using commonly employed metrics, but one can also garner a richer, more intuitive understanding of how the individual behavior of the agents self-organize to produce the entire system. Using this type of modeling for small-scale planning problems can both inform planning theorists and improve ...

Robert N. Bernard

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

207

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment, behaviour, energy price, consumers Abstract “suggest that raising energy prices—such as in the form ofconsumers actually “see” energy prices and are therefore

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The Actual Impact of the International Tribunal for former Yugoslavia on the Reconciliation Process in Bosnia-Herzegovina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the actual impact of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on the reconciliation process in Bosnia-Herzegovina and analyses possible… (more)

Johansen, Kristine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Roof-top solar energy potential under performance-based building energy codes: The case of Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantification at regional level of the amount of energy (for thermal uses and for electricity) that can be generated by using solar systems in buildings is hindered by the availability of data for roof area estimation. In this note, we build on an existing geo-referenced method for determining available roof area for solar facilities in Spain to produce a quantitative picture of the likely limits of roof-top solar energy. The installation of solar hot water systems (SHWS) and photovoltaic systems (PV) is considered. After satisfying up to 70% (if possible) of the service hot water demand in every municipality, PV systems are installed in the remaining roof area. Results show that, applying this performance-based criterion, SHWS would contribute up to 1662 ktoe/y of primary energy (or 68.5% of the total thermal-energy demand for service hot water), while PV systems would provide 10 T W h/y of electricity (or 4.0% of the total electricity demand). (author)

Izquierdo, Salvador; Montanes, Carlos; Dopazo, Cesar; Fueyo, Norberto [Fluid Mechanics Group, University of Zaragoza and LITEC (CSIC), Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Actual versus predicted impacts of three ethanol plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help reduce US dependence on imported petroleum, Congress passed the Energy Security Act of 1980 (public Law 96-294). This legislation authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to promote expansion of the fuel alcohol industry through, among other measures, its Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program. Under this program, selected proposals for the conversion of plant biomass into fuel-grade ethanol would be granted loan guarantees. of 57 applications submitted for loan guarantees to build and operate ethanol fuel projects under this program, 11 were considered by DOE to have the greatest potential for satisfying DOE`s requirements and goals. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE evaluated the potential impacts of proceeding with the Loan Guarantee Program in a programmatic environmental assessment (DOE 1981) that resulted in a finding of no significant impact (FANCY) (47 Federal Register 34, p. 7483). The following year, DOE conducted site-specific environmental assessments (EAs) for 10 of the proposed projects. These F-As predicted no significant environmental impacts from these projects. Eventually, three ethanol fuel projects received loan guarantees and were actually built: the Tennol Energy Company (Tennol; DOE 1982a) facility near Jasper in southeastern Tennessee; the Agrifuels Refining Corporation (Agrifuels; DOE 1985) facility near New Liberia in southern Louisiana; and the New Energy Company of Indiana (NECI; DOE 1982b) facility in South Bend, Indiana. As part of a larger retrospective examination of a wide range of environmental effects of ethanol fuel plants, we compared the actual effects of the three completed plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources with the effects predicted in the NEPA EAs several years earlier. A secondary purpose was to determine: Why were there differences, if any, between actual effects and predictions? How can assessments be improved and impacts reduced?

Eddlemon, G.K.; Webb, J.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Miller, R.L.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

212

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

213

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

214

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

215

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

216

File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:33, 3 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 09:33, 3 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (257 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools High School Curricula

217

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

218

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

219

Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

An evaluation of integrated-gasification-combined-cycle and pulverized-coal-fired steam plants: Volume 1, Base case studies: Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the performance and costs for a Texaco-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant as compared to a conventional pulverized coal-fired steam (PCFS) power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is provided. A general set of groundrules was used within which each plant design was optimized. The study incorporated numerous sensitivity cases along with up-to-date operating and cost data obtained through participation of equipment vendors and process developers. Consequently, the IGCC designs presented in this study use the most recent data available from Texaco's ongoing international coal gasification development program and General Electric's continuing gas turbine development efforts. The Texaco-based IGCC has advantages over the conventional PCFS technology with regard to environmental emissions and natural resource requirements. SO/sub 2/, NOx, and particulate emissions are lower. Land area and water requirements are less for IGCC concepts. Coal consumption is less due to the higher plant thermal efficiency attainable in the IGCC plant. The IGCC plant also has the capability to be designed in several different configurations, with and without the use of natural gas or oil as a backup fuel. This capability may prove to be particularly advantageous in certain utility planning and operation scenarios. 107 figs., 114 tabs.

Pietruszkiewicz, J.; Milkavich, R.J.; Booras, G.S.; Thomas, G.O.; Doss, H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

225

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

226

Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

Han Chunhui [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Actual versus design performance of solar systems in the National Solar Data Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report relates field measured performance to the designer predicted performance. The field measured data was collected by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) over a period of six years. Data from 25 solar systems was selected from a data pool of some 170 solar systems. The scope of the project extends beyond merely presenting comparisons of data. There is an attempt to provide answers which will move the solar industry forward. As a result of some industry and research workshops, several concerns arose which can be partially allayed by careful study of the NSDN data. These are: What types of failures occurred and why. How good was the design versus actual performance. Why was predicted performance not achieved in the field. Which components should be integrated with a system type for good performance. Since the designs span several years and since design philosophies are quite variable, the measured results were also compared to f-Chart 5.1 results. This comparison is a type of normalization in that all systems are modeled with the same process. An added benefit of this normalization is a further validation of the f-Chart model on a fairly large scale. The systems were modeled using equipment design parameters, measured loads, and f-Chart weather data from nearby cities.

Logee, T.L.; Kendall, P.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution.

Peterson, Reid A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rapko, Brian M.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

230

Actinide partitioning from actual Idaho chemical processing plant acidic tank waste using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Iron was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Mercury was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (76%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} wash section.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Determination of Effective Emittance and a Radiatively Equivalent Microphysical Model of Cirrus from Ground-Based and Satellite Observations during the International Cirrus Experiment: The 18 October 1989 Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based observations and satellite data have been compared for the 18 October 1989 case study of the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE) field campaign. They correspond to thin cirrus clouds with infrared emittances in the range 0–0.3. ...

G. Brogniez; J. C. Buriez; V. Giraud; F. Parol; C. Vanbauce

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

233

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Case Study to Evaluate the Reliability Impact of Large-Scale Wind Generation: Incorporating Variable Generation and Loads into Rel iability-based Transmission Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a case study using a probabilistic framework to capture variations in output of variable generation connected to the transmission system along with system loads. The research in 2010, 2011, and some part of 2012 focused on developing the probabilistic model framework. The focus of the 2012 work was to use this model on a real-world (as opposed to a test system) transmission planning case along with data for all the variable generation and system loads modeled in the case to ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

236

Crossing the Divide: A Case Study of Cross-Cultural Organizational Culture and Leadership Perceptions in a Faith-Based Non-Profit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For this qualitative research a single case study was conducted of a faith-based non-profit organization, Health Education and Literacy Providers (H.E.L.P.), which operates simultaneously in the United States and Nigeria. The purpose of this study was to explore the cross-cultural leadership phenomena occurring within H.E.L.P. and to provide evaluation services and research data to the American members of H.E.L.P. Participants included a sample of the American board members, Nigerian board members, and Nigerian employees. Three data collection methods were used to achieve triangulation including participant observations, interviews, and analysis of documents. The first research objective was to investigate the cross-cultural leadership context by analyzing the organizational culture of H.E.L.P. in Nigeria. Results revealed H.E.L.P. was designed by American board members to operate as a bureaucratic culture with an emphasis on a business-like structure, centralized authority, compartmentalization, and efficiency. The Nigerian board members and employees, however, expressed a desire for a supportive culture that focused on love and harmony uncovering a discrepancy between American and Nigerian preferences in organizational culture typology. The results from the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) study were referenced to provide a cultural explanation for variations in organizational culture preferences. According to GLOBE study findings, the United States ranked higher on performance orientation meaning Americans are more likely to value results above people, ambition, and competitiveness, and explains the American?s desire for a bureaucratic organizational culture. Nigeria ranked behind the United States as a lower performance oriented society meaning individuals place high value on relationships and harmony, explaining their desire for a supportive culture. The second and third research objectives were to determine how H.E.L.P.'s Nigerian members perceive effective leadership within their culture, and determine how the Nigerians? definition of effective leadership supports or refutes the literature on prevalent Westernized leadership theories. Results indicated the overarching leadership theme perceived to be effective by the Nigerian members of H.E.L.P. was love. Several aspects of a loving leader were evident in the data and divided into five categories each with one subcategory. These findings supported both Transformational and Authentic leadership theories.

Muenich, Joelle 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

DEMONSTRATION OF THE GLYCOLIC-FORMIC FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ACTUAL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Glycolic acid was effective at dissolving many metals, including iron, during processing with simulants. Criticality constraints take credit for the insolubility of iron during processing to prevent criticality of fissile materials. Testing with actual waste was needed to determine the extent of iron and fissile isotope dissolution during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The Alternate Reductant Project was initiated by the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Company to explore options for the replacement of the nitric-formic flowsheet used for the CPC at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The goals of the Alternate Reductant Project are to reduce CPC cycle time, increase mass throughput of the facility, and reduce operational hazards. In order to achieve these goals, several different reductants were considered during initial evaluations conducted by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). After review of the reductants by SRR, SRNL, and Energy Solutions (ES) Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL), two flowsheets were further developed in parallel. The two flowsheet options included a nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet, and a nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet. As of July 2011, SRNL and ES/VSL have completed the initial flowsheet development work for the nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet and nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet, respectively. On July 12th and July 13th, SRR conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to down select the alternate reductant flowsheet. The SEE team selected the Formic-Glycolic Flowsheet for further development. Two risks were identified in SEE for expedited research. The first risk is related to iron and plutonium solubility during the CPC process with respect to criticality. Currently, DWPF credits iron as a poison for the fissile components of the sludge. Due to the high iron solubility observed during the flowsheet demonstrations with simulants, it was necessary to determine if the plutonium in the radioactive sludge slurry demonstrated the same behavior. The second risk is related to potential downstream impacts of glycolate on Tank Farm processes. The downstream impacts will be evaluated by a separate research team. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested a radioactive demonstration of the Glycolic-Formic Flowsheet with radioactive sludge slurry be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the SRNL. The Shielded Cells demonstration only included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, and not a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle or the co-processing of salt products. Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) slurry was used for the demonstration since it was readily available, had been previously characterized, and was generally representative of sludges being processing in DWPF. This sample was never used in the planned Shielded Cells Run 7 (SC-7).

Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

The Uneasy Case for Product Liability (co-authored with Steven Shavell)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

car engines. In the case of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, thein North American history, Exxon’s revenue actually rose inthe quarter after the spill. Exxon reported $22.2 billion in

Polinsky, A. Mitchell

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Comparison of Ensemble Kalman Filter–Based Forecasts to Traditional Ensemble and Deterministic Forecasts for a Case Study of Banded Snow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) technique is compared to other modeling approaches for a case study of banded snow. The forecasts include a 12- and 3-km grid-spaced deterministic forecast (D12 and D3), a 12-km 30-member ensemble (E12), and a 12-...

Astrid Suarez; Heather Dawn Reeves; Dustan Wheatley; Michael Coniglio

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Modified blame-based noise reduction for concept drift  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Competence enhancement plays an important role in case-base editing. Traditional competence enhancement methods tend to omit the evolving nature of a case-based learner, but take the whole case-base as a static training set. This may seriously delay ... Keywords: case-base editing, case-base maintenance, case-based reasoning, competence enhancement, concept drift

Ning Lu; Guangquan Zhang; Jie Lu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Difficulties with Correcting Radar Rainfall Estimates Based on Rain Gauge Data: A Case Study of Severe Weather in Montana on 16–17 June 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal source of information for operational flash flood monitoring and warning issuance is weather radar–based quantitative estimates of precipitation. Rain gauges are considered truth for the purposes of validating and calibrating real-...

Steven V. Vasiloff; Kenneth W. Howard; Jian Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Selection of the most advantageous gas turbine air filtration system: Comparative study of actual operating experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses relative merits of three types of air filtration systems used by Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Ltd. (Pakistan), on its gas turbine compressor packages. These Filtration systems are: (i) Two stage inertial plus auto oil bath type multi-duty filters by AAF used on Saturn Mark-1 packages manufactured by Solar Turbines Inc. (ii) Three stage high efficiency barrier filters by AAF used on Centaur packages by Solar. (iii) Single stage pulse-jet self-cleaning filter by Donaldson again used on a Centaur package. The selection is primarily based in package performance data collected over a 15 month period analyzing power loss due to fouling effects and related operation and maintenance costs for the three systems. The Company's operating experience indicates that on new installations the pulse clean system offers the best advantage both in terms of filtration costs as well as availability of additional horse power when operating under moderate to severe environmental conditions.

Gilani, S.I.; Mehr, M.Z.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Analysis of Actual Operating Conditions of an Off-grid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been proposed as ideal replacements for other technologies in remote locations such as Rural Alaska. A number of suppliers have developed systems that might be applicable in these locations, but there are several requirements that must be met before they can be deployed: they must be able to operate on portable fuels, and be able to operate with little operator assistance for long periods of time. This project was intended to demonstrate the operation of a 5 kW fuel cell on propane at a remote site (defined as one without access to grid power, internet, or cell phone, but on the road system). A fuel cell was purchased by the National Park Service for installation in their newly constructed visitor center at Exit Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park. The DOE participation in this project as initially scoped was for independent verification of the operation of this demonstration. This project met with mixed success. The fuel cell has operated over 6 seasons at the facility with varying degrees of success, with one very good run of about 1049 hours late in the summer of 2006, but in general the operation has been below expectations. There have been numerous stack failures, the efficiency of electrical generation has been lower than expected, and the field support effort required has been far higher than expected. Based on the results to date, it appears that this technology has not developed to the point where demonstrations in off road sites are justified.

Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson; Jack Schmid

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Human activity recognition based on surrounding things  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes human activity recognition based on the actual semantics of the human’s current location. Since predefining the semantics of location is inadequate to identify human activities, we process information about things to automatically ...

Naoharu Yamada; Kenji Sakamoto; Goro Kunito; Kenichi Yamazaki; Satoshi Tanaka

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A MCDM-based expert system for climate-change impact assessment and adaptation planning - A case study for the Georgia Basin, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An MCDM-based expert system was developed to tackle the interrelationships between the climate change and the adaptation policies in terms of water resources management in the Georgia Basin, Canada. User interfaces of the developed expert system, named ... Keywords: Adaptation, Climate change, Georgia Basin, MCDM, Policy analysis, Water resources

X. S. Qin; G. H. Huang; A. Chakma; X. H. Nie; Q. G. Lin

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

An assessment framework based on social perspectives and Analytic Hierarchy Process: A case study on sustainability in the Japanese concrete industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research introduces a framework for assessing concrete sustainability which is based upon the concept that technology is defined by stakeholders' perspectives and which applied Analytic Hierarchy Process to translate these perspectives into quantifiable ... Keywords: Analytic Hierarchy Process, Concrete, Construction, O31, O32, Sociology of technology, Sustainability

Michael Henry; Yoshitaka Kato

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The effect of oil revenues instability on the oil-based and labor-exporting economies: The case of the Arab region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The changes in the trend of the oil-export earnings in the oil-based economics not only affected the growth of the domestic economics not only affected the growth of the domestic economies but influenced the economic activities in the neighboring labor-exporting economies. This study investigates and tests the hypothesis that uncertainty associated with fluctuations in oil-export earnings affect adversely the economic growth in the oil-based economies of the Middle East. In addition, it seeks to examine the hypothesis that the impact of such fluctuations has been transmitted to the neighboring labor-exporting economies, during the period 1970-1986. Results show that oil-export instability does indeed create a wave of fluctuations in the domestic economic activity of the oil-based economies through the negative effect on investment, government spending, and domestic output. For the labor-exporting economies, results suggest that the flow of workers' remittances have had a positive impact on investment and income growth. Results also indicate that the rate of economic growth in the oil-based economies sets a broad limit on the range of feasible growth in the labor-exporting economies.

Al-Abbasi, M.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Diagnosis of condensation-induced waterhammer: Case studies  

SciTech Connect

This guidebook provides reference material and diagnostic procedures concerning condensation-induced waterhammer in nuclear power plants. Condensation-induced waterhammer is the most damaging form of waterhammer, and its diagnosis is complicated by the complex nature of the underlying phenomena. In Volume 1, the guidebook groups condensation-induced waterhammers into five event classes which have similar phenomena and levels of damage. Diagnostic guidelines focus on locating the event center where condensation and slug acceleration take place. Diagnosis is described in three stages: an initial assessment, detailed evaluation and final confirmation. Graphical scoping analyses are provided to evaluate whether an event from one of the event classes could have occurred at the event center. Examples are provided for each type of waterhammer. Special instructions are provided for walking down damaged piping and evaluating damage due to waterhammer. To illustrate the diagnostic methods and document past experience, six case studies have been compiled in Volume 2. These case studies, based on actual condensation-induced waterhammer events at nuclear plants, present detailed data and work through the event diagnosis using the tools introduced in the first volume. 20 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

Izenson, M.G.; Rothe, P.H.; Wallis, G.B.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Comparison between two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions for the case of heat transfer equations arising in porous medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions have been considered; one be computed through the integration process (IRBF) and one be computed through the differentiation process (DRBF). We investigated the two approaches on natural convection heat transfer equations embedded in porous medium which are of great importance in the design of canisters for nuclear wastes disposal. Numerical results show that the IRBF be performed much better than the common DRBF, and show good accuracy and high rate of convergence of IRBF process.

K. Parand; S. Abbasbandy; S. Kazem; A. R. Rezaei

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Comparison between two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions for the case of heat transfer equations arising in porous medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions have been considered; one be computed through the integration process (IRBF) and one be computed through the differentiation process (DRBF). We investigated the two approaches on natural convection heat transfer equations embedded in porous medium which are of great importance in the design of canisters for nuclear wastes disposal. Numerical results show that the IRBF be performed much better than the common DRBF, and show good accuracy and high rate of convergence of IRBF process.

Parand, K; Kazem, S; Rezaei, A R; 10.1016/j.cnsns.2010.07.011

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Is interactivity actually important?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It appears that it is a well-accepted assumption that interactivity will improve the entertainment and/or learning value of a media. This paper reviews various studies exploring the role of interactivity and reports on a study conducted to see whether ... Keywords: game engine, interactivity, learning, simulation, training

Debbie Richards

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Enforcement Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

cases Office of the General Counsel 1000 cases Office of the General Counsel 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-586-5281 en AeroSys: Order (2011-SCE-1624) http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/aerosys-order-2011-sce-1624 AeroSys: Order (2011-SCE-1624)

255

Case Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study Case Study M2M Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 An irrigation pump connected to a web---to---wireless controller designed by M2M Communications. Agricultural Demand Response Program in California Helps Farmers Reduce Peak Electricity Usage, Operate More Efficiently Year---Round The development of a two---way, web---to---wireless controller for irrigation pumps is the foundation for an agricultural demand response program in California. Designed by M2M Communications of Boise, Idaho, the controller is part of an irrigation load control system that also includes sensors, smart meters, and other monitoring equipment. Partially funded with $2.2 million in Recovery Act stimulus funds awarded by the U.S. Department of

256

Case Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

257

Security Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

security-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 security-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en PSH-13-0103 - In the Matter of Personnel Security http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/psh-13-0103-matter-personnel-security PSH-13-0103 - In the Matter of Personnel Security

258

Whistleblower Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

whistleblower-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals whistleblower-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en WBX-12-0004 - In the Matter of Denise Hunter http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/wbx-12-0004-matter-denise-hunter WBX-12-0004 - In the Matter of Denise Hunter

259

EIA Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

eia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 eia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc. http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/tee-0073-matter-cole-distributing-inc TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc.

260

FOIA Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

foia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 foia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en FIA-13-0077 - In the Matter of John F. Garrity http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/fia-13-0077-matter-john-f-garrity FIA-13-0077 - In the Matter of John F. Garrity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NREL: Buildings Research - Building Physics Test Cases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cases, the model inputs that describe the house are fixed by the test specification. The energy usage for the base case and energy savings for a number of retrofit measures are...

262

Aerosol properties computed from aircraft-based observations during the ACE-Asia campaign: 2. A case study of lidar ratio closure  

SciTech Connect

For a vertical profile with three distinct layers (marine boundary, pollution and dust layers), observed during the ACE-Asia campaign, we carried out a comparison between the modeled lidar ratio vertical profile and that obtained from co-located airborne NASA AATS-14 sunphotometer and shipborne Micro-Pulse Lidar (MPL) measurements. The vertically resolved lidar ratio was calculated from two size distribution vertical profiles – one obtained by inversion of sunphotometer-derived extinction spectra, and one measured in-situ – combined with the same refractive index model based on aerosol chemical composition. The aerosol model implies single scattering albedos of 0.78 – 0.81 and 0.93 – 0.96 at 0.523 ?m (the wavelength of the lidar measurements), in the pollution and dust layers, respectively. The lidar ratios calculated from the two size distribution profiles agree closely in the dust layer; they are however, significantly lower than the lidar ratios derived from combined lidar and sunphotometer measurements. Uncertainties in aerosol size distributions and refractive index only partly explain these differences, suggesting that particle nonsphericity in this layer is an additional explanation. In the pollution layer, the two size distribution profiles yield lidar ratios that agree within the estimated uncertainties. The retrieved size distributions result in a lidar ratio which is in closer agreement with that derived from lidar/sunphotometer measurements in this layer, with still large differences at certain altitudes (the largest relative difference was 46%). We explain these differences by non-uniqueness of the result of the size distribution retrieval, by a lack of information on the mixing state of particles, and the vertical variability of the particle refractive index.

Kuzmanoski, Maja; Box, M. A.; Schmid, Beat; Box, G. P.; Wang, Jian; Russel, P. R.; Bates, D.; Jonsson, Haf; Welton, E. J.; Seinfeld, J. H.

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

263

Rainfall-Induced Changes in Actual Surface Backscattering Cross Sections and Effects on Rain-Rate Estimates by Spaceborne Precipitation Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors used Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar (TRMM PR) data to investigate changes in the actual (attenuation corrected) surface backscattering cross section (?0e) due to changes in surface conditions ...

Shinta Seto; Toshio Iguchi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

dBASE IV basics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

O`Connor, P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirement s. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A. (INEEL); Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N. (V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute); Logunov, M.V. (MAYAK Production Association)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Demonstration of the SREX process for the removal of {sup 90}Sr from actual highly radioactive solutions in centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SREX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of {sup 90}Sr from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the SREX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.995% was obtained for {sup 90}Sr. As a result, the activity of {sup 90}Sr was reduced from 201 Ci/m{sup 3} in the feed solution of 0.0089 Ci/m{sup 3} in the aqueous raffinate, which is below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW limit of 0.04 Ci/m{sup 3} for {sup 90}Sr. Lead was extracted by the SREX solvent and successfully partitioned from the {sup 90}Sr using an ammonium citrate strip solution. Additionally, 94% of the total alpha activity, 1.9% of the {sup 241}Am, 99.94% of the {sup 238}Pu, 99.97% of the {sup 239}Pu, 36.4% of the K, 64% of the Ba, and >83% of the Zr were extracted by the SREX solvent. Cs, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Na were essentially inextractable. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Demonstration of an optimized TRUEX flowsheet for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in recent demonstrations of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. The first demonstration was performed in 1996 using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. Based on the results of this flowsheet demonstration, the flowsheet was optimized and a second flowsheet demonstration was performed. This test also was performed using 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. However, the total number of contactor stages was reduced from 24 to 20. Also, the concentration of HEDPA in the strip solution was reduced from 0.04 M to 0.01 M in order to minimize the amount of phosphate in the HLW fraction, which would be immobilized into a glass waste form. This flowsheet demonstration was performed using centrifugal contactors installed in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet tested consisted of six extraction stages, four scrub stages, six strip stages, two solvent was stages, and two acid rinse stages. An overall removal efficiency of 99.79% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 540 nCi/g in the feed to 0.90 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Removal efficiencies of 99.84%, 99.97%, 99.97%, 99.85%, and 99.76% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Property:BLM CaseStatus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BLM CaseStatus BLM CaseStatus Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Property Name BLM CaseStatus Property Type String Description Status of case at most recent import from LR2000. Most of these cases are actually leases. Allows Values Authorized, Cancelled, Closed, Expired, Pending, Rejected, Relinquished, Withdrawn This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Authorized Cancelled Closed Expired Pending Rejected Relinquished Withdrawn Subproperties This property has the following 5 subproperties: C CACA-005224 N NVN-075549 NVN-076209 NVN-076822 NVN-076825 Pages using the property "BLM CaseStatus" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AZA-009168 + Closed + AZA-009169 + Closed + AZA-009170 + Closed +

269

Casing pull tests for directionally drilled environmental wells  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests to evaluate several types of environmental well casings have been conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and it`s industrial partner, The Charles Machine Works, Inc. (CMW). A test bed was constructed at the CMW test range to model a typical shallow, horizontal, directionally drilled wellbore. Four different types of casings were pulled through this test bed. The loads required to pull the casings through the test bed and the condition of the casing material were documented during the pulling operations. An additional test was conducted to make a comparison of test bed vs actual wellbore casing pull loads. A directionally drilled well was emplaced by CMW to closely match the test bed. An instrumented casing was installed in the well and the pull loads recorded. The completed tests are reviewed and the results reported.

Staller, G.E.; Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Quantitative study of oilfield casing damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carrying on the analysis to the cause of casing failure based on engineering factors and geological factors, and choosing the improved analytic hierarchy process to have a quantitative study for oilfield of the casing failure, improved the influence ... Keywords: analytical hierarchy process (AHP), casing damage, quantitative analysis

Deng Rui; Zhang Liang; Guo Haimin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

272

ELECTRICITY CASE: MAIN REPORT RISK, CONSEQUENCES, AND ECONOMIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that historically, electric power outages have played a central role in disruptions of many other infrastructures path for their operation. Moreover, historically, electric power outages have played a central role event will occur increases by about 9% per year (based on actual outages between 1990 and 2004

Wang, Hai

273

Retail Market Based Pricing: Retail Market Based Pricing - Three Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Customers are not provided with incentives for efficient conservation and substitution of electricity away from peak periods if they do not face prices that reflect the real-time cost of purchasing wholesale electricity that is experienced by their retail energy provider. Recent events in California's restructured electricity market underscore the importance of developing products and structures that enable demand response to changes in prices in these markets. This report assembles three studies of cust...

2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

274

Less than severe worst case accidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many systems can provide tremendous benefit if operating correctly, produce only an inconvenience if they fail to operate, but have extreme consequences if they are only partially disabled such that they operate erratically or prematurely. In order to assure safety, systems are often tested against the most severe environments and accidents that are considered possible to ensure either safe operation or safe failure. However, it is often the less severe environments which result in the ``worst case accident`` since these are the conditions in which part of the system may be exposed or rendered unpredictable prior to total system failure. Some examples of less severe mechanical, thermal, and electrical environments which may actually be worst case are described as cautions for others in industries with high consequence operations or products.

Sanders, G.A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have put practical electric cars within reach, but politicsthat markets for electric cars might actually emergeratherTO CAR WorldResources Insnmte, 1994 TAKING CWARGE ELECTRIC

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Assessment of power-frequency based algorithms for fault location in power grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased accuracy of the faults' location is a very actual request of the power grids' operation and management, reason to develop new and as precise as possible techniques for the estimation of the short-circuits' location. The actual fault locating ... Keywords: ATP simulation, fault location, power grids, power-frequency based algorithms

Marcel Istrate

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

NP Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(BES) Biological and Environmental Science (BER) Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) High Energy Physics (HEP) Nuclear Physics (NP) Agenda Hotel Case Studies Case Study Worksheets...

278

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Development of the prototype Munitions Case Moisture Meter, Model ORNL-1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

There is a great need for a rapid and simple means of determining the moisture content in combustible cartridge case (ccc) munitions. Previous studies have demonstrated that accumulation of moisture in ccc rounds, such as the M829, leads to softening of the case wall and weakening of the adhesive joint. Moisture in the ccc can lead to incomplete combustion of the case upon firing the round. Currently, there are no facile methods for measuring the moisture content. A prototype portable meter for non-destructive and rapid estimation of moisture in ccc has been developed. The Munitions Case Moisture Meter Model ORNL-1 demonstrates the feasibility of developing an instrument based on the moisture dependence of dielectric properties, to measure moisture in ccc munitions in storage and in the field. These instruments are simple, inexpensive, lightweight, portable, low-power battery operated, and intrinsically safe. They provide nondestructive, noninvasive, and rapid measurements. Calibration data for the prototype are not available at this time. Therefore, calibration of the meter and the development of a scale reading directly moisture content in munitions rounds could not be completed. These data will be supplied by the US Army from its tests of the meter with actual munitions. However, experimental results on empty cccs in laboratory conditions demonstrate satisfactory performance of the instrument. Additional work is needed to bring the prototype to its optimum usefulness and accuracy for field measurements. This includes: Calibration of the meter scale with full-up munitions; Data and evaluation procedures to adjust the performance of the meter for different environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity; and Studies of the dielectric properties of moist ccc materials, as a function of frequency and temperature, are needed for adjustment of the meter for optimal performance.

Agouridis, D.C.; Gayle, T.M.; Griest, W.H.

1993-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Case Engineering Group India | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group India Group India Jump to: navigation, search Name Case Engineering Group India Place Uttar Pradesh, India Sector Services, Solar Product Faridabad-based coal gasifiers and pollution services firm. Through its joint venture with Norasco the firm is planning to venture into solar power generation sector. References Case Engineering Group India[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Case Engineering Group India is a company located in Uttar Pradesh, India . References ↑ "Case Engineering Group India" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Case_Engineering_Group_India&oldid=343278" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

282

Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Lattice-based Cryptography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this chapter we describe some of the recent progress in lattice-based cryptography. Lattice-based cryptographic constructions hold a great promise for post-quantum cryptography, as they enjoy very strong security proofs based on worst-case hardness, relatively efficient implementations, as well as great simplicity. In addition, lattice-based cryptography is believed to be secure against quantum computers. Our focus here

Daniele Micciancio; Oded Regev

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Performance evaluation of 24 ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated N-Reactor storage basin water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of 24 organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated waters from the 100 Area 105 N-Reactor fuel storage basin. The data described in this report can be applied for developing and evaluating ion exchange pre-treatment process flowsheets. Cesium and strontium batch distribution ratios (K{sub d}`s), decontamination factors (DF), and material loadings (mmol g{sup -1}) are compared as a function of ion exchange material and initial cesium concentration. The actual and simulated N-Basin waters contain relatively low levels of aluminum, barium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (ranging from 8.33E-04 to 6.40E-05 M), with slightly higher levels of boron (6.63E-03 M) and sodium (1.62E-03 M). The {sup 137}Cs level is 1.74E-06 Ci L-{sup 1} which corresponds to approximately 4.87E-10 M Cs. The initial Na/Cs ratio was 3.33E+06. The concentration of total strontium is 4.45E-06 M, while the {sup 90}Sr radioactive component was measured to be 6.13E-06 Ci L{sup -1}. Simulant tests were conducted by contacting 0.067 g or each ion exchange material with approximately 100 mL of either the actual or simulated N-Basin water. The simulants contained variable initial cesium concentrations ranging from 1.00E-04 to 2.57E- 10 M Cs while all other components were held constant. For all materials, the average cesium K{sub d} was independent of cesium concentration below approximately 1.0E-06 M. Above this level, the average cesium K{sub d} values decreased significantly. Cesium K{sub d} values exceeding 1.0E+07 mL g{sup -1} were measured in the simulated N-Basin water. However, when measured in the actual N-Basin water the values were several orders of magnitude lower, with a maximum of 1.24E+05 mL g{sup -1} observed.

Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

In Case of Emergency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Case of Emergency In Case of Emergency Print FirePolice Emergency: ext. 7911 Cell phone or off-site: 510-486-7911 When dialing from off-site, the following numbers need to be...

286

Long-Term Regional Estimates of Evapotranspiration for Mexico Based on Downscaled ISCCP Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development and evaluation of a long-term high-resolution dataset of potential and actual evapotranspiration for Mexico based on remote sensing data are described. Evapotranspiration is calculated using a modified version of the Penman–...

Justin Sheffield; Eric F. Wood; Francisco Munoz-Arriola

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Business Case for CNG in Municipal Fleets (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation about compressed natural gas in municipal fleets, assessing investment profitability, the VICE model, base-case scenarios, and pressing questions for fleet owners.

Johnson, C.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

288

186 Wireline Failures in Oil & Gas Wells - Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, 186 Wireline Failures in Oil & Gas Wells - Case Studies ..... 202 Microstructure Exploration of High Strength High Ductility Iron-Based Glassy

289

Case Study 2 - Ventilation, IAQ and Energy Impacts of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... approaches: a base case of envelope infiltration only, passive inlet vents in ... building air change rates, air distribution within the house, heating and ...

290

A framework for password-based authenticated key exchange1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a general framework for password-based authenticated key exchange protocols, in the common reference string model. Our protocol is actually an abstraction of the key exchange protocol of Katz et al. and is based on the recently ... Keywords: Passwords, authentication, dictionary attack, projective hash functions

Rosario Gennaro; Yehuda Lindell

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

POEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for optimally controlling HVAC systems in buildings based on actual occupancy levels. POEM is comprised for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based are then fused with an occupancy prediction model us- ing a particle filter in order to determine the most

Cerpa, Alberto E.

292

Fracture Optimization eXpert (FOX) -How Computational Intelligence Helps the Bottom-Line in Gas Storage; A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The understanding of this value concept is to a natural gas storage pool: the top gas capacity, the first to expand a market for natural gas ing side, though, the storage pool cap/del working unit is storage case is established. The actual incremental increases in expansion. value of the natural gas storage

Mohaghegh, Shahab

293

Boehmite Actual Waste Dissolutions Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite, sodium aluminate and boehmite. Gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic. Boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Samples were taken from four Hanford tanks and homogenized in order to give a sample that is representative of REDOX (Reduction Oxidation process for Pu recovery) sludge solids. Bench scale testing was performed on the homogenized waste to study the dissolution of boehmite. Dissolution was studied at three different hydroxide concentrations, with each concentration being run at three different temperatures. Samples were taken periodically over the 170 hour runs in order to determine leaching kinetics. Results of the dissolution studies and implications for the proposed processing of these wastes will be discussed.

Snow, Lanee A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Peterson, Reid A.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Comparison of strength and load-based methods for testing wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to compare two methods of blade test loading and show how they are applied in an actual blade test. Strength and load-based methods were examined to determine the test load for an Atlantic Orient Corporation (AOC) 15/50 wind turbine blade for fatigue and static testing. Fatigue load-based analysis was performed using measured field test loads extrapolated for extreme rare events and scaled to thirty-year spectra. An accelerated constant amplitude fatigue test that gives equivalent damage at critical locations was developed using Miner`s Rule and the material S-N curves. Test load factors were applied to adjust the test loads for uncertainties, and differences between the test and operating environment. Similar analyses were carried, out for the strength-based fatigue test using the strength of the blade and the material properties to determine the load level and number of constant amplitude cycles to failure. Static tests were also developed using load and strength criteria. The resulting test loads were compared and contrasted. The analysis shows that, for the AOC 15/50 blade, the strength-based test loads are higher than any of the static load-based cases considered but were exceeded in the fatigue analysis for a severe hot/wet environment.

Musial, W.D.; Clark, M.E.; Egging, N. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a Low Carbon Economy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a...

296

Standard Bullets and Casings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Figure 2. On the left, a NIST SRM 2461 ... Case mounted on a brass cylinder holder; right, optical micrograph ... the data are in ASCII tab delimited format ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

OSCARS Case Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feedback: info@es.net OSCARS Case Study OSCARS Virtual Circuits Extend JGI Network Capacity The Challenge In February 2010, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) at Lawrence Berkeley...

298

Sustainable Building Case Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Studies Case Studies Sustainable Building Case Studies October 4, 2013 - 4:58pm Addthis These case studies feature examples of sustainably designed buildings and facilities from Federal agencies and industry. High Performance Federal Buildings Database The High Performance Federal Buildings database presents a sampling of sustainable buildings projects in the Federal Government. This database taps into the existing U.S. Department of Energy High Performance Buildings database, showcasing only Federal case study examples. Third-Party Certification ENERGY STAR for Federal Agencies: A site that provides access to the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, the Federal High Performance Sustainable Buildings Checklist, and ENERGY STAR qualified products, and much more. Green Globes: A Web-based program from the Green Building Initiative for

299

Sustainable Building Case Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Studies Case Studies Sustainable Building Case Studies October 4, 2013 - 4:58pm Addthis These case studies feature examples of sustainably designed buildings and facilities from Federal agencies and industry. High Performance Federal Buildings Database The High Performance Federal Buildings database presents a sampling of sustainable buildings projects in the Federal Government. This database taps into the existing U.S. Department of Energy High Performance Buildings database, showcasing only Federal case study examples. Third-Party Certification ENERGY STAR for Federal Agencies: A site that provides access to the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, the Federal High Performance Sustainable Buildings Checklist, and ENERGY STAR qualified products, and much more. Green Globes: A Web-based program from the Green Building Initiative for

300

The 27–28 October 1986 FIRE Cirrus Case Study: Retrieval of Cloud Particle Sizes and Optical Depths from Comparative Analyses of Aircraft and Satellite-based Infrared Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrared radiance measurements were acquired from a narrow-field nadir-viewing radiometer based on the NASA ER-2 aircraft during a coincident Landsat 5 overpass on 28 October 1986 as part of the FIRE Cirrus IFO in the vicinity of Lake Michigan. ...

Philip D. Hammer; Francisco P. J. Valero; Stefan Kinne

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Meta-Model for Textual Use Case Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Use Case is a specification of interactions involving a system and external actors of that system. The capability for use case modeling has been integrated to the Unified Modeling Language (UML) since its inception. However, use cases are only defined at an abstract level, as the UML Specification does not discuss use case description in text form. In this paper, we propose an abstract syntax for textual use case description as a meta-model extension of the UML Specification. This meta-model is based on elements commonly found in use case templates. The meta-model also includes OCL constraints for ensuring consistency with the UML specification.

Stéphane S. Somé

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Performance-Based Incentive | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Performance-Based Incentive Performance-Based Incentive Jump to: navigation, search Performance-based incentives (PBIs), also known as production incentives, provide cash payments based on the number of kilowatt-hours (kWh) or BTUs generated by a renewable energy system. A "feed-in tariff" is an example of a PBI. To ensure project quality, payments based on a system's actual performance are generally more effective than payments based on a system's rated capacity. (Note that tax incentives based on the amount of energy produced by an eligible commercial facility are categorized as "Corporate Tax Incentives" in DSIRE.) [1] Contents 1 Performance-Based Incentive Incentives 2 References Performance-Based Incentive Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 194) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

303

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V.; Smirnov, I.; Babain, V.; Zaitsev, B.; Esimantovskiy, V.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Universal Solvent Exchange (UNEX) Process II: Flowsheet Development & Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Actual Acidic Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel solvent extraction process, the Universal Extraction (UNEX) process, has been developed for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from acidic waste solutions. The UNEX process solvent consists of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide for the extraction of 137Cs, polyethylene glycol for the extraction of 90Sr, and diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide for the extraction of the actinides and lanthanides. A nonnitroaromatic polar diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone has been developed for this process. A UNEX flowsheet consisting of a single solvent extraction cycle has been developed as a part of a collaborative effort between the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This flowsheet has been demonstrated with actual acidic radioactive tank waste at the INEEL using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded cell facility. The activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and the actinides were reduced to levels at which a grout waste form would meet NRC Class A LLW requirements. The extraction of 99Tc and several nonradioactive metals by the UNEX solvent has also been evaluated.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V. N.; Smirnov, I. V.; Esimantovskiy, V. M.; Zaitsev. B. N.; Babain, V. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Science DMZ Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies Studies About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ Case Studies Developed by ESnet engineers, the Science DMZ model addresses common network performance problems encountered at any institution by creating an environment that is tailored to the needs of high performance science

306

Case No. VBU-0016  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16 16 September 15, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner:Gary Roybal Date of Filing:June 23, 1999 Case Number:VBU-0016 On October 6, 1998, Gary Roybal (Roybal) filed a complaint under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The regulations governing the program were revised in a new interim final rule that took effect on April 14, 1999. Along with other procedural changes, the interim final rule reassigned the investigative function to the Office of Hearings and Appeals. All of the pending whistleblower cases in the investigative stage, including Roybal's case, were then transferred to OHA. The OHA investigator assigned to the case dismissed Roybal's complaint on June 11, 1999. On June 23,

307

Case No. VWZ-0009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. Date of Filing: March 8, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0009 This decision...

308

Web-based gis and public participation:an aid to widening female participation in revitalizing outdoor recreational facilities in saudi arabia. a case study in jeddah, saudi arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last decade, the Internet and Geographic Information System (GIS) have made changes in the relationship between governments and citizens in many developed countries. Citizens, in such countries, have been given more chances to participate in the decision making process of the spatial issues relevant to them. Such participation has helping to make urban planning more democratic and to make planners plan with the public rather than plan for the public. In Saudi Arabia (a developing country), participation of citizens in spatial decision making is very limited. Such limitation is more severe when considering women due to the circumstance of gender segregation in the Saudi society. While males may somehow muddle through ways to express their views about spatial issues to the planning authority, females have no ways unless they behave against the local norms. There is a persistent need for implementing distance participation for women in Saudi Arabia. This research examines whether developing and employing an Internet / GIS participatory approach can facilitate (without conflicting with the local conservative cultural norms) women’s participation in the municipal decision making process of the neighborhood’s outdoor recreational facilities. The goal was primarily to adapt the technology to serve the society instead of necessitating the society to change its inherited norms to be able to advance. The research involved an exploratory ethnographic case study carried out in a selected residential community in the city of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The research was carried out in two phases where the current status of public participation in the Saudi community planning was investigated first, and then a prototype for an Internet/GIS system for female public participation was developed and evaluated. The research found that there is a legitimate enthusiasm amongst the public and officials of the research sample for adopting e-public participation. Such enthusiasm is supported by a number of political, economical, technological and religious reasons. However, the findings showed that adopting e-public participation is more promising in the near future than currently due to different reasons including the current relatively small number of Internet users in Saudi Arabia. Since such research is the first of its type to be conducted in the Saudi context, the findings can serve as a road map indicating that adopting e-public participation in Saudi Arabia is promising and worth researching.

Daghistani, Farouk

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Case tool evaluation system  

SciTech Connect

An automated system that uses an analytical approach to evaluate Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools is currently being developed. this system is referred to as the CASE Tool Evaluation System. The following general criteria will be used: overall tool functionality; tool stability; cost; interfaces with other software; customization; ease of use; output produced; hardware and operating system needs; documentation; training and vendor support; repository interface; methodologies; and vendor stability. in Phase 1 CASE tools will be eliminated that do not meet certain must-have'' characteristics specified by the user. Phase 2 will further reduce the size of the tool list by retaining those tools that possess desirable, but not absolutely necessary'' characteristics, also specified by the user. Phase 3 will employ the Analytic Hierarchy Process, developed by Dr. Thomas L. Saaty, to rank the tools. Users will be able to supply tools of their own choosing, in addition to tools that are generated via normal use of the system. All three phases will interact with a database that stores objective information about CASE tools. The use of the Analytic Hierarchy process (AHP) distinguishes this method of CASE tool evaluation from others. As used in this system, the AHP is a method of breaking down the complex, unstructured problem of selecting a CASE tool into its component evaluation criteria and candidate tools. These criteria and tools are arranged into a hierarchical order. Each criterion and tool is assigned a subjective numerical value (by experts or users or both). These values are then synthesized to determine which have the highest priority. The result will be a ranked list of CASE tools tailored to the needs and desires of the user.

Green, P.L.; Andreae, P.V.; Pennewell, W.J.; Clinard, L.A.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Tarrant, P.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Implementation of a Silver Iodide Cloud-Seeding Parameterization in WRF. Part II: 3D Simulations of Actual Seeding Events and Sensitivity Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four cloud-seeding cases over southern Idaho during the 2010/11 winter season have been simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using the coupled silver iodide (AgI) cloud-seeding scheme that was described in Part I. The ...

Lulin Xue; Sarah A. Tessendorf; Eric Nelson; Roy Rasmussen; Daniel Breed; Shaun Parkinson; Pat Holbrook; Derek Blestrud

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Singular operators in multiwavelet bases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review some recent results on multiwavelet methods for solving integral and partial differential equations and present an efficient representation of operators using discontinuous multiwavelet bases, including the case for singular integral operators. ...

G. Fann; G. Beylkin; R. J. Harrison; K. E. Jordan

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With this testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137 Cs and 90 Sr to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Brewer, Ken Neal; Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP tank waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRUEX is being evaluated at Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for separating actinides from acidic radioactive waste stored at ICPP; efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration with actual tank waste. A continuous countercurrent flowsheet test was successfully completed at ICPP using waste from tank WM-183. This demonstration was performed using 24 states of 2-cm dia centrifugal contactors in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet had 8 extraction stages, 5 scrub stages, 6 strip stages, 3 solvent wash stages, and 2 acid rinse stages. A centrifugal contactor stage in the scrub section was not working during testing, and the scrub feed (aqueous) solution followed the solvent into the strip section, eliminating the scrub section in the flowsheet. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides, reducing the activity from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste.The 0.04 M HEDPA strip section back-extracted 99.9998% of the actinide from the TRUEX solvent. Removal efficiencies of >99. 90, 99.96, 99.98, >98.89, 93.3, and 89% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 99}Tc. Fe was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Hg was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (73%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na2CO3 wash section. Only 1.4% of the Hg exited with the high activity waste strip product.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm-diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With the testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for Cs-137, Sr-90, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of Cs-137 and Sr-90 to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent with actinides and metals (Zr, Fe, and Mo). Also, the carryover of aqueous solution (flooding) with the solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (>6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

B. N. Zaitsev (Khlopin Radium Institute); D. J. Wood (INEEL); I. V. Smirnov; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst; T. A. Todd; V. A. Babain; V. M. Esimantovskiy; V. N. Romanovskiy

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum View topic -Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553d  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12 Dark Energy may not actually exist Moderators: arc - On With the New #12;9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 2

Temple, Blake

316

Case No. VBR-0002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VBR-0002 VBR-0002 January 24, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Supplemental Order Name of Petitioner: Westinghouse Savannah River Company Date of Filing: November 12, 1999 Case Number: VBR-0002 This supplemental order concerns a Motion for Reconsideration (Case No. VBR-0002) filed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) on November 12, 1999. The reconsideration motion relates to an Initial Agency Decision issued by the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE) on November 2, 1999 (Case No. VBH-0002). In the Initial Agency Decision, I granted relief to the Complainant on the whistleblower complaint he had filed against WSRC under 10 C.F.R. Part 708.(1) I found that WSRC had failed to prove by "clear and convincing" evidence

317

Case No. VWD-0004  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 July 1, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Supplemental Order Names of Petitioners:Princeton University General Physics Corporation Date of Filing: June 10, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0004 This decision will consider a Motion for Discovery filed jointly by Princeton University (Princeton) and General Physics Corporation (GPC) on June 10, 1999 with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The discovery motion relates to a hearing requested by David Turner under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). The OHA has assigned Mr. Turner's hearing request Case No. VWA-0038, and the discovery request under consideration Case No. VWD-0004. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program

318

Case No. VBH-0025  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 June 22, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Alizabeth Aramowicz Smith Date of Filing:July 6, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0025 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Alizabeth Aramowicz Smith, a former contractor employee at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As explained below, Smith's complaint should be denied. This case arises under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the "whistleblower" regulations. The whistleblower regulations prohibit a contractor from retaliating against a contractor employee who engages in protected conduct. Protected conduct includes disclosing information that the employee believes reveals 1) a substantial violation of a law, rule, or

319

Case No. VBH-0023  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 March 31, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Stephanie A. Ashburn Date of Filing:July 6, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0023 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Stephanie A. Ashburn, a former fellow of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). As explained below, Ashburn's complaint is denied. This case arises under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the "whistleblower" regulations. The whistleblower regulations prohibit a contractor from retaliating against a contractor employee who engages in protected conduct. Protected conduct includes disclosing information that the employee believes reveals 1) a substantial violation of a law, rule, or

320

Case No. VBZ-0047  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47 47 August 30, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Summary Judgment Name of Case: Edward J. Seawalt Date of Filing: August 23, 2000 Case Number: VBZ-0047 This decision will consider a Motion for Summary Judgment that Contract Associates, Inc., ("the contractor") filed on August 23, 2000. The contractor moves to deny a complaint filed by Edward J. Seawalt ("Mr. Seawalt" or "the complainant") under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Seawalt's complaint has been set for a hearing under Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VBH-0047. I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Case No. VWX-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWX-0014 VWX-0014 November 29, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Supplemental Order Name of Case:Frank E. Isbill Date of Filing:November 4, 1999 Case Number: VWX-0014 This Decision supplements an Initial Agency Decision, dated September 27, 1999, issued by the undersigned Hearing Officer of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy in a case involving a "whistleblower" complaint filed by Frank E. Isbill (the complainant) under 10 C.F.R. Part 708. See Frank E. Isbill, 27 DOE ¶ 87,529 (1999). In the Decision, I found that NCI Information Systems, Inc. (the contractor), a DOE contractor, had violated the provisions of 10 C.F.R. § 708.5 by removing the complainant's supervisory duties in reprisal for his making protected disclosures related to a

322

Case No. VBZ-0057  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57 57 November 1, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motions to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Janet K. Benson Date of Filings: April 6, 2000 August 7, 2000 Case Numbers: VBZ-0057 VBZ-0058 This determination considers Motions to Dismiss(1) filed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Laboratory)(2) under the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In these Motions, the Laboratory contends that the claims asserted by Janet Benson in OHA Case No. VWA-0044 are defective as a matter of law and should not be determined on the merits.(3) The Laboratory makes the following arguments in support of these Motions: (1) The Laboratory cannot be held liable for any acts of reprisal that occurred prior to September 23, 1994, the date it agreed to comply with Part 708 (OHA Case No. VBZ-0057);

323

Case No. VBZ-0028  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28 28 October 12, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Sandia Corporation Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBZ-0028 This decision considers a "Motion to Dismiss" filed by the Sandia Corporation (Sandia) on August 24, 1999. In its Motion, Sandia seeks judgment on the record of Complaint filed by Dr. Jiunn Yu (Yu) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Yu's Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VBH-0028. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VBZ-0028. The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

324

Case No. VWZ-0011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 May 19, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. Date of Filing: May 18, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0011 This decision considers a "Motion to Dismiss" filed by West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc. (West Valley) on May 18, 1999. In its Motion, West Valley seeks the partial dismissal of a Complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Gretencord requested a hearing on his Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 on March 19, 1999, and it has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0033. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VWZ-0011.

325

Case No. VBX-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VBX-0014 VBX-0014 April 25, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Supplemental Order Name of Case: Roy Leonard Moxley Date of Filing:January 10, 2000 Case Number: VBX-0014 This Decision supplements an Initial Agency Decision, dated December 29, 1999, that I issued as the Hearing Officer in a case involving a "whistleblower" complaint. The complaint was filed by Roy Leonard Moxley under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. See Roy Leonard Moxley, 27 DOE ¶ 87,546 (1999) (the Initial Agency Decision). In that Decision, I found that Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), a DOE contractor, had violated the provisions of 10 C.F.R. § 708.5 by reducing Mr. Moxley's salary grade level (SGL) from SGL 31 to SGL

326

Case No. VWD-0002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 May 21, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Supplemental Order Name of Petitioner:Frank E. Isbill Date of Filing: May 4, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0002 This determination will consider two requests for discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) on May 4, 1999, by Frank E. Isbill (the complainant). These requests (which have been grouped together as one Motion for Discovery, Case No. VWD-0002) concern the hearing requested by the complainant under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). He requested this hearing on March 29, 1999 (Case No. VWA-0034) in connection with the Part 708 complaint he filed against NCI Communications, Inc. (the contractor). The DOE recently

327

Case No. VWZ-0017  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 November 10, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: University of California Date of Filing: October 6, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0017 This decision considers a Motion to Dismiss filed by the University of California (the University) on October 6, 1999. In its Motion, the University seeks dismissal of the complaint filed against it by Charles Montaño under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Montaño's complaint under Part 708 has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0042. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VWZ-0017. The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

328

Case No. VWZ-0010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 May 12, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0010 This decision considers a "Motion to Dismiss" filed by West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc. (West Valley) on April 27, 1999. In its Motion, West Valley seeks the dismissal of a Complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Gretencord requested a hearing on his Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 on March 19, 1999, and it has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0033. The present Motion has been assigned Case No. VWZ-0010.

329

Project Finance Case Studies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finance Case Finance Case Studies FUPWG Meeting October 21, 2010 RENEWABLE ENERGY * Solar, wind, biomass and geothermal power resources show great promise to positively impact both the environment and energy security. * While these technologies are coming down in cost, there is often no price associated with carbon content, causing renewable energy to remain more expensive than fossil fuels in most markets. * Utilizing Treasury Cash Grant, Investment and Production Tax Credits, Renewable Energy Credits and state rebates is essential to a project's viability. WATER and WASTEWATER * With operating budgets stretched, many public-sector utilities are struggling to upgrade critical water treatment facilities to comply with changing environmental regulations or to maintain system efficiencies.

330

The Case for Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land Press, 1995 TESTING ELECTRIC VEHICLE DEMAND IN " HYBRIDThe Case for Electric Vehicles DanieI Sperlmg Reprint UCTCor The Case for Electric Vehicles Darnel Sperling Institute

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Retrospective Case Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project, Retrospective Case Studies (RCS) operates directly under DGE's Resource Exploration and Assessment program. The overall objectives of this project are: (1) to improve the general and specific level of understanding of geothermal systems, and (2) to improve tools and technology for geothermal exploration and assessment.

Wright, Phillip M.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Security Cases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 31, 2012 July 31, 2012 PSH-12-0042 - In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing This case involves an Individual who failed to meet his financial obligations during the final years of his first marriage. The Individual reported the repossession of his motor vehicle and a home foreclosure to the Local Security Office (LSO) in 2008. The LSO subsequently conducted a series of three Personal Security Interviews (PSI) of the Individual, the most recent on February 1, 2012. July 27, 2012 PSH-12-0050 - In the Matter of Personnel Security Hearing The individual's present employer, a DOE contractor, has requested a DOE access authorization for the individual. The individual completed and submitted an Electronic Questionnaire for Investigations Processing (QNSP) in November 2011. DOE Exhibit 8. Based on issues contained in the

333

SU?E?T?21: A Grid Intensity?Based Dose Algorithm to Realize MLC Irregular and Inhomogeneous Field Modeling for Monte Carlo Clinical Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A grid intensity?based dose algorithm to realize MLC irregular?inhomogeneous field modeling is presented for Monte Carlo clinical application in ARTS (Accurate Radiotherapy System). Methods: Linac modeling actually is a multi?parameter optimization process

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Case No. VWZ-0012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 August 6, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Case: Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: June 30, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0012 This determination will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) on June 30, 1999. WSRC seeks dismissal of the underlying complaint filed by Lucy B. Smith under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. I. Background Ms. Smith's Part 708 complaint arises from her employment as a chemist with WSRC at DOE's Savannah River Site. Ms. Smith alleges that she made three protected disclosures involving health and safety concerns to WSRC officials during the last half of 1996. Subsequently, on January 20, 1997, Ms. Smith received a Reduction in Force notice from WSRC. Ms. Smith then filed a complaint with the United

335

EDO: Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EDO Case Studies EDO Case Studies Technology Transfer / Technology Assistance Technology identifies anomalies in complex financial data Identifying atypical information in financial data early could help determine problematic financial trends such as the systemic risk that recently put the U.S. and global financial systems in a downward fall. Recognizing such anomalous information can also help regulators understand markets, and identify the potential need of new rules and regulations. Additionally, it can help investors and advisors better manage their investment and savings portfolios. The AnomalatorTM software, developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, uses advanced mathematical algorithms to identify unusual trends in complex financial data and graphically show how it compares with

336

Case No. VWA-0040  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 December 13, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Rosie L. Beckham Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0040 Rosie L. Beckham (hereinafter the complainant) filed a complaint against her former employer, KENROB and Associates, Inc. (hereinafter the contractor) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The program prohibits a DOE contractor from retaliating against an employee for disclosing certain information (a protected disclosure). A DOE office investigated the complaint and issued a report, which concluded that the complainant was not entitled to relief. The complainant requested a hearing, and I was appointed to conduct the hearing and issue an

337

Case No. VBH-0021  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 21 February 7, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Eugene J. Dreger Date of Filing: July 14, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0021 This Initial Agency Decision addresses a whistleblower complaint filed by Eugene J. Dreger (the complainant) against his former employer, Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. At the time of the incidents described below, Dreger worked at the DOE's Nevada Test Site as a safety inspector. REECO was a primary contractor at the Test Site until December 31, 1995. Beginning January 1, 1996, Bechtel Nevada assumed this responsibility, and it has also assumed responsibility for litigation relating to

338

Case No. VWA-0039  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 February 25, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Luis P. Silva Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0039 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Luis P. Silva, a former employee of the Scientific Ecology Group (SEG) and its successor firm, GTS Duratek (GTS).(1) SEG, and then GTS, were subcontractors to Sandia Corporation at the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF) where Silva worked before he was laid off by GTS in August 1997. Sandia is a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, the management and operating contractor at DOE's Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In March 1998, Roy F. Weston, Inc. replaced GTS as Sandia's subcontractor at the RMWMF. Silva alleges that he made protected disclosures

339

WSH Case Studies 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Health Case Summaries and Health Case Summaries Enforcement Workshop, March 2012 1. Unescorted Entry into Active Laser Area A Facilities electrician received a work order from his work lead to install a switch box and a power cord on a vacuum pump in a Class 4 laser room. He arrived escorted by a laser lab scientist to review the scope of work. After reviewing the work to be performed and inspecting the equipment, the electrician alerted the laser lab scientist that he needed additional tools and materials to complete the task. The scientist informed the electrician that he should not work in a laser lab without an escort. The electrician then informed his work lead that he needed to re- schedule the job. The work lead did not discuss or address the work area hazards and controls

340

Case No. VBA-0055  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

<BR> Case No. VBA-0055 October 2, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Lucy Smith Date of Filing: July 20, 2000 Case Number: VBA-0055 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on July 11, 2000, involving a Complaint filed by Lucy Smith (Smith or the Complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her Complaint, Smith claims that her former employer, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), a DOE contractor, terminated her employment during a reduction in force (RIF), and then failed to rehire her, in retaliation for making disclosures that are protected under Part 708. In the IAD, however, the Hearing Officer determined that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Case No. VBH-0007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 September 27, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Salvatore Gionfriddo Date of Filing: June 23, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0007 On December 28, 1998, Salvatore Gionfriddo (Complainant) filed a Complaint of Reprisal with the Director of the Federal Energy Technology Center of the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program. The Complainant alleged that he made a protected disclosure under Part 708 and his employer, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) retaliated against him by terminating his employment. (1) On July 19, 1999, ERC filed a Motion to Dismiss the complaint. The firm claims that its agreement with the DOE is not covered by Part 708 and that it is not obligated to participate in proceedings

342

Case No. VBH-0035  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 September 22, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Theresa G. Joyner Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0035 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Theresa G. Joyner, a former employee (hereinafter the employee) of NCI Information Systems, Inc. (NCI) (hereinafter the contractor). As explained below, the employee's request for relief is denied. I. Background The Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program governs this matter. The DOE recently revised the regulations governing this program. See 64 Fed. Reg. 12862 (March 15, 1999) (amending 10 C.F.R. pt. 708) (the whistleblower regulations). Under the regulations, the DOE's Office of

343

Case No. VWZ-0020  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20 20 February 3, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Case: Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: October 14, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0020 This determination will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) on October 14, 1999. WSRC seeks dismissal of three allegations of retaliation by reason of failure to rehire submitted by Lucy B. Smith under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In a submission dated December 6, 1999, WSRC further requests dismissal of a discovery request made by Ms. Smith regarding hiring by subcontractors of WSRC. I. Background Ms. Smith's Part 708 complaint arises from her employment as a chemist with WSRC at DOE's Savannah

344

Case No. VWD-0006  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 August 10, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Petitioner:Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: August 2, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0006 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Lucy B. Smith. This Motion, dated July 20, 1999, concerns the hearing requested by Ms. Smith under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). She requested this hearing on May 5, 1999 (Case No. VWA-0041) in connection with the Part 708 complaint she filed against Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). I. Factual Background Ms. Smith's Part 708 complaint arises from her employment as a chemist with WSRC at DOE's Savannah

345

Case No. VBD-0059  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

59 59 June 8, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Case: Janet L. Westbrook Date of Filing: June 5, 2001 Case Number: VBD-0059 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by UT-Battelle, LLC, the company that manages the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Motion relates to a hearing soon to be held on a complaint that Janet L. Westbrook filed under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). For the reasons stated below, the motion is denied. Ms. Westbrook worked at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a radiological engineer. She claims that she has persistently disclosed various safety-related concerns and as a result experienced hostility and

346

Case No. VBD-0063  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63 63 August 14, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Petitioner:Bruce R. Field Date of Filing: August 2, 2001 Case Number: VBD-0063 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Bruce R. Field (Field). This Motion, dated August 2, 2001, concerns the hearing requested by Field under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). Field requested this hearing on April 24, 2001 (Case No. VBH-0063) in connection with the Part 708 complaint he filed against the management and operating contractor, Midwest Research Institute (MRI) for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).(1) I. Background Field's complaint arises from his employment at NREL as a Project Manager. During the period 1994 to

347

Case No. VWZ-0016  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 November 8, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Charles Montaño Date of Filing: October 4, 1999 Case Number: VWZ-0016 This decision considers a Motion to Dismiss filed by Charles Montaño (Montaño) on October 4, 1999. In his Motion, Montaño seeks dismissal of the hearing scheduled to begin on November 16, 1999 and judgment on the existing record for the Whistleblower Complaint that he filed against the University of California (the University) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. His Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VWA-0042. The present Motion has been

348

Case No. VBU-0050  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50 50 June 15, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision of the Director Name of Case: Darryl H. Shadel Date of Filing: May 30, 2000 Case Number: VBU-0050 Darryl H. Shadel (the complainant) appeals the dismissal of his whistleblower complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program. As explained below, I have determined that the complaint was improperly dismissed, and that further processing should be accorded. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program Part 708 prohibits contractors from retaliating against contractor employees who engage in protected conduct. Protected conduct includes disclosing information that the employee believes reveals a substantial and specific danger to employees (a protected disclosure). If a contractor retaliates against an employee

349

Case No. VBH-0034  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 September 29, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Case: Jennifer S. Gentry Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0034 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Jennifer S. Gentry, a former employee (hereinafter the employee) of Golder Federal Services Incorporated, formerly Golder Associates, Inc. (Golder). Golder was a subcontractor for EG&G, then the managing and operating contractor at DOE's Rocky Flats site (hereinafter the term "contractors" refers to both Golder and EG&G). The employee alleges that she made protected disclosures concerning health and safety matters, and as a result, the contractors took retaliatory actions against her. For the reasons explained below, I have

350

Case No. VBI-0045  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VBI-0045 VBI-0045 June 22, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision and Order Name of Case: Joseph P. Carson Date of Filing: March 14, 2000 Case Number: VBI-0045 On March 14, 2000, Joseph P. Carson (Carson) filed a "Whistleblower Reprisal Complaint per section 3164 of the NNSA Authorization Act for FY 2000." Carson is employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a Safety Engineer, nominally assigned to the Office of Oversight, Planning and Analysis, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight, Office of Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (EH), but he is currently stationed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the March 14, 2000 complaint, Carson alleges that in 1999 he made a number of protected disclosures about Glenn Podonsky, a senior

351

Case No. VBU-0039  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

39 39 November 30, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision of the Director Name of Case: Edward J. Seawalt Date of Filing: November 2, 1999 Case Number: VBU-0039 Edward J. Seawalt (the complainant) appeals the dismissal of his complaint against Contract Associates, Inc. (the Contractor) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The program prohibits a DOE contractor from retaliating against an employee for disclosing certain information (a protected disclosure). As explained below, I have determined that Mr. Seawalt's appeal should be granted in part and his complaint remanded for further processing. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program is set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The DOE recently

352

Case No. VWJ-0001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWJ-0001 VWJ-0001 June 29, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Protective Order Name of Petitioner:Nicholas Dominguez Date of Filing: June 25, 1999 Case Number:VWJ-0001 On April 20, 1999, Nicholas Dominguez filed a request for hearing under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Case No. LWA- 0006). Dominguez alleges that his former employer, Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Lockheed Martin), retaliated against him for disclosing information concerning possible safety issues. Dominguez seeks discovery of Lockheed Martin documents that the firm claims are confidential business documents. Lockheed Martin has agreed to provide these documents pursuant to the attached Protective Order that has been agreed to by counsel for Dominguez. The parties ask that the attached Agreed

353

Product Efficiency Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

product-efficiency-cases Office of Hearings and product-efficiency-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd. http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/exc-13-0004-matter-liebherr-canada-ltd EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd.

354

Case No. VBZ-0005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 October 4, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner: Fluor Daniel Fernald Date of Filing: September 7, 1999 Case Number: VBZ-0005 This decision will consider a Motion to Dismiss Fluor Daniel Fernald (FDF) filed on September 7, 1999. FDF moves to dismiss a Complaint filed by Thomas W. Dwyer under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dwyer's Complaint has been assigned Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Case No. VBH-0005. I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public and employee health and safety; ensur[e] compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; and prevent[] fraud, mismanagement, waste, and abuse" at DOE's Government-owned or -leased facilities.

355

Case No. VBU-0047  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47 47 April 17, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Decision of the Director Name of Case: Edward J. Seawalt Date of Filing: March 20, 2000 Case Number: VBU-0047 Edward J. Seawalt (the Complainant) appeals the second dismissal of his whistleblower complaint. In a prior decision, I remanded the first dismissal for consideration of whether good reason existed for the Complainant's late filing of his complaint. Edward J. Seawalt, 27 DOE ¶ ____ (1999) (Seawalt). As explained below, I have determined that the Complainant has shown good reason for the late filing of his complaint and, therefore, that the complaint should be remanded for further processing. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program is set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The DOE's new Part

356

Case No. VWD-0007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 August 24, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Discovery Name of Petitioner:Linda D. Gass Date of Filing: August 11, 1999 Case Number: VWD-0007 This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Linda D. Gass. This Motion, dated August 10, 1999, concerns the hearing requested by Ms. Gass under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708). She requested this hearing on January 12, 1999 (Case No. VWA- 0041) in connection with the Part 708 complaint she filed against Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES). I. Background Ms. Gass began working for LMES in March 1982. In her Complaint, Ms. Gass alleged that in 1991 she

357

Heat Balance in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer during CASES-99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique set of nocturnal longwave radiative and sensible heat flux divergences was obtained during the 1999 Cooperative Atmosphere–Surface Exchange Study (CASES-99). These divergences are based on upward and downward longwave radiation ...

Jielun Sun; Sean P. Burns; Anthony C. Delany; Steven P. Oncley; Thomas W. Horst; Donald H. Lenschow

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Fossil Generating Station Case Histories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2005, EPRI Operations and Management Program managers and contractors have collected information on events that have occurred in fossil generating stations. These events represent only a small sample of those being experienced by the power generation industry, but provide a basis for understanding where actions to improve operations are necessary. Sufficient details have been included for analyzing the events without divulging sources. Recognizing that these reports represent actual events and not...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fossil Generating Station Case Histories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2006, EPRI Operations and Management Program managers have collected information on events that have occurred in fossil generating stations. These events represent only a small sample of those being experienced by the power generation industry, but provide a basis for understanding where actions to improve operations are necessary. Sufficient details have been included for analyzing the events without divulging sources. Recognizing that these reports represent actual events and not discounting the...

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

360

VIVACE context based search platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the key challenges of knowledge management is to provide the right knowledge to the right person at the right time. To face this challenge, a context based search platform was developed in the frame of the European Integrated Project VIVACE. This ... Keywords: analogy and case based reasoning, context aware systems and applications, context modelling, knowledge management

Romaric Redon; Andreas Larsson; Richard Leblond; Barthelemy Longueville

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

UESC Case Study: Philadelphia Navy Yard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study Case Study Philadelphia Navy Yard Presented by M. Richard Boyette and Beverly C. Wade 26 October 2011 UESC Financed Energy Projects - Basics Aligning NAVFAC Business Practices with Federal Energy Management Program Processes NAVFAC BMS 5.1.3 UESC Process FEMP UESC Process 2 Sometimes things are difficult, but hard work overcomes obstacles !!!!! Financed Energy Projects - Challenges * Financed Energy Project Challenges * General Issues * Financed projects are designed to save energy costs but overarching goals are set up to reduce energy usage and energy intensity. * Financed projects favor regions or bases with higher utility rates. * Financed projects cannot be utilized in cases where energy consumption is reduced substantially but energy cost savings is

362

Casing design for trapped annular pressure buildup  

SciTech Connect

Conventional single-string analysis for casing design with annular-fluid expansion can underpredict or overpredict pressures between strings because multistring effects are neglected. Multiple-string systems with multiple sealed annuli behave as composite interactive systems. This paper presents a constitutive-based multistring analysis method for composite string effects and complex fluid behavior. The composite stiffness of cemented casings is determined from elastic stress/strain relationships, and the nonlinear fluid behavior is modeled by direct use of fluid PVT relations in the formulation and solution. The method is incorporated in a computer model linking comprehensive stress calculations to accurate temperature and pressure predictions. Sensitivity studies of the system response to various key parameters and operating conditions are presented, and comparisons are made with single-string analyses to demonstrate the strong interaction between casing strings.

Halal, A.S.; Mitchell, R.F. (Enertech Engineering Research Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Connectivity-based, all-hexahedral mesh generation method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a computer-based method and apparatus for constructing all-hexahedral finite element meshes for finite element analysis. The present invention begins with a three-dimensional geometry and an all-quadrilateral surface mesh, then constructs hexahedral element connectivity from the outer boundary inward, and then resolves invalid connectivity. The result of the present invention is a complete representation of hex mesh connectivity only; actual mesh node locations are determined later. The basic method of the present invention comprises the step of forming hexahedral elements by making crossings of entities referred to as ``whisker chords.`` This step, combined with a seaming operation in space, is shown to be sufficient for meshing simple block problems. Entities that appear when meshing more complex geometries, namely blind chords, merged sheets, and self-intersecting chords, are described. A method for detecting invalid connectivity in space, based on repeated edges, is also described, along with its application to various cases of invalid connectivity introduced and resolved by the method. 79 figs.

Tautges, T.J.; Mitchell, S.A.; Blacker, T.D.; Murdoch, P.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

364

Connectivity-based, all-hexahedral mesh generation method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a computer-based method and apparatus for constructing all-hexahedral finite element meshes for finite element analysis. The present invention begins with a three-dimensional geometry and an all-quadrilateral surface mesh, then constructs hexahedral element connectivity from the outer boundary inward, and then resolves invalid connectivity. The result of the present invention is a complete representation of hex mesh connectivity only; actual mesh node locations are determined later. The basic method of the present invention comprises the step of forming hexahedral elements by making crossings of entities referred to as "whisker chords." This step, combined with a seaming operation in space, is shown to be sufficient for meshing simple block problems. Entities that appear when meshing more complex geometries, namely blind chords, merged sheets, and self-intersecting chords, are described. A method for detecting invalid connectivity in space, based on repeated edges, is also described, along with its application to various cases of invalid connectivity introduced and resolved by the method.

Tautges, Timothy James (Albuquerque, NM); Mitchell, Scott A. (Albuquerque, NM); Blacker, Ted D. (Green Oaks, IL); Murdoch, Peter (Salt Lake City, UT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Journal of Medical Case Reports BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Although not as common as the other melanomas, amelanotic melanoma often evades diagnosis by masquerading as other pathology. A high index of suspicion is therefore required for early and appropriate intervention. We present a patient who was diagnosed and managed as having paronychia of the middle finger while in actual fact he had a subungual amelanotic melanoma. By the time of his referral to the orthopaedic team it had progressed to an advanced stage. Our case underlies the importance of early recognition and referral of this rare but malignant lesion by primary care physicians. Background With malignant melanoma early diagnosis is vital. Amelanotic malignant melanoma often presents in unusual ways, often evading early diagnosis, resulting in a poorer prognosis. Differential diagnosis can include paronychia, pyogenic granuloma, glomus tumor, and subungual

Ezekiel Oburu; Alberto Gregori

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Natural Gas Spot Prices: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spot prices at the Henry Hub traded at a midpoint of $6.91 per MMBtu on Wednesday. This is the first time the price has been below $7.00 since December 1, ...

367

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi disruption added to a market sense of oversupply. Relatively mild weather in Europe allowed distillate ...

368

WTI Crude Oil Price: Potential for Volatility Around Base Case  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pledges by Saudi Arabia/OPEC to offset a longer term Iraqi disruption added to a market sense of oversupply. Relatively mild weather in Europe allowed distillate ...

369

WTI Crude Oil Price: Base Case and 95% Confidence Interval  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Prices had been running higher than supply/demand fundamentals would have indicated throughout the fall months as a result of rising Mideast tensions, ...

370

Hill Air Force Base as a case study for linking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANACONDA ("MORTARVILLE") near Balad Iraq, April 2004 ­ March 2005. #12;Great Salt Lake WASATCHMOUNTAINRANGE

371

A SCIENCE-BASED CASE FOR LARGE-SCALE SIMULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Engineering Materials for nuclear energy system, fission reactors, nuclear fuels, energy policy solidification; microgravity processing. Xudong Wang Assistant Professor, Materials Sci & Eng Nanomaterials and photoelectrochemical devices; nanomaterials for energy storage; nanoelectronics; nano-biomaterials. Jay Samuel Senior

Gropp, Bill

372

A Case Study of Solar Powered  Cellular Base Stations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Green power, environment protection and emission reduction are key factors nowadays in the telecom industry. Balancing of these modes while reducing the capital and… (more)

PANDE, GEETHA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Case No. VBH-0036  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 September 23, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Complainant: XXXXXXX Date of Filing: August 24, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0036 XXXXXXX (the complainant) filed a complaint against his employer, Fluor Daniel, Inc. (FDI), and two other DOE contractors, Duke Engineering & Services (DE&S) and TRW Environmental Safety Systems (TRW), pursuant to the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In that complaint, the complainant alleges that he suffered reprisals because he had made a disclosure that is protected by Part 708. I. Background The Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to encourage contractor employees to

374

Green Circuits: Distribution Efficiency Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Green Circuits project was a collaborative effort of 22 utilities. The main goal of the project was to evaluate ways to improve distribution efficiency. Modeling, economic evaluations, and field trials formed the core of the research effort. To evaluate efficiency improvements, 66 circuit case studies were modeled and fine-tuned, based on field data. Field trials of voltage optimization were implemented on nine circuits. Detailed advanced metering infrastructu...

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

375

NCCoE - Use Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Health IT: Mobile Devices Use Case. Energy. ... system for mobile devices server* • Mobile device management server* • Auditing mobile device ...

376

Case Western Reserve University's Institute for Advanced Materials | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reserve University's Institute for Advanced Materials Reserve University's Institute for Advanced Materials Jump to: navigation, search Name The Institute for Advanced Materials at Case Western Reserve University Address 2061 Cornell Rd Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44106-3808 Website http://case.edu/advancedmateri References The Institute for Advanced Materials at Case Western Reserve University [1] LinkedIn Connections This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Case Western Reserve University's Institute for Advanced Materials is a research institution based in Cleveland, Ohio. References ↑ "The Institute for Advanced Materials at Case Western Reserve University" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Case_Western_Reserve_University%27s_Institute_for_Advanced_Materials&oldid=367381"

377

Case No. VWA-0037  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 September 27, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Ann Johndro-Collins Date of Filing: April 27, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0037 This Decision considers a complaint of retaliation and request for relief filed by Ann Johndro-Collins (the Complainant) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The Complainant alleged that her employer, Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH), retaliated against her for making a protected disclosure as defined in the Part 708 regulations. As explained below, I have concluded that the Complainant's request for relief should be denied. BACKGROUND Procedural Background The Complainant filed a complaint with the DOE's Office of Inspections, Office of the Inspector General,

378

Item Subject FAR Case  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Acquisition Circular (FAC) 2005-53 Item Subject FAR Case I. Equal Opportunity for Veterans 2009-007 II. Unique Procurement Instrument Identifier 2009-023 III. Uniform Suspension and Debarment Requirement 2009-036 IV. Extension of Sunset Date for Protests of Task and 2011-015 Delivery Orders V. Encouraging Contractor Policies to Ban Text Messaging 2009-028 While Driving. VI. TINA Interest Calculations 2009-034 Item I--Equal Opportunity for Veterans (FAR 2009-007) The interim rule, published September 29, 2010, is adopted as final with minor changes. A definition from the clause at FAR 52.222-35 for ``executive and senior management'' is added to FAR subpart 22.13. The interim rule implemented Department of

379

Case No. VBH-0028  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 April 7, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Dr. Jiunn S. Yu Date of Filing: July 2, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0028 This decision considers a Complaint filed by Dr. Jiunn S. Yu (Dr. Yu) against the Sandia Corporation (Sandia) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. I. Background The Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to safeguard "public and employee health and safety; ensur[e] compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; and prevent[] fraud, mismanagement, waste and abuse" at DOE's Government-owned or -leased facilities. 57 Fed. Reg. 7533 (March 3, 1992). Its primary purpose is to encourage contractor employees to disclose

380

Case No. VBA-0007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 December 15, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Salvatore Gionfriddo Date of Filing: October 13, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0007 On October 13, 1999, Salvatore Gionfriddo ("Appellant" or "Complainant") filed a Notice of Appeal from an Initial Agency Decision by a Hearing Officer from the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In the Initial Agency Decision, the Hearing Officer dismissed a complaint filed by Mr. Gionfriddo under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Salvatore Gionfriddo, 27 DOE ¶ 87,528 (1999). I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to safeguard "public and employee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Case No. VBH-0056  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 March 6, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Jean G. Rouse Date of Filing:November 7, 2000 Case Number: VBH-0056 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Jean G. Rouse (the Complainant) against her current employer, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. WSRC is the management and operating contractor at the DOE's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The Complainant alleges that in June 2000, WSRC changed her job classification in retaliation for her having filed a whistleblower complaint against the company in 1998. As discussed below, I have determined that

382

Case No. VBZ-0003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 June 21, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion to Dismiss Name of Petitioner:Carl J. Blier Date of Filing:May 11, 1999 Case Number: VBZ-0003 This determination will consider a request to dismiss filed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) on May 11, 1999. ORAU seeks dismissal of the underlying complaint filed by Carl J. Blier under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. This matter is before me as the investigator assigned to investigate Mr. Blier's complaint. I. Background Mr. Blier's Part 708 complaint arises from his employment with ORAU. In his complaint, Mr. Blier alleges that in April 1996 he became aware of possible irregularities regarding the approval of higher cost air-

383

Case No. VBH-0002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 November 2, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Don W. Beckwith Date of Filing:February 2, 1998 Case Number: VBH-0002 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Don W. Beckwith (the Complainant) against his former employer, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. At all times relevant to this proceeding, WSRC was the management and operating contractor at the DOE's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The Complainant alleges that in December 1997, he disclosed to WSRC that a WSRC management official had engaged in improper conduct. According to the Complainant, WSRC terminated him in January 1998 as a consequence of his disclosure. As discussed

384

Case No. VWA-0005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 * The original of this document contains information which is subject to withholding from disclosure under 5 U.S.C. 552. Such material has been deleted from this copy and replaced with XXXXX's. DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Names of Petitioners:Daniel L. Holsinger K-Ray Security, Inc. Date of Filing:December 6, 1995 Case Numbers: VWA-0005 VWA-0009 I. Introduction This Decision involves a complaint filed by Daniel L. Holsinger (Holsinger) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Holsinger contends that certain reprisals were taken against him after he raised concerns relating to the possible theft of government property from the DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). These reprisals

385

Case No. VWA-0041  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 July 11, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Lucy B. Smith Date of Filing: May 5, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0041 This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Lucy B. Smith (Smith) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. From September 1973 to March 1997, Smith was employed as a chemist at the DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) by various contractors, the most recent of which was Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). At the time of her termination, Smith worked at WSRC's Waste Management Laboratory. Smith alleges that in retaliation for making a number of health and safety disclosures WSRC terminated her pursuant to a January 1997 Reduction-in-

386

Case No. VWA-0021  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 21 June 1, 1998 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Carlos M. Castillo Date of Filing: February 2, 1998 Case Number: VWA-0021 This Decision involves a complaint filed by Carlos M. Castillo (Castillo or "the complainant") under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Castillo is the former employee of a DOE contractor, Kiewit Construction Company (Kiewit), and alleges in his complaint that during that employment certain reprisals were taken against him by Kiewit as a result of his raising a concern related to safety. These alleged reprisals include the complainant's wrongful termination from employment and, after he had been rehired, being improperly selected for a company layoff. After a

387

Case No. VBA-0005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 July 24, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Thomas Dwyer Date of Filing: May 23, 2000 Case Number: VBA-0005 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on May 2, 2000, involving a complaint filed by Thomas Dwyer (Dwyer or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Dwyer claims that Fluor Daniel Fernald (FDF), a DOE contractor, suspended and then terminated his employment in retaliation for his making disclosures that are protected under Part 708. In the IAD, however, the Hearing Officer determined that FDF had shown that it would have terminated the complainant for his misconduct, even in the absence of the protected disclosures. As set forth in this decision, I have determined that Dwyer's

388

Case No. VBH-0060  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60 60 November 1, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Robert Burd Date of Filing:March 27, 2001 Case Number: VBH-0060 This Decision addresses the complaint filed by Robert Burd (Complainant) against his former employer, Mason and Hangar Corporation (the employer), pursuant to the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Complainant alleges that the employer wrongfully terminated him for raising safety concerns. For the reasons set forth below, the complaint will be granted. I. Procedural History Complainant filed his Part 708 complaint on October 13, 2000 with the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AOO). At all times relevant to the complaint, the employer was the primary management and

389

Case No. VWA-0026  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 February 17, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hearing Officer Decision Name of Petitioner: Joseph Carson Date of Filing: October 26, 1998 Case Number: VWA-0026 This Decision involves the referral of a whistleblower matter involving Joseph Carson (Carson), a Department of Energy (DOE) employee. Pursuant to an order of an administrative judge of the United States Merit Systems Protection Board (http://www.mspb.gov) (MSPB) that implemented a settlement agreement between the DOE and Carson, Carson was permitted to submit documents to the Office of Hearings and Appeals regarding six instances of retaliation that he claims occurred because of certain protected disclosures that he made. The DOE was also permitted to submit documents at the same time.

390

Case No. VWA-0036  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 November 8, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Robert Gardner Date of Filing: April 20, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0036 This Decision involves a complaint filed by Robert Gardner (Gardner or "Complainant") under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Gardner is a former employee of a DOE contractor, Rust GeoTech (Rust). He alleges that certain reprisals were taken against him by Rust, including denial of a merit pay increase in 1996 and interference with his prospects for future employment in retaliation for his protected disclosures to DOE management and public officials. On the basis of the hearing that was conducted and the record before me, I have concluded

391

Case No. VBA-0044  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 April 10, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Rosie L. Beckham Date of Filing: December 28, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0044 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision issued on December 13, 1999, involving a complaint filed by Rosie L. Beckham filed against her former employer, KENROB and Associates, Inc. (KENROB) under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Rosie L. Beckham, 27 DOE ¶ 87,543 (1999). In her complaint, Ms. Beckham alleges that KENROB, among other things, terminated her employment after she questioned the legality of the company's procurement practices. A Hearing Officer denied relief to Ms. Beckham, finding in the Initial Agency Decision that she had failed to make any disclosures protected under the Part 708 regulations. As set forth in this Decision, I

392

Case No. VBA-0032  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 November 26, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Roger H. Hardwick Date of Filing: July 26, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0032 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision issued on July 6, 1999, on a complaint filed by Roger H. Hardwick (Hardwick or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Hardwick seeks compensation for alleged retaliatory actions taken against him by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), a DOE contractor, and by KenRob and Associates, Inc. (KenRob), his former employer under a subcontract with SAIC, as a result of making an alleged protected disclosure to DOE. In the Initial Agency Decision, however, the Hearing Officer determined that the complainant had failed to

393

Case No. VWA-0032  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 July 6, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Roger W. Hardwick Date of Filing: March 8, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0032 This Decision involves a complaint of reprisal filed by Roger W. Hardwick (also referred to as the Complainant) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Hardwick was employed by KenRob and Associates, Inc. and worked as a subcontractor on a contract that the DOE awarded to Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). Mr. Hardwick contends that in January 1994, he made a protected disclosure to the DOE concerning the manner in which SAIC was performing its DOE contract. Hardwick states that he was terminated from the subcontract two weeks after the disclosure and that KenRob terminated his

394

Case No. VBH-0059  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 December 21, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hearing Officer Decision Name of Petitioner: Janet L. Westbrook Date of Filing: March 20, 2001 Case Number: VBH-0059 This Decision involves a complaint that Janet L. Westbrook (Westbrook) filed under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program against UT-Batelle, LLC, the contractor that manages the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (the Laboratory). That program is codified at Part 708 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her complaint, Westbrook maintains that she was retaliated against and ultimately discharged for making a series of disclosures about radiation safety at the Laboratory. I. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program

395

Case No. VBA-0011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 July 28, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Names of Petitioner:Diane E. Meier Date of Filing:January 11, 2000 Case Number: VBA-0011 On January 11, 2000, Diane E. Meier (Meier) filed a Notice of Appeal from an Initial Agency Decision by a Hearing Officer from the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The Decision denied the relief which Meier seeks in her complaint against Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Diane E. Meier, 27 DOE ¶ 87,545 (1999) (Meier). In her Appeal, Meier challenges several aspects of the Initial Agency Decision and requests that her complaint be granted. As set forth in this decision, I have

396

Case No. VBA-0038  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 March 28, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Ann Johndro-Collins Date of Filing: October 29, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0038 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision issued on September 27, 1999, on a complaint filed by Ann Johndro-Collins (Johndro-Collins or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her complaint, Johndro- Collins seeks compensation for alleged retaliatory actions taken against her by Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH), a DOE contractor, as a result of making an alleged protected disclosure to DOE. As set forth in this decision, I have determined that Johndro-Collins's Appeal must be denied. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program

397

Case No. VBH-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 December 29, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Roy Leonard Moxley Date of Filing:November 7, 1996 Case Number: VBH-0014 This Initial Agency Decision concerns a whistleblower complaint filed by Roy Leonard Moxley against his employer, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. At all times relevant to this proceeding, WSRC was the management and operating contractor at the DOE's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. Mr. Moxley alleges that during a period of at least two years, he made several disclosures to WSRC that its personnel practices were in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). According

398

Case No. VWA-0031  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 August 6, 1999 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Barbara Nabb Date of Filing: February 25, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0031 I. Introduction This Decision involves a complaint filed by Mrs. Barbara Nabb under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her complaint, Mrs. Nabb contends that reprisals were taken against her after she made certain disclosures concerning possible health and safety violations and mismanagement at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). These reprisals allegedly were taken by EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG&G) and by Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC (Kaiser Hill). EG&G was the managing and operating contractor of Rocky Flats beginning in December

399

Case No. VWR-0003  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VWR-0003 VWR-0003 September 20, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Motion for Reconsideration Name of Petitioner: Linda D. Gass Date of Filing: September 3, 1999 Case Number: VWR-0003 This decision will consider a "Motion to Revive Disclosures Dismissed Prior to the Enactment of Revisions to Part 708" Linda D. Gass filed on March 8, 1999. In her Motion, Ms. Gass requests that I reconsider an order issued on March 12, 1999, in which I dismissed in part her Complaint filed under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, 27 DOE ¶ 87,510 (1999). I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public

400

Case No. VBH-0042  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42 42 March 1, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hearing Officer Decision Name of Petitioner: Richard R. Sena Date of Filing: February 24, 2000 Case Number: VBH-0042 This Decision involves a complaint filed by Richard R. Sena (Sena) against Sandia Corporation under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program. That program is codified at Part 708 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Sena maintains that he was retaliated against and ultimately constructively discharged for disclosing that laboratory personnel were using the Internet improperly at Sandia National Laboratories. I. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program was established to safeguard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Case No. VBA-0041  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 March 13, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: John L. Gretencord Date of Filing: November 26, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0041 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on November 4, 1999, involving a complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord or the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Gretencord claims that West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc.(West Valley), a DOE contractor, terminated his employment in retaliation for his making disclosures that are protected under Part 708. In the IAD, however, the Hearing Officer determined that West Valley had shown that it would have terminated the

402

Case No. VBH-0015  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 December 1, 1999 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Morris J. Osborne Date of Filing: June 28, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0015 This Decision involves a complaint filed by Mr. Morris J. Osborne (hereinafter the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The complainant contends that reprisals were taken against him after he made disclosures concerning the lack of electrical inspections at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab (INEEL). These alleged reprisals were taken by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed). Lockheed was the managing and operating contractor of INEEL through September 30, 1999. Bechtel assumed Lockheed's

403

Case No. VWA-0014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 February 5, 1997 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Charles Barry DeLoach Date of Filing:November 1, 1996 Case Number: VWA-0014 This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Charles Barry DeLoach (DeLoach) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. For a four year period, DeLoach was employed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), a DOE management and operating contractor, at DOE's Savannah River site (Savannah River). DeLoach alleges that during his tenure at WSRC, he made disclosures regarding health and safety issues to various supervisors or managers at Savannah River. On March 19, 1993, DeLoach was fired after an investigation

404

Case No. VWA-0033  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 November 4, 1999 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioners:Gretencord v. West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. Date of Filing: March 19, 1999 Case Number: VWA-0033 This decision considers a Complaint filed by John L. Gretencord (Gretencord) against West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc. (West Valley) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, which is codified at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Gretencord requested a hearing on his Complaint under 10 C.F.R. Part 708 on March 19, 1999. I. Background The Department of Energy established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to safeguard "public and employee health and safety; ensur[e] compliance with applicable laws, rules, and regulations; and

405

Case No. VBH-0010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 September 1, 2000 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Jagdish C. Laul Date of Filing: December 3, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0010 This Decision involves a complaint filed by Dr. Jagdish C. Laul (hereinafter the complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The complainant contends that his dismissal by his employer, Excalibur Associates, Inc. (Excalibur) was a reprisal for his participation in a prior Part 708 proceeding. Excalibur is a subcontractor of Kaiser Hill Company (Kaiser) who is the managing and operating contractor of DOE's Rocky Flats Field Office (Rocky Flats). I. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program A. Regulatory Background

406

Case No. VWA-0018  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 May 21, 1998 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner:Thomas T. Tiller Date of Filing:November 17, 1997 Case Number: VWA-0018 This Decision concerns two whistleblower complaints filed by Thomas T. Tiller (Tiller) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. At all times relevant to this proceeding, Tiller was employed by Wackenhut Services, Incorporated (Wackenhut), a DOE contractor that provides paramilitary security support services at the DOE's Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. Tiller contends in his first complaint that Wackenhut demoted him after he alleged that a senior level manager at Wackenhut had engaged in unethical and possible criminal conduct. In his

407

Case No. VBH-0024  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 March 1, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Matthew J. Rooks Date of Filing: July 6, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0024 This Initial Agency Decision considers a complaint filed by Matthew J. Rooks under the whistleblower protection program of the Department of Energy, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. As explained below, Rooks' complaint is denied. Background Rooks filed this complaint under the Part 708 regulations on November 17, 1998, and the Department's Office of the Inspector General began an investigation. While the investigation was pending, responsibility for conducting investigations of Part 708 complaints was transferred to the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). 64 Fed. Reg. 12826 (March 15, 1999). The OHA issued a Report of Investigation on July 6, 1999. The Report, which I will discuss further below,

408

Case No. VBH-0017  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 July 18, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Jimmie L. Russell Date of Filing: October 12, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0017 This Initial Agency Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Mr. Jimmie L. Russell under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In his complaint, Mr. Russell contends that reprisals were taken against him after he made certain disclosures concerning mismanagement, breaches in security procedures and safety violations at the DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL is managed and operated by the University of California (the UC). At the time that he made the alleged disclosures, Mr. Russell worked at LANL for managers who

409

Case No. VWA-0017  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 April 13, 1998 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Timothy E. Barton Date of Filing: June 27, 1994 Case Number: VWA-0017 This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Timothy E. Barton under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. From June to September 1994, Barton was employed as a Quality Assurance/Safety Manager by R.E. Schweitzer Construction Company (RESCC), which was awarded a contract by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) to perform construction work on the Vitrification Pilot Plant at the DOE's Fernald site. Barton alleges that RESCC retaliated against him by terminating his employment for taking certain actions and

410

Case No. VBU-0077  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

77 77 October 25, 2001 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Decision of the Director Name of Petitioner: Ronald E. Timm Date of Filing: September 25, 2001 Case Number: VBU-0077 Ronald E. Timm (the Complainant), the President of RETA Security, a Department of Energy (DOE) subcontractor, appeals the dismissal of his whistleblower complaint filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program. On September 10, 2001, the Employee Concerns Program Manager at the DOE's Albuquerque Operations Office dismissed the Complainant's complaint for lack of jurisdiction. As explained below, I uphold the dismissal of the subject complaint. I. Background A. The DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program The regulations governing the DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program are set forth at 10 C.F.R.

411

Case No. VBH-0005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 May 2, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Name of Petitioner: Thomas Dwyer Date of Filing: June 23, 1999 Case Number: VBH-0005 This Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Thomas Dwyer under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. From January 1996 to October 1997, Mr. Dwyer was employed as a pipefitter by Fluor Daniel Fernald (FDF), a DOE contractor responsible for the cleanup of the Fernald Environmental Management Project, a former DOE uranium production facility located about 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. Dwyer alleges that FDF first suspended him and then terminated him in retaliation for taking certain actions and making health and safety disclosures.

412

Toward Engineered, Useful Use Cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore common problems that exist in the practice of use case modeling: lack of consistency in defining use cases, misalignment between the UML metamodel and the textual representations of use cases expounded in the literature, and the lack of a semantics that allows use cases to be executable and analyzable. We propose an engineering approach to the issues that can provide a precise foundation for use case development. We next discuss four potential uses of such a foundation and identify the research problems that must be addressed to support these applications.

Clay Williams; Matthew Kaplan; Tim Klinger; Amit Paradkar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

EPICS BASE  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002230MLTPL00 Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System BASE  http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics 

414

Lead Defendant Cases Filed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 0 Judgment for defendant 77 Navy 1 3 Adverse dispositions: 73 NRC 3 0 TRO 0 DOI - BLM 14 3 Preliminary Injunction 6 - FWS 6 0 Permanent Injunction 10 - BuRec 1 0 Remand 19 - NPS 6 1 Dismissal w/ settlement 26 - BIA/NIGC 3 0 Dismissal w/o settlement 12 - MMS 0 2 Case pending, NEPA 233 - OSM 1 0 USDA - FS 46 13 - APHIS 3 5 DOC - NOAA 8 0 Army - COE 15 5 Gov't Agency Army 2 0 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 1 DOT - FHWA 9 1 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 27 - FTA 1 0 NEPA - Not required 3 - FAA 0 0 NEPA - Is required 0 DOE 6 0 CE - Adequate 5 EPA 1 0 CE - Not Adequate 3 HUD 1 0 EA - Adequate* 14 Air Force 0 0 EA - Not Adequate* 9 TVA 1 1 EIS - Adequate* 21 FCC 0 1 EIS - Not Adequate* 15 GSA 1 0 SEIS - Needed* 1 Ex-Im Bank (OPEC) 0 0 SEIS -Not Needed* 8 USPS 0 0 HHS-FDA 0 0 -NIH 0 0 VA Pending

415

Case No. VBA-0033  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 April 5, 2000 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Names of Petitioners:Kaiser-Hill Company, L.L.C. EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. Dates of Filing:August 26, 1999 August 27, 1999 Case Number: VBA-0033 On August 26 and 27, 1999, Kaiser-Hill Company, L.L.C. (K-H) and EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. (EG&G) respectively filed Notices of Appeal from an Initial Agency Decision by a Hearing Officer from the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In the Initial Agency Decision, the Hearing Officer granted relief to Barbara Nabb on the basis of her complaint under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Barbara Nabb, 27 DOE ¶ 87,519 (1999). In their Appeals, K-H and EG&G challenge several aspects of the Initial Agency Decision and request that Ms.

416

Explosively separable casing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosively separable casing including a cylindrical afterbody and a circular cover for one end of the afterbody is disclosed. The afterbody has a cylindrical tongue extending longitudinally from one end which is matingly received in a corresponding groove in the cover. The groove is sized to provide a pocket between the end of the tongue and the remainder of the groove so that an explosive can be located therein. A seal is also provided between the tongue and the groove for sealing the pocket from the atmosphere. A frangible holding device is utilized to hold the cover to the afterbody. When the explosive is ignited, the increase in pressure in the pocket causes the cover to be accelerated away from the afterbody. Preferably, the inner wall of the afterbody is in the same plane as the inner wall of the tongue to provide a maximum space for storage in the afterbody and the side wall of the cover is thicker than the side wall of the afterbody so as to provide a sufficiently strong surrounding portion for the pocket in which the explosion takes place. The detonator for the explosive is also located on the cover and is carried away with the cover during separation. The seal is preferably located at the longitudinal end of the tongue and has a chevron cross section.

Jacobson, Albin K. (Albuquerque, NM); Rychnovsky, Raymond E. (Livermore, CA); Visbeck, Cornelius N. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Better Building Case Competition: 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of California, Irvine, presents his team's HEI Hotel case. Image of student presenting Noah Walker, a first year MBA-Master of Environmental Management joint degree student at...

418

FAQ for Case Study Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements...

419

Geophysics-based method of locating a stationary earth object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A geophysics-based method for determining the position of a stationary earth object uses the periodic changes in the gravity vector of the earth caused by the sun- and moon-orbits. Because the local gravity field is highly irregular over a global scale, a model of local tidal accelerations can be compared to actual accelerometer measurements to determine the latitude and longitude of the stationary object.

Daily, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM); Novak, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

CENTIMETER CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE NORTHERN HEAD OF THE HH 80/81/80N JET: REVISING THE ACTUAL DIMENSIONS OF A PARSEC-SCALE JET  

SciTech Connect

We present 6 and 20 cm Jansky Very Large Array/Very Large Array observations of the northern head of the HH 80/81/80N jet, one of the largest collimated jet systems known so far, aimed to look for knots farther than HH 80N, the northern head of the jet. Aligned with the jet and 10' northeast of HH 80N, we found a radio source not reported before, with a negative spectral index similar to that of HH 80, HH 81, and HH 80N. The fit of a precessing jet model to the knots of the HH 80/81/80N jet, including the new source, shows that the position of this source is close to the jet path resulting from the modeling. If the new source belongs to the HH 80/81/80N jet, its derived size and dynamical age are 18.4 pc and >9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr, respectively. If the jet is symmetric, its southern lobe would expand beyond the cloud edge resulting in an asymmetric appearance of the jet. Based on the updated dynamical age, we speculate on the possibility that the HH 80/81/80N jet triggered the star formation observed in a dense core found ahead of HH 80N, which shows signposts of interaction with the jet. These results indicate that parsec-scale radio jets can play a role in the stability of dense clumps and the regulation of star formation in the molecular cloud.

Masque, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert [Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Beltran, Maria T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Utility Energy Service Contract Case Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Studies Case Studies Utility Energy Service Contract Case Studies October 7, 2013 - 3:25pm Addthis These case studies feature examples of successful projects that involved utility energy service contracts (UESC). Coast Guard Multi-Site UESC Project: Twelve-site project with 21 energy-conservation measures reduced electricity consumption by 19.1%, water consumption by 64.2%, and natural gas consumption by 21.1%. National Institute of Health: Saved at least $5 million in annual energy costs at its main campus in Bethesda, Maryland, through energy conservation measures. General Services Administration Ted Weiss Federal Building: Multiple energy conservation measures and utility services saved $256,000 in annual energy costs and 64,872 Btu per gross square foot. Patrick Air Force Base: Base-wide energy program implemented to exceed

422

OPTIMAL CONTROL OF PROJECTS BASED ON KALMAN FILTER APPROACH FOR TRACKING & FORECASTING THE PROJECT PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional scheduling tools like Gantt Charts and CPM while useful in planning and execution of complex construction projects with multiple interdependent activities haven?t been of much help in implementing effective control systems for the same projects in case of deviation from their desired or assumed behavior. Further, in case of such deviations project managers in most cases make decisions which might be guided either by the prospects of short term gains or the intension of forcing the project to follow the original schedule or plan, inadvertently increasing the overall project cost. Many deterministic project control methods have been proposed by various researchers for calculating optimal resource schedules considering the time-cost as well as the time-cost-quality trade-off analysis. But the need is for a project control system which optimizes the effort or cost required for controlling the project by incorporating the stochastic dynamic nature of the construction-production process. Further, such a system must include a method for updating and revising the beliefs or models used for representing the dynamics of the project using the actual progress data of the project. This research develops such an optimal project control method using Kalman Filter forecasting method for updating and using the assumed project dynamics model for forecasting the Estimated Cost at Completion (EAC) and the Estimated Duration at Completion (EDAC) taking into account the inherent uncertainties in the project progress and progress measurements. The controller is then formulated for iteratively calculating the optimal resource allocation schedule that minimizes either the EAC or both the EAC and EDAC together using the evolutionary optimization algorithm Covariance Matrix Adaption Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES). The implementation of the developed framework is used with a hypothetical project and tested for its robustness in updating the assumed initial project dynamics model and yielding the optimal control policy considering some hypothetical cases of uncertainties in the project progress and progress measurements. Based on the tests and demonstrations firstly it is concluded that a project dynamics model based on the project Gantt chart for spatial interdependencies of sub-tasks with triangular progress rates is a good representation of a typical construction project; and secondly, it is shown that the use of CMA-ES in conjunction with the Kalman Filter estimation and forecasting method provides a robust framework that can be implemented for any kind of complex construction process for yielding the optimal control policies.

Bondugula, Srikant

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fretting Corrosion Induced Fracture of a Floating Bearing Base Plate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation will decribe the case of the rupture of a 250 Tons Yankee drum free bearing floating base plate made in a hardened low alloyed carbon steel ...

424

A Test Suite Generator For Struts Based Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Testing web-based enterprise applications requires the use of automated testing frameworks. The testing framework's ability to run suites of test cases through development ensures enhancements… (more)

Jackson, Gregory M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Symbolic Test Selection Based on Approximate Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symbolic Test Selection Based on Approximate Analysis Bertrand Jeannet, Thierry J´eron, Vlad Rusu}@irisa.fr Abstract. This paper addresses the problem of generating symbolic test cases for testing the conformance. The challenge we consider is the selection of test cases according to a test purpose, which is here a set

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

426

Dataplot Commands for Alaska Pipeline Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dataplot Commands for Alaska Pipeline Case Study. Set Software Options and Get Started, . . Starting Alaska Pipeline Calibration Case Study . . ...

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Sandy Hill Case Study Packet 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandy Hill Case Study Packet 2004. The Baldrige Case Study Packet is composed of documents used to train Baldrige ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

Use case concepts using a clear, consistent, concise ontology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The UML ontology is unnatural and limited (at odds with the categories of thought people use for engineering in natural languages such as Japanese and in mathematics). As a consequence, the UML standard confuses use case specifications, types, and instances, as well as confusing a use case model with what it is a model of. The Extends relationship illustrates these problems. ISO’s RM-ODP provides a richer ontology based on logical theory. ODP explains Extends as a relationship between specifications, while opening the door for relationships between the actions so specified, and reconciling diagrammatic and textual use case techniques. 1

Guy Genilloud

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Dead-Time Compensation for PMSM Drive Based on Neuro-Fuzzy Observer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To compensate voltage difference between the reference and the actual output voltages caused by dead-time effects, a novel compensation method for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) drive based on neuro-fuzzy observer is proposed. This method ... Keywords: dead-time, PMSM, ANN, FC

Xianqing Cao; Liping Fan

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Embedded Temporal Difference in Life Cycle Assessment: Case Study on VW Golf A4 Car  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Case Study on VW Golf A4 Car Chris Y. Yuan, Rachel Simon,performed on VW Golf A4 Car based on previous LCA results.case study on the VW Golf A4 car. Our study is based on a 4

Yuan, Chris; Simon, Rachel; Natalie Mady; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

reference case | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reference case reference case Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

432

case studies | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

case studies case studies Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Three case studies in (1) Solar market electrification, (2) Wind-solar hybrid system in Kuakata Sea Beach and (3) Micro hydro power plant of Aung Thuwi Khoi. (Purpose): SWERA Documentation Source Renewable Energy Research Centre Date Released December 02nd, 2003 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 20th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Bangladesh case studies documentation GEF renewable energy small hydro solar SWERA UNEP wind Data application/pdf icon Download Document (pdf, 566.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2002 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Please cite publication as follows: RERC,2003. Utilization of Renewables in Bangladesh: Case Studies. Renewable Energy Research Centre, Dhaka University, Bangladesh. GEF UNEP SWERA. Available from http://swera.unep.net on 2 December 2003.

433

Analysis of Restricted Natural Gas Supply Cases  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The four cases examined in this study have progressively greater impacts on overall natural gas consumption, prices, and supply. Compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case, the no Alaska pipeline case has the least impact; the low liquefied natural gas case has more impact; the low unconventional gas recovery case has even more impact; and the combined case has the most impact.

James Kendell

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Case Study: Darlington Nuclear Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Darlington is a four-reactor nuclear plant east of Toronto. It is operated by Ontario Hydro. Each reactor has two independent shutdown systems: SDS1 drops neutron-absorbing rods into the core, while SDS2 injects liquid poison into the moderator. Both ... Keywords: Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada, Canada, Darlington nuclear generating station, Ontario Hydro, case study, certification, code quality, decision-making logic, documentation, fission reactor core control and monitoring, fission reactor safety, formal methods, formal model-based inspection, formal specification, licensing, liquid poison injection, neutron-absorbing rods, nuclear engineering computing, nuclear plant, safety, safety-critical systems, software driven shutdown systems, software reliability, specifications

Dan Craigen; Susan Gerhart; Ted Ralston

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Net-Shape Forging of Aerofoil Blade based on Flash Trimming and Compensation methods  

SciTech Connect

In this research, an automatic blade forging die shape optimisation system was developed by using direct compensation and flash trimming algorithms and integrating with the DEFORM 3D software package. To validate the developed system, a 3D blade forging case problem was simulated and optimised with and without the consideration of trimming simulation. The results were compared with actual measurement data of the forged aerofoil blade with excellent results obtained with the fast trimming simulation procedure used.

Lu, B. [Department of Plasticity Forming Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200030 (China); Ou, H. [Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Armstrong, C. G. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

437

Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Borehole electromagnetic (EM) measurements, using fiberglass-cased boreholes, have proven useful in oil field reservoir characterization and process monitoring (Wilt et al., 1995). It has been presumed that these measurements would be impossible in steel-cased wells due to the very large EM attenuation and phase shifts. Recent laboratory and field studies have indicated that detection of EM signals through steel casing should be possible at low frequencies, and that these data provide a reasonable conductivity image at a useful scale. Thus, we see an increased application of this technique to mature oilfields, and an immediate extension to geothermal industry as well. Along with the field experiments numerical model studies have been carried out for analyzing the effect of steel casing to the EM fields. The model used to be an infinitely long uniform casing embedded in a homogeneous whole space. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the formation signal could be accurately recovered if the casing characteristics were independently known (Becker et al., 1998; Lee el al., 1998). Real steel-cased wells are much more complex than the simple laboratory models used in work to date. The purpose of this study is to develop efficient numerical methods for analyzing EM fields in realistic settings, and to evaluate the potential application of EM technologies to cross-borehole and single-hole environment for reservoir characterization and monitoring.

Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, Hee Joon; Uchida, Toshihiro

2001-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Identifying and controlling casing corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey of 73 wells in California's vintage South Belridge field indicated numerous casing leaks concentrated at 200-ft and 400- to 500-ft depths. Cathodic protection methods could not be used, and it was necessary to establish the precise causes of corrosion in order to develop techniques to control it. Casing was retrieved from two wells and, after thorough lab analysis, it was concluded that shallow-zone corrosion was triggered by oxygen in surrounding soil and that deep-zone corrosion was the result of CO/sub 2/ in formation water. Prevention depends upon more reliable isolation of casing from the formation with better cementing methods and longer conductor pipe.

Gordon, B.A.; Grimes, W.D.; Treseder, R.S.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

OHA EIA CASES ARCHIVE FILE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our EIA decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the...

440

OHA Whistleblower Cases Archive File  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our Whistleblower decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

OHA Security Cases Archive File  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our Security decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of...

442

OHA FOIA Cases Archive File  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our FOIA decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the...

443

OHA Misc Cases Archive File  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a archive file of our Misc decisions, Please download this file to your local computer and use the build in adobe search feature. Individual cases are listed in the bookmark section of the...

444

The Compelling Case for NGVs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Compelling Case for NGVs Compelling Case for NGVs Utilities and Federal Agencies Working Together to Make the Most of The Opportunity Stephe Yborra Director of Market Analysis, Education & Communications Clean Vehicle Education Foundation Director of Market Development NGVAmerica A Compelling Case for Natural Gas Vehicles * Natural gas is America's fuel: America's resource, America's jobs. Reduced reliance on volatile foreign oil supplies = Energy Security. * A wide variety of NGVs are available from OEMs and SVMs. Natural gas engines emit far less emissions than diesel or gasoline and their performance now match/exceed diesel, gasoline * Significantly lower fuel / O&M costs generate substantial life-cycle savings and, in many cases, provide fast payback of initial purchase

445

More than suggestion: The effect of interviewing techniques from the McMartin Preschool case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Child interviewing techniques derived from transcripts of the McMartin Preschool case were found to be substantially more effective than simple suggestive questions at inducing preschool children to make false allegations against a classroom visitor. Thirty-six children interviewed with McMartin techniques made 58 % accusations, compared with 17% for 30 children interviewed with suggestive questions. Social influence and reinforcement appeared to be more powerful determinants of children's answers than simple suggestive questions. The SIRR model is proposed to explain how false statements may be elicited from children or adults. Categories identified in the SIRR model are suggestive questions, social influence, reinforcement, and removal from direct experience. During the 1980s a series of highly publicized "daycare ritual abuse cases " erupted in communities across the United States and Europe (Kelley, 1996; Nathan & Snedeker, 1995). The cases typically involved allegations by preschool children that they had been terrorized and sexually abused by day-care workers in bizarre scenarios with Satanic or ritualistic overtones. Some scholars continue to take the view that these cases were genuine and involved actual ritual abuse (Faller, 1996; Summit, 1994). However, skepticism has become widespread among research psychologists (Bottoms & Davis, 1997; Bottoms, Shaver, & Goodman, 1996; Ceci & Bruck, 1995). An extensive body of research, arising in the wake of the day-care cases of the 1980s, has identified a variety of interviewing techniques that can induce children to make

Sena Garven; James M. Wood; Roy S. Malpass; John S. Shaw

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Fault-based test suite prioritization for specification-based testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Context: Existing test suite prioritization techniques usually rely on code coverage information or historical execution data that serve as indicators for estimating the fault-detecting ability of test cases. Such indicators are primarily empirical in ... Keywords: Fault class hierarchy, Fault-based prioritization, Fault-based testing, Software testing, Specification-based testing, Test suite prioritization

Yuen Tak Yu; Man Fai Lau

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case  

SciTech Connect

Highly Integrated Quality Assurance – An Empirical Case Drake Kirkham1, Amy Powell2, Lucas Rich3 1Quality Manager, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 M/S 6122, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6122 2Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory 3Quality Engineer, RPS Program, Idaho National Laboratory Contact: Voice: (208) 533-7550 Email: Drake.Kirkham@inl.gov Abstract. The Radioisotope Power Systems Program of the Idaho National Laboratory makes an empirical case for a highly integrated Quality Assurance function pertaining to the preparation, assembly, testing, storage and transportation of 238Pu fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Case data represents multiple campaigns including the Pluto/New Horizons mission, the Mars Science Laboratory mission in progress, and other related projects. Traditional Quality Assurance models would attempt to reduce cost by minimizing the role of dedicated Quality Assurance personnel in favor of either functional tasking or peer-based implementations. Highly integrated Quality Assurance adds value by placing trained quality inspectors on the production floor side-by-side with nuclear facility operators to enhance team dynamics, reduce inspection wait time, and provide for immediate, independent feedback. Value is also added by maintaining dedicated Quality Engineers to provide for rapid identification and resolution of corrective action, enhanced and expedited supply chain interfaces, improved bonded storage capabilities, and technical resources for requirements management including data package development and Certificates of Inspection. A broad examination of cost-benefit indicates highly integrated Quality Assurance can reduce cost through the mitigation of risk and reducing administrative burden thereby allowing engineers to be engineers, nuclear operators to be nuclear operators, and the cross-functional team to operate more efficiently. Applicability of this case extends to any high-value, long-term project where traceability and accountability are determining factors.

Drake Kirkham; Amy Powell; Lucas Rich

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Actual Date of Delivery Deliverable Security Class  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of all NoAH components, defines their requirements and describes the interface between them. The NoAH architecture, as described so far, is a set of individual components that cooperate to form a farm of distributed honeypots. Although the main NoAH components –low- and highinteraction honeypots, signature generation,

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

maintenance costs should be reported from asset-level data collected in the Site's Maintenance Management and Financial Management Systems. b. Annual Required Maintenance...

450

The Actual Cost of Food Systems on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs ...................................................................................................................16 Table 14: Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Rate Per Capita from County Survey

Beresnev, Igor

451

Might Dark Matter be Actually Black?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been proposals that primordial black hole remnants (BHRs) are the dark matter, but the idea is somewhat vague. We argue here first that the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) may prevent black holes from evaporating completely, in a similar way that the standard uncertainty principle prevents the hydrogen atom from collapsing. Secondly we note that the hybrid inflation model provides a plausible mechanism for production of large numbers of small black holes. Combining these we suggest that the dark matter might be composed of Planck-size BHRs and discuss the possible constraints and signatures associated with this notion.

Chen, Pisin

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

452

Design Parameters Derived from Actual Forgings*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Minimum R f : R c ratio is 1.0 to 1. Maximum R f : R c ratio is 6.8 to 1. Average R f : R c ratio is 2.8 to 1....

453

Definition: Net Actual Interchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interchange, balancing authority, smart grid, Balancing Authority Area References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

454

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

barrels) calculated Quantity oil produced from unit i inbest representation of the quantity of oil actually presentRemaining for Prudhoe Bay Oil Quantity Wells Count Jun 1968

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Monitoring and repairing geothermal casing cement: a case history  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A manmade geothermal reservoir has been created by drilling a deep hole into relatively impermeable hot rocks, creating a large surface area for heat transfer by hydraulic fracturing, then drilling a second hole to intersect the fracture to complete the closed circulation loop. A second generation system, presently being drilled, will entail creating multiple, parallel, vertical fractures between a pair of inclined boreholes. The original completion of injection Hole EE-1, consisting of a conventional high-temperature formulation of Class B portland cement, stabilized with 40% silica sand, did not withstand the cyclic stresses, and rapid deterioration of casing-to-cement and cement-to-formation bonds occurred, which allowed significant flow in the resulting microannulus. The performance history of the casing cement for the existing HDR EE-1 injection well, the subsequent remedial cementing program, the cement bond logs, and the radioactive isotope tracer injections tests, used to monitor the condition of the casing cement is described. (MHR)

Pettitt, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Base Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Principal effects of superalloy base elements on alloy characteristics...to γ� or γ� Requires fcc stabilizer Cobalt prices have been known to be volatile in the past. Suitable for creep-resistant applications with low stresses or

457

Energy Savings Performance Contract Case Studies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Funding » Energy Savings Performance Contracts » Energy Project Funding » Energy Savings Performance Contracts » Energy Savings Performance Contract Case Studies Energy Savings Performance Contract Case Studies October 7, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis These case studies feature examples of projects made possible by the use of energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). Bureau of Land Management (BLM) ESPC across Six States: BLM initiated lighting, HVAC, and other upgrades at remote facilities across six states as part of this successful ESPC. Dyess Air Force Base Water Conservation and Green Energy: Dyess Air Force Base leveraged an ESPC to implement water conservation and wind energy projects. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) White Oak Campus Environmental Stewardship and Cost Savings: The FDA White Oak Campus in Silver Spring,

458

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Savings Performance Contract Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Studies Case Studies These case studies feature examples of projects made possible by the use of energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). Bureau of Land Management (BLM) ESPC across Six States: BLM initiated lighting, HVAC, and other upgrades at remote facilities across six states as part of this successful ESPC. Dyess Air Force Base Water Conservation and Green Energy: Dyess Air Force Base leveraged an ESPC to implement water conservation and wind energy projects. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) White Oak Campus Environmental Stewardship and Cost Savings: The FDA White Oak Campus in Silver Spring, Maryland, receives power from a central utility plant constructed using an ESPC. Harold Washington Social Security Administration (SSA) Center Water Conservation and Green Energy: SSA installed numerous energy conservation measures at its Harold Washington Center in Chicago, Illinois, using an ESPC.

459

Worst-Case and Average-Case Analysis of n-Detection Test Sets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test sets that detect each target fault n times (n-detection test sets) are typically generated for restricted values of n due to the increase in test set size with n. We perform both a worst-case analysis and an average-case analysis to check the effect of restricting n on the unmodeled fault coverage of an (arbitrary) n-detection test set. Our analysis is independent of any particular test set or test generation approach. It is based on a specific set of target faults and a specific set of untargeted faults. It shows that, depending on the circuit, very large values of n may be needed to guarantee the detection of all the untargeted faults. We discuss the implications of these results.

Pomeranz, Irith

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Tools & Resources: Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Case Studies Case Studies Find out more about how energy efficiency upgrade programs across the United States are using innovative financing mechanisms, high-demand promotions, tailored contractor training, and more to drive the number of building upgrades through a holistic, whole-home approach. Use the lessons they learned to accelerate your own program's journey to success. The case studies below provide extensive, beneficial insight from Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners and others on the topics of: Driving Demand Financing Service Delivery Workforce Development. Topic Title Description Program Featured Sector Source Year Service Delivery Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time Provides examples of lessons learned through the implementation and monitoring of Austin Energy's Best Offer Ever promotion. The promotional offer generated a record number of home upgrades in just six months.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual base case" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Enforcement Cases | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Cases Enforcement Cases Enforcement Cases RSS December 20, 2013 AeroSys: Order (2011-SCE-1624) DOE ordered AeroSys, Inc. (AeroSys) to pay a $100,000 civil penalty after finding AeroSys had (1) failed to certify that certain models of space-constrained central air conditioners and air conditioning heat pumps comply with the applicable energy conservation standards; and (2) manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. units of noncompliant models of space-constrained central air conditioners and air conditioning heat pumps. November 15, 2013 Sylvane: Order (2013-CE-36005) DOE ordered Sylvane, Inc. to pay a $4,000 civil penalty after finding Sylvane had failed to certify that certain models of dehumidifiers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

462

Security Cases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security Cases Security Cases Security Cases RSS December 23, 2013 PSH-13-0103 - In the Matter of Personnel Security On January 29, 2013, the Individual completed and submitted a Questionnaire for National Security Positions (QNSP) to a Local Security Office (LSO). In this QNSP, the Individual admitted that he had used a neighbor's internet connection without permission on several occasions in 2010 and 2011, and had downloaded copyrighted software and media to his computer without permission from the copyright holders from 2000 through 2006. Exhibit 7 at 18-19. December 20, 2013 PSH-13-0102 - In the Matter of Personnel Security On December 20, 2013, a Hearing Officer determined that an individual's security clearance should be restored. In reaching this determination, the

463

EIA Cases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIA Cases EIA Cases EIA Cases RSS February 14, 2011 TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc. On December 13, 2010, Cole Distributing, Inc. (Cole) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The firm requests that it be permanently relieved of the requirement to prepare and file the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-782B, entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." As explained below, we have determined that Cole's request should be denied. February 14, 2011 TEE-0076 - In the Matter of Brodeur's Oil Service, Inc. On February 18, 2011, Brodeur's Oil Service, Inc. (Brodeur's) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of

464

Extracting Information from the World-Wide Web: A Case Study of Fuel Cell Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this document is divided in two main parts: chapters 2 and 3 are based on the literature, while chapters 4 and 5 describe the actual work done in this research project. Chapter 2 gives a general overview of information extraction: the concepts, its history and present main research sites. Chapter 3 presents the structure of a typical information extraction system and describes different approaches used in the literature. Chapter 4 describes the system developed to fulfil the task of extracting fuel cell information, and the results are given in chapter 5. Chapter 6 concludes the document.

Instructors M. Sc; Matti Keijola; Dr. Eng Samuel Kaski; Lauri Seitsonen; Lauri Seitsonen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Health IT Mobile Device Use Case Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health IT Mobile Device Use Case Meeting. Purpose: ... This meeting will address the Health IT project's first use case, Mobile Devices. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

Renewable Energy Case Studies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Case Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Renewable Energy Case Studies AgencyCompany Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

467

Model-Checking Based on Fluid Petri Nets for the Temperature Control System of the ICARO Co-generative Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling and analysis of hybrid systems is a recent and challenging research area which is actually dominated by two main lines: a functional analysis based on the description of the system in terms of discrete state (hybrid) automata (whose goal ...

Marco Gribaudo; A. Horváth; Andrea Bobbio; Enrico Tronci; Ester Ciancamerla; Michele Minichino

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Fossil Generating Station Case Histories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual EPRI Technical Update is a compilation of several case histories of events and activities that occurred at member fossil generating stations in 2007. The purpose of this report is to share this operating experience with other member utilities so that lessons can be learned and an opportunity provided to improve overall performance across the generation fleet.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

469

Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are added to the utility’s rate base. These results areAs noted earlier, the utility’s rate base is larger underthe utility collects less revenue between rate cases which

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Comorphism-based Grothendieck logics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to obtain a semantic foundation for heterogeneous specification, we extend Diaconescu's morphism-based Grothendieck institutions to the case of comorphisms. This is not just a dualization, because we obtain more general results, especially concerning amalgamation properties. We also introduce a proof calculus for structured heterogeneous speci cations and study its soundness and completeness (where amalgamation properties play a r^ole for obtaining the latter).

Till Mossakowski

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

MDU Solar Energy Project Case Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MDU Solar Energy Project MDU Solar Energy Project Case Study A Partnership between Ellsworth AFB and MDU Resources Group, Inc.  Based in Bismarck, North Dakota  Celebrated our 85 th year in 2009  NYSE - MDU for over 60 years  Over $4B market cap  Fortune 500 Company  Member of the S&P MidCap 400 Index  Over 8,000 employees in 44 states  Business Lines:  Energy  Utility Resources  Construction Materials  Construction Materials  Energy  Oil and Gas Production  Utility Resources  Natural Gas Pipelines  Construction Services  Electric / Natural Gas Utilities  Utility Resources  Montana - Dakota Utilities Co.  Cascade Natural Gas Co.  Intermountain Gas Corporation  Great Plains Natural Gas Co.  About 950,000 customers  ND, SD, WY, MT, WA, OR, ID, MN

472

The Influence of Cloud-Base Temperature and Pressure on Droplet Concentration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-base temperature is an important, but often neglected, parameter in the activation of cloud drops. Other factors being equal, clouds with colder bases will activate more condensation nuclei than clouds having warmer bases. In a typical case,...

David B. Johnson

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

NEPA Cases Filed in 2010 2010 NEPA Case Dispositions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Filed in 2010 2010 NEPA Case Dispositions Filed in 2010 2010 NEPA Case Dispositions Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands Judgment for defendant 46 ARMY-USACE 6 3 Dismissal w/o settlement 11 DHS-USCG 0 0 Settlement 8 DOD 1 0 Adverse dispositions: 17 DOE-Energy 0 0 TRO 0 DOE-FERC 0 0 Preliminary Injunction 5 DOE-NNSA 1 0 Permanent Injunction 4 DOI-BIA 1 0 Remand 8 DOI-BLM 17 5 DOI-BOEM 5 0 Basis for 2010 NEPA Dispositions DOI-BOR 0 0 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 0 DOI-FWS 6 1 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 12 DOI-OSM 0 1 NEPA - Not required 1 DOI-NPS 2 2 NEPA - Is required 2 DOJ 0 0 CE - Adequate 4 DOS 0 0 CE - Not Adequate 1 DOT-FAA 3 0 EA - Adequate* 11 DOT-FHWA 10 1 EA - Not Adequate* 5 DOT-FTA 2 0 EIS - Adequate* 17 EPA 1 0 EIS - Not Adequate* 5

474

Mining Test Cases To Improve Software Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finding TestTracing Features to Test Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.4.2 Finding Test Intents Using

Ziftci, Celal

475

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Implementation of ASME Code Case N-818  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N-818-1—the objective of which is to help users avoid unnecessary repairs of Class 1 and Class 2 full-penetration butt welds—provides alternatives to the existing ASME Section III acceptance criteria for new fabrication welds. This report presents the bases and justification for Code Case N-818-1 and provides guidance for use of the alternative fitness-for-service acceptance criteria for disposition of subsurface weld flaws that ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

476

Evaluating Equipment Performance Using SCADA/PMS Data for Thermal Utility Plants - Case Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equipment in cogeneration plants and thermal energy plants such as gas tubing generators, boilers, steam turbine generators, chillers and cooling towers are often critical to satisfying building needs. Their actual energy performance is very important when implementing the continuous Commissioning (CC) process. The actual performance can be used to develop optimal operation strategies, to conduct thermo-economy analysis, to perform fault diagnostics, and so forth. Because the standard performance test such as chiller test per ARI standard and cooling tower test per CTI standard often require the equipment to be operated under specific test conditions; however, in reality the dynamics of the system load normally do not allow the equipment to be operated under such conditions. It is costly and even impossible to take such critical equipment offline for test purposes. In order to facilitate the plant processes and on-going operations, utility plants usually employ Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Plant Monitoring Systems (SCADA/PMS) or Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCS) to monitor sensors, display data, control equipment, activate alarms and log information. However, the utilization and interpretation of the logged data are often at the minimum level especially in old systems without automatic operation and control optimization capabilities. Through three case studies, this paper presents methods for evaluating equipment performance using SCADA/PMS or EMSC data.

Deng, X.; Chen, Q.; Xu, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z