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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Examiner Paid Training Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPEP is offering a limited number of paid seats in its Examiner Preparation course classrooms. So, you can learn the methods ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

2

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

3

PAID-UP NONEXCLUSIVE PATENT LICENSE AGREEMENT  

Halbach Array DC Motor/Generator Company Name 1/7 TL0_____ Date PAID-UP NONEXCLUSIVE PATENT LICENSE AGREEMENT This Agreement between Lawrence Livermore National ...

4

PAID-UP NONEXCLUSIVE PATENT LICENSE AGREEMENT  

Cross-Talk Free, Low-Noise Optical Amplifier Company Name 1/7 TL0_____ Date PAID-UP NONEXCLUSIVE PATENT LICENSE AGREEMENT This Agreement between ...

5

The Aging Workforce and Paid Time Off  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Aging Workforce and Paid Time Off Draft 07/08/09 Gilliana matter of the workforce aging as the population ages. Thephysical changes with aging that can affect performance. 10

Lester, Gillian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 FY2010 0 FY2011 0 FY2012 12,862 FY2013 0 Cumulative Fee Paid 12,862 1,111,678 URS Energy & Construction, Inc. DE-AT30-08CC60014SP16 Contractor: Contract Number: Minimum...

7

(Paid) Internship IT Project Manager About Calix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Responsibilities: · Collaborate and manage project and program budgeting and cost estimation approaches, resource(Paid) Internship IT Project Manager About Calix Calix is the largest communications equipment, governance for use of the IT tools and process and assistance in providing operational functionality. Job

Ravikumar, B.

8

Battling the Internet Water Army: Detection of Hidden Paid Posters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We initiate a systematic study to help distinguish a special group of online users, called hidden paid posters, or termed "Internet water army" in China, from the legitimate ones. On the Internet, the paid posters represent a new type of online job opportunity. They get paid for posting comments and new threads or articles on different online communities and websites for some hidden purposes, e.g., to influence the opinion of other people towards certain social events or business markets. Though an interesting strategy in business marketing, paid posters may create a significant negative effect on the online communities, since the information from paid posters is usually not trustworthy. When two competitive companies hire paid posters to post fake news or negative comments about each other, normal online users may feel overwhelmed and find it difficult to put any trust in the information they acquire from the Internet. In this paper, we thoroughly investigate the behavioral pattern of online paid posters bas...

Chen, Cheng; Srinivasan, Venkatesh; Zhang, Xudong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 01 $4,547,400 FY2002 $4,871,000 FY2003 $6,177,902 FY2004 $8,743,007 FY2005 $13,134,189 FY2006 $7,489,704 FY2007 $9,090,924 FY2008 $10,045,072 FY2009 $12,504,247 FY2010 $17,590,414 FY2011 $17,558,710 FY2012 $14,528,770 Cumulative Fee Paid $126,281,339 Cost Plus Award Fee DE-AC29-01AL66444 Washington TRU Solutions LLC Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: $8,743,007 Contract Period: $1,813,482,000 Fee Information Maximum Fee $131,691,744 Total Estimated Contract Cost: $4,547,400 $4,871,000 $6,177,902 October 2000 - September 2012 Minimum Fee $0 Fee Available EM Contractor Fee Site: Carlsbad Field Office - Carlsbad, NM Contract Name: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operations March 2013 $13,196,690 $9,262,042 $10,064,940 $14,828,770 $12,348,558 $12,204,247 $17,590,414 $17,856,774

10

PREMIUMS PAID FOR GREEN GENERATION IN THE APX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PREMIUMS PAID FOR GREEN GENERATION PREMIUMS PAID FOR GREEN GENERATION IN THE APX GREEN POWER MARKET Janis C. Pepper Enertron Consultants / APX pepper@enertroncons.com 650-949-5719 Presented at Windpower 2000 May 1, 2000 Abstract Automated Power Exchange (APX) operates markets that allow buyers and sellers of electricity to do business with each other easily, efficiently, and directly. The APX Green Power Market opened on March 30, 1998 with the start of the restructured electricity market in California, providing a wholesale marketplace for buyers and sellers of renewable power to transact. Those renewable energy plants that are no longer under utility contracts, and new merchant renewable plants, are selling through this market. The overwhelming majority of green buyers and green sellers operating in the California market use the APX Green Power Market. APX

11

China Total Cloud Amount Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Total Cloud Amount Over China DOI: 10.3334CDIACcli.008 data Data image Graphics Investigator Dale P. Kaiser Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental...

12

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$ 3,422,994.00 $ 3,422,994.00 FY2011 4,445,142.00 $ FY2012 $ 5,021,951.68 FY2013 $ 3,501,670.00 FY2014 $0 FY2015 $0 FY2016 $0 FY2017 $0 FY2018 $0 FY2019 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $16,391,758 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee $989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December 2019 Contract Number: EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Contract Name: Comprehensive Security Services September 2013 Fee Information Maximum Fee $55,541,496 $5,204,095 $3,667,493 $5,041,415 Minimum Fee 0 Fee Available $5,428,947 $6,326,114

14

Pre-paid water metering: social experiences and lessons learned from Klipheuwel pilot project, South Africa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis examined a pre-paid water metering pilot project which was implemented in Klipheuwel , Cape Town, South Africa in 2001. It was anticipated… (more)

Kumwenda, Moses

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Before Getting There: Potential and Actual Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the concepts of Actual and Potential Collaboration Spaces. The former applies to the space where collaborative activities are performed, while the second relates to the initial space where opportunities for collaboration are ... Keywords: Doc2U, PIÑAS, casual and informal interactions, potential and actual collaboration spaces, potential collaboration awareness

Alberto L. Morán; Jesús Favela; Ana María Martínez Enríquez; Dominique Decouchant

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount.

17

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

18

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

19

Improving Industrial Refrigeration System Efficiency - Actual Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses actual design and modifications for increased system efficiency and includes reduced chilled liquid flow during part load operation, reduced condensing and increased evaporator temperatures for reduced system head, thermosiphon cycle cooling during winter operation, compressor intercooling, direct refrigeration vs. brine cooling, insulation of cold piping to reduce heat gain, multiple screw compressors for improved part load operation, evaporative condensers for reduced system head and pumping energy, and using high efficiency motors.

White, T. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2011 September 13, 2011 Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount. Last year, workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company treated 600 mil- lion gallons of groundwater at the site. "It's great to know the amount of treated groundwater is increasing. We are meeting our goals, which means we are protecting the Columbia River," said Bill Barrett, CH2M HILL director of pump and treat operations and maintenance. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work to expand Hanford's capacity for treating contami- nated groundwater led to the 2011 record amount. The Recovery Act funded the installation of more

22

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

23

Number of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universities 30 2,886,684 State of Colorado** 35 2,210,660 Miscellaneous agencies 11 498 the University of Colorado and Colorado State University Colorado School of Mines Awards by Funding Agency FiscalNumber of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount Department of Agriculture Department of Commerce 4

24

Number of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

289 13,089,070 Other Universities 31 2,399,092 State of Colorado** 27 2,139,037 Miscellaneous agencies the University of Colorado and Colorado State University Colorado School of Mines Awards by Funding Agency FiscalNumber of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount Department of Agriculture 1 499,815 Department

25

Number of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,739,813 State of Colorado** 26 1,846,825 Miscellaneous agencies 10 697,285 326 29,281,431 Total Awards ReceivedNumber of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount Department of Commerce 2 25,613 Department 215,000 Environmental Protection Agency 0 - National Aeronautics and Space Administration 1 30

26

Number of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,096,445 State of Colorado 22 1,007,618 Miscellaneous agencies 10 514,288 327 24,608,655 Total Awards ReceivedNumber of Award Federal Agencies Awards Amount Department of Commerce 3 117,227 Department,385,219 Environmental Protection Agency 1 21,602 National Aeronautics and Space Administration 5 703,140 National

27

1981 national survey of compensation paid scientists and engineers engaged in research and development activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a compensation survey conducted by the Columbus Laboratories of Battelle are presented. The survey was entitled A National Survey of Compensation Paid to Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development Activities. Information is included on the: sampling procedures; basic data for survey analysis; beginning salaries for recent graduates with bachelor, master, or doctorate degrees; salary trends; geographic analysis; interpretation of results; and salary tables. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

29

The Mythogenesis of Gender: Judicial Images of Women in Paid and Unpaid Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LAW JOURNAL [Vol. 6:457 AFDC would not actually receivethat 87.6% of children on AFDC are living with a singlea 1936 study (one year after AFDC was enacted as part of the

Brown, Judith Olans; Williams, Lucy A.; Baumann, Phyllis Tropper

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

1980 national survey of compensation paid scientists and engineers engaged in research and development activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In November of 1966, the United States Department of Energy awarded a contract to the Columbus Laboratories of Battelle to design a survey of compensation paid to scientific and engineering personnel engaged in research and development in the United States. The contract provided that such a survey would utilize the maturity or age-wage approach, under which salary data would be related to years since receipt of degree or chronological age. This document reports the results of the thirteenth annual survey, conducted in 1980.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)"...

32

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

33

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 999...

34

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002...

35

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,200...

36

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011...

37

Predicted vs. Actual Energy Savings of Retrofitted House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of actual energy savings and the predicted energy savings of retrofitted one-story house located in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The process started with modeling the house prior to retrofitting and after retrofitting. The monthly metered energy consumption is acquired from the electric company archives for seven years prior to retrofitting and recording the actual monthly energy consumption of the post retrofitting. The house model is established on DOE 2.1. Actual monthly energy consumption is used to calibrate and fine-tuning the model until the gap between actual and predicted consumption was narrowed. Then the Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) are entered into the modeled house according to the changes in thermo-physical properties of the envelope and the changes in schedules and number of users. In order to account for those differences, electrical consumption attributed to A/C in summer was isolated and compared. The study followed the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP) in assessing the impact of energy conservation measures on actual, metered, building energy consumption. The study aimed to show the predicted savings by the simulated building model and the actual utility bills' analysis in air conditioning consumption and peak at monthly load due to building envelope.

Al-Mofeez, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Determination of Total Ozone Amount from TIROS Radiance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total ozone amounts are determined from atmospheric radiances measured by the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS). The retrieval procedure is one of linear regression where total ozone amounts derived from Dobson spectrophotometer ...

Walter G. Planet; David S. Crosby; James H. Lienesch; Michael L. Hill

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level

40

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final July 01, 2010 Final July 01, 2010 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2010 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft July 9, 2009 Draft July 9, 2009 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2009 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

42

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

43

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884 7924 AEO 1998 6895 6906 7066 7161 7278 7400 7488 7597 7719 7859 7959 8074 8190 8286 8361 AEO 1999 6884 7007 7269 7383 7472 7539 7620 7725 7841 7949 8069 8174 8283 8351 AEO 2000 7056 7141 7266 7363 7452 7578 7694 7815 7926 8028 8113 8217 8288

44

Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2935 3201 3362 3504 3657 3738 3880 3993 4099 4212 4303 4398 4475 4541 4584 4639 4668 4672 AEO 1995 2953 3157 3281 3489 3610 3741 3818 3920 4000 4103 4208 4303 4362 4420 4442 4460 4460 AEO 1996 3011 3106 3219 3398 3519 3679 3807 3891 3979 4070 4165 4212 4260 4289 4303 4322 4325 AEO 1997 3099 3245 3497 3665 3825 3975 4084 4190 4285 4380 4464 4552 4617 4654 4709 4760 AEO 1998 3303 3391 3654 3713 3876 4053 4137 4298 4415 4556 4639 4750 4910 4992 5087 AEO 1999 3380 3442 3888 4022 4153 4238 4336 4441 4545 4652 4780 4888 4999 5073 AEO 2000 3599 3847 4036 4187 4320 4465 4579 4690 4780 4882 4968 5055 5113

45

Tropical Africa: Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Closed Forests (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Land Use Maximum Potential Biomass Density Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By Country) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1960 (By Administrative Unit)

46

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

47

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.983258692,2.124739238,2.26534793,2.409252566,2.585728477,2.727400662,2.854942053,2.980927152,3.13861755,3.345819536,3.591100993,3.849544702,4.184279801,4.510016556,4.915074503,5.29147351,5.56022351,5.960471854 "AEO 1995",,1.891706924,1.998384058,1.952818035,2.064227053,2.152302174,2.400016103,2.569033816,2.897681159,3.160088567,3.556344605,3.869033816,4.267391304,4.561932367,4.848599034,5.157246377,5.413405797,5.660917874 "AEO 1996",,,1.630674532,1.740334763,1.862956911,1.9915856,2.10351261,2.194934146,2.287655669,2.378991658,2.476043002,2.589847464,2.717610782,2.836870306,2.967124845,3.117719429,3.294003735,3.485657428,3.728419409

48

Physical Education Building Building Room Material Amount Percentage Priority Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physical Education Building Building Room Material Amount Percentage Priority Action Phys Ed Level Mechanical Insulation 250 LF 70.00 P6 Manage Phys Ed Level 1 East PE1H2 Pipe Fitting Mud 6 each 85.00 P5 #12;Building Room Material Amount Percentage Priority Action Phys Ed Level 2 West PE200 Pipe Fitting

Seldin, Jonathan P.

49

Service Building 4 Building Room Material Amount Percentage Priority Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Service Building 4 Building Room Material Amount Percentage Priority Action Service Building 4 S160 65 sqft 15.00 P5 Manage S1J74 Friday, February 18, 2011 Page 1 of 2 #12;Building Room Material Amount Manage Mechanical Insulation 100 LF 55.00 P5 Manage Service Buliding 4 S16H6A Gypsum Wallboard Joint

Seldin, Jonathan P.

50

Report on 1986 national survey of compensation paid scientists and engineers engaged in research and development activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In November of 1966, the United States Department of Energy awarded a contract to the Columbus Division of Battelle to design a survey of compensation paid to scientific and engineering personnel engaged in research and development in the United States. This survey utilized the maturity or ''age-wage'' approach, under which salary data would be related to years since receipt or degree of chronological age. This document reports the results of the eighteenth annual survey, with a salary effective data of February 1, 1986.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Report on 1985 national survey of compensation paid scientists and engineers engaged in research and development activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In November of 1966, the US DOE awarded a contract to the Columbus Division of Battelle to design a survey of compensation paid to scientific and engineering personnel engaged in research and development in the United States. The contract provided that such a survey would utilize the maturity or ''age-wage'' approach, under which salary data would be related to years since receipt of degree or chronological age. This document reports the results of the seventeenth annual survey, with a salary effective date of February 1, 1985.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Report on 1984 national survey of compensation paid scientists and engineers engaged in research and development activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In November 1966, the United States Department of Energy awarded a contract to the Columbus Laboratories of Battelle to design a survey of compensation paid to scientific and engineering personnel engaged in research and development in the United States. The contract provided that such a survey would utilize the maturity of age-wage approach, under which salary data would be related to years since receipt of degree or chronological age. This document reports the results of the sixteenth annual survey, conducted in 1984.

Not Available

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund raises record amount  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund raises record amount Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund raises record amount Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund raises record amount $555,625 will fund regional students' post-secondary education July 1, 2013 Students from Valarde Middle School won the video competition in the Best in Show and Middle School categories. They are shown here with sixth-grade teacher Jimmy Lara. Lab Director Charlie McMillan throws out the first pitch at an Isotopes game that helped raise funds for Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation scholarship program Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund raises record amount

54

On the Conditional Distribution of Daily Precipitation Amounts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possible conditional dependence of the distribution of daily precipitation amounts on the occurrence of precipitation on the preceding day is examined. Test results based on 25 years of data at 30 stations in the conterminous United States show ...

Edwin H. Chin; John F. Miller

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Automatic Monitoring of the Amount of Deposited Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automatic device for measurement of the amount (weight) of deposited precipitation developed at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, is described. Examples of measurements of various types of ...

J. Fišák; J. Chum; J. Vojta; K. Bart??ková

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Automatic Estimation of Cloud Amount Using Computer Vision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was carried out to establish the feasibility of using computer vision to estimate cloud amount. Various techniques were investigated and optimum diagnostic parameters derived. These were then applied to a number of images representing a ...

Gordon B. Davis; David J. Griggs; Geoffrey D. Sullivan

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rising steam costs and a high failure rate on the Joliet Plants standard steam trap, a testing and evaluation program was begun to find a steam trap that would work at Olin-Joliet. The basis was to conduct the test on the actual process equipment and that a minimum life be achieved. This paper deals with the history of the steam system/condensate systems, the setting up of the testing procedure, which traps were and were not tested and the results of the testing program to date.

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2.02,2.4,2.66,2.74,2.81,2.85,2.89,2.93,2.95,2.97,3,3.16,3.31,3.5,3.57,3.63,3.74,3.85 "AEO 1995",,2.46,2.54,2.8,2.87,2.87,2.89,2.9,2.9,2.92,2.95,2.97,3,3.03,3.19,3.35,3.51,3.6 "AEO 1996",,,2.56,2.75,2.85,2.88,2.93,2.98,3.02,3.06,3.07,3.09,3.12,3.17,3.23,3.29,3.37,3.46,3.56 "AEO 1997",,,,2.82,2.96,3.16,3.43,3.46,3.5,3.53,3.58,3.64,3.69,3.74,3.78,3.83,3.87,3.92,3.97 "AEO 1998",,,,,2.95,3.19,3.531808376,3.842532873,3.869043112,3.894513845,3.935930967,3.976293564,4.021911621,4.062207222,4.107616425,4.164502144,4.221304417,4.277039051,4.339964867

59

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099 1104 AEO 1998 1009 1051 1044 1058 1087 1084 1090 1097 1112 1130 1142 1148 1160 1162 1180 AEO 1999 1040 1075 1092 1109 1113 1118 1120 1120 1133 1139 1150 1155 1156 1173 AEO 2000 1053 1086 1103 1124 1142 1164 1175 1184 1189 1194 1199 1195 1200 AEO 2001 1078 1112 1135 1153 1165 1183 1191 1220 1228 1228 1235 1240

60

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Table 16. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual (billion kilowatt-hours) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2364 2454 2534 2626 2708 2811 AEO 1983 2318 2395 2476 2565 2650 2739 3153 AEO 1984 2321 2376 2461 2551 2637 2738 3182 AEO 1985 2317 2360 2427 2491 2570 2651 2730 2808 2879 2949 3026 AEO 1986 2363 2416 2479 2533 2608 2706 2798 2883 2966 3048 3116 3185 3255 3324 3397 AEO 1987 2460 2494 2555 2622 2683 2748 2823 2902 2977 3363 AEO 1989* 2556 2619 2689 2760 2835 2917 2994 3072 3156 3236 3313 3394 3473 AEO 1990 2612 2689 3083 3488.0 3870.0 AEO 1991 2700 2762 2806 2855 2904 2959 3022 3088 3151 3214 3282 3355 3427 3496 3563 3632 3704 3776 3846 3916 AEO 1992 2746 2845 2858 2913 2975 3030 3087 3146 3209 3276 3345 3415 3483 3552 3625 3699 3774 3847 3921 AEO 1993 2803 2840 2893 2946 2998 3052 3104 3157 3214 3271 3327

62

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

63

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO Dollar Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1992,1.9399,2.029,2.1099,2.1899,2.29,2.35,2.39,2.42,2.47,2.55,2.65,2.75,2.89,3.01,3.17,3.3,3.35,3.47 "AEO 1995",1993,,1.85,1.899,1.81,1.87,1.8999,2.06,2.14,2.34,2.47,2.69,2.83,3.02,3.12,3.21,3.3,3.35,3.39 "AEO 1996",1994,,,1.597672343,1.665446997,1.74129355,1.815978527,1.866241336,1.892736554,1.913619637,1.928664207,1.943216205,1.964540124,1.988652706,2.003382921,2.024799585,2.056392431,2.099974155,2.14731431,2.218094587

64

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 AEO 1996 1994 7.09 6.99 6.94 6.93 6.96 6.96 6.96 6.97 6.98 6.97 6.98 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.96 6.95 6.91 AEO 1997 1995 6.94 6.89 6.90 6.91 6.86 6.84 6.78 6.73 6.66 6.60 6.58 6.54 6.49 6.48 6.45 6.36

65

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO 1995",,6398.45,6544.45,6555.4,6675.85,6745.2,6821.85,6887.55,6964.2,7048.15,7146.7,7245.25,7336.5,7405.85,7471.55,7537.25,7581.05,7621.2 "AEO 1996",,,6489.7,6526.2,6606.5,6708.7,6781.7,6854.7,6942.3,7008,7084.65,7175.9,7259.85,7329.2,7383.95,7449.65,7500.75,7544.55,7581.05 "AEO 1997",,,,6635.7,6694.1,6825.5,6953.25,7073.7,7183.2,7267.15,7369.35,7460.6,7548.2,7643.1,7730.7,7792.75,7832.9,7884,7924.15

66

Direct quantum communication without actual transmission of the message qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently an orthogonal state based protocol of direct quantum communication without actual transmission of particles is proposed by Salih \\emph{et al.}{[}Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{110} (2013) 170502{]} using chained quantum Zeno effect. As the no-transmission of particle claim is criticized by Vaidman {[}arXiv:1304.6689 (2013){]}, the condition (claim) of Salih \\emph{et al.} is weaken here to the extent that transmission of particles is allowed, but transmission of the message qubits (the qubits on which the secret information is encoded) is not allowed. Remaining within this weaker condition it is shown that there exists a large class of quantum states, that can be used to implement an orthogonal state based protocol of secure direct quantum communication using entanglement swapping, where actual transmission of the message qubits is not required. The security of the protocol originates from monogamy of entanglement. As the protocol can be implemented without using conjugate coding its security is independent of non-commutativity.

Chitra Shukla; Anirban Pathak

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

68

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",17.71,17.68,17.84,18.12,18.25,18.43,18.58,18.93,19.28,19.51,19.8,19.92,20.13,20.18,20.38,20.35,20.16,20.19 "AEO 1995",,18.28,17.98,17.92,18.21,18.63,18.92,19.08,19.2,19.36,19.52,19.75,19.94,20.17,20.28,20.6,20.59,20.88 "AEO 1996",,,18.9,19.15,19.52,19.59,19.59,19.65,19.73,19.97,20.36,20.82,21.25,21.37,21.68,22.11,22.47,22.83,23.36 "AEO 1997",,,,19.1,19.7,20.17,20.32,20.54,20.77,21.26,21.9,22.31,22.66,22.93,23.38,23.68,23.99,24.25,24.65 "AEO 1998",,,,,18.85,19.06,20.34936142,20.27427673,20.60257721,20.94442177,21.44076347,21.80969238,22.25416183,22.65365219,23.176651,23.74545097,24.22989273,24.70069313,24.96691322

69

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.94 2.03 2.11 2.19 2.29 2.35 2.39 2.42 2.47 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.89 3.01 3.17 3.30 3.35 3.47 AEO 1995 1993 1.85 1.90 1.81 1.87 1.90 2.06 2.14 2.34 2.47 2.69 2.83 3.02 3.12 3.21 3.30 3.35 3.39 AEO 1996 1994 1.60 1.67 1.74 1.82 1.87 1.89 1.91 1.93 1.94 1.96 1.99 2.00 2.02 2.06 2.10 2.15 2.22

70

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

71

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

72

Nonlinear excitations in DNA: Aperiodic models vs actual genome sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of the sequence on the propagation of nonlinear excitations in simple models of DNA in which we incorporate actual DNA sequences obtained from human genome data. We show that kink propagation requires forces over a certain threshold, a phenomenon already found for aperiodic sequences [F. Dom\\'\\i nguez-Adame {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 52}, 2183 (1995)]. For forces below threshold, the final stop positions are highly dependent on the specific sequence. The results of our model are consistent with the stick-slip dynamics of the unzipping process observed in experiments. We also show that the effective potential, a collective coordinate formalism introduced by Salerno and Kivshar [Phys. Lett. A {\\bf 193}, 263 (1994)] is a useful tool to identify key regions in DNA that control the dynamical behavior of large segments. Additionally, our results lead to further insights in the phenomenology observed in aperiodic systems.

Sara Cuenda; Angel Sanchez

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

73

Report on 1982 national survey of compensation paid scientists and engineers engaged in research and development activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In November of 1966, the United States Department of Energy awarded a contract to the Columbus Laboratories of Battelle to design a survey of compensation paid to scientific and engineering personnel engaged in research and development in the United States. The contract provided that such a survey would utilize the maturity or age-wage approach, under which salary data would be related to years since receipt of degree or chronological age. The document reports the results of the fifteenth annual survey, conducted in 1982. This survey was funded by the Department of Energy. The conduct of the survey has been approved by the Office of Management and Budget under the Federal Reports Act.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Comparison of compensation paid scientists and engineers in research and development: DOE National Survey of Compensation, 1982 data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under a contract with the US Department of Energy, the Columbus Laboratories of Battelle conducts an annual salary survey entitled A National Survey of Compensation Paid to Scientists and Engineers engaged in Research and Development Activities. The 1982 report contained the results of its 15th annual survey and included data for five types of R and D establishments (sectors): Industry, Nonprofit Research Institutes, Federally Funded R and D Centers (referred to as Contract Research Centers), Federal Government Laboratories, and Educational Institutions. This study covers 18 DOE contractor-operated laboratories, 7 of which are included in the Contract Research Center sector of Battelle's National Survey. Each DOE Laboratory agreed that computer tapes of its submission, reflecting Survey input, would be made available to DOE for this study. The purpose of this study is to compare compensation and other characteristics of the DOE Laboratories with National Survey patterns.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Comparison of compensation paid scientists and engineers in research and development: DOE national survey of compensation, 1981 data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under a contract with the US Department of Energy, the Columbus Laboratories of Battelle conducts an annual salary survey entitled A National Survey of Compensation Paid to Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development Activities. The 1981 report contained the results of its 14th annual survey and included data for five types of R and D establishments (sectors): Industry, Nonprofit Research Institutes, Federally Funded R and D Centers (referred to as Contract Research Centers), Federal Government Laboratories, and Educational Institutions. This study covers 18 DOE contractor-operated laboratories, 7 of which are included in the Contract Research Center sector of Battelle's National Survey. Each DOE Laboratory agreed that computer tapes of its submission, reflecting Survey input, would be made available to DOE for this study. The purpose of this study is to compare compensation and other characteristics of the DOE Laboratories with National Survey patterns.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

77

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

78

Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production, Projected vs. Actual Production, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 14.74 14.26 14.33 14.89 15.39 15.88 AEO 1983 16.48 16.27 16.20 16.31 16.27 16.29 14.89 AEO 1984 17.48 17.10 17.44 17.58 17.52 17.32 16.39 AEO 1985 16.95 17.08 17.11 17.29 17.40 17.33 17.32 17.27 17.05 16.80 16.50 AEO 1986 16.30 16.27 17.15 16.68 16.90 16.97 16.87 16.93 16.86 16.62 16.40 16.33 16.57 16.23 16.12 AEO 1987 16.21 16.09 16.38 16.32 16.30 16.30 16.44 16.62 16.81 17.39 AEO 1989* 16.71 16.71 16.94 17.01 16.83 17.09 17.35 17.54 17.67 17.98 18.20 18.25 18.49 AEO 1990 16.91 17.25 18.84 20.58 20.24 AEO 1991 17.40 17.48 18.11 18.22 18.15 18.22 18.39 18.82 19.03 19.28 19.62 19.89 20.13 20.07 19.95 19.82 19.64 19.50 19.30 19.08 AEO 1992 17.43 17.69 17.95 18.00 18.29 18.27 18.51 18.75 18.97

79

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

80

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

82

Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 9.2 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 7.29 8.09 8.94 9.62 10.27 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 6.37 6.89 7.50 8.15 9.05 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30

83

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

84

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

85

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

86

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

87

Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 7.58 7.45 7.12 6.82 6.66 7.09 AEO 1983 5.15 5.44 5.73 5.79 5.72 5.95 6.96 AEO 1984 4.85 5.11 5.53 5.95 6.31 6.59 8.65 AEO 1985 4.17 4.38 4.73 4.93 5.36 5.72 6.23 6.66 7.14 7.39 7.74 AEO 1986 5.15 5.38 5.46 5.92 6.46 7.09 7.50 7.78 7.96 8.20 8.47 8.74 9.04 9.57 9.76 AEO 1987 5.81 6.04 6.81 7.28 7.82 8.34 8.71 8.94 8.98 10.01 AEO 1989* 6.28 6.84 7.49 7.96 8.53 8.83 9.04 9.28 9.60 9.64 9.75 10.02 10.20 AEO 1990 7.20 7.61 9.13 9.95 11.02 AEO 1991 7.28 7.25 7.34 7.48 7.72 8.10 8.57 9.09 9.61 10.07 10.51 11.00 11.44 11.72 11.86 12.11 12.30 12.49 12.71 12.91 AEO 1992 6.86 7.42 7.88 8.16 8.55 8.80 9.06 9.32 9.50 9.80 10.17 10.35 10.56 10.61 10.85 11.00 11.15 11.29 11.50 AEO 1993 7.25 8.01 8.49 9.06

88

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1.98 2.12 2.27 2.41 2.59 2.73 2.85 2.98 3.14 3.35 3.59 3.85 4.18 4.51 4.92 5.29 5.56 5.96 AEO 1995 1.89 2.00 1.95 2.06 2.15 2.40 2.57 2.90 3.16 3.56 3.87 4.27 4.56 4.85 5.16 5.41 5.66 AEO 1996 1.63 1.74 1.86 1.99 2.10 2.19 2.29 2.38 2.48 2.59 2.72 2.84 2.97 3.12 3.29 3.49 3.73 AEO 1997 2.03 1.82 1.90 1.99 2.06 2.13 2.21 2.32 2.43 2.54 2.65 2.77 2.88 3.00 3.11 3.24 AEO 1998 2.30 2.20 2.26 2.31 2.38 2.44 2.52 2.60 2.69 2.79 2.93 3.06 3.20 3.35 3.48 AEO 1999 1.98 2.15 2.20 2.32 2.43 2.53 2.63 2.76 2.90 3.02 3.12 3.23 3.35 3.47

89

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

90

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

91

Table 15. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual (nominal cents per kilowatt-hour) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.38 6.96 7.63 8.23 8.83 9.49 AEO 1983 6.85 7.28 7.74 8.22 8.68 9.18 13.12 AEO 1984 6.67 7.05 7.48 7.89 8.25 8.65 11.53 AEO 1985 6.62 6.94 7.32 7.63 7.89 8.15 8.46 8.85 9.20 9.61 10.04 AEO 1986 6.67 6.88 7.05 7.18 7.35 7.52 7.65 7.87 8.31 8.83 9.41 10.01 10.61 11.33 12.02 AEO 1987 6.63 6.65 6.92 7.12 7.38 7.62 7.94 8.36 8.86 11.99 AEO 1989* 6.50 6.75 7.14 7.48 7.82 8.11 8.50 8.91 9.39 9.91 10.49 11.05 11.61 AEO 1990 6.49 6.72 8.40 10.99 14.5 AEO 1991 6.94 7.31 7.59 7.82 8.18 8.38 8.54 8.73 8.99 9.38 9.83 10.29 10.83 11.36 11.94 12.58 13.21 13.88 14.58 15.21 AEO 1992 6.97 7.16 7.32 7.56 7.78 8.04 8.29 8.57 8.93 9.38 9.82 10.26 10.73 11.25 11.83 12.37 12.96 13.58 14.23 AEO 1993

92

Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 AEO 1983 1.08 1.16 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 AEO 1984 0.99 1.05 1.16 1.27 1.43 1.57 2.11 AEO 1985 0.94 1.00 1.19 1.45 1.58 1.86 1.94 2.06 2.17 2.32 2.44 AEO 1986 0.74 0.88 0.62 1.03 1.05 1.27 1.39 1.47 1.66 1.79 1.96 2.17 2.38 2.42 2.43 AEO 1987 0.84 0.89 1.07 1.16 1.26 1.36 1.46 1.65 1.75 2.50 AEO 1989* 1.15 1.32 1.44 1.52 1.61 1.70 1.79 1.87 1.98 2.06 2.15 2.23 2.31 AEO 1990 1.26 1.43 2.07 2.68 2.95 AEO 1991 1.36 1.53 1.70 1.82 2.11 2.30 2.33 2.36 2.42 2.49 2.56 2.70 2.75 2.83 2.90 2.95 3.02 3.09 3.17 3.19 AEO 1992 1.48 1.62 1.88 2.08 2.25 2.41 2.56 2.68 2.70 2.72 2.76 2.84 2.92 3.05 3.10 3.20 3.25 3.30 3.30 AEO 1993 1.79 2.08 2.35 2.49 2.61 2.74 2.89 2.95 3.00 3.05 3.10

93

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

94

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 23.36 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25 24.65 AEO 1998 18.85 19.06 20.35 20.27 20.60 20.94 21.44 21.81 22.25 22.65 23.18 23.75 24.23 24.70 24.97 AEO 1999 18.80 19.13 19.28 19.82 20.23 20.77 21.05 21.57 21.98 22.47 22.85 23.26 23.77 24.15

95

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

96

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00 26.63 AEO 1997 22.15 22.75 23.24 23.64 23.86 24.13 24.65 25.34 25.82 26.22 26.52 27.00 27.35 27.70 28.01 28.47 AEO 1998 21.84 23.03 23.84 24.08 24.44 24.81 25.33 25.72 26.22 26.65 27.22 27.84 28.35 28.84 29.17 AEO 1999 21.35 22.36 22.54 23.18 23.65 24.17 24.57 25.19 25.77 26.41 26.92 27.42 28.02 28.50

97

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

98

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Feb-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Mar-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1

Johns, Russell Taylor

99

Organization USPostagePaid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, California, where he is working on developing novel integrated analysis systems on a chip. Previously he associate at the Center for Integrated Systems at Stanford University. In 1982, he was awarded a Doctorate of VCSELs for HP's fiberoptic tranceiver product line, and later to GaN materials and device technology

Wu, Junqiao

100

Organization USPostagePaid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency of a light emitting diode to the open circuit voltage of a solar cell.28 A non-ideal PC will also

Wu, Junqiao

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparison of Compensation paid scientists and engineers in research and development. DOE National Survey of Compensation, 1980 data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several compensation characteristics of DOE contractor-operated laboratories are compared with those reported in the 1980 National Survey of Compensation Paid Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development Activities. The data are as of August 1, 1980. A total of 339 establishments (industry, Federal laboratories, Federal contract research centers, nonprofit research institutes, educational institutions) and 18 DOE laboratories are included in the survey. Characteristics of DOE laboratories such as salaries by field of degree, maturity, and management levels are shown and are compared with the National Survey patterns. Approximately 8 out of 10 S and E's at DOE Laboratories (84.8%) held a degree in one of four fields: engineering, chemistry, physics, or mathematics/statistics. In the National Survey, 78.5% of all S and E's held degrees in these fields. The average DOE Laboratory S and E salary increased 6.6% between 1979 and 1980, while the average salary in the National Survey advanced by 7.5%. The National Survey percentage increase over the year was greater at each degree level than among DOE Laboratories.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 ACADEMIC UC PAID FACULTY-LADDER RANKS 012 PROFESSORIAL-RECALL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PREPARATION AND DISTRIBUTION - SUPERVISORS & WORKERS Total HEALTH CARE AND ALLIED SERVICES H35 NURSING SERVICES J10 POLICE AND FIRE SERVICES J15 PARKING AND GUARD SERVICES Total SCIENCES, LABORATORY AND ALLIED OR RESIDENT Total Total Total STAFF UC PAID ARCHITECTURE, ENGINEERING AND ALLIED SERVICES E10 ARCHITECTURE

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

103

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time News Featured Articles 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony...

104

The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Actual Production History insurance plan protects against crop losses from a number of causes. All aspects of this insurance are described, including reporting requirements for the producer.

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Using Henry's Constant for Determining the Amount of Isoprene in the Liquid Phase The amount of isoprene in the gas phase (mols)1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure 101,000 (Pa)2. Volume of the liquid phase3. Things you need to know Math Amount of isoprene in gas = ideal gas constant 8.314 J mol-1 K-1 T = temperature of liquid phase units °K (which is 273.1 + °C) CUsing Henry's Constant for Determining the Amount of Isoprene in the Liquid Phase The amount

Last, Robert L.

106

Trends of Calculated and Simulated Actual Evaporation in the Yangtze River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actual evaporation in the Yangtze River basin is calculated by the complementary relationship approach—that is, the advection–aridity (AA) model with parameter validation from 1961 to 2007—and simulated by the general circulation model (GCM) ...

Yanjun Wang; Bo Liu; Buda Su; Jianqing Zhai; Marco Gemmer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Assessing Climate Information Use in Agribusiness. Part I: Actual and Potential Use and Impediments to Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project for the development of methodology to enable agribusiness decision makers to utilize more effectively climate information involved investigation of three agribusiness firms, as well as measurement of their actual and potential use. The ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Steven T. Sonka; Steven Hofing

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Use of Remotely Sensed Actual Evapotranspiration to Improve Rainfall–Runoff Modeling in Southeast Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), mounted on the polar-orbiting Terra satellite, to determine leaf area index (LAI), and use actual evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS LAI data combined ...

Yongqiang Zhang; Francis H. S. Chiew; Lu Zhang; Hongxia Li

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration from Satellite and Meteorological Data in Central Bolivia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial estimates of actual evapotranspiration are useful for calculating the water balance of river basins, quantifying hydrological services provided by ecosystems, and assessing the hydrological impacts of land-use practices. To provide this ...

Christian Seiler; Arnold F. Moene

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Date Published 05/2013 Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Traditional energy performance calculated using building simulation with the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data represents the energy performance in a typical year but not necessarily the average or typical energy performance of a building in long term. Furthermore, the simulated results do not provide the range of variations due to the change of weather, which is important in building energy management and risk assessment of energy efficiency investment. This study analyzes the weather impact on peak electric demand and energy use by building simulation using 30-year actual meteorological year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels across all 17 climate zones. The simulated results from the AMY are compared to those from TMY3 to determine and analyze the differences. It was found that yearly weather variation has significant impact on building performance especially peak electric demand. Energy savings of building technologies should be evaluated using simulations with multi-decade actual weather data to fully consider investment risk and the long term performance.

111

What types and amounts of energy are produced in each state? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar › Energy in Brief. ... What types and amounts of energy are produced in each state? EIA has data on the types and amounts of energy produced in each state as ...

112

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - XLS Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top...

113

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - ODS format Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...

114

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirement s. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A. (INEEL); Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N. (V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute); Logunov, M.V. (MAYAK Production Association)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.7% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

117

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.3% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas) #/Month

Johns, Russell Taylor

118

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 1.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

119

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1. 8.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

120

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 2.2% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.1% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas

Johns, Russell Taylor

122

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance. 1/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

123

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET

Johns, Russell Taylor

124

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance Shops Offices 6 OF REPORT DP Form #31 - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES

Johns, Russell Taylor

125

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Theft Total $280 $280 Total % Rcvd 0.4% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List

Johns, Russell Taylor

126

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared.1% DP Form #31 Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY Form #31 Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY

Johns, Russell Taylor

127

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran, Davis Introduction · The Iran Oil Project, initiated in 2007, aims to find the inefficiencies and their possible sources in Iranian oil and gas policies. Background Information Assumptions · Perfect Competition

California at Davis, University of

128

Satellite-Based Actual Evapotranspiration over Drying Semiarid Terrain in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple satellite-based algorithm for estimating actual evaporation based on Makkink’s equation is applied to a seasonal cycle in 2002 at three test sites in Ghana, West Africa: at a location in the humid tropical southern region and two in the ...

D. Schüttemeyer; Ch Schillings; A. F. Moene; H. A. R. de Bruin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

VGLI Coverage Amount by State as of April 30, 2012 | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VGLI Coverage Amount by State as of April 30, 2012 VGLI Coverage Amount by State as of April 30, 2012 Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data VGLI Coverage Amount by State as of April 30, 2012 Dataset Summary Description Provides the amount of Veterans' Group Life Insurance (VGLI) coverage by state. This report provides a snapshot of the amount of VGLI coverage as of April 30, 2012. For members who reside outside the United States, coverage is not identified by individual country. The total amount of coverage was captured to ensure 100% of the population was identified in the report. Tags {Benefits,Insurance,(State,County,etc.)} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access

130

Controlling the amount of physical activity in a specific exertion interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the empirical validation of a system that controls the amount of physical activity that children do while playing in a specific exertion interface called the Interactive Slide. The control of the amount of physical activity is done through ... Keywords: children, exergame, exertion interface, health, mixed reality, physical activity, sedentarism, user control

Pascal Landry; Narcis Pares

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

133

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment, behaviour, energy price, consumers Abstract “suggest that raising energy prices—such as in the form ofconsumers actually “see” energy prices and are therefore

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Actual Impact of the International Tribunal for former Yugoslavia on the Reconciliation Process in Bosnia-Herzegovina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the actual impact of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on the reconciliation process in Bosnia-Herzegovina and analyses possible… (more)

Johansen, Kristine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Fourteenth Annual National Survey of Compensation Paid to Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development Activities in the United States. Phase XV. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the conduct of the Fourteenth Annual National Survey of Compensation Paid to Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development Activities. This survey utilizes the survey design developed for the first annual survey, taking into account the DOE acceptances and modification of the recommendations contained in Battelle's Columbus Laboratories final report of the previous surveys. The contract scope of work specified that the survey should obtain information concerning compensation and compensation-related characteristics of both nondegreed and degreed scientists and engineers engaged in research and development. Information was to be obtained concerning both the employees and employers. The survey variables for which information was to be obtained were specified. As before, the universe specifications were to encompass industrial establishments, educational institutions, nonprofit research institutes, federal laboratories and federally funded research and development centers. The sampling plan was to be the same as for the previous surveys. The sample size was to be maintained at approximately 300 to 325 establishments. The sampling plan incorporated stratification and clustering based upon: (1) establishment size in terms of numbers of scientists and engineers employed; and (2) size of the Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) in terms of scientists and engineers in the area. Trend analyses, showing changes in salary levels over a five-year period, were to be prepared. Tabulated results of the survey are presented.

Spurgeon, M.; Evans, P.; Beatty, G.H.; Arnold, L.

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Phase XIV: the thirteenth annual national survey of compensation paid to scientists and engineers engaged in research and development activities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thirteenth Annual National Survey of Compensation Paid to Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development in 1980 is summarized. The contract scope of work specified that the survey should obtain information concerning compensation and compensation-related characteristics of both nondegreed and degreed scientists and engineers engaged in research and development. Information was to be obtained concerning both the employees and employers. The survey variables for which information was to be obtained were specified. As before, the universe specifications were to encompass industrial establishments, educational institutions, nonprofit research institutes, federal laboratories, and federally funded research and development centers. The sampling plan was to be the same as for the previous surveys. The sample size was to be maintained at approximately 300 to 325 establishments. The sampling plan incorporated stratification and clustering based upon (a) establishment size in terms of numbers of scientists and engineers employed and (b) size of the Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) in terms of scientists and engineers in the area. Trend analyses, showing changes in salary levels over a five-year period, were to be prepared.

Newborg, J.; Gabel, J.; Beatty, G.H.; Spurgeon, M.; Newman, S.

1980-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

137

How Do You Reduce the Amount of Energy Used by Your Televisions? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Amount of Energy Used by Your Televisions? the Amount of Energy Used by Your Televisions? How Do You Reduce the Amount of Energy Used by Your Televisions? December 30, 2010 - 6:30am Addthis On Monday, John told you about some changes to television labeling that will help you compare the energy use of different models when you're shopping. Many households have more than one television, and many of those televisions are always on! Unless you're paying attention, that could add up to a lot of energy use-and a higher electricity bill. How do you reduce the amount of energy used by your televisions? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov.

138

Observational and Model Estimates of Cloud Amount Feedback over the Indian and Pacific Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constraining intermodel spread in cloud feedback with observations is problematic because available cloud datasets are affected by spurious behavior in long-term variability. This problem is addressed by examining cloud amount in three independent ...

Katinka Bellomo; Amy C. Clement; Joel R. Norris; Brian J. Soden

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Effect of Spatial and Temporal Averaging on Sampling Strategies for Cloud Amount Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling and averaging strategies are as significant an influence upon the resulting cloud climatologies as the resolution of the original cloud archives. An investigation of total cloud amount data, as represented by the U.S. Air Force 3-...

N. A. Hughes; A. Henderson-Sellers

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

XLS Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - XLS Updated through 12:00 AM on July 16, 2010. 52Item84Recovery...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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141

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ODS format Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - ODS format Updated through 12:00 AM on July 16, 2010....

142

Experiments in probability of Precipitation Amount Forecasting Using Model Output Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modifications to current model output statistics procedures for quantitative precipitation forecasting were explored. Probability of precipitation amount equations were developed for warm and cool seasons in a region in the eastern United States. ...

Raymond W. Arritt; William M. Frank

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A High-Resolution Analysis of Cloud Amount and Type over Complex Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the first application of a multispectral textural Bayesian cloud classification algorithm (“SRTex”) to the general problem of the determination of high–spatial resolution cloud-amount and cloud-type climatological ...

Michael J. Uddstrom; John A. McGregor; Warren R. Gray; John W. Kidson

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Evaluation of Probabilistic Precipitation Forecasts Determined from Eta and AVN Forecasted Amounts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note examines the connection between the probability of precipitation and forecasted amounts from the NCEP Eta (now known as the North American Mesoscale model) and Aviation (AVN; now known as the Global Forecast System) models run over a 2-...

William A. Gallus Jr.; Michael E. Baldwin; Kimberly L. Elmore

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Obtaining accurate amounts of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for obtaining pre-determined, accurate rate amounts of mercury. In one embodiment, predetermined, precise amounts of Hg are separated from HgO and plated onto a cathode wire. The method for doing this involves dissolving a precise amount of HgO which corresponds to a pre-determined amount of Hg desired in an electrolyte solution comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. The mercuric ions are then electrolytically reduced and plated onto a cathode producing the required pre-determined quantity of Hg. In another embodiment, pre-determined, precise amounts of Hg are obtained from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The method for doing this involves dissolving a precise amount of Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] in an electrolyte solution comprised of concentrated HCl and H[sub 2]O. The mercurous ions in solution are then electrolytically reduced and plated onto a cathode wire producing the required, pre-determined quantity of Hg. 1 fig.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

Obtaining accurate amounts of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for obtaining pre-determined, accurate rate amounts of mercury. In one embodiment, predetermined, precise amounts of Hg are separated from HgO and plated onto a cathode wire. The method for doing this involves dissolving a precise amount of HgO which corresponds to a pre-determined amount of Hg desired in an electrolyte solution comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. The mercuric ions are then electrolytically reduced and plated onto a cathode producing the required pre-determined quantity of Hg. In another embodiment, pre-determined, precise amounts of Hg are obtained from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The method for doing this involves dissolving a precise amount of Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 in an electrolyte solution comprised of concentrated HCl and H.sub.2 O. The mercurous ions in solution are then electrolytically reduced and plated onto a cathode wire producing the required, pre-determined quantity of Hg.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Actual versus predicted impacts of three ethanol plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help reduce US dependence on imported petroleum, Congress passed the Energy Security Act of 1980 (public Law 96-294). This legislation authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to promote expansion of the fuel alcohol industry through, among other measures, its Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program. Under this program, selected proposals for the conversion of plant biomass into fuel-grade ethanol would be granted loan guarantees. of 57 applications submitted for loan guarantees to build and operate ethanol fuel projects under this program, 11 were considered by DOE to have the greatest potential for satisfying DOE`s requirements and goals. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE evaluated the potential impacts of proceeding with the Loan Guarantee Program in a programmatic environmental assessment (DOE 1981) that resulted in a finding of no significant impact (FANCY) (47 Federal Register 34, p. 7483). The following year, DOE conducted site-specific environmental assessments (EAs) for 10 of the proposed projects. These F-As predicted no significant environmental impacts from these projects. Eventually, three ethanol fuel projects received loan guarantees and were actually built: the Tennol Energy Company (Tennol; DOE 1982a) facility near Jasper in southeastern Tennessee; the Agrifuels Refining Corporation (Agrifuels; DOE 1985) facility near New Liberia in southern Louisiana; and the New Energy Company of Indiana (NECI; DOE 1982b) facility in South Bend, Indiana. As part of a larger retrospective examination of a wide range of environmental effects of ethanol fuel plants, we compared the actual effects of the three completed plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources with the effects predicted in the NEPA EAs several years earlier. A secondary purpose was to determine: Why were there differences, if any, between actual effects and predictions? How can assessments be improved and impacts reduced?

Eddlemon, G.K.; Webb, J.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Miller, R.L.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Method and apparatus for distinguishing actual sparse events from sparse event false alarms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Remote sensing method and apparatus wherein sparse optical events are distinguished from false events. "Ghost" images of actual optical phenomena are generated using an optical beam splitter and optics configured to direct split beams to a single sensor or segmented sensor. True optical signals are distinguished from false signals or noise based on whether the ghost image is presence or absent. The invention obviates the need for dual sensor systems to effect a false target detection capability, thus significantly reducing system complexity and cost.

Spalding, Richard E. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

150

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

151

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

152

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

153

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

154

File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:33, 3 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 09:33, 3 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (257 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools High School Curricula

155

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

156

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

157

Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

158

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Comparison of Projections to Actual Performance in the DOE-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), Global Energy Concepts (GEC) worked with participating utilities to develop a set of performance projections for their projects based on historical site atmospheric conditions, turbine performance data, operation and maintenance (O and M) strategies, and assumptions about various energy losses. After a preliminary operation period at each project, GEC compared the actual performance to projections and evaluated the accuracy of the data and assumptions that formed the performance projections. This paper presents a comparison of 1999 power output, turbine availability, and other performance characteristics to the projections for TVP projects in Texas, Vermont, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Alaska. Factors that were overestimated or underestimated are quantified. Actual wind speeds are compared to projections based on long-term historical measurements. Turbine power curve measurements are compared with data provided by the manufacturers, and loss assumptions are evaluated for accuracy. Overall, the projects performed well, particularly new commercial turbines in the first few years of operation. However, some sites experienced below average wind resources and greater than expected losses. The TVP project owners successfully developed and constructed wind power plants that are now in full commercial operation, serving a total of approximately 12,000 households.

Rhoads, H.; VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Compton, A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of Active hurricane season expected to shut-in higher amount of oil and natural gas production An above-normal 2013 hurricane season is expected to cause a median production loss of about 19 million barrels of U.S. crude oil and 46 billion cubic feet of natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the new forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. That's about one-third more than the amount of oil and gas production knocked offline during last year's hurricane season. Government weather forecasts predict 13 to 20 named storms will form between June and the end of November, with 7 to 11 of those turning into hurricanes. Production outages in previous hurricane seasons were as high as 107 million barrels of crude oil

162

X-ray emission from the plasma is used as a proxy for the amount  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray emission from the plasma is used as a proxy for the amount X-ray emission from the plasma is used as a proxy for the amount of driven current. The solid line indicates the amount of x-ray emission predicted by a computer simulation if edge losses are not included, while the dashed line represents the computer simulation including edge losses. The colored points are experimental data from Alcator C-Mod. Contact: Gregory Wallace MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center 175 Albany St. Cambridge, MA 02139 wallaceg@mit.edu Post deadline invited talk: Lower hybrid current drive at high density in the multi-pass regime A post-deadline invited talk explains how experiments on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center are making important steps towards learning how to keep future fusion power plants running 24/7.

163

Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Building a Model Patient Room to Test Design Innovations With Actual Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfortable hospital environment SUMMARY Designing and constructing a new hospital is a complex and costly undertaking that involves experts from many disciplines both inside and outside the health care arena. But despite expending funds and time, hospital leaders often discover significant flaws once a hospital opens that can undermine the quality of patient care and staff effectiveness and efficiency. From 2010 to 2012, a team at the Princeton HealthCare System worked to devise an optimal design for inpatient rooms at a new hospital: the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The project entailed building a “functional model patient room.” This was a unique and innovative method to allow the team to test design innovations with actual patients, according to project director Susan Lorenz, DrNP, RN, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer for the Princeton HealthCare System. The project helped support the emerging field of evidence-based hospital design.

A Princeton; More Efficient; Key Results

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A TEST OF THE PRECIPITATION AMOUNT AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH THE OTT PLUVIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A TEST OF THE PRECIPITATION AMOUNT AND INTENSITY MEASUREMENTS WITH THE OTT PLUVIO Wiel M.F. Wauben precipitation sensor of Ott has been tested at KNMI in order to find out whether it is a suitable candidate for replacing the current operational KNMI precipitation gauge. Tests performed at the calibration facilities

Wauben, Wiel

168

Wormholes, Gamma Ray Bursts and the Amount of Negative Mass in the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this essay, we assume that negative mass objects can exist in the extragalactic space and analyze the consequences of their microlensing on light from distant Active Galactic Nuclei. We find that such events have very similar features to some observed Gamma Ray Bursts and use recent satellite data to set an upper bound to the amount of negative mass in the universe.

Diego F. Torres; Gustavo E. Romero; Luis A. Anchordoqui

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

169

Global 3D-Nephanalysis of Total Cloud Amount: Climatology for 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-year global total cloud amount climatology has been compiled from the U.S. Air Force's three-dimensional nephanalysis cloud archive. The derived cloud distributions are shown to be reliable and in good agreement with known features of the ...

N. A. Hughes; A. Henderson-Sellers

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Measurement of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor Using Ground-Based Millimeterwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extremely dry conditions characterized by amounts of precipitable water vapor (PWV) as low as 1–2 mm commonly occur in high-latitude regions during the winter months. While such dry atmospheres carry only a few percent of the latent heat energy ...

Paul E. Racette; Ed R. Westwater; Yong Han; Albin J. Gasiewski; Marian Klein; Domenico Cimini; David C. Jones; Will Manning; Edward J. Kim; James R. Wang; Vladimir Leuski; Peter Kiedron

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The comparison of three common methods for reducing the amount of dissipation in a feeder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every year, a high amount of the best and most valuable kind of energy, i.e. electrical energy, is dissipated before received by consumers. Although, it is not possible to remove this fact thoroughly; but research on this area can be a start point for ... Keywords: capacitor placement (capaciting), feeder, load balance, power factor, power flow, profile

Mohsen Hayati; Behnam Karami

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

173

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

174

Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Steps taken to reduce the amount of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steps taken to reduce the amount of tritium Steps taken to reduce the amount of tritium Actions taken in response to the detection of low levels of tritium in surface and sewer water in November 2005 What did we detect in November 2005? In November 2005, for the first time in the then-35-year history of our environmental monitoring program at Fermilab, we detected low levels of tritium in a stream leaving the Fermilab site, and in the sanitary sewers that pump water to the Batavia Wastewater Treatment Plant. The levels detected were far lower than the federal water standards that Fermilab is required to meet, and pose no threat to human health or the environment. (Our Frequently Asked Questions page provides more general information about tritium.) How much tritium did we find? Very little. Samples of Indian Creek, taken just inside the Fermilab

175

Face Amount of Life Insurance Coverage by Program by State | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Face Amount of Life Insurance Coverage by Program by State Face Amount of Life Insurance Coverage by Program by State Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data Face Amount of Life Insurance Coverage by Program by State Dataset Summary Description Face value of insurance for each administered life insurance program listed by state. Data is current as of 04/30/12. All programs are closed to new issues except for Service-Disabled Veterans' Insurance and Veterans' Mortgage Life Insurance. United States Government Life Insurance was issued to WWI military personnel and Veterans. National Service Life Insurance was established to meet the needs of WWII military personnel and Veterans. Veterans' Special Life Insurance was issued to Korean War-era Veterans. Veterans' Reopened Insurance provides coverage to certain classes of disabled Veterans from WWII and the Korean conflict who had dropped their government life insurance coverage. Service-Disabled Veterans' Insurance was established in 1951 and is available to Veterans with service-connected disabilities. Veterans' Mortgage Life Insurance was established in 1971 to provide mortgage protection life insurance to severely disabled Veterans who have received grants for the purchase of specially adapted housing.

176

Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

Han Chunhui [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Actual versus design performance of solar systems in the National Solar Data Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report relates field measured performance to the designer predicted performance. The field measured data was collected by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) over a period of six years. Data from 25 solar systems was selected from a data pool of some 170 solar systems. The scope of the project extends beyond merely presenting comparisons of data. There is an attempt to provide answers which will move the solar industry forward. As a result of some industry and research workshops, several concerns arose which can be partially allayed by careful study of the NSDN data. These are: What types of failures occurred and why. How good was the design versus actual performance. Why was predicted performance not achieved in the field. Which components should be integrated with a system type for good performance. Since the designs span several years and since design philosophies are quite variable, the measured results were also compared to f-Chart 5.1 results. This comparison is a type of normalization in that all systems are modeled with the same process. An added benefit of this normalization is a further validation of the f-Chart model on a fairly large scale. The systems were modeled using equipment design parameters, measured loads, and f-Chart weather data from nearby cities.

Logee, T.L.; Kendall, P.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution.

Peterson, Reid A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rapko, Brian M.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

180

Actinide partitioning from actual Idaho chemical processing plant acidic tank waste using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Iron was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Mercury was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (76%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} wash section.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

182

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

184

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V.; Smirnov, I.; Babain, V.; Zaitsev, B.; Esimantovskiy, V.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Thermostat means adaptively controlling the amount of overshoot or undershoot of space temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a clock thermostat adaptively controlling the amount of overshoot or undershoot of space temperature due to changes in the current temperature setpoint of the thermostat means, including: microcomputer means including real time clock and memory; data input means connected to the microcomputer to input a sequence of desired heat and cool control temperature setpoints and times for a desired temperature control by the thermostat; temperature sensor including connection to monitor temperature at the thermostat means; connection means connected to microcomputer to communicate a temperature at sensor means to the microcomputer; thermostat means further including output switch adapted to control heating and cooling equipment by thermostat means; microcomputer means and memory means including overshoot-undershoot correction program means which is operable to adjust a ramprate slope of a current temperature setpoint of thermostat means; overshoot-undershoot correction program and the memory means providing a ramprate slope that reduces an overshoot-undershoot of space temperature due to a change in current temperature setpoint; and overshoot-undershoot correction program means and memory means creating a new ramprate slope after a temperature setpoint change to progressively adjust the ramprate slope of the thermostat to limit the amount of overshoot-undershoot of the space temperature to an acceptable level.

Beckey, T.J.

1987-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

Simplified calculational procedure for determining the amount of intercepted sunlight in an imaging solar concentrator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In imaging solar concentrators, the solar radiation incident on a receiver surface depends upon both the overall concentrator shape and the angular distribution of light rays (sunshape) that reach the receiver. Calculation of the amount of sunlight incident on the receiver usually requires sophisticated computer programs. A simplified calculational procedure is presented to solve this problem for both one- and two-dimensional concentrators, with the results presented in graphical form. The procedure first determines the amount of sunshape broadening resulting from optical scattering caused by reflector or glazing materials, surface slope errors, or other ''mechanical'' factors such as tracking errors or vibrations. These optical effects are combined into an effective error cone which is convoluted with measured sunshapes in order to obtain effective, broadened sunshapes. Broadened sunshapes for a variety of effective error-cone distributions are calculated and presented. It is found that when the root-mean-square (RMS) width of the effective error cone is greater than approximately two times the RMS width of the incident sunshape, the broadened sunshape can be adequately described by a circular normal distribution. A specific example is included which illustrates the calculational procedure discussed in the paper.

Pettit, R.B.; Biggs, F.; Vittitoe, C.N.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

DEMONSTRATION OF THE GLYCOLIC-FORMIC FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ACTUAL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Glycolic acid was effective at dissolving many metals, including iron, during processing with simulants. Criticality constraints take credit for the insolubility of iron during processing to prevent criticality of fissile materials. Testing with actual waste was needed to determine the extent of iron and fissile isotope dissolution during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The Alternate Reductant Project was initiated by the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Company to explore options for the replacement of the nitric-formic flowsheet used for the CPC at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The goals of the Alternate Reductant Project are to reduce CPC cycle time, increase mass throughput of the facility, and reduce operational hazards. In order to achieve these goals, several different reductants were considered during initial evaluations conducted by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). After review of the reductants by SRR, SRNL, and Energy Solutions (ES) Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL), two flowsheets were further developed in parallel. The two flowsheet options included a nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet, and a nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet. As of July 2011, SRNL and ES/VSL have completed the initial flowsheet development work for the nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet and nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet, respectively. On July 12th and July 13th, SRR conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to down select the alternate reductant flowsheet. The SEE team selected the Formic-Glycolic Flowsheet for further development. Two risks were identified in SEE for expedited research. The first risk is related to iron and plutonium solubility during the CPC process with respect to criticality. Currently, DWPF credits iron as a poison for the fissile components of the sludge. Due to the high iron solubility observed during the flowsheet demonstrations with simulants, it was necessary to determine if the plutonium in the radioactive sludge slurry demonstrated the same behavior. The second risk is related to potential downstream impacts of glycolate on Tank Farm processes. The downstream impacts will be evaluated by a separate research team. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested a radioactive demonstration of the Glycolic-Formic Flowsheet with radioactive sludge slurry be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the SRNL. The Shielded Cells demonstration only included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, and not a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle or the co-processing of salt products. Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) slurry was used for the demonstration since it was readily available, had been previously characterized, and was generally representative of sludges being processing in DWPF. This sample was never used in the planned Shielded Cells Run 7 (SC-7).

Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying marketfailures in the end use of energy  

SciTech Connect

"Getting the price right" is a goal of many market-orientedenergy policies. However, there are situations where the consumer payingfor the energy is separate from the owner of the energy-using device.Economists call this a "principal agent problem". A team organised by theInternational Energy Agency examined seven end uses and one sector whereprincipal agent problems existed: refrigerators, water heating, spaceheating, vending machines, commercial HVAC, company cars, lighting, andfirms. These investigations took place in Australia, Japan, theNetherlands, Norway, and the United States. About 2 100 percent of theenergy consumed in the end uses examined was affected by principal agentproblems. The size (and sometimes even the existence) varied greatly fromone country to another but all countries had significant amounts ofenergy affected by principal agent problems. The presence of a marketfailure does not mean that energy use would fall substantially if thefailure were eliminated; however it does suggest that raising energyprices such as in the form of carbon taxes will not necessarily increaseefficiency investments.

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The influence of indoor temperature on the difference between actual and theoretical energy consumption for space heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Advice procedure (EAP) is developed to evaluate the energetic performance of "existing" dwellings to generate a useful advice for the occupants of the dwelling to invest in rational energy measures. The EAP is based on a theoretical calculation ... Keywords: actual energy consumption, consumer behaviour, indoor temperature, space heating, theoretical energy consumption

Amaryllis Audenaert; Katleen Briffaerts; Dries De Boeck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

Vail, W.B. III

1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

Grating light reflection spectroelectrochemistry for detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons in water  

SciTech Connect

Grating light reflection spectroscopy (GLRS) is an emerging technique for spectroscopic analysis and sensing. A transmission diffraction grating is placed in contact with the sample to be analyzed, and an incident light beam is directed onto the grating. At certain angles of incidence, some of the diffracted orders are transformed from traveling waves to evanescent waves. This occurs at a specific wavelength that is a function of the grating period and the complex index of refraction of the sample. The intensities of diffracted orders are also dependent on the sample's complex index of refraction. The authors describe the use of GLRS, in combination with electrochemical modulation of the grating, for the detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons. The diffraction grating consisted of chromium lines on a fused silica substrate. The depth of the grating lines was 1 {micro}m, the grating period was 1 {micro}m, and the duty cycle was 50%. Since chromium was not suitable for electrochemical modulation of the analyte concentration, a 200 nm gold layer was deposited over the entire grating. This gold layer slightly degraded the transmission of the grating, but provided satisfactory optical transparency for the spectroelectrochemical experiments. The grating was configured as the working electrode in an electrochemical cell containing water plus trace amounts of the aromatic hydrocarbon analytes. The grating was then electrochemically modulated via cyclic voltammetry waveforms, and the normalized intensity of the zero order reflection was simultaneously measured. The authors discuss the lower limits of detection (LLD) for two analytes, 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine (Meldola's Blue dye) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), probed with an incident HeNe laser beam ({lambda} = 543.5 nm) at an incident angle of 52.5{degree}. The LLD for 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine is approximately 50 parts per billion (ppb), while the LLD for TNT is approximately 50 parts per million (ppm). The possible factors contributing to the differences in LLD for these analytes are discussed. This is the final report for a Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project conducted during fiscal years 1998 and 1999 (case number 3518.190).

KELLY,MICHAEL J.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; KASUNIC,K.J.; BLAIR,DIANNA S.; ZAIDI,S.H.; MCNEIL,J.R.; BURGESS,L.W.; BRODSKY,A.M.; SMITH,S.A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ITEM NO. ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR 2 2 CONTINUATION SHEET REFERENCE NO. OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED PAGE OF OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES, INC. (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) DE-AC05-06OR23100/0456 Payment: OR for Oak Ridge/OSTI U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office Oak Ridge Financial Service Center P.O. Box 6017 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Period of Performance: 01/01/2006 to 12/31/2015 NSN 7540-01-152-8067 OPTIONAL FORM 336 (4-86) Sponsored by GSA FAR (48 CFR) 53.110 ___________ (x) x DE-AC05-06OR23100 copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT

194

Wind Plant Capacity Credit Variations: A Comparison of Results Using Multiyear Actual and Simulated Wind-Speed Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter- annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

Milligan, Michael

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With this testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137 Cs and 90 Sr to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Brewer, Ken Neal; Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Demonstration of an optimized TRUEX flowsheet for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in recent demonstrations of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. The first demonstration was performed in 1996 using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. Based on the results of this flowsheet demonstration, the flowsheet was optimized and a second flowsheet demonstration was performed. This test also was performed using 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. However, the total number of contactor stages was reduced from 24 to 20. Also, the concentration of HEDPA in the strip solution was reduced from 0.04 M to 0.01 M in order to minimize the amount of phosphate in the HLW fraction, which would be immobilized into a glass waste form. This flowsheet demonstration was performed using centrifugal contactors installed in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet tested consisted of six extraction stages, four scrub stages, six strip stages, two solvent was stages, and two acid rinse stages. An overall removal efficiency of 99.79% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 540 nCi/g in the feed to 0.90 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Removal efficiencies of 99.84%, 99.97%, 99.97%, 99.85%, and 99.76% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm-diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With the testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for Cs-137, Sr-90, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of Cs-137 and Sr-90 to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent with actinides and metals (Zr, Fe, and Mo). Also, the carryover of aqueous solution (flooding) with the solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (>6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

B. N. Zaitsev (Khlopin Radium Institute); D. J. Wood (INEEL); I. V. Smirnov; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst; T. A. Todd; V. A. Babain; V. M. Esimantovskiy; V. N. Romanovskiy

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Relationships between Cloud Type and Amount, Precipitation, and Surface Temperature in the Mackenzie River Valley-Beaufort Sea Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly data from climatological stations in the Mackenzie River valley-Beaufort Sea area of northern Canada have been examined to determine the relationships between cloud type and amount, precipitation, and surface temperatures. During all ...

G. A. Isaac; R. A. Stuart

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The amount of information on emotional states conveyed by the verbal and nonverbal channels: some perceptual data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a face-to-face interaction, the addressee exploits both the verbal and nonverbal communication modes to infer the speaker's emotional state. Is such an informational content redundant? Is the amount of information conveyed by each communication mode ...

Anna Esposito

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Relationship between Meteorological Parameters and Daily Summer Rainfall Amount and Coverage in West-Central Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable daily variations of summer convective rainfall average areal coverage and rainfall amount were identified in west-central Florida for the period May–September 1997–2000 using a 29-site rainfall network. Pearson correlation ...

Ira S. Brenner

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cloud Diabatic Forcing of the Atmosphere, Estimated from Simultaneous ECMWF Diabatic Heating and ISCCP Cloud Amount Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud diabatic forcing (CDF) of the atmosphere, defined as the difference between the diabatic heating in average and in clear-sky conditions is estimated from time series of simultaneous observations of diabatic heating and cloud amount. The ...

Peter Siegmund

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Demonstration of a SREX flowsheet for the partitioning of strontium and lead from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning {sup 90}Sr and Pb from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Previous countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process with simulated waste resulted in 99.98% removal of Sr and 99.9% removal of Pb. Based on the results of these studies, a demonstration of the SREX flowsheet was performed. The demonstration consisted of (1) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using simulated sodium-bearing waste spiked with {sup 85}Sr and (2) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using actual waste from tank WM-183. All testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0. 15 M 4`,4`(5)-di-(tert-butyldicyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L{reg_sign}), a 2.0 MHNO{sub 3} scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.1 M ammonium citrate strip section for the removal of Pb from the SREX solvent, and a 3.0 M HNO{sub 3} equilibration section. The behavior of {sup 90}Sr, Pb, Na, K, Hg, H{sup +}, the actinides, and numerous other non-radioactive elements was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted and selectively stripped Sr and Ph from the SBW simulant and the actual tank waste. For the testing with actual tank waste (WM - 183), removal efficiencies of 99.995 % and >94% were obtained for {sup 90}Sr and Pb, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Olson, L.G.; Todd, T.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Is interactivity actually important?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It appears that it is a well-accepted assumption that interactivity will improve the entertainment and/or learning value of a media. This paper reviews various studies exploring the role of interactivity and reports on a study conducted to see whether ... Keywords: game engine, interactivity, learning, simulation, training

Debbie Richards

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

PAID-UP NONEXCLUSIVE PATENT LICENSE AGREEMENT  

United States Department of Energy (“DOE”) Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 to manage ... Sale, or import of the Licensed Products, performance of ...

206

(Paid) Internship MSOE Software Integration About Calix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment. Familiarity with one of the scripting languages such as Perl, TCL/Tk, Python, csh, Java script

Ravikumar, B.

207

PAID-UP NONEXCLUSIVE PATENT LICENSE AGREEMENT  

government audit, the California Public Records Act, the Freedom of Information Act, or other applicable law. In-Situ Thermally Enhanced Biodegradation

208

PAID-UP NONEXCLUSIVE PATENT LICENSE AGREEMENT  

and operate Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory ... which may be useful for human health treatment ... Licensed Service” means the use of Licensed ...

209

National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling THE AMOUNT AND FATE OF THE OIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling THE AMOUNT AND FATE OF THE OIL ---Draft--- Staff Working Paper No. 3 Staff Working Papers are written by the staff of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling for the use of members

Meyers, Steven D.

210

Evaluation of Concrete Containing Fly Ash With High Carbon Content and/or Small Amounts of Wood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive database of information on the impacts of the use of high carbon coal ashes and concretes with small amounts of wood ash on the performance of concretes. It is expected these data will support easing the restrictions on the use of high carbon ashes and any wood ash products in concrete in the ASTM standards.

1998-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Effect of Changes in Cloud Amount on the Net Radiation at the Top of the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the opposing albedo and greenhouse effects of clouds, the possibility exists that the net radiation at the top of the earth-atmosphere system is, in the mean, insensitive to changes in cloud amount. If so, this would have important ...

George Ohring; Philip Clapp

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Simple Parcel Method for Prediction of Cumulus Onset and Area-Averaged Cloud Amount over Heterogeneous Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this note is to compare several methods for predicting the onset and quantitative amount of cloud cover over heterogeneous land surfaces. Among the methods tested are that of Wilde et al. (1985) and a new, simple parcel approach. ...

Peter J. Wetzel

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

When feeding lactating dairy cows it is best to limit amounts of certain feeds. Reasons can be problems with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amounts. Both are relatively expensive sources of protein and should be used selectively. Tallow or animal. BW cow/day Urea 1.5 0.03 0.4 Fish meal 3 0.08 1 Blood meal 3 0.08 1 Tallow 4 0.12 1.5 Molasses, dry 6

Liskiewicz, Maciej

214

An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large scale water test facility and a commercial CFD computer program were used to investigate labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape found in aircraft engines. The 2-D test rig cases focused on the effect of tooth position and operating condition for the standard geometry. The computed cases considered tooth axial and radial position, different operating conditions, and several geometric dimensions. This investigation also compares the leakage of the standard geometry to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers and at nine different tooth positions. The discharge coefficient and a dimensionless pressure drop number were used to plot the leakage data to make it easier for seal designers to predict the leakage of labyrinth seals. The experimental visualization results show for a given Reynolds number that the closer the labryinth tooth gets to the step the deeper the throughflow jet penetrated into the seal cavity. The decrease of the tooth tip clearance also has a similar effect. Specifically the smaller the tooth tip clearance the deeper the flow path penetrated into the seal cavity. The experimental measurements show that the tooth tip axial position, as well as the minimum-tooth clearance, affect the leakage. A significant improvement in leakage was generally observed when the minimum-distance tooth clearance occurs across the entire tip of the tooth. This occurs only at the most upstream tooth position tested. Similarly, the computed results show that the tooth axial position affects the seal leakage. It was also found that the leakage of the modified convex wall geometry was significantly less than that of the standard geometry.

Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Rainfall-Induced Changes in Actual Surface Backscattering Cross Sections and Effects on Rain-Rate Estimates by Spaceborne Precipitation Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors used Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar (TRMM PR) data to investigate changes in the actual (attenuation corrected) surface backscattering cross section (?0e) due to changes in surface conditions ...

Shinta Seto; Toshio Iguchi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Estimation of daily actual evapotranspiration from remotely sensed data under complex terrain over the upper Chao river basin in North China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily actual evapotranspiration over the upper Chao river basin in North China on 23 June 2005 was estimated based on the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), in which the parameterization schemes for calculating the instantaneous solar ...

Yanchun Gao; Di Long; Zhao-Liang Li

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

The U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-21 requires that certain expenses be treated as indirect costs and paid for through the indirect cost (F&A) mechanism. To qualify as a direct charge on a sponsored project, costs normally considere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charge on a sponsored project, costs normally considered F&A must be charged in a timely manner and must that discuss which costs can be charged directly to federally funded projects and which expenses may qualify be treated as indirect costs and paid for through the indirect cost (F&A) mechanism. To qualify as a direct

Scott, Robert A.

218

Demonstration of the SREX process for the removal of {sup 90}Sr from actual highly radioactive solutions in centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SREX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of {sup 90}Sr from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the SREX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.995% was obtained for {sup 90}Sr. As a result, the activity of {sup 90}Sr was reduced from 201 Ci/m{sup 3} in the feed solution of 0.0089 Ci/m{sup 3} in the aqueous raffinate, which is below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW limit of 0.04 Ci/m{sup 3} for {sup 90}Sr. Lead was extracted by the SREX solvent and successfully partitioned from the {sup 90}Sr using an ammonium citrate strip solution. Additionally, 94% of the total alpha activity, 1.9% of the {sup 241}Am, 99.94% of the {sup 238}Pu, 99.97% of the {sup 239}Pu, 36.4% of the K, 64% of the Ba, and >83% of the Zr were extracted by the SREX solvent. Cs, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Na were essentially inextractable. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

Understanding waste phenomenology to reduce the amount of sampling and analysis required to resolve Hanford waste tank safety issues  

SciTech Connect

Safety issues associated with Hanford Site waste tanks arose because of inadequate safety analyses and high levels of uncertainty over the release of radioactivity resulting from condensed phase exothermic chemical reactions (organic solvent fires, organic complexant-nitrate reactions, and ferrocyanide-nitrate reactions). The approach to resolving the Organic Complexant, Organic Solvent, and Ferrocyanide safety issues has changed considerably since 1990. The approach formerly utilized core sampling and extensive analysis of the samples with the expectation the data would provide insight into the hazard. This resulted in high costs and the generation of a large amount of data that was of limited value in resolving the safety issues. The new approach relies on an understanding of the hazard phenomenology to focus sampling and analysis on those analytes that are key to ensuring safe storage of the waste.

Meacham, J.E.; Babad, H.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Impacts of Large Amounts of Wind Power on Design and Operation of Power Systems, Results of IEA Collaboration  

SciTech Connect

There are a multitude of studies completed and ongoing related to the cost of wind integration. However, the results are not easy to compare. An international forum for exchange of knowledge of power system impacts of wind power has been formed under the IEA Implementing Agreement on Wind Energy. IEA WIND R and D Task 25 on 'Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power' produced a state-of-the-art report in October 2007, where the most relevant wind-power grid integration studies were analyzed, especially regarding methodologies and input data. This paper summarizes the results from 18 case studies, with discussion on differences in methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.

Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; O'Malley, M.; Ummels, B. C.; Tande, J. O.; Estanqueiro, A.; Gomez, E.; Smith, J. C.; Ela, E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Practical method for including material scattering effects in determining the amount of intercepted sunlight in solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In imaging solar concentrators, the amount of solar radiation incident on a receiver surface depends upon both the overall concentrator shape and the angular distribution of light rays (sunshape) that reach the receiver. Sunshape broadening effects, which include the specular reflectance or transmittance properties of mirrors or glazings, image degradation caused by surface slope errors, and tracking errors are combined into an effective error cone. Broadened sunshapes for a variety of effective error-cone distributions are calculated and presented in graphical form. It is found that when the root-mean-square (RMS) width of the effective error cone is approximately 2 to 3 times the RMS width of the incident sunshape, the broadened sunshape can be adequately described by a circular normal distribution.

Pettit, R.B.; Vittitoe, C.N.; Biggs, F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

APPROXIMATE YEARLY BUDGET, 20112012 (summer, fall, winter) the table below shows an estimate of the yearly cost per person for studying in montral. all amounts are in Canadian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) immigration (temporary residents) 300 $ arrival from abroad (hotel, meals...) 500 $ winter clothing 800.santeetudiante.com (in french only). 9 these amounts include furniture, utilities (water, electricity, heating

Skorobogatiy, Maksim

224

Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

Wamsley, Paula R. (Littleton, CO); Weimer, Carl S. (Littleton, CO); Nelson, Loren D. (Evergreen, CO); O' Brien, Martin J. (Pine, CO)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

226

Determination of the Relative Amount of Fluorine in Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Optical Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both nuclear forensics and environmental sampling depend upon laboratory analysis of nuclear material that has often been exposed to the environment after it has been produced. It is therefore important to understand how those environmental conditions might have changed the chemical composition of the material over time, particularly for chemically sensitive compounds. In the specific case of uranium enrichment facilities, uranium-bearing particles stem from small releases of uranium hexafluoride, a highly reactive gas that hydrolyzes upon contact with moisture from the air to form uranium oxyfluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) particles. The uranium isotopic composition of those particles is used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to verify whether a facility is compliant with its declarations. The present study, however, aims to demonstrate how knowledge of time-dependent changes in chemical composition, particle morphology and molecular structure can contribute to an even more reliable interpretation of the analytical results. We prepared a set of uranium oxyfluoride particles at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM, European Commission, Belgium) and followed changes in their composition, morphology and structure with time to see if we could use these properties to place boundaries on the particle exposure time in the environment. Because the rate of change is affected by exposure to UV-light, humidity levels and elevated temperatures, the samples were subjected to varying conditions of those three parameters. The NanoSIMS at LLNL was found to be the optimal tool to measure the relative amount of fluorine in individual uranium oxyfluoride particles. At PNNL, cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved U(VI) fluorescence microspectroscopy (CLIFS) was used to monitor changes in the molecular structure.

Kips, R; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D; Amonette, J; Wang, Z; Johnson, T; Gerlach, D; Olsen, K B

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

227

Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

228

An Operational System for Specifying Monthly Precipitation Amounts over the United States from the Field of Concurrent Mean 700-mb Heights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an operational system for specifying monthly precipitation amounts in the contiguous United States from the concurrent 700-mb monthly mean height field over North America and adjacent oceans. Multiple regression equations are ...

William H. Klein; Hal J. Bloom

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evaluation of the Daylight Cycle of Model-Predicted Cloud Amount and Condensed Water Path over Europe with Observations from MSG SEVIRI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation of the diurnal cycle of cloud amount (CA) and cloud condensed water path (CWP) as predicted by climate models receives relatively little attention, mostly because of the lack of observational data capturing the diurnal cycle of ...

R. A. Roebeling; E. van Meijgaard

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Performance evaluation of 24 ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated N-Reactor storage basin water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of 24 organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated waters from the 100 Area 105 N-Reactor fuel storage basin. The data described in this report can be applied for developing and evaluating ion exchange pre-treatment process flowsheets. Cesium and strontium batch distribution ratios (K{sub d}`s), decontamination factors (DF), and material loadings (mmol g{sup -1}) are compared as a function of ion exchange material and initial cesium concentration. The actual and simulated N-Basin waters contain relatively low levels of aluminum, barium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (ranging from 8.33E-04 to 6.40E-05 M), with slightly higher levels of boron (6.63E-03 M) and sodium (1.62E-03 M). The {sup 137}Cs level is 1.74E-06 Ci L-{sup 1} which corresponds to approximately 4.87E-10 M Cs. The initial Na/Cs ratio was 3.33E+06. The concentration of total strontium is 4.45E-06 M, while the {sup 90}Sr radioactive component was measured to be 6.13E-06 Ci L{sup -1}. Simulant tests were conducted by contacting 0.067 g or each ion exchange material with approximately 100 mL of either the actual or simulated N-Basin water. The simulants contained variable initial cesium concentrations ranging from 1.00E-04 to 2.57E- 10 M Cs while all other components were held constant. For all materials, the average cesium K{sub d} was independent of cesium concentration below approximately 1.0E-06 M. Above this level, the average cesium K{sub d} values decreased significantly. Cesium K{sub d} values exceeding 1.0E+07 mL g{sup -1} were measured in the simulated N-Basin water. However, when measured in the actual N-Basin water the values were several orders of magnitude lower, with a maximum of 1.24E+05 mL g{sup -1} observed.

Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Boehmite Actual Waste Dissolutions Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite, sodium aluminate and boehmite. Gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic. Boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Samples were taken from four Hanford tanks and homogenized in order to give a sample that is representative of REDOX (Reduction Oxidation process for Pu recovery) sludge solids. Bench scale testing was performed on the homogenized waste to study the dissolution of boehmite. Dissolution was studied at three different hydroxide concentrations, with each concentration being run at three different temperatures. Samples were taken periodically over the 170 hour runs in order to determine leaching kinetics. Results of the dissolution studies and implications for the proposed processing of these wastes will be discussed.

Snow, Lanee A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Peterson, Reid A.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Exam Stochastic Processes 2WB08 January 29, 2007 A light bulb burns for an amount of time having distribution F(), with Laplace trans-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exam Stochastic Processes 2WB08 ­ January 29, 2007 Problem 1: A light bulb burns for an amount moment µ2. When the light bulb burns out, it is immediately replaced by another light bulb which has the same life time distribution F(·), etc. Let m(t) be the mean number of replacements of light bulbs upto

Giardinà, Cristian

234

The amount of power in the wind is very dependent on the speed of the wind. Because the power in the wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of power in the wind is very dependent on the speed of the wind. Because the power in the wind is proportional to the cube of the wind speed, small differences in the wind speed make a big. This gives rise to the primary reason for wind re- source assessment. In order to more accurately predict

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

235

Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide power in remote environments or to convert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells, "using this bacterial strain in a fuel cell to generate electricity would greatly increase the cell were more efficient at transferring electrons to generate power in fuel cells than bacteria

Lovley, Derek

236

Making more efficient fuel cells 08.09.2009 -Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making more efficient fuel cells 08.09.2009 - Bacteria that generate significant amounts of electricity could be used in microbial fuel cells to provide power in remote environments or to convert waste to generate electricity would greatly increase the cell's power output." The pili on the bacteria's surface

Lovley, Derek

237

Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part II: Attribution to Changes in Cloud Amount, Altitude, and Optical Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud radiative kernels and histograms of cloud fraction, both as functions of cloud-top pressure and optical depth, are used to quantify cloud amount, altitude, and optical depth feedbacks. The analysis is applied to doubled-CO2 simulations from ...

Mark D. Zelinka; Stephen A. Klein; Dennis L. Hartmann

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Huge amounts of capital needed  

SciTech Connect

Investor-owned electric utilities will require $24 to $25 billion in capital funds in 1979, up about $2 billion from 1978. Public utility and rural electric cooperative systems will need, perhaps, another $8 billion. Rural electric cooperatives--some with big loan guarantees from the Rural Electrification Administration--and municipals ought to be able to raise the money they need for their projects. The investor-owned companies will have to go into a tight capital market-place for nearly 60% of the money they need for their projects. Most companies will be able to raise the capital they need through stock or bond offerings, partnerships with foreign banks and institutions, or a combination of these. Some companies already have turned to leveraged leasing (explained in-depth in this article) and others are investigating leasing, even of base-load generating units. But for all investor-owned companies the key to the capital market is continuing, prompt and adequate rate relief provided by state and Federal regulatory agencies. In states where commissions have balked at providing companies with adequate rates of return utilities are into the capital market for only the barest necessities. New methods for raising funds are discussed for TVA and Duke Power. (MCW)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

WTP Calculation Sheet: Determining the LAW Glass Former Constituents and Amounts for G2 and Acm Models. 24590-LAW-M4C-LFP-00002, Rev. B  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation is to determine the LAW glass former recipe and additives with their respective amounts. The methodology and equations contained herein are to be used in the G2 and ACM models until better information is supplied by R&T efforts. This revision includes calculations that determines the mass and volume of the bulk chemicals/minerals needed per batch. Plus, it contains calculations (for the G2 model) to help prevent overflow in LAW Feed Preparation Vessel.

Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Universal Solvent Exchange (UNEX) Process II: Flowsheet Development & Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Actual Acidic Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel solvent extraction process, the Universal Extraction (UNEX) process, has been developed for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from acidic waste solutions. The UNEX process solvent consists of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide for the extraction of 137Cs, polyethylene glycol for the extraction of 90Sr, and diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide for the extraction of the actinides and lanthanides. A nonnitroaromatic polar diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone has been developed for this process. A UNEX flowsheet consisting of a single solvent extraction cycle has been developed as a part of a collaborative effort between the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This flowsheet has been demonstrated with actual acidic radioactive tank waste at the INEEL using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded cell facility. The activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and the actinides were reduced to levels at which a grout waste form would meet NRC Class A LLW requirements. The extraction of 99Tc and several nonradioactive metals by the UNEX solvent has also been evaluated.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V. N.; Smirnov, I. V.; Esimantovskiy, V. M.; Zaitsev. B. N.; Babain, V. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP tank waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRUEX is being evaluated at Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for separating actinides from acidic radioactive waste stored at ICPP; efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration with actual tank waste. A continuous countercurrent flowsheet test was successfully completed at ICPP using waste from tank WM-183. This demonstration was performed using 24 states of 2-cm dia centrifugal contactors in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet had 8 extraction stages, 5 scrub stages, 6 strip stages, 3 solvent wash stages, and 2 acid rinse stages. A centrifugal contactor stage in the scrub section was not working during testing, and the scrub feed (aqueous) solution followed the solvent into the strip section, eliminating the scrub section in the flowsheet. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides, reducing the activity from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste.The 0.04 M HEDPA strip section back-extracted 99.9998% of the actinide from the TRUEX solvent. Removal efficiencies of >99. 90, 99.96, 99.98, >98.89, 93.3, and 89% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 99}Tc. Fe was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Hg was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (73%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na2CO3 wash section. Only 1.4% of the Hg exited with the high activity waste strip product.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Information; and Other Matters- Amount of Uranium in Liquid Waste Effluents, Treated Domestic Sanitary Wastewater Sampling, and Liquid Effluent Collection and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the AES exemption request related to commencement of construction (Ref. 2). On October 15, 2009, AES submitted the response to the NRC RAIs related to commencement of construction (Ref. 3). Subsequently, the NRC requested additional information regarding the AES response. Enclosure 1.1 provides the AES response to the additional information regarding preconstrucion activities requested by the NRC. Enclosure 2.1 provides the markup pages of the EREF ER. On August 10, 2009, the NRC transmitted to AES RAIs regarding the EREF Environmental Report (ER) (Ref. 4). On September 9, 2009, AES submitted the response to the NRC ER RAIs (Ref. 5). Subsequently, the NRC requested additional information regarding other matters including the amount of uranium in liquid waste effluents, treated domestic sanitary wastewater sampling, and Liquid Effluent Collection and Treatment System evaporator sediment sampling. Enclosure 1.2 provides the AES response regarding the amount of uranium in liquid waste effluent. There are no markup pages to the EREF ER for this response. Enclosure 1.3 provides the AES response regarding treated domestic sanitary wastewater sampling. Enclosure 2.2 provides the markup pages of the EREF ER. Enclosure 1.4 provides the AES

Eagle Rock; Enrichment Facility

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum View topic -Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553d  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12 Dark Energy may not actually exist Moderators: arc - On With the New #12;9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 2

Temple, Blake

244

Getting paid to break into things: Argonne's Roger Johnston on...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

break into "foolproof" systems. Speakers Roger Johnston Duration 4:06 Topic Security Cyber security Vulnerability assessment Video ID http:youtu.befrBBGJqkz9E Credit NBC...

245

Commuting, Congestion and Pollution: The Employer-Paid Parking Connection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation marketto raise marketprices to reflect social cost.social cost. Ceasingan inappropriate intervention in the transportation

Shoup, Donald C.; Willson, Richard W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15,763,807 Contractor: 93,591,118 Fee Available Contract Period: Contract Type: URSCH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) DE-SC-0004645 April 29, 2011 - July 13, 2016 Contract...

247

Paid Nuclear and Radiochemistry Summer School Opportunities for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

any questions about this program, please contact David Robertson, National Director of ACS Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry, at robertsonjo@missouri.edu. Addthis...

248

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fee September, 2013 Site: Portsmouth Paducah Project Office Contract Name: Operation of DUF6 Contractor: Babcock & Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number:...

249

Subscriber access provided by - Access paid by the | UC Berkeley...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Letter Molecular-Scale Quantum Dots from Carbon Nanotube...

250

Vol. 2010, No. 3 July 30, 2009 Periodical postage paid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Referral Guide to KU policies and procedures. More information is online at www.studenthandbook.ku.edu, www

Peterson, Blake R.

251

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fee 0 May 2011 - September 2015 June 2013 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Information 419,202,975...

252

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

357,223 597,797 894,699 EM Contractor Fee Site: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Contract Name: SLAC Environmental Remediation December 2012 1,516,646 Fee Available...

253

Subscriber access provided by - Access paid by the | UC Berkeley...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nanocrystals of solar absorber materials have attracted much attention. 6-11 Nanocrystal syntheses can utilize lower processing temperatures than bulk synthesis methods,...

254

Paid Family Leave in California: New Research Findings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7. Fred Darbonnier, U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS), totaxable by the U.S. Internal Revenue Ser- vice, although the

Appelbaum, Eileen; Milkman, Ruth

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Paid Family Leave in California: New Research Findings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7. Fred Darbonnier, U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS), totaxable by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service, although the

Milkman, Ruth; Appelbaum, Eileen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Paid and Unpaid Work. Can Policy Improve Gender Inequalities?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3: Average Annual Gross Earnings of 1995 Graduates by Gender Source: Figure from Purcell and Elias (2008). First main job after 1995 degree £0 £5,000 £10,000 £15,000 Men Women Gender gap = 11% Gender gap = 15% Gender gap = 19% £20,000 £25,000 £30,000 £35... over the last decade. The data used are from the British Household Panel Survey, which is a longitudinal survey of over 5,000 households in Britain. Here we report analysis by Harkness (2008) which concentrates on couples where the women...

Scott, Jacqueline; Dex, Shirley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Method for quantitative determination and separation of trace amounts of chemical elements in the presence of large quantities of other elements having the same atomic mass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photoionization via autoionizing atomic levels combined with conventional mass spectroscopy provides a technique for quantitative analysis of trace quantities of chemical elements in the presence of much larger amounts of other elements with substantially the same atomic mass. Ytterbium samples smaller than 10 ng have been detected using an ArF* excimer laser which provides the atomic ions for a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Elemental selectivity of greater than 5:1 with respect to lutetium impurity has been obtained. Autoionization via a single photon process permits greater photon utilization efficiency because of its greater absorption cross section than bound-free transitions, while maintaining sufficient spectroscopic structure to allow significant photoionization selectivity between different atomic species. Separation of atomic species from others of substantially the same atomic mass is also described.

Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

258

Development of a Chemistry-Based, Predictive Method for Determining the Amount of Non-Pertechnetate Technetium in the Hanford Tanks: FY 2012 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes investigations directed toward understanding the extent of the presence of highly alkaline soluble, non-pertechnetate technetium (n-Tc) in the Hanford Tank supernatants. The goals of this report are to: a) present a review of the available literature relevant to the speciation of technetium in the Hanford tank supernatants, b) attempt to establish a chemically logical correlation between available Hanford tank measurements and the presence of supernatant soluble n-Tc, c) use existing measurement data to estimate the amount of n-Tc in the Hanford tank supernatants, and d) report on any likely, process-friendly methods to eventually sequester soluble n-Tc from Hanford tank supernatants.

Rapko, Brian M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Bryant, Janet L.; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Edwards, Matthew K.; Houchin, Joy Y.; Janik, Tadeusz J.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Peterson, James M.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Smith, Frances N.; Wittman, Richard S.

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Magnetic Electrochemical Sensing Platform for Biomonitoring of Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Agents Based on Simultaneous Measurement of Total Enzyme Amount and Enzyme Activity  

SciTech Connect

We report a new approach for electrochemical quantification of enzymatic inhibition and phosphorylation for biomonitoring of exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and nerve agents based on a magnetic beads (MBs) immunosensing platform. The principle of this approach is based on the combination of MBs immuno-capture based enzyme activity assay and competitive immunoassay of total amount of enzyme for simultaneous detection of enzyme inhibition and phosphorylation in biological fluids. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) was chosen as a model enzyme. In competitive immunoassay, the target total BChE in a sample (mixture of OP-inhibited BChE and active BChE) competes with the BChE modified on the MBs to bind to the limited anti-BChE antibody labeled with quantum dots (QDs-anti-BChE), and followed by electrochemical stripping analysis of the bound QDs conjugate on the MBs. This assay shows a linear response over the total BChE concentration range of 0.1~20 nM. Simultaneously, real time BChE activity was measured on an electrochemical carbon nanotube-based sensor coupled with microflow injection system after immuno-capture by MBs-anti-BChE conjugate. Therefore, the formed phosphorylated adduct (OP-BChE) can be estimated by the difference values of the total amount BChE (including active and OP-inhibited) and active BChE from established calibration curves. This approach not only eliminates the difficulty in screening of low-dose OP exposure (less than 20% inhibition of BChE) because of individual variation of BChE values, but also avoids the drawback of the scarce availability of OP-BChE antibody. It is sensitive enough to detect 0.5 nM OP-BChE, which is less than 2% BChE inhibition. This method offers a new method for rapid, accurate, selective and inexpensive quantification of phosphorylated adducts and enzyme inhibition for biomonitoring of OP and nerve agent exposures.

Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; Lu, Donglai; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Lin, Yuehe

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Validity of automated x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy algorithm to determine the amount of substance and the depth distribution of atoms  

SciTech Connect

The author reports a systematic study of the range of validity of a previously developed algorithm for automated x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, which takes into account the variation in both peak intensity and the intensity in the background of inelastically scattered electrons. This test was done by first simulating spectra for the Au4d peak with gold atoms distributed in the form of a wide range of nanostructures, which includes overlayers with varying thickness, a 5 A layer of atoms buried at varying depths and a substrate covered with an overlayer of varying thickness. Next, the algorithm was applied to analyze these spectra. The algorithm determines the number of atoms within the outermost 3 {lambda} of the surface. This amount of substance is denoted AOS{sub 3{lambda}} (where {lambda} is the electron inelastic mean free path). In general the determined AOS{sub 3{lambda}} is found to be accurate to within {approx}10-20% depending on the depth distribution of the atoms. The algorithm also determines a characteristic length L, which was found to give unambiguous information on the depth distribution of the atoms for practically all studied cases. A set of rules for this parameter, which relates the value of L to the depths where the atoms are distributed, was tested, and these rules were found to be generally valid with only a few exceptions. The results were found to be rather independent of the spectral energy range (from 20 to 40 eV below the peak energy) used in the analysis.

Tougaard, Sven [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense M DK-5230 (Denmark)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during a one-day period and the rate of air flowing through the furnace are to be determined.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-11 7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during The heating value of the coal is given to be 28,000 kJ/kg. Analysis (a) The rate and the amount of heat inputs'tQQ The amount and rate of coal consumed during this period are kg/s48.33 s360024 kg10893.2 MJ/kg28 MJ101.8 6

Bahrami, Majid

262

APPROXIMATE YEARLY BUDGET, 2013-2014 (fall and winter) the table below shows an estimate of the yearly cost per person for studying in Montral. all amounts are in Canadian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) immigration (temporary residents) 300 $ arrival from abroad (hotel, meals...) 500 $ winter clothing 800 at santeetudiante.com. 9 these amounts include furniture, utilities (water, electricity, heating), a telephone land

263

Stochastic Nash Equilibrium Problems: Sample Average ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

financial instruments which do not involve the actual generation of electricity, but the money paid under the contract is tied to the pool price. There are essentially ...

264

Actual Date of Delivery Deliverable Security Class  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of all NoAH components, defines their requirements and describes the interface between them. The NoAH architecture, as described so far, is a set of individual components that cooperate to form a farm of distributed honeypots. Although the main NoAH components –low- and highinteraction honeypots, signature generation,

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

maintenance costs should be reported from asset-level data collected in the Site's Maintenance Management and Financial Management Systems. b. Annual Required Maintenance...

266

The Actual Cost of Food Systems on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs ...................................................................................................................16 Table 14: Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Rate Per Capita from County Survey

Beresnev, Igor

267

Might Dark Matter be Actually Black?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been proposals that primordial black hole remnants (BHRs) are the dark matter, but the idea is somewhat vague. We argue here first that the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) may prevent black holes from evaporating completely, in a similar way that the standard uncertainty principle prevents the hydrogen atom from collapsing. Secondly we note that the hybrid inflation model provides a plausible mechanism for production of large numbers of small black holes. Combining these we suggest that the dark matter might be composed of Planck-size BHRs and discuss the possible constraints and signatures associated with this notion.

Chen, Pisin

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Design Parameters Derived from Actual Forgings*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Minimum R f : R c ratio is 1.0 to 1. Maximum R f : R c ratio is 6.8 to 1. Average R f : R c ratio is 2.8 to 1....

269

Definition: Net Actual Interchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interchange, balancing authority, smart grid, Balancing Authority Area References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

270

Comparison of ISCCP and Other Cloud Amounts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new 8-year global cloud climatology has been produced by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) that provides information every 3 h at 280-km spatial resolution covering the period from July 1983 through June 1991. If ...

William B. Rossow; Alison W. Walker; Leonid C. Garder

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Handwritten Bank Check Recognition of Courtesy Amounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In spite of rapid evolution of electronic techniques, a number of large-scale applications continue to rely on the use of paper as the dominant medium. This is especially true for processing of bank ...

Palacios, Rafael

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

272

Institute for Wisconsin’s Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wisconsin citizens want strong communities, reasonable state and local taxes and a revenue system in which all individuals, businesses and organizations pay a fair share. IWF’s Fair and Adequate series of reports examines how the current tax system works and what changes are needed to create a fair system that adequately funds the services needed for the common good. Wisconsin’s Tax Gap Executive Summary In 2010, recovery from the recession requires better schools, better roads, better infrastructure and aid for the unemployed. However, Wisconsin faces a multi-billion dollar revenue shortfall. Almost half of that deficit would disappear if the state was not losing over one billion dollars annually to the “tax gap, ” the difference between what is legally owed by taxpayers and what is actually paid. The majority of Wisconsin citizens are conscientious, paying responsibly to keep our state, county, municipal and education systems running. Unfortunately, a substantial number of taxpayers don’t. The tax gap is defined as the difference between the amount of money that taxpayers should pay and the amount that is actually paid voluntarily and on time. Wisconsin’s annual tax gap of $1.2 billion is equal to 10 % of state tax collections. This tax gap contributes heavily to the state budget shortfall and reduces

Dennis Collier; Jack Norman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Snohomish County PUD No 1 - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Custom incentives are paid based on the amount of electricity saved. Commercial, industrial, school, non-profit, or governmental buildings in Snohomish County can be...

274

Subscriber access provided by - Access paid by the | UC Berkeley Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Journal of Combinatorial Chemistry is published by the American Chemical Journal of Combinatorial Chemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article High-Throughput Sequencing of Peptoids and Peptide#Peptoid Hybrids by Partial Edman Degradation and Mass Spectrometry Amit Thakkar, Allison S. Cohen, Michael D. Connolly, Ronald N. Zuckermann, and Dehua Pei J. Comb. Chem., 2009, 11 (2), 294-302* DOI: 10.1021/cc8001734 * Publication Date (Web): 20 January 2009 Downloaded from http://pubs.acs.org on May 7, 2009 More About This Article Additional resources and features associated with this article are available within the HTML version: * Supporting Information * Access to high resolution figures * Links to articles and content related to this article * Copyright permission to reproduce figures and/or text from this article

275

Subscriber access provided by - Access paid by the | UC Berkeley Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Letter Electron#Hole Interaction in Carbon Nanotubes: Novel Screening and Exciton Excitation Spectra Jack Deslippe, Mario Dipoppa, David Prendergast, Marcus V. O. Moutinho, Rodrigo B. Capaz, and Steven G. Louie Nano Lett., 2009, 9 (4), 1330-1334* DOI: 10.1021/nl802957t * Publication Date (Web): 09 March 2009 Downloaded from http://pubs.acs.org on May 14, 2009 More About This Article Additional resources and features associated with this article are available within the HTML version: * Supporting Information * Access to high resolution figures * Links to articles and content related to this article * Copyright permission to reproduce figures and/or text from this article

276

Cashing Out Employer-Paid Parking: A Precedent for Congestion Pricing?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation market to raise the price of driving up to its social cost.Transportation economists, and especially congestion pricing theorists, usually focus on sophisticated waysto makemotorists pay for the social costs

Shoup, Donald C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SANTA BARBARA Second-class postage paid at Santa Barbara, California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Nondiscrimination Policy The University of California, in accordance with applicable Federal and State law and in our research centers, are state-of-the-art, and most are available to undergraduate as well minorities and/or other ethnic groups in the United States.Courses that meet this requirement are included

Liebling, Michael

278

Paid Nuclear and Radiochemistry Summer School Opportunities for Undergraduates - Applications Due Feb 1.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Are you an undergradutate student interested in a career in nuclear or radiochemistry? From now until February 1, 2013, applications are open for the Nuclear and Radiochemistry Summer School...

279

Cashing Out Employer-Paid Parking: A Precedent for Congestion Pricing?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the proposed cash-out requirement does not prohibit, tax, orparking, the cash-out requirement does not apply until thefrom the cash-out requirement, but this does not seemto be a

Shoup, Donald C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Handicap spaces on campus Handicap spaces on city streets (paid meter parking)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................................96 D-4 Grosvenor, West Wing................119 D-4 Grounds Maintenance..................88 G-6 Grover .............................96 D-4 Heating Plant ..............................108 C-3 Heating Substation

Botte, Gerardine G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Operating in musical economies of compromise (or . . . When do I get paid for writing this?)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article Thaemlitz posits that the current state of digital audio production's borders are not determined by battles between academia and the marketplace, subsidy and enterprise, nor high-brow and low-brow. However, such binarisms continue to ...

Terre Thaemlitz

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

NOAA/NMFS Developments More Than $10 Million Paid by Foreign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operations Com- mittee from 1972 through 1976. His responsibilities included the reorgani- zation of atomic, the New York Post, and the Cleveland Plain Dealer. A native of New York City, Leven- thal received

283

Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2012 3/2012 Interviewee Travel Regulations Scope These regulations apply to the reimbursement of round-trip travel expenses incurred by interviewees. These regulations do not apply to applicants who live within a 50-mile radius of Los Alamos based on the Rand McNally Standard Highway Mileage Guide. Reimbursement With the exception of airfare, interviewees will be reimbursed for travel expenses according to Federal travel regulations. For interviewees, airfare reimbursement is limited to the lesser of the standard coach airfare or the actual amount paid. The lowest available airfare should be obtained based on the official business dates and locations. The reimbursement amount will be based on the most direct route available between the interviewee's residence and the laboratory. Costs incurred over the lowest available fare will be the

284

Effective Monday, March 12, 2007, a revised protocol will be implemented for requesting the rehire of University annuitants pursuant to HR45, Rehire of University SERS and TIAA/CREF Annuitants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of University annuitants pursuant to HR45, Rehire of University SERS and TIAA/CREF Annuitants. 1. Discussions be the expected amount to be paid over 95 days, up to the maximum amount that will be paid. For TIAA of ninety-five (95) working days in one calendar year. TIAA/CREF annuitants approved for rehire may

Omiecinski, Curtis

285

What if you could actually trust your kernel?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of formally verified OS kernels means that for the first time we have a truly trustworthy foundation for systems. In this paper we explore the design space this opens up. The obvious applications are in security, although not all of them are ...

Gernot Heiser; Leonid Ryzhyk; Michael Von Tessin; Aleksander Budzynowski

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Table 5. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.00 17.89 17.55 17.24 16.98 16.99 AEO 1983 15.82 16.13 16.37 16.50 16.56 16.63 17.37 AEO 1984 15.77 15.76 16.01...

287

Energy Efficiency in Denmark - Results and actual programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renato Ezban is responsible for the implementation of a new system for certification of buildings and inspection of boilers and ventilation systems. Peter Bach is chairman of ECEEE...

288

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O'Sullivan, Francis

289

experiment actually sees," Smith says. "When we were  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,200 pieces of music from record companies and various artists, and that number is still growing. "As more of ceremonies for a number of nationally known gospel artists' concerts and have produced a CD titled Thank You components. The students' main robot features customized parts made with a titanium powder manufacturing

290

Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Actual Commercial Buildings Energy Use and Emissions and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

An analysis of trends in energy consumption and energy-related carbon emissions in U.S. buildings, 1970-1998.

292

Pu speciation in actual and simulated aged wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Pu L{sub II/III} edge was used to determine the speciation of this element in (1) Hanford Z-9 Pu crib samples, (2) deteriorated waste resins from a chloride process ion-exchange purification line, and (3) the sediments from two Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Liter Scale simulant brine systems. The Pu speciation in all of these samples except one is within the range previously displayed by PuO{sub 2+x-2y}(OH){sub y}{center_dot}zH{sub 2}O compounds, which is expected based on the putative thermodynamic stability of this system for Pu equilibrated with excess H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} under environmental conditions. The primary exception was a near neutral brine experiment that displayed evidence for partial substitution of the normal O-based ligands with Cl{sup -} and a concomitant expansion of the Pu-Pu distance relative to the much more highly ordered Pu near neighbor shell in PuO{sub 2}. However, although the Pu speciation was not necessarily unusual, the Pu chemistry identified via the history of these samples did exhibit unexpected patterns, the most significant of which may be that the presence of the Pu(V)-oxo species may decrease rather than increase the overall solubility of these compounds. Several additional aspects of the Pu speciation have also not been previously observed in laboratory-based samples. The molecular environmental chemistry of Pu is therefore likely to be more complicated than would be predicted based solely on the behavior of PuO{sub 2} under laboratory conditions.

Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The potential and actual effectiveness of interactive query expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Van Rijsbergen,C.J. Magennis,M. Proceedings of the 20th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Reseach and Development in Information Retrieval (Seattle, USA) pp 324-332 ACM

Van Rijsbergen, C.J.

294

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

295

Method of forming capsules containing a precise amount of material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming a sealed capsule containing a submilligram quantity of mercury or the like, the capsule being constructed from a hollow glass tube, by placing a globule or droplet of the mercury in the tube. The tube is then evacuated and sealed and is subsequently heated so as to vaporize the mercury and fill the tube therewith. The tube is then separated into separate sealed capsules by heating spaced locations along the tube with a coiled heating wire means to cause collapse spaced locations therealong and thus enable separation of the tube into said capsules.

Grossman, Mark W. (Framingham, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA); Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Analyzing the Deployment of Large Amounts of Offshore Wind to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

not directly capture the wear-and-tear costs associated with operating the conventional thermal power plant fleet in a more flexible fashion. Additional research on these costs...

297

UTILITY_ID","UTILITY_NAME","SCHEDULE","LINENO","AMOUNT","DESCRIPTION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

City of",3,23,1072647241,"Net Income (sum of lines 20, 21, less line 22)" 13523,"Newberry City of",3,1,12632516,"Electric Operating Revenues (400)" 13523,"Newberry City...

298

UTILITY","UTILITY_NAME","SCHEDULE","LINENO","AMOUNT","DESCRIPTION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liabilities and Other Credits (sum of lines 32,37,40,48,52)" 13523,"Newberry City of",2,1,9717212,"Electric Plant and Adjustments (101-106, 114, 116)"...

299

STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

08026","Greer Comm of Public Works",90 4500013523,01,013,1,1830371,"SC 13590","Newberry City of",90 4500013523,01,014,1,552070,"SC 14300","Newberry City of",90...

300

STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

08026","Greer Comm of Public Works",92 4500013523,01,001,1,7425262,"SC 10610","Newberry City of",92 4500013523,01,003,1,3801080,"SC 10897","Newberry City of",92...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

UTILITY_ID","UTILITY_NAME","SCHEDULE","LINENO","AMOUNT","DESCRIPTION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Services to Municipality or Other Government Units (line 14, less line 19)" 13523,"Newberry City of",5,1,0,"Taxes Other Than Income Taxes, Operating Income (408.1)"...

302

STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

08026","Greer Comm of Public Works",91 4500013523,01,013,1,2046718,"SC 13590","Newberry City of",91 4500013523,01,014,1,793018,"SC 14300","Newberry City of",91...

303

U.S. refineries and blenders produced record amounts of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because of its chemical composition, crude oil run through a refinery typically yields roughly twice as much motor gasoline as distillate fuels.

304

Adsorption process producing chronologically constant amount of a residual gas  

SciTech Connect

An adsorption process is disclosed for purifying or fractionating a gaseous feed mixture comprises an adsorption phase, at least one expansion phase, a purging phase and at least one pressure buildup phase. The expansion phase(S) and the purging phase produce residual process gas fractions. The sum total of volume, and/or mass streams of the residual process gas fractions comprises a residual gas stream which is maintained chronologically substantially constant by controlling the volume and/or gas streams of the gas entering the purging phase and maintaining the gas leaving the expansion phase(S) at a substantially constant value, dependent on the desired mass and/or volume quantity of the residual gas stream. The length of the purging phase and of the expansion phase(S) is adjusted accordingly so that the relationship of the length of time of the purging phase to the length of time of the expansion phase(S) is substantially the same as the relationship of the volume and/or mass of the gas fractions obtained during the purging to those obtained during the expansion phase(S), respectively. The control of the purging and of the expansion phase(S) can also be varied in response to a flow rate of a feed gas entering the process.

Benkmann, C.

1982-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

SCHOOL/DEPARTMENT REFERENCE# AMOUNT CHART FIELD INFORMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ITEM(S) PURCHASED TRUST FUNDS OR ORPS CERTIFICATION DATE (Rev.7/01/2004) SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

de la Torre, José R.

306

CHALLENGES OF INTEGRATING LARGE AMOUNTS OF WIND Jonathan D. Rose  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-300 MW, with the largest coal and nuclear power plants rated at 2,000 to 3,000 MW. Although wind energy are meshed networks of transmission lines connecting together cities, towns, and power plants

Hiskens, Ian A.

307

Effect of Free Surface Variation on Intermixed Amount in Continuous ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterisation of Oxide Scale of Stainless Steel and Its Effect on Interfacial Behaviour in Hot Rolling ... Purification of Indium by Vacuum Distillation.

308

U.S. refineries and blenders produced record amounts of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. Comprehensive data summaries, comparisons, ... RSS Feeds. Learn About Energy; Today in Energy.

309

STUTCO","SN","LN","CL","FL","AMOUNT","SCHEDULE","UTNAME","YEAROFDAT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

08026","Sheboygan Falls City of",98 5500018312,01,001,1,1,000016519548,"WI 10610","Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm",98 5500018312,01,002,1,1,000001111652,"WI 10620","Sun...

310

Method of forming capsules containing a precise amount of material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming a sealed capsule containing a submilligram quantity of mercury or the like, the capsule being constructed from a hollow glass tube, by placing a globule or droplet of the mercury in the tube. The tube is then evacuated and sealed and is subsequently heated so as to vaporize the mercury and fill the tube therewith. The tube is then separated into separate sealed capsules by heating spaced locations along the tube with a coiled heating wire means to cause collapse spaced locations there along and thus enable separation of the tube into said capsules. 7 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.; Maya, J.

1986-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

311

Feedback Based Architecture for Reading Check Courtesy Amounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, a number of large-scale applications continue to rely heavily on the use of paper as the dominant medium, either on intra-organization basis or on inter-organization basis, including ...

Palacios, Rafael

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

312

Original article Combined effects of tricaprylin, coconut oil and amount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a trial comprising two parts. Two differ- ent diets (C, Ta), containing 160 or 95 g tallow, 90 or 53 g

Recanati, Catherine

313

Self-Generation Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Self-Generation Incentive Program Self-Generation Incentive Program Self-Generation Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Wind Maximum Rebate $5 million, or 60% of eligible project costs, whichever is less. Incentive payment is capped at 3 MW. Program Info Start Date 2001 Expiration Date 1/1/2016 State California Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount For projects 30 kW or larger, 50% of incentive will be received up-front; 50% will be received based on actual kWh production over the first 5 years. For projects under 30kW, 100% of the incentive will be paid up front.

314

Abstract--The increasing attention paid to reliability in regional transmission organizations provide the impetus for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@uiuc.edu, gross@uiuc.edu). E. Litvinov and R. Coutu are with the ISO New England Inc., Holyoke, MA 01040 USA Gross, Fellow, IEEE, Eugene Litvinov, Member, IEEE, and Ron Coutu S #12;2 instances, a stricter-markets-related research and development since 1996. Ron Coutu has a degree in Computer Science and over 20 years

315

Wind Energy Facility Sales and Use Tax Reimbursement (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

South Dakota allows for a reinvestment payment up to the total amount of sales and use taxes paid for a new or expanded wind energy facility and equipment upgrades to an existing facility. To...

316

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

the paid amount of the Wisconsin state fuel tax. Refund claims must be filed within one year of the fuel purchase date and must be for a minimum of 100 gallons of alternative...

317

CenterPoint Energy - ENERGY STAR Homes Efficiency Program (Texas...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

15% more efficient than the 2009 IECC. Incentives are tied directly to the amount of energy savings. Depending upon the physical location of the home, homes will be paid based...

318

Data:Ef07e6fa-a752-4771-8357-ee8219f8a8e3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

is a large amount of Ripley Power & Light's electric cost. About 82 cents of every dollar paid by our customers for electricity is used to purchase energy from TVA. (Less than...

319

Data:4e9271dc-9d18-437f-9842-642ed467f841 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

is a large amount of Ripley Power & Light's electric cost. About 82 cents of every dollar paid by our customers for electricity is used to purchase energy from TVA. Demand...

320

Data:Cb80b158-ed2a-4070-a2cd-2c6cd67af655 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

is a large amount of Ripley Power & Light's electric cost. About 82 cents of every dollar paid by our customers for electricity is used to purchase energy from TVA. (1001-5000...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Data:F2ec84ec-df8b-499c-8629-a0e1de6caf71 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

if known: Rate name: Net Metering Sector: Description: The rate used to determine the dollar amount paid for net energy purchased by the Cooperative shall be based upon the...

322

BARNARD COLLEGE SALARY REDUCTION AGREEMENT Faculty & Administrators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the amount indicated below, allocated between TIAA-CREF or Fidelity as designated by the employee. It is understood that the monies so deducted from pay will be paid by the College to TIAA-CREF or Fidelity Amount Percentage Annual Election Amount Fidelity $_____________ _________% $___________________ OR TIAA

323

When home is work : grounding the virtual worker in an actual world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In our increasingly wired society, the numbers of people who work from their homes is rapidly growing. However, few have the luxury of living in a space designed for office work and as such suffer from a number of problems, ...

Nussbaum Kress, Stephanie N. (Stephanie Nicole), 1975-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ferrocyanide Safety Project: Comparison of actual and simulated ferrocyanide waste properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1950s, additional high-level radioactive waste storage capacity was needed to accommodate the wastes that would result from the production of recovery of additional nuclear defense materials. To provide this additional waste storage capacity, the Hanford Site operating contractor developed a process to decontaminate aqueous wastes by precipitating radiocesium as an alkali nickel ferrocyanide; this process allowed disposal of the aqueous waste. The radiocesium scavenging process as developed was used to decontaminate (1) first-cycle bismuth phosphate (BiPO{sub 4}) wastes, (2) acidic wastes resulting from uranium recovery operations, and (3) the supernate from neutralized uranium recovery wastes. The radiocesium scavenging process was often coupled with other scavenging processes to remove radiostrontium and radiocobalt. Because all defense materials recovery processes used nitric acid solutions, all of the wastes contained nitrate, which is a strong oxidizer. The variety of wastes treated, and the occasional coupling of radiostrontium and radiocobalt scavenging processes with the radiocesium scavenging process, resulted in ferrocyanide-bearing wastes having many different compositions. In this report, we compare selected physical, chemical, and radiochemical properties measured for Tanks C-109 and C-112 wastes and selected physical and chemical properties of simulated ferrocyanide wastes to assess the representativeness of stimulants prepared by WHC.

Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Sell, R.L.; Bredt, P.R.; Barrington, R.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Predicted mouse peroxisome-targeted proteins and their actual subcellular locations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sequences that con- tained only motifs incompatible with peroxisomal locali- zation (e.g., RNA-helicase (IPR0006050)), or that were supported by an unequivocal PSORT II [17] nuclear local- ization were eliminated. In addition, we predicted protein solubility...

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

Characterization and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

This report describes processing and analysis results of boehmite waste type (Group 5) and insoluble high Cr waste type (Group 6). The sample selection, compositing, subdivision, physical and chemical characterization are described. Extensive batch leach testing was conducted to define kinetics and leach factors of selected analytes as functions of NaOH concentration and temperature. Testing supports issue M-12 resolution for the Waste Treatment Plant.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

A longitudinal analysis of moving desires, expectations and actual moving behaviour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than homeowners; experiencing a deficiency of space increases mobility; longer durations at the same address and housing satisfaction or liking the neighbourhood lead to a lower likelihood of subsequently moving. ***Table 6 about here*** Model...

Coulter, Rory; van Ham, Maarten; Feijten, Peteke

328

Paying for public transportation : the optimal, the actual, and the possible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passenger transportation poses challenges to American cities in the form of air pollution, traffic congestion, auto collisions, and barriers to mobility. Public transit has the potential to be part of a solution to these ...

Antos, Justin David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The myth of the single mode man : how the mobility pass better meets actual travel demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this thesis is to investigate how employer transportation subsidy programs can result in more sustainable outcomes. Cities are growth machines that increasingly seek to mitigate the effects of that growth caused ...

Block-Schachter, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The analysis and comparison of actual to predicted collector array performances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hottel-Whillier-Bliss (HWB) equation has been the standard tool for the evaluation of collector thermal performance for four decades. This paper presents a technique that applies the criteria of ASHRAE Standard 93-77 to the determination of the HWB ...

W. H. McCumber; M. W. Weston

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Analysis of Actual Operating Conditions of an Off-grid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been proposed as ideal replacements for other technologies in remote locations such as Rural Alaska. A number of suppliers have developed systems that might be applicable in these locations, but there are several requirements that must be met before they can be deployed: they must be able to operate on portable fuels, and be able to operate with little operator assistance for long periods of time. This project was intended to demonstrate the operation of a 5 kW fuel cell on propane at a remote site (defined as one without access to grid power, internet, or cell phone, but on the road system). A fuel cell was purchased by the National Park Service for installation in their newly constructed visitor center at Exit Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park. The DOE participation in this project as initially scoped was for independent verification of the operation of this demonstration. This project met with mixed success. The fuel cell has operated over 6 seasons at the facility with varying degrees of success, with one very good run of about 1049 hours late in the summer of 2006, but in general the operation has been below expectations. There have been numerous stack failures, the efficiency of electrical generation has been lower than expected, and the field support effort required has been far higher than expected. Based on the results to date, it appears that this technology has not developed to the point where demonstrations in off road sites are justified.

Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson; Jack Schmid

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Basis for a Waste Management Public Communication Policy: Actual Situation Analysis and Implementation of Corrective Actions  

SciTech Connect

Argentina will require new sites for the location of radioactive waste final disposal systems. It is currently mandatory to have social and political consensus to obtain the corresponding agreements. The experience obtained with the cancellation of the project ''Feasibility Study and Engineering Project--Repository for High Level Radioactive Waste'', reinforces even more the necessity to count with the acceptance of the public to carry out projects of this kind. The first phase of the former was developed in the 80's: geological, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed in a compact granitic rock located in Sierra del Medio, Chubut province. This project had to be called off in the early 90's due to strong social rejection. This decision was closely related to the poor attention given to social communication issues. The governmental decision-makers in charge underwent a lot of pressure from social groups claiming for the cancellation of the project due to the lack of information and the fear it triggered. Thus, the lesson learnt: ''social communication activities must be carefully undertaken in order to achieve the appropriate management of the radioactive waste produced in our country.'' The same as in other countries, the specific National Law demands the formulation of a Strategic Plan which will not only include the research into radioactive waste, but the design of a Social Communication Programme as well. The latter will be in charge of informing the population clearly and objectively about the latest scientific and technological advances in the issue. A tentative perception-attitude pattern of the Argentine society about the overall nuclear issue is outlined in this paper. It is meant to contribute to the understanding of the public's adverse reaction to this kind of project. A communication programme is also presented. Its objective is to install the waste management topic in the public's opinion with a positive real outlook.

Jolivet, L. A.; Maset, E. R.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

Probabilistic structural seismic performance assessment methodology and application to an actual bridge-foundation -ground system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Structural Engineering , ASCE, to be submitted, JanuaryJournal of Structural Engineering , ASCE, 113(5), 1011-1028.response of bridge piers. ” ASCE Journal of Structural

Zhang, Yuyi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Houston, we have a problem...: a survey of actual problems in computer games development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a survey of problems found in the development process of electronic games. These problems were collected mainly from game postmortems and specialized litterature on game development, allowing a comparison with respect to well-known ... Keywords: electronic games, game development, postmortems, problems in game development, survey

Fábio Petrillo; Marcelo Pimenta; Francisco Trindade; Carlos Dietrich

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Basis for a Waste Management Public Communication Policy: Actual Situation Analysis and Implementation of Corrective Actions  

SciTech Connect

Argentina will require new sites for the location of radioactive waste final disposal systems. It is currently mandatory to have social and political consensus to obtain the corresponding agreements. The experience obtained with the cancellation of the project ''Feasibility Study and Engineering Project--Repository for High Level Radioactive Waste'', reinforces even more the necessity to count with the acceptance of the public to carry out projects of this kind. The first phase of the former was developed in the 80's: geological, geophysical and hydrogeological studies were performed in a compact granitic rock located in Sierra del Medio, Chubut province. This project had to be called off in the early 90's due to strong social rejection. This decision was closely related to the poor attention given to social communication issues. The governmental decision-makers in charge underwent a lot of pressure from social groups claiming for the cancellation of the project due to the lack of information and the fear it triggered. Thus, the lesson learnt: ''social communication activities must be carefully undertaken in order to achieve the appropriate management of the radioactive waste produced in our country.'' The same as in other countries, the specific National Law demands the formulation of a Strategic Plan which will not only include the research into radioactive waste, but the design of a Social Communication Programme as well. The latter will be in charge of informing the population clearly and objectively about the latest scientific and technological advances in the issue. A tentative perception-attitude pattern of the Argentine society about the overall nuclear issue is outlined in this paper. It is meant to contribute to the understanding of the public's adverse reaction to this kind of project. A communication programme is also presented. Its objective is to install the waste management topic in the public's opinion with a positive real outlook.

Jolivet, L. A.; Maset, E. R.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

336

Actual screens may vary slightly due to the frequent enhancements and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to move to the latest news--without entering search terms. C Get a document. Select the type; enter for a list of available segments. Choose a segment and enter your search terms. Click Add. (If you know, enter the page number you want to display, and click Go. 3 421 4 Navigating to a Specific Search Term

337

Actual vs anticipated savings from DSM programs: An assessment of the California experience  

SciTech Connect

Since the late 1980`s, utilities in California have used demand-side management (DSM) extensively to achieve a variety of corporate and public policy goals. This commitment to ene efficiency was encouraged by the establishment of financial incentives for the utilities to acquire demand-side resources. With restructuring of electric and gas markets underway in California, including recent cutbacks by the California utilities in their DSM program efforts, it is timely to review retrospectively the accomplishments of California`s DSM investments. This paper summarizes the results of 50 evaluation studies that assess California DSM programs operating between 1990 and 1992. On average, the programs delivered 112% of the energy savings that were planned, and the typical program realized approximately 86% of the energy savings it was expected to deliver. Thus, the California DSM programs outperformed DSM programs from the 1980s, in terms of more accurately forecasting energy impacts. Among the 50 impact studies, lower realization rates are associated with residential-sector programs, relatively high ex-ante estimates of savings, and significant levels of free ridership.

Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mihlmester, P.E. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), and their recent paper in Science magazine. That team, led by Despina Milathianaki and including collaborators from Lawrence Livermore National...

339

Plan Provision Comparison (Summary information only for specific provisions please refer to actual plan document language)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is effective. Investment Providers (* indicates discontinued contributions) Securian TIAA-CREF* Securian* TIAA-CREF* Vanguard* Fidelity* Defined Benefit Plan ­ Assets managed by the State Board of Investment Securian TIAA-CREF* Fidelity Vanguard DWS Investments T Rowe Price* Securian TIAA-CREF* Fidelity Vanguard #12;All information

Thomas, David D.

340

Selection of the most advantageous gas turbine air filtration system: Comparative study of actual operating experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses relative merits of three types of air filtration systems used by Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Ltd. (Pakistan), on its gas turbine compressor packages. These Filtration systems are: (i) Two stage inertial plus auto oil bath type multi-duty filters by AAF used on Saturn Mark-1 packages manufactured by Solar Turbines Inc. (ii) Three stage high efficiency barrier filters by AAF used on Centaur packages by Solar. (iii) Single stage pulse-jet self-cleaning filter by Donaldson again used on a Centaur package. The selection is primarily based in package performance data collected over a 15 month period analyzing power loss due to fouling effects and related operation and maintenance costs for the three systems. The Company's operating experience indicates that on new installations the pulse clean system offers the best advantage both in terms of filtration costs as well as availability of additional horse power when operating under moderate to severe environmental conditions.

Gilani, S.I.; Mehr, M.Z.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Membership Matters: This publication is paid for in part by dues-paying members of the Indiana University Alumni Association. Vol. 7 Fall 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minted journalism graduate, work- ing for a national news program in Beijing, China, my home country. ID program, 34 are in the MA program, and 27 are working toward an MS degree. · They come from 2 states University Alumni Association. Vol. 7 Fall 2007 Graduate program plays vital role in life of department

Indiana University

342

Membership Matters: This publication is paid for in part by dues-paying members of the Indiana University Alumni Association. Vol. 19 Fall 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Television distributed his documentary, A Blackfeet Encounter, to PBS stations nationwide. Neary, who filmed the docu- mentary primarily on a Blackfeet Indian reservation in north- western

Indiana University

343

Subscriber access provided by -Access paid by the | UC Berkeley Library Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dashed line, and varies in magnitude from one to seven microamperes as a function of gate voltage dashed line) at 20 mK. Traces of multiple Andreev reflections at constant voltages 2g/ne for n ) 1, 2, 3 by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Letter Tunable Graphene dc

Zettl, Alex

344

Data:3c514310-051c-4bed-a10a-8d88da859cb9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

amount is determined by comparing MMU's actual power supply costs (minus the Industrial Rate class) to a base kwh cost. The power supply cost adjustment reflects either an...

345

Data:Fccfca46-e5a4-4489-bf18-e7eb9892fef7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

amount is determined by comparing MMU's actual power supply costs (minus the Industrial Rate class) to a base kwh cost. The power supply cost adjustment reflects either an...

346

AVCEM: Advanced-Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the battery, according to the battery cost equations (seediscussion of battery cost above). There actually are twoin the amount and cost of fuel-storage, battery, vehicle

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

AVCEM: Advanced Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model. Overview of AVCEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the battery, according to the battery cost equations (seediscussion of battery cost above). There actually are twoin the amount and cost of fuel-storage, battery, vehicle

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Application of Triple Coincidence for the Detection of Small Amounts of Special Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We constructed a device that measures two {gamma}-rays and one neutron from spontaneous fission and any resulting multiplication chains. It extends the associated particle technique based upon correlated counting of the multiplicity of gamma-rays and neutrons released in spontaneous- or neutron-induced fission. There are two advantages in incorporating a third detector in the design over the standard two-detector version. First, we found that random uncorrelated events dominate the background of coincident counting with a gamma-ray and neutron detector. These might be suppressed by requiring an additional coincidence. Second, the time history of gamma-ray emission between the two gamma-ray detectors is related to multiplication in the target media. Multiplication in highly enriched uranium is much greater than in depleted uranium.

Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-500 (United States); Forman, L. [Ion Focus Technology Inc., Miller Place, New York 11764 (United States)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

349

Application of Triple Coincidence for the Detection of Small Amounts of Special Nuclear Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We constructed a device that measures two {gamma}-rays and one neutron from spontaneous fission and any resulting multiplication chains. It extends the associated particle technique based upon correlated counting of the multiplicity of gamma-rays and neutrons released in spontaneous- or neutron-induced fission. There are two advantages in incorporating a third detector in the design over the standard two-detector version. First, we found that random uncorrelated events dominate the background of coincident counting with a gamma-ray- and neutron-detector. These might be suppressed by requiring an additional coincidence. Second, the time history of gamma-ray emission between the two gamma-ray detectors is related to multiplication in the target media. Multiplication in highly enriched uranium is much greater than in depleted uranium.

DIOSZEGI, I.; Salwen, C.; and Forman, L.

2011-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

X-ray emission from the plasma is used as a proxy for the amount  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

direction (the long way around the torus). This current is typically induced by a transformer coil in accordance with Faraday's law of induction, similar to the way that an...

351

Cloud amount and sunshine duration in the People`s Republic of China, 1954--1988  

SciTech Connect

A part of the world with extensive records of cloudiness is the People`s Republic of China (PRC). These data, along with records of other meteorological observations, have recently been made available through a joint research agreement established between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the PRC Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) for the purpose of studying possible global warming due to an enhanced greenhouse effect. This paper examines the variation of PRC cloudiness, along with that of sunshine duration (a useful measure of cloudiness), over the 35-year period 1954--1988.

Kaiser, D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

reprogrammed $9 million of that amount this spring to cover salaries for the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sen- sitive to the issue because Abdul Qadeer Khan, the so-called father of Pakistan's nuclear program facilities where they might have access to nuclear technology. The Dutch government says the rules are an implementa- tion of U.N. Security Council resolution 1737, which seeks to limit Iran's access to nuclear

Crowther, Paul

353

Transient Stability Assessment of Power System with Large Amount of Wind Power Penetration: the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of HVDC connection to manage the imbalance at the system interconnections with the increased wind power. 2 is based on a 400 kV and 150 kV transmission system with HVDC connections to Nordel systems, Norway at the planned power exchange. Earlier studies in [4] and [5] have shown that the power exchange through the HVDC

Chen, Zhe

354

In high-tech industries, large amounts of reliable, high-quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the grid, three reciprocating engines, two absorption chillers, and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSGW natural gas-fired fuel cells · Two 70-ton Thermax LiBr absorption chillers · One unfired heat recovery, absorption chillers, and a HRSG. DISTRIBUTED ENERGY PROGRAM PROJECT PROFILE #12;Distributed Energy Project

355

Design and operation of power systems with large amounts of wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production”has been formed in IEA Wind. The R&D task will collect and share information on the experience gained and the studies made on power system impacts of wind power, and review methodologies, tools and data used. This paper outlines the power system impacts of wind power, the national studies published and ongoing and describes the goals of the international collaboration. There are dozens of studies made and ongoing related to cost of wind integration, however, the results are not easy to compare. An indepth review of the studies is needed to draw conclusions on the range of integration costs for wind power. Stateofthe art review process will seek for reasons behind the wide range of results for costs of wind integration –definitions for wind penetration, reserves and costs; different power system and load characteristics and operational rules; underlying assumptions on variability of wind etc. 1

Hannele Holttinen; Peter Meibom; Cornel Ensslin; Lutz Hofmann; John Mccann; Jan Pierik; John Olav T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

one was tested, all reaction mixtures were supple-mented with an appropriate amount of ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Carbon Storage in China Between 1949 and 1998 Jingyun Fang,1 * Anping Chen,1 Changhui Peng,2

Moorcroft, Paul R.

357

ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not Pass 2 Universal Waste Systems, Inc. CNG Refueling Station for Refuse trucks with Public Access $200 Infrastructure Project $470,600 $470,600 89.7% Awardee 19 SCAQMD Ontario 76 CNG Infrastructure Installation $300 Alternative Fuel CNG Station $195,600 $195,600 81.9% Awardee 18 South Coast Air Quality Management District

358

Past 25 Years Results for Large Amount of Tritium Handling Technology in JAEA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept and Facility / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Toshihiko Yamanishi et al.

359

What types and amounts of energy are produced in each state? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity. Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. ... tariff, and demand charge ...

360

Characteristics of Electricity Storage Technologies for Maintaining Reliability of Grid with High Amounts of Intermittent Energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For the grid to be stable, the supply of power must equal the demands of the consumer at every moment during the day. The unpredictable… (more)

Sundararagavan, Sandhya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Effect of Increasing C02 Amounts on TOVS Longwave Sounding Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer models used in processing TIROS-N sounder data via Physical retrieval schemes do not explicitly account for changes in CO2 mixing ratio. However, CO2 mixing ratios have increased by approximately 30 ppmv over the past 17 years. ...

D. S. Turner

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

What types and amounts of energy are produced in each state? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to build different types of power plants in the United States? How much energy does a person use in a year? How much energy is consumed in ...

363

ITEM NO. SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT NAME...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL FEDERAL FACILITIES COMPLIANCE AGREEMENT EP PUBLIC LAW 104-113 NATIONAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND ADVANCEMENT ACT OF 1995 EG, CP SECTION J, ATTACHMENT E...

364

Transient Stability Assessment of Power System with Large Amount of Wind Power Penetration: the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: a danish study case," Int. Journal of Eletrical Power and Energy Systems, vol. 28, no. 1, pp 48-57, Oct on the transient fault behavior of the Nordic power system," Int. Journal of Eletrical Power and Energy Systems

Chen, Zhe

365

Has fire suppression increased the amount of carbon stored in western U.S. forests?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Entomology, 8, 295 – 303. Makela, A. , and H. T. Valentine (with greater biomass (Makela and Valentine, 2001; but see

Fellows, Aaron W.; Goulden, Michael L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Role of Small Amounts of Magnesium in Nickel-Base and ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

incentive for reduction and elimination of Co in nickel-base superalloys. ..... effect on steady-state creep rate and activation energy of creep. Substitution of small.

367

Cold Model for Enhancing Nut Coke Amount in Nut-Coke-Sinter Mix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D8: Study of Rack and Chord Assembly Formability for Jack-up Platforms ... Zone of Zr-Ti Microalloyed High-strength High-toughness Offshore Structural Steels.

368

Rainfall Amount, Intensity, Duration, and Frequency Relationships in the Mae Chaem Watershed in Southeast Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dense tipping-bucket rain gauge network was established in the Mae Chaem watershed in the mountains of northwestern Thailand as part of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment-Tropics (GAME-T). ...

Koji Dairaku; Seita Emori; Taikan Oki

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Studies on activated carbon capacitor materials loaded with different amounts of ruthenium oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

speci®c capacitance [4]. However, the cost of ruthenium and its compounds limits its wide spread usage in electric/hybrid vehicles and consumer electronics. Substitutes for Ru oxides do not show compar- able 100 F/g, much lower than 720 F/g reported for amorphous RuO2. Wilde et al. [9] synthesized SrRuO3

Popov, Branko N.

370

Report on Qiagen Columns with Precipitation versus Packed Bed Technology for Trace Amounts of DNA  

SciTech Connect

The assured limit of detection (LOD), where 100% of the PCR assays are successful, for the Qiagen spin column is dramatically improved when combined with an ethanol precipitation step of the eluted sample. A detailed SOP for the ethanol precipitation was delivered as a separate report. A key finding in the precipitation work was to incubate the ethanol precipitation at -20{sup o}C overnight when concentrating low copy number samples. Combining this modified ethanol precipitation with the Qiagen spin columns, the limit of assured detection was improved by 1-2 orders of magnitude, for the aliquot and assay variables used. The lower limit of detection (defined as when at least 1 assay of 1 aliquot was positive) was only improved by approximately 1 order of magnitude. The packed bed process has the potential of a 20-fold improvement in the limit of detection compared to Qiagen plus precipitation, based on a mass balance analysis for the entire DNA concentration and purification processes. Figure ES1 shows a mass balance for all the DNA processing steps. The packed bed process minimizes losses from elution, precipitation, and pipetting (aliquoting and transferring). Figure ES1 assumes that 100 copies of DNA serve as the input sample. Efficiencies for each step have been estimated based on our experiences or a worst case scenario (for example, a 50% loss was assumed for pipetting). Table ES1 summarizes the number of copies that are the input template for PCR assuming 100 copies of DNA are processed through the three options detailed in Figure ES1.Theoretically a 20-fold increase in the number of starting copies in the PCR reaction is gained when the DNA is concentrated, purified and then amplified directly on the surface of the beads in the packed bed.

Wheeler, E K; Erler, A M; Seiler, A

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

371

Camden AEF Awards 2007 -2008 Lead Project Director Co-PIs Title of Project Award Amount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Falkowski, Oscar Schofield, Max Gorbunov Acquisition of a Flow Cytometer/ High- Speed Cell Sorter Research Consortium on the Human Side of Threat Detection $35,000 Lee Slater Evert Elizinga A Soil

Chen, Kuang-Yu

372

An Improved Parameterization for Simulating Arctic Cloud Amount in the CCSM3 Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple alternative parameterization for predicting cloud fraction in the Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3) global climate model is presented. This formula, dubbed “freeezedry,” is designed to alleviate the bias of excessive low ...

Steve Vavrus; Duane Waliser

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Effect of type and amount of dietary fat on bile flow and composition in rats.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containing 7 or 20 p. 100 of corn oil or 20 p. 100 of lard or mutton tallow. In those conditions of these two components was lower in the « lard » and « mutton tallow » groups. Among the groups receiving group, while the absolute biliary cholesterol concentration was identical in the lard and mutton tallow

Recanati, Catherine

374

" Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" C9.1. Number of Establishments by Participation in Energy-Management Activity, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Participation and General Amounts of Establishment-Paid Activity Cost;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,,,," " " "," ",,,"General","Amount of ","Establishment-Paid","Activity Cost","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","All","Some","None","Don't Know","Factors"

375

Evaluating Financial Model Performance: An Empirical Analysis of Some North Sea Investments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fifty North Sea oil & gas investment transactions were analysed using traditional spreadsheet based financial modelling methods. The purpose of the analysis was to determine if there was a statistically significant relationship between the price paid for an oil & gas asset and the actual or expected financial return over the asset's economically useful life. Several interesting and statistically significant relationships were found which reveal useful information about financial modelling performance, the premia paid to acquire North Sea assets, the contribution oil and gas price uncertainty has on estimates of future financial returns and the median financial return of these North Sea Investments.

Croll, Grenville J; Lawal, Ola

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Sample Invoice Cost Share UT-B Contracts Div August 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SHIPPED VIA CUSTOMER NUMBER TERMS NET DAYS COST ELEMENT DESCRIPTION CURRENT COSTS CUMULATIVE COSTS DIRECT for the Department of Energy COMMENTS OR SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: SUBCONTRACT NUMBER BILLING PERIOD Begin/End Date AMOUNT PREVIOUSLY PAID TOTAL COST INCURRED COMPANY COST SHARE * SELLERS COST SHARE * TOTAL INVOICED *If

377

STATE OF CALIFORNIA HOTEL / MOTEL TRANSIENT OCCUPANCY TAX WAIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR STATE AGENCIES) HOTEL MOTEL OPERATORS: RETAIN THIS WAIVER FOR YOUR FILES TO SUBSTANTIATE YOUR REPORTS of the State Agency indicated below; that the charge for the occupancy at the above establishment on the dates of California. $ OCCUPANCY DATES AMOUNT PAID California State University, Fullerton STATE AGENCY NAME 800 North

de Lijser, Peter

378

2. Fachtagung 6. 8. April 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Orlando Hotel Instead look for ways to use energy you've already paid for: ­ Domestic hot water heating amounts of energy (like a "flux capacitor") giving us a thermal flywheel effect · GeoHP Systems can "time shift" that energy · Think "Thermal Battery" #12;Greensleeves LLC Greensleeves Approach

Heinemann, Detlev

379

Presented at 38th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Systems Science, Waikoloa, HI, Jan. 5-8,2005 Market Structure and the Predictability of Electricity System Line Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-8,2005 Market Structure and the Predictability of Electricity System Line Flows: An Experimental Analysis Nodir results, that the power flow on any line in an electric network is linearly proportional to the total in the subsequent period and are paid a pre-specified amount for each kWh less than their benchmark level of usage

380

9/18/09 2:57 PMDark energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 9http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/health/dark-energy-may-not-actually-exist_100234185.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National New Delhi nuclear Ads by Google Origin Universe Albert Einstein E Sabai Body Temple Hero Universe in Pakistan Dundalk Avenue flooded as water main breaks Al Qaeda video threatens Germans ahead of polls

Temple, Blake

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Incentives Program Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Commercial Kitchen and Grocery Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Retail Supplier State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Other Maximum Rebate $600,000/year/facility. Incentives $1-$200,000: paid at 100% Incentives $200,000-$600,000: paid at 50% Program Info Expiration Date 05/31/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Steamers: $300-$450 Hot Holding Cabinet: $200-$500

382

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for the treatment of actual high activity tank waste at the INEEL using centrifugal contactors  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), formerly reprocessed spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The radioactive raffinates from the solvent extraction uranium recovery processes were converted to granular solids (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. A secondary liquid waste stream was generated during the course of reprocessing, primarily from equipment decontamination between campaigns and solvent wash activities. This acidic tank waste cannot be directly calcined due to the high sodium content and has historically been blended with reprocessing raffinates or non-radioactive aluminum nitrate prior to calcination. Fuel reprocessing activities are no longer being performed at the ICPP, thereby eliminating the option of waste blending to deplete the waste inventory. Currently, approximately 5.7 million liters of high-activity waste are temporarily stored at the ICPP in large underground stainless-steel tanks. The United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare filed a Notice of Noncompliance in 1992 contending some of the underground waste storage tanks do not meet secondary containment. As part of a 1995 agreement between the State of Idaho, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Navy, the waste must be removed from the tanks by 2012. Treatment of the tank waste inventories by partitioning the radionuclides and immobilizing the resulting high-activity and low-activity waste streams is currently under evaluation. A recent peer review identified the most promising radionuclide separation technologies for evaluation. The Transuranic Extraction-(TRUEX) process was identified as a primary candidate for separation of the actinides from ICPP tank waste.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Analysis of information exchange activities to actualize and validate situation awareness during shift changeovers in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shift work situations occur in almost all safety-critical organizations, and the investigations of some catastrophes like Chernobyl, Exxon Valdez, and the Gol/Legacy mid-air collision indicated that shift work information exchange played an important ... Keywords: Process systems safety, Resilience engineering, Shift work changeover, Situation awareness

Paulo Victor Rodrigues de Carvalho; Tahar-Hakim Benchekroun; Jose Orlando Gomes

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Theoretical, Discrete, and Actual Response of the Barnes Objective Analysis Scheme for One- and Two-Dimensional Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the response of the Barnes objective analysis scheme as a function of wavenumber or wavelength and extends previous work in two primary areas. First, the first- and second-pass theoretical response functions for continuous two-...

Patricia M. Pauley; Xiaihua Wu

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

6.0 UNCERTAINTIES The major uncertainty in this analysis is the actual exposure that people will experience.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will experience. Because many abandoned uranium mines are on federal lands, the most likely exposure scenario to this are Native Americans who live around the uranium mines and personnel who may work around the sites effect uranium mines have on the ground water and the subsequent use of the water. In many parts

386

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the tenant. If energy prices rise (from market fluctuationsenergy consumption that is “affected” by a market failure and “insulated” from pricemarket barriers, principal agent problem, energy efficiency, investment, behaviour, energy price,

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1991) The Issue of Domestic Energy Market Failure. Canberra,information in energy service markets – leading to problemsis a goal of many market-oriented energy policies. However,

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to minimize energy and environmental problems by placingprincipal agent problem, energy efficiency, investment,Agent Problem on US Residential Energy Use. Berkeley (CA),

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cloud amount and sunshine duration in the People's Republic of China, 1954--1988  

SciTech Connect

A part of the world with extensive records of cloudiness is the People's Republic of China (PRC). These data, along with records of other meteorological observations, have recently been made available through a joint research agreement established between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the PRC Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) for the purpose of studying possible global warming due to an enhanced greenhouse effect. This paper examines the variation of PRC cloudiness, along with that of sunshine duration (a useful measure of cloudiness), over the 35-year period 1954--1988.

Kaiser, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Analyzing the Deployment of Large Amounts of Offshore Wind to Design an Offshore Transmission Grid in the United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper revisits the results from the U.S. Department of Energy's '20% Wind Energy By 2030' study, which envisioned that 54 GW of offshore wind would be installed by said year. The analysis is conducted using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS), a capacity expansion model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The model is used to optimize the deployment of the 54 GW of wind capacity along the coasts and lakes of the United States. The graphical representation of the results through maps will be used to provide a qualitative description for planning and designing an offshore grid. ReEDS takes into account many factors in the process of siting offshore wind capacity, such as the quality of the resource, capital and O&M costs, interconnection costs, or variability metrics (wind capacity value, forecast error, expected curtailment). The effect of these metrics in the deployment of offshore wind will be analyzed through examples in the results.

Ibanez, E.; Mai, T.; Coles, L.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A Pixel-Scale Algorithm of Cloud Type, Layer, and Amount for AVHRR Data. Part I: Nighttime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated pixel-scale algorithm has been developed to retrieve cloud type, related cloud layer(s), and the fractional coverages for all cloud layers in each AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) pixel at night. In the algorithm, ...

Gang Luo; Paul A. Davis; Larry L. Stowe; E. Paul McClain

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Impacts of Large Amounts of Wind Power on Design and Operation of Power Systems; Results of IEA Collaboration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results from 18 case studies, with discussion on differences in methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.

Ela, E.; Parsons, B.; Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; O'Malley, M.; Ummels, B. C.; Tande, J. O.; Estanqueiro, A.; Gomez, E.; Smith, J. C.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Method of regulating the amount of underfire air for combustion of wood fuels in spreader-stroke boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of metering underfire air for increasing efficiency and reducing particulate emissions from wood-fire, spreader-stoker boilers is disclosed. A portion of the combustion air, approximately one pound of air per pound of wood, is fed through the grate into the fuel bed, while the remainder of the combustion air is distributed above the fuel in the furnace, and the fuel bed is maintained at a depth sufficient to consume all oxygen admitted under fire and to insure a continuous layer of fresh fuel thereover to entrap charred particles inside the fuel bed.

Tuttle, Kenneth L. (Federal Way, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A Sensitive Sandwich ELISA for the Detection of Trace Amounts of Cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) Nut in Foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In addition, no cross-reactivity was detected in protein extracts of host foods (whole wheat flour, all purpose wheat flour, rolled oats, milk chocolate, raisin bran cereal, chocolate- filled cookies, and rice wheat flour, all purpose wheat flour, rolled oats, chocolate-filled cookies, and rice cereal, detection

Ronquist, Fredrik

395

Stochastic Methods for Planning and Operating Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind and Solar Power: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind and solar generators differ in their generation characteristics than conventional generators. The variable output and imperfect predictability of these generators face a stochastic approach to plan and operate the power system without fundamentally changing the operation and planning problems. This paper overviews stochastic modeling challenges in operations, generation planning, and transmission planning, with references to current industry and academic work. Different stochastic problem formulations, including approximations, are also discussed.

Milligan, M.; Donohoo, P.; O'Malley, M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Why a Large Amount of Rain Falls over the Sea in the Vicinity of Western Sumatra Island during Nighttime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite indicate that annual rainfall over the sea in the vicinity of western Sumatra Island is among the highest on the earth, and most of this rainfall occurs during ...

Peiming Wu; Masayuki Hara; Jun-ichi Hamada; Manabu D. Yamanaka; Fujio Kimura

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Analyzing the Deployment of Large Amounts of Offshore Wind to Design an Offshore Transmission Grid in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper revisits the results from the U.S. Department of Energy's '20% Wind Energy By 2030' study, which envisioned that 54 GW of offshore wind would be installed by said year. The analysis is conducted using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS), a capacity expansion model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The model is used to optimize the deployment of the 54 GW of wind capacity along the coasts and lakes of the United States. The graphical representation of the results through maps will be used to provide a qualitative description for planning and designing an offshore grid. ReEDS takes into account many factors in the process of siting offshore wind capacity, such as the quality of the resource, capital and O&M costs, interconnection costs, or variability metrics (wind capacity value, forecast error, expected curtailment). The effect of these metrics in the deployment of offshore wind will be analyzed through examples in the results.

Ibanez, E.; Mai, T.; Coles, L.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

FAST NEUTRON DOSIMETER FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE OPERATION BY MEASUREMENT OF THE AMOUNT OF CESIUM 137 FORMED FROM A THORIUM WIRE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device for measurement of integrated fast neutron flux in the presence of a large thermal neutron field are described. The device comprises a thorium wire surrounded by a thermal neutron attenuator that is, in turn, enclosed by heat-resistant material. The method consists of irradiating the device in a neutron field whereby neutrons with energies in excess of 1.1 Mev cause fast fissions in the thorium, then removing the thorium wire, separating the cesium-137 fission product by chemical means from the thorium, and finally counting the radioactivity of the cesium to determine the number of fissions which have occurred so that the integrated fast flux may be obtained. (AEC)

McCune, D.A.

1964-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

399

Design method to determine the optimal distribution and amount of insulation for in-ground heat storage tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The seasonal sensible heat storage model developed by F.C. Hooper and C.R. Attwater is modified to describe the thermal behaviour of the soil regime surrounding cylindrical, in-ground, heat storage tanks with optimally distributed insulation. The model assumes steady-state heat transfer, and the surrounding soil is considered to be homogeneous and isotropic. Changes in soil thermal properties due to moisture migration, whether driven by thermal or hydrostatic gradients, are assumed negligible. The optimal distribution is determined using the method of Lagrange multipliers. It is shown that the marginal cost per unit of energy lost and per unit of tank surface area must be the same at all points on the surface of the tank as the condition for minimum total heat loss with a given total investment in insulation. This condition appears to apply for all axi-symmetric in-ground tank geometries. For a given volume of insulation, the incremental increase in storage efficiency with an optimal redistribution of the insulation is a function of tank geometry. The problem of determining the optimal total investment in insulation for a given marginal cost of fuel is described and a method of solution is outlined.

Williams, G.T.; Attwater, C.R.; Hooper, F.C.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Interpretation of the Transient Variations in the Time Series of Precipitation Amounts in Seoul, Korea. Part I: Diurnal Variation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of temporal variations of precipitation for Seoul, Korea, have been examined using a 220-yr record. Precipitation records from modern rain gauges were used for 1908–96 together with the traditional Korean rain gauge precipitations ...

Hyun-Sook Jung; Gyu-Ho Lim; Jai-Ho Oh

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Gridded Climatic Monthly Frequencies of Precipitation Amount for 1-, 3-, and 6-h Periods over the Conterminous United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gridded fields of monthly mean relative frequency for ?0.10 (2.5), ?0.25 (6.4), ?0.50 (12.7), ?1.00 (25.4), and ?2.00 (50.8) in. (mm) of precipitation have been developed for 1-, 3-, and 6-h periods over the conterminous United States. The ...

Jerome P. Charba; Yijun Liu; Matthew H. Hollar; Bryan Exley; Anwar Belayachi

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Effect of Operational Voltage on a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operating on Coal Syngas Containing Trace Amounts of Phosphine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electrolyte-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells have been proven capable of generating usable electricity when supplied with various fuels, including a synthetic fuel (syngas) generated from… (more)

Kaufman, Brian A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Extended-burnup LWR (light-water reactor) fuel: The amount, characteristics, and potential effects on interim storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a study on extended-burnup, light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the study was to collect and evaluate information on the status of in-reactor performance and integrity of extended-burnup LWR fuel and initiate the investigation of the effects of extending fuel burnup on the subsequent handling, interim storage, and other operations (e.g., rod consolidation and shipping) associated with the back end of the fuel cycle. The results of this study will aid DOE and the nuclear industry in assessing the effects on waste management of extending the useful in-reactor life of nuclear fuel. The experience base with extended-burnup fuel is now substantial and projections for future use of extended-burnup fuel in domestic LWRs are positive. The basic performance and integrity of the fuel in the reactor has not been compromised by extending the burnup, and the potential limitations for further extending the burnup are not severe. 104 refs., 15 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Preliminary Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Commonwealth of Virginia's Efforts to Implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Weatherization Assistance Program"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (Department) Weatherization Assistance Program received $5 billion under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to improve the energy efficiency of homes, multi-family rental units and mobile homes owned or occupied by low-income persons. Subsequently, the Department awarded a three-year Weatherization Assistance Program grant for $94 million to the Commonwealth of Virginia (Virginia). This grant provided more than a ten-fold increase in funds available to Virginia for weatherization over that authorized in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009. Corresponding to the increase in funding, the Recovery Act increased the limit on the average amount spent to weatherize a home (unit) from $2,500 to $6,500. Virginia's Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) administers the Recovery Act grant through 22 local community action agencies. These agencies (sub-grantees) are responsible for determining applicant eligibility, weatherizing homes, and conducting home assessments and inspections. Typical weatherization services include installing insulation; sealing ducts; tuning and repairing furnaces; and, mitigating heat loss through windows, doors and other infiltration points. Virginia plans to use its Recovery Act Weatherization funding to weatherize about 9,193 units over the life of the grant - a significant increase over the 1,475 housing units that were planned to be completed in FY 2009. Given the significant increase in funding and the demands associated with weatherizing thousands of homes, we initiated this audit to determine if Virginia had adequate safeguards in place to ensure that the Weatherization Program was managed efficiently and effectively. The State of Virginia's DHCD had not implemented financial and reporting controls needed to ensure Weatherization Program funds are spent effectively and efficiently. Specifically, DHCD had not: (1) Performed on-site financial monitoring of any of its sub-grantees under the Recovery Act; (2) Reviewed documentation supporting sub-grantee requests for reimbursements to verify the accuracy of amounts charged; (3) Periodically reconciled amounts paid to sub-grantees to the actual cost to weatherize units; (4) Maintained vehicle and equipment inventories as required by Federal regulations and state and Federal program directives; and (5) Accurately reported Weatherization Program results to the Department. Exacerbating weaknesses in DHCD's financial controls, the Department's most recent program monitoring visit to Virginia, made in 2008 before passage of the Recovery Act, did not include a required financial review. Hence, the financial control weaknesses discussed above were not detected and had not been addressed. As described in this report, these control and reporting weaknesses increase the risk that Recovery Act objectives may not be achieved and that fraud, waste or abuse can occur and not be detected in this critically important program.

None

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Vol. 23 College of Arts & Sciences Alumni Association Fall 2009 Membership Matters. This publication is paid for in part by dues-paying members of the Indiana University Alumni Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

member whose many interests include gender, sexuality, and folklore, two new journals edited by AAADS American literature, gender and sexuality studies, cultural studies, and black folklore. Horton- ebrated 35 years of service to Indiana University. M39 was filled with great energy and excitement

Indiana University

406

Short Desc Long Desc Short Desc Long Desc Short Desc Long Desc Short Desc Long Desc 401k 401k D PP PT2 Dental Pre-Paid PT 2 Misc Miscellaneous Deductions ROTH ROTH 401(k)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FICA Additional Medicare Tax ORP ING1 ORP Retirement ING 10% TCRS NF TCRS Retirement Non-Faculty AFLACSIC Aflac - Sickness Indemnity Foundat Foundation ORP ING2 ORP Retirement ING Two Split TCRS TCB Closed Teacher Class B Contrib AFLCIEET Aflac - Critical ILL-EE-Tobacco Foundat ETSU Foundation ORP ING3

Karsai, Istvan

407

Utility Green Pricing Programs: A Statistical Analysis of Program Effectiveness  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes actual utility green pricing program data to provide further insight into which program features might help maximize both customer participation in green pricing programs and the amount of renewable energy purchased by customers in those programs.

Wiser, R.; Olson, S.; Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Data Center NISTIR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... When amounts are stated in actual prices as of the ... were no change in the general price level to ... 17 Throughout this section the prefix, PV, is used to ...

2004-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

409

Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit Zero-Emission Facilities Production Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Maximum Rebate Not specified Program Info Start Date 01/01/03 Expiration Date 12/31/2020 State Oklahoma Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 0.0025/kWh - 0.0075/kWh for 10 years; amount varies depending on when the facility is placed in operation and when electricity is generated. Provider Oklahoma Department of Commerce '''''Note: No credits will be paid during 2011 for electricity produced from July 1, 2010 - June 30, 2011. But any credits that accrue during that time period will be paid during the 2012 tax year.''''' For tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2003, a state income tax

410

Renewable Energy Facility Sales and Use Tax Reimbursement (South Dakota) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Facility Sales and Use Tax Reimbursement (South Energy Facility Sales and Use Tax Reimbursement (South Dakota) Renewable Energy Facility Sales and Use Tax Reimbursement (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Installer/Contractor Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Water Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 04/01/2013 State South Dakota Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Up to 100% of the tax paid on project costs Provider South Dakota Governor's Office of Economic Development South Dakota allows for a reinvestment payment up to the total amount of sales and use taxes paid for certain new or expanded renewable energy systems, equipment upgrades to existing systems, and manufacturing

411

State of California BOARD OF EQUALIZATION ENERGY RESOURCES SURCHARGE REGULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An electric utility is relieved from liability to collect the surcharge insofar as the base upon which the surcharge is imposed is represented by accounts which have been found to be worthless and charged off in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. If the electric utility has previously paid the amount of the surcharge, it may take as a deduction on its return the amount found to be worthless and charged off. If such accounts are thereafter collected in whole or in part, the surcharge so collected shall be paid with the first return filed after such collection. Electric utilities may charge off their worthless accounts on the basis of their experience ratio provided the writeoff

unknown authors

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

52  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.222-8 PAYROLLS AND BASIC RECORDS (DEVIATION NOV 2009) .222-8 PAYROLLS AND BASIC RECORDS (DEVIATION NOV 2009) (a) Payrolls and basic records relating thereto shall be maintained by the Contractor during the course of the work and preserved for a period of 3 years thereafter for all laborers and mechanics working at the site of the work. Such records shall contain the name, address, and social security number of each such worker, his or her correct classification, hourly rates of wages paid (including rates of contributions or costs anticipated for bona fide fringe benefits or cash equivalents thereof of the types described in section 1(b)(2)(B) of the Davis-Bacon Act), daily and weekly number of hours worked, deductions made, and actual wages paid. Whenever the Secretary of Labor has found, under paragraph (d) of the clause entitled Davis-Bacon Act, that

413

Geothermal R&D Program FY 1988 Project Summaries  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes DOE Geothermal R&D subprograms, major tasks, and projects. Contract funding amounts are shown. Many summaries have references (citations) to the researchers' previous related work. These can be useful. Geothermal budget actual amounts are shown for FY 1984 -1988. (DJE 2005)

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geothermal R&D Program FY 1988 Project Summaries  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes DOE Geothermal R&D subprograms, major tasks, and projects. Contract funding amounts are shown. Many summaries have references (citations) to the researchers' previous related work. These can be useful. Geothermal budget actual amounts are shown for FY 1984 -1988. (DJE 2005)

None

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

State of California BOARD OF EQUALIZATION ENERGY RESOURCES SURCHARGE REGULATIONS Regulation 2301.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surcharges required to be collected by electric utilities are due quarterly on or before the last day of the month next succeeding each calendar quarter. Amounts of surcharge due for which a billing for the electrical energy is issued by an electric utility to the consumer prior to the close of a calendar quarter are payable with the surcharge return for that quarter. Any amounts of the surcharge required to be paid or collected that are not billed in the ordinary course of the

Due; Payable Dates

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Air pollution by road traffic-Problems and solutions in the European context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a vehicle demonstration programme the high compression lean burn technology showed good potential for further improving emissions and energy effiency of the average European car. At the US '83 emission control level a 10 per cent improvement in fuel consumption over the equivalent presentday vehicle was found under European city and highway driving conditions. An oxidation catalyst was found an essential and effective element of the setup. Special attention should be paid to the representation of actual driving patterns in Europe in relation to the type approval test procedures. Especially for control of NOx emissions the situation is very unsatisfactory. Suggestions for improvement are made.

Van Beckhoven, L.C.; Rijkeboer, R.C.; Van Sloten, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

More than Money: The Spatial Mismatch Between Where Homeowners of Color in Metro Boston Can Afford to Live and Where They Actually Reside Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

argue, simply a matter of money. People of color do not livecosts – both in terms of money and time – of traveling vastthe same or slightly less money. Why not have a home Many

Harris, David J.; McArdle, Nancy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

More than Money: The Spatial Mismatch Between Where Homeowners of Color in Metro Boston Can Afford to Live and Where They Actually Reside Part I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than Money: The Spatial Mismatch Between Whereattributable to more than money. We recommend several stepsproposals. More than Money: The Spatial Mismatch Between

Harris, David J.; McArdle, Nancy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

High potential, but low actual, glycine uptake of dominant plant species in three Australian land-use types with intermediate N availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with intermediate N availability Ansgar Kahmen & Stephen J.with different N availabilities. We here report patterns ofwith intermediate N availability, mineral N is the plants’

Kahmen, Ansgar; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CENTIMETER CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS OF THE NORTHERN HEAD OF THE HH 80/81/80N JET: REVISING THE ACTUAL DIMENSIONS OF A PARSEC-SCALE JET  

SciTech Connect

We present 6 and 20 cm Jansky Very Large Array/Very Large Array observations of the northern head of the HH 80/81/80N jet, one of the largest collimated jet systems known so far, aimed to look for knots farther than HH 80N, the northern head of the jet. Aligned with the jet and 10' northeast of HH 80N, we found a radio source not reported before, with a negative spectral index similar to that of HH 80, HH 81, and HH 80N. The fit of a precessing jet model to the knots of the HH 80/81/80N jet, including the new source, shows that the position of this source is close to the jet path resulting from the modeling. If the new source belongs to the HH 80/81/80N jet, its derived size and dynamical age are 18.4 pc and >9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr, respectively. If the jet is symmetric, its southern lobe would expand beyond the cloud edge resulting in an asymmetric appearance of the jet. Based on the updated dynamical age, we speculate on the possibility that the HH 80/81/80N jet triggered the star formation observed in a dense core found ahead of HH 80N, which shows signposts of interaction with the jet. These results indicate that parsec-scale radio jets can play a role in the stability of dense clumps and the regulation of star formation in the molecular cloud.

Masque, Josep M.; Estalella, Robert [Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Rodriguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Beltran, Maria T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

Examining the Cycle: How Perceived and Actual Bicycling Risk Influence Cycling Frequency, Roadway Design Preferences, and Support for Cycling Among Bay Area Residents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

street parking, lighting, presence, width, quality, and placement of bicycle infrastructure, etc. However, with the exception of research

Sanders, Rebecca Lauren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Implementation of a Silver Iodide Cloud-Seeding Parameterization in WRF. Part II: 3D Simulations of Actual Seeding Events and Sensitivity Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four cloud-seeding cases over southern Idaho during the 2010/11 winter season have been simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using the coupled silver iodide (AgI) cloud-seeding scheme that was described in Part I. The ...

Lulin Xue; Sarah A. Tessendorf; Eric Nelson; Roy Rasmussen; Daniel Breed; Shaun Parkinson; Pat Holbrook; Derek Blestrud

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

What is Gross Up?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/19/12 Rev 0 /19/12 Rev 0 What is Gross Up? Gross up on relocation refers to money that is added to your pay to offset the federal and state tax deducted from the relocation reimbursement amount. You do not see the money in your pocket, but rather it offsets taxes that would have reduced the payment if we had not paid you the additional amount. For example: If the Relocation reimbursement request submitted = $5668. Without a gross up the net payment received would be $3539.66 because federal and state taxes reduce the pay out by $1694.73 ($1417 federal + $277.73 state). Paying only the additional amount of the taxes would create a larger tax burden because there would be taxes on that additional amount as well. Instead by paying an additional $2417.59 the federal and state taxes on the original $5668 and the additional federal and state taxes on

425

Amount and Source of CO2: Not applicable – this is a terrestrial field test to determine and validate rates of sequestration using different agricultural methods.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple test sites located within different Major Land Resource Areas (MLRA’s) have been selected to collect soil samples from three predominant land uses, namely till, no till and woodlot (Figure 1). Soil samples were collected from five different depths (i.e., 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm, 10-30 cm, 30-50 cm, and>50 cm) in four replications 100 m apart. These samples were analyzed for total soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen concentrations (N) and various soil physical quality parameters, including soil moisture content, soil bulk density, aggregate size distribution and stability, plant available water, texture, shrinkage, soil compaction, and soil hydraulic properties. A complete range of MRCSP, Croplands Terrestrial 1 November 2009field and laboratory studies have been conducted to assess the impact of soil C pool on soil quality and the attendant co-benefits (Figure 2). Three sites based on different parent material: Glacial Till (Coshocton), Till plain (Delaware), and Glacial Lake

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

27Solar Irradiance Changes and the Sunspot Cycle Irradiance (also called insolation) is a measure of the amount of sunlight power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system generate in 1989? Space Math http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov #12;27Answer Key Problem 1 - About to be the relationship between sunspot number and solar irradiance? Problem 3 - A homeowner built a solar electricity (photovoltaic) system on his roof in 1985 that produced 3,000 kilowatts-hours of electricity that year. Assuming

427

Analysis of the Madaras Rotor Power Plant: an alternate method for extracting large amounts of power from the wind. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the program was to analyze and up-date the design of the Madaras Rotor Power Plant concept that had been developed in the 1930's to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this system to be competitive with conventional horizontal axis wind turbines. The Madaras concept uses rotating cylinders, vertically mounted on flat cars, to react with the wind like a sail and propel an endless train of connected cars around a closed track at constant speed. Electricity is generated by alternators on each car that are geared to the wheels. Electrical power is transmitted from each car to the power house by a trolley system. A four-task program consisting of a series of wind tunnel tests, an electro-mechanical analysis, a performance analysis, and a cost analysis was conducted.

Whitford, D.H.; Minardi, J.E.; West, B.S.; Dominic, R.J.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Probability Density Functions of Liquid Water Path and Cloud Amount of Marine Boundary Layer Clouds: Geographical and Seasonal Variations and Controlling Meteorological Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subgrid-scale variability of the liquid water path (LWP) of marine boundary layer clouds in areas that correspond to the typical grid size of large-scale (global climate and weather prediction) atmospheric models (200 km × 200 km) is ...

Hideaki Kawai; João Teixeira

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Improvement of Carbon Dioxide Sweep Efficiency by Utilization of Microbial Permeability Profile Modification to Reduce the Amount of Oil Bypassed During Carbon Dioxide Flood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to couple microbial permeability profile modification (MPPM), with carbon dioxide flooding to improve oil recovery from the Upper Cretaceous Little Creek Oil Field situated in Lincoln and Pike counties, MS. This study determined that MPPM technology, which improves production by utilizing environmentally friendly nutrient solutions to simulate the growth of the indigenous microflora in the most permeable zones of the reservoir thus diverting production to less permeable, previously unswept zones, increased oil production without interfering with the carbon dioxide flooding operation. Laboratory tests determined that no microorganisms were produced in formation waters, but were present in cores. Perhaps the single most significant contribution of this study is the demonstration that microorganisms are active at a formation temperature of 115?C (239?F) by using a specially designed culturing device. Laboratory tests were employed to simulate the MPPM process by demonstrating that microorganisms could be activated with the resulting production of oil in coreflood tests performed in the presence of carbon dioxide at 66?C (the highest temperature that could be employed in the coreflood facility). Geological assessment determined significant heterogeneity in the Eutaw Formation, and documented relatively thin, variably-lithified, well-laminated sandstone interbedded with heavily-bioturbated, clay-rich sandstone and shale. Live core samples of the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw Formation from the Heidelberg Field, MS were quantitatively assessed using SEM, and showed that during MPPM permeability modification occurs ubiquitously within pore and throat spaces of 10-20 ?m diameter. Testing of the MPPM procedure in the Little Creek Field showed a significant increase in production occurred in two of the five production test wells; furthermore, the decline curve in each of the production wells became noticeably less steep. This project greatly extends the number of oil fields in which MPPM can be implemented.

Darrel Schmitz; Lewis Brown F. Leo Lynch; Brenda Kirkland; Krystal Collins; William Funderburk

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

Analysis of the Madaras Rotor Power Plant: an alternate method for extracting large amounts of power from the wind. Volume 2. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the program was to analyze and up-date the design of the Madaras Rotor Power Plant concept that had been developed in the 1930's to determine the technical and economic feasibility of this system to be competitive with conventional horizontal axis wind turbines. A four-task program consisting of a series of wind tunnel tests, an electro-mechanical analysis, a performance analysis, and a cost analysis was conducted.

Whitford, D.H.; Minardi, J.E.; West, B.S.; Dominic, R.J.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Techno-Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Systems Used as an Electricity Storage Technology in a Wind Farm with Large Amounts of Intermittent Energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the growing demand for electricity, renewable sources of energy have garnered a lot of support from all quarters. The problem with depending on these… (more)

Sanghai, Yash

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Experimental and computational study of methane counterflow diffusion flames perturbed by trace amounts of either jet fuel or a 6-component surrogate under non-sooting conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical structure of a methane counterflow diffusion flame and of the same flame doped with 1000 ppm (molar) of either jet fuel or a 6-component jet fuel surrogate was analyzed experimentally, by gas sampling via quartz microprobes and subsequent GC/MS analysis, and computationally using a semi-detailed kinetic mechanism for the surrogate blend. Conditions were chosen to ensure that all three flames were non-sooting, with identical temperature profiles and stoichiometric mixture fraction, through a judicious selection of feed stream composition and strain rate. The experimental dataset provides a glimpse of the pyrolysis and oxidation behavior of jet fuel in a diffusion flame. The jet fuel initial oxidation is consistent with anticipated chemical kinetic behavior, based on thermal decomposition of large alkanes to smaller and smaller fragments and the survival of ring-stabilized aromatics at higher temperatures. The 6-component surrogate captures the same trend correctly, but the agreement is not quantitative with respect to some of the aromatics such as benzene and toluene. Various alkanes, alkenes and aromatics among the jet fuel components are either only qualitatively characterized or could not be identified, because of the presence of many isomers and overlapping spectra in the chromatogram, leaving 80% of the carbon from the jet fuel unaccounted for in the early pyrolysis history of the parent fuel. Computationally, the one-dimensional code adopted a semi-detailed kinetic mechanism for the surrogate blend that is based on an existing hierarchically constructed kinetic model for alkanes and simple aromatics, extended to account for the presence of tetralin and methylcyclohexane as reference fuels. The computational results are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental ones for the surrogate behavior, with the greatest discrepancy in the concentrations of aromatics and ethylene. (author)

Bufferand, H.; Tosatto, L.; La Mantia, B.; Smooke, M.D.; Gomez, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale Center for Combustion Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8286 (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Experimental study of ethylene counterflow diffusion flames perturbed by trace amounts of jet fuel and jet fuel surrogates under incipiently sooting conditions  

SciTech Connect

The structure of an ethylene counterflow diffusion flame doped with 2000 ppm on a molar basis of either jet fuel or two jet fuel surrogates is studied under incipient sooting conditions. The doped flames have identical stoichiometric mixture fractions (z{sub f} = 0.18) and strain rates (a = 92 s{sup -1}), resulting in a well-defined and fixed temperature/time history for all of the flames. Gas samples are extracted from the flame with quartz microprobes for subsequent GC/MS analysis. Profiles of critical fuel decomposition products and soot precursors, such as benzene and toluene, are compared. The data for C7-C12 alkanes are consistent with typical decomposition of large alkanes with both surrogates showing good qualitative agreement with jet fuel in their pyrolysis trends. Olefins are formed as the fuel alkanes decompose, with agreement between the surrogates and jet fuel that improves for small alkenes, probably because of an increase in kinetic pathways which makes the specifics of the alkane structure less important. Good agreement between jet fuel and the surrogates is found with respect to critical soot precursors such as benzene and toluene. Although the six-component Utah/Yale surrogate performs better than the Aachen surrogate, the latter performs adequately and retains the advantage of simplicity, since it consists of only two components. The acetylene profiles present a unique multimodal behavior that can be attributed to acetylene's participation in early stages of formation of soot precursors, such as benzene and other large pyrolysis products, as well as in the surface growth of soot particles. (author)

Jahangirian, Saeed; Gomez, Alessandro [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale Center for Combustion Studies, New Haven, CT 06477 (United States); McEnally, Charles S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Yale Center for Combustion Studies, New Haven, CT 06477 (United States)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Experimental Test of the Effects of Z–R Law Variations on Comparison of WSR-88D Rainfall Amounts with Surface Rain Gauge and Disdrometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflectivity factors and rainfall rates found from Level II WSR-88D data for the National Weather Service (NWS) radar in Greer, South Carolina (KGSP), are compared with similar parameters found from disdrometer data collected at the Clemson ...

Carlton W. Ulbrich; Neil E. Miller

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

~A four carbon alcohol. It has double the amount of carbon of ethanol, which equates to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's). ~Butanol is safer to handle with a Reid Value of 0.33 psi is easily recovered, increasing the energy yield of a bushel of corn by an additional 18 percent over the energy yield of ethanol produced from the same quantity of corn. ~Current butanol prices as a chemical

Toohey, Darin W.

436

Renewable Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Renewable Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate 2 million per year Program Info Start Date 12/31/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2020 State Arizona Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount Wind and Biomass: 0.01/kWh, paid for 10 years Solar: Varies by year (see below), paid for 10 years Provider Arizona Department of Revenue '''''Note: this tax credit is only available for systems installed on or after December 31, 2010, and before January 1, 2021.''''' [http://www.azleg.gov/FormatDocument.asp?inDoc=/legtext/49leg/2r/bills/sb... Senate Bill 1254] of 2010 created a tax credit for electricity produced by certain renewable resources. Qualified renewable energy systems installed

437

Social Structure and Inter-Group Relations: A Case Study of A Village In Nepal Tarai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population Yadav 2197 33.52 Kanu 1060 17.17 Kalwar 410 6.25 Teli 485 7.40 Chamar 401 6.11 Sonar 371 5.66 Kumhar 192 2.92 Tatma 139 2.12 Dhanuk 122 1.86 Barai 119 1.81 Bhedihar 114 1.73 Hajam 112 1.70 Koiri 104 1.58 Baniya 88 1.34 Malaha 94 1.43 Sanyasi 85 1... also does the iron work and contract their clients on a fixed amount of grains to be paid annually. They charge 40 k. g. of grains per plough per household. Chamar The Chamars are also engaged in the Soli system. Each Chamar household is paid 5 k...

Mishra, Surendra

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Ameren Illinois - Lighting Rebates for Businesses | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Lighting Rebates for Businesses - Lighting Rebates for Businesses Ameren Illinois - Lighting Rebates for Businesses < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate $600,000/year/facility Incentives $1-$200,000: paid at 100% Incentives $200,000- $600,000: paid at 50% Program Info Funding Source Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) surcharge Expiration Date 5/31/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Fluorescent U-Bend Relamp and Reballast: $0.25/watt reduced T12 to T8 Relamp and Reballast: $0.25/watt reduced T12 to T5 Fluorescent Fixture: $0.25/watt reduced T8 to reduced wattage T8 or T5 Relamp and Reballast: $0.40/watt reduced

439

Fixed Capital Investment Tax Credit (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fixed Capital Investment Tax Credit (Connecticut) Fixed Capital Investment Tax Credit (Connecticut) Fixed Capital Investment Tax Credit (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Provider Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development The Fixed Capital Investment Tax Credit allows a tax credit of 5% of the amount paid for any new fixed capital investment. Companies with fewer than 800 full-time employees may take a tax credit for machinery and equipment purchased and installed in a facility. The credit is based on a percentage of the amount spent on machinery that exceeds the amount spend on machinery

440

Tax and Fee Payments by Motor-Vehicle Users for the Use of Highways, Fuels, and Vehicles: Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Severance taxes paid on oil and gas (attributed to MV use)Severance taxes paid on oil and gas (attributed to MV use)Severance taxes paid on oil and gas (attributed to MV use)

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Severance taxes paid on oil and gas (attributed to MV use)Severance taxes paid on oil and gas (attributed to MV use)Severance taxes paid on oil and gas (attributed to MV use)

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

"RSE Table C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;" C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," " " "," ",,,"General","Amount of ","Establishment-Paid","Activity Cost" "NAICS"," "," " "Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation","Participation(b)","All","Some","None","Don't Know" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Activities",1,2,0,0,0,0 ," Energy Audits",1,3,5,6,5,7 ," Electricity Load Control",1,3,4,7,6,7

443

Be SMART Home Efficiency Rebate Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Program (Maryland) Rebate Program (Maryland) Be SMART Home Efficiency Rebate Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Water Heating Maximum Rebate Total: $4,250 Building Envelope Improvements: $2,000 Program Info State Maryland Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: $300 (paid to contractor) Building Envelope Improvements: 50% of cost HVAC Equipment: varies by measure, $25 - $500 Water Heating: varies by measure, $25 - $350 Appliances: varies by measure, $75 - $150 Provider Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development '''''Note: This program is expiring. Homeowner rebate applications and

444

CHARACTERIZATION OF INCLUSIONS IN DINGOT URANIUM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nonmetallic inclusions in both as-reduced and fabricated dingot U were studied for comparison with those in ingot U. Special attention was paid to the hydride for the purpose of determining the amount and distribution in the various types of U. The types and distribution of other inclusions were also studied. It wss found tbat the dingot U was of a higher quality than ingot U and was comparable to as-reduced derby U on the basis of over-all inclusion count. The H content in dingot U, however, was found to be appreciably higher than in either ingot or derby U. (auth)

Cheney, D.M.; Dickerson, R.F.

1957-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

445

ATP Chapt 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... terms and for making smaller equity investments than entities ... of a debt is tax deductible ... However, dividends paid on equity investment must be paid ...

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

POST ISSUE PAID-UP CAPITAL OF OUR COMPANY ASSUMING THAT THE GREEN SHOE OPTION IS NOT EXERCISED AND 16.26% ASSUMING THAT THE GREEN SHOE OPTION IS EXERCISED IN FULL. PRICE BAND: Rs. [?]/- TO Rs. [?]/- PER EQUITY SHARE OF FACE VALUE RS. 10/- EACH THE FLOOR P  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Please read Section 60B of the Companies Act, 1956 (This Draft Red Herring Prospectus will be updated upon filing with the RoC) 100 % Book Building Issue (We were incorporated as Prince Foundations Private Limited on February 27, 2004. Our status was subsequently changed to a public limited company by way of a special resolution of the members passed at the Extra-Ordinary general meeting held on March 07, 2007. The fresh certificate of incorporation consequent to the change of name was granted to us on April 23, 2007 by the Registrar of Companies, Tamil Nadu, Chennai. For details of the change in our name and registered office, please refer to the chapter titled

Draft Red; Herring Prospectus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Smart Meter Security Infrastructure: Some Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, access Smart Grid nodes via the Smart Meter, or pretend electricity use that is other than the actual use and thereby reduce the electricity bill amount. 4 Computer-based attacks are easily automated and distributed 1 An attacker who is interested in violating the privacy of others can use Smart Metering data

Ladkin, Peter B.

448

Present Climatic Cooling and a Proposed Causative Mechanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence has been presented and discussed to show a cooling trend over the Northern Hemisphere since around 1940, amounting to over 0.5°C, due primarily to cooling at mid- and high latitudes. Some regions of the middle latitudes have actually ...

Ernest M. Agee

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A package for making sticky labels in LATEX* Sebastian Rahtz, Leonor Barroca Grant Gustafson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Border and \\RightBorder are amounts of white space to be added to the left and right of the actual label area so centered. Apply box methods to ad* *just the white space left and right, using horizontal rules of zero 2 2.1 Paper Sizes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .* * . 2 2

Mintmire, John W.

450

Effect of turbine-operating regime and adjustment of automated control system on stability and critical area of surge tanks at HPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials of the works of several authors who have investigated the effect of turbine-operating regime on the stability of HPP with surge tanks are presented. Anumber of new results are obtained. Analytical relationships that can be used in stability calculations for a number of coefficients are compared with a large amount of actual data.

Murav'ev, O. A. [Moscow State Civil-Engineering University (Russian Federation)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Experimental Tests of Competitive Markets for Electric Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing the performance of electricity markets using POWERWEB has already shown that relatively inexperienced players can identify and exploit market power in load pockets. When transmission constraints are not binding, however, auctions with six players have been shown to be efficient. There is evidence from operating electricity markets that prices can be driven above competitive levels when the largest supplier controls less than 20 % of total installed capacity. This is accomplished by causing price spikes to occur. In experiments, uncertainty about the actual load and paying standby costs regardless of whether or not a unit is actually dispatched contribute to volatile price behavior. The objective of this paper is to investigate characteristics of a market that affect price volatility. The tests consider three different sets of rules for setting price when there are capacity shortfalls, and the following four market structures: 1. Load is responsive to price 2. Price forecasts are made before market settlement 3 A day-ahead market and a balancing market auction 4. Suppliers are paid actual offers (a discriminatory auction) 1

Simon Ede; Timothy Mount; William Schulze; Robert Thomas; Ray Zimmerman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

DOE F 3450.3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . 1. Employee (Complete Payroll Name): 2. Social Security Number: 3. Effective Date in Current Position: 4. Period of Service on Which Nomination is Based: APPROVAL 32. Title of Authorizing Official: 31. 45. Title of Authorizing Official (Personnel Office): 12. Title: 26. Reviewing Official (Print or Type Name): 18. Signature: 11. Initiator (Print or Type Name): 5. Type of Award for Which Nominated: Award Justification Attached (See Instructions on Reverse). SERVICING PERSONNEL OFFICE 33. Signature: The following award meets the Departmental requirements and is hereby approved: Sufficient funds are available. The award is to be paid in the following amounts: (The total of the following amounts must equal the total award indicated in item 35.) 35. Total Monetary

453

Clark Public Utilities - Residential Weatherization Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weatherization Loan Program Weatherization Loan Program Clark Public Utilities - Residential Weatherization Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount up to $15,000 Provider Clark Public Utilities Loans of up to $15,000 at a 5.25% interest are available through Clark Public Utilities' Weatherization Loan Program. The loans can pay for the average local cost of eligible measures, based on recently completed projects. Customers have up to seven years to repay the loans, but monthly payments will be at least $25. The utility charges a $225 or $350 loan set-up fee, depending on the loan amount, which can be paid up front or

454

EM Contractor Fee Payments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Fee Payments Contractor Fee Payments EM Contractor Fee Payments In the interest of furthering transparency in its government operations, the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM) herein is releasing information relating to fee payments under its major cost-reimbursable contracts. Charts delineating fees that are paid under cost-plus-award-fee (CPAF), cost-plus-incentive-fee (CPIF), and cost-plus-fixed-fee (CPFF) contracts are listed by site location in the following hyperlinks. With CPFF contracts, the fee is negotiated and fixed at the inception of the contract. The fixed fee will not vary with the actual costs that the contractor incurs. In general, the contractor earns fee either by completing the work called for in the contract or devoting a specified

455

John C. Layton: Before The Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. House of Representatives U.S. House of Representatives John C. Layton: Before The Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations U.S. House of Representatives October 23, 1997 Before The Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations U.S. House of Representatives Statement of John C. Layton, Inspector General Department of Energy The Office of Inspector General, Department of Energy (DOE), has identified deficiencies in the administration of performance-based contracts. I believe that if contracts have incentives, they should encourage superior performance and discourage substandard performance. They should also be structured to ensure that safety is not compromised. We have made recommendations to help assure that incentive fees paid under performance based contracts represent actual achievement by the Department's

456

Audit Report: OAS-M-04-07 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Audit Report: OAS-M-04-07 September 22, 2004 Management Controls over Contractor Tuition Reimbursements for Courses Leading to Degrees at Non-Accredited Educational Institutions Many educational institutions offer on-line courses, provide credit for life and work experience, and permit individuals to obtain undergraduate or graduate level degrees without classroom attendance. While a number of these institutions provide legitimate "distance learning" opportunities, some essentially grant degrees for a flat fee with little or nor actual academic work. Such organizations lack national accreditation and many have become known as "diploma mills." Recent U.S. Senate hearings disclosed that a number of agencies, including the Department of Energy, had paid for

457

Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Summary Executive Summary Highway-based excise taxes are paid by highway users, and the tax revenues are distributed to States for supporting highways, safety, and transit programs. The processes for collecting these taxes and redistributing them to the States are very complex. The U.S. Treasury collects most of the taxes from a relatively small number of large corporations located in only a few States. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) does not have an accurate picture of where the motor fuel is eventually consumed. Because the actual State-by-State contributions are not available, detailed analyses are required to estimate a State's on-highway motor fuel use. The attribution process uses State-reported data and nationally applied statistical models to determine how much fuel is used on highways in each State and the proportion of each State's usage in comparison to the total motor fuel usage for all States.

458

Local Transportation Sales Taxes: California's Experiment in Transportation Finance (Detailed Research Findings)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

taxes paid on gasoline provide California’s principal source of subsidy to transit operations. Motor-

Crabbe, Amber; Hiatt, Rachel; Poliwka, Susan; Watts, Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Local Transportation Sales Taxes: California's Experiment in Transportation Finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

taxes paid on gasoline provide California’s principal source of subsidy to transit operations. Motor-

Crabbe, Amber E.; Hiatt, Rachel; Poliwka, Susan D.; Wachs, Martin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Brandeis University 2013-2014 Financial Aid Appeal Guidelines and Worksheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Credit $ Child Support Received $ AFDC/ADC or TANF $ Untaxed Pension Distributions $ Cash/Gifts Paid

Snider, Barry B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equipment costs paid, electricity bill dollars saved, and12$ back though its electricity bill savings. Considering

Letschert, Virginie E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Optical transitions in Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te-based quantum wells and their analysis with account for the actual band structure of the material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum-confinement levels in a Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te-based rectangular quantum well are calculated in the framework of the four-band Kane model taking into account mixing between the states of electrons and three types of holes (heavy, light, and spin-split holes). Comparison of the calculation results with experimental data on the photoluminescence of Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te-based quantum wells suggests that optical transitions involving the conduction and light-hole bands are possibly observed in the spectra.

Bazhenov, N. L., E-mail: bazhnil.ivom@mail.ioffe.ru; Shilyaev, A. V.; Mynbaev, K. D.; Zegrya, G. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Actual trends of decentralized CHP integration -- The Californian investment subsidy system and its implication for the energy efficiency directive (Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWK Technologie Integration -- Das kalifornische Fordermodell und dessen Implikation fur die Endenergieeffizienzrichtlinie)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sein (Stadler, 2003). Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWKsich auf 3375€/kW. Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWKdes gesamten Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWK

Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structures in the southern North Sea hold natural gas (Cameron et al., 1992). The study focussed on six UK and manuscript policies are encouraged to visit: http://www.elsevier.com/copyright #12;Author's personal copy International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 6 (2012) 210­219 Contents lists available at SciVerse Science

Haszeldine, Stuart

465

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China h i g h l i g h t s " The performance of VRFBs with different flow does. Ã? 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Renewable energies like solar and wind are among a few of the central topics of our time. However, the random and intermittent nature of renewable

Zhao, Tianshou

466

Actual trends of decentralized CHP integration -- The Californian investment subsidy system and its implication for the energy efficiency directive (Aktuelle Trends in der dezentralen KWK Technologie Integration -- Das kalifornische Fordermodell und dessen Implikation fur die Endenergieeffizienzrichtlinie)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treibstoffe kommen Erdgas, Biogas, Klärgas, Deponiegas,zum Teil verunreinigtem Biogas (Stadler et al. , 2006). Diekönnen mit Erdgas, Biogas oder Benzin betrieben werden.

Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

(This is a sample cover image for this issue. The actual cover is not yet available at this time.) This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

edge relative to the forest interior. Increased exposure to solar radiation and wind at forest edges for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at the authors institution

Malhi, Yadvinder

469

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

470

An important part of a healthy diet is eating fiber-rich foods. This handout will explain what fiber is, where it's found, and how to increase the amount of fiber in your diet.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peanut flour Rye flour Soybean flour Wild rice Whole wheat flour Breads labeled "healthy" or mixed grain. baking soda 1 qt. Buttermilk 5 cups flour (3 whole wheat, 2 white)* 2 cups sugar 1 package (15 oz germ may be substituted for ½ cup whole-wheat flour. Dissolve baking soda in buttermilk. Mix together

Sheridan, Jennifer

471

Estimating the Amount of Coal Tar Weathering in Sediments by Two-Dimensional Automated-Sequential Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC-GC/MS) and Comprehensive Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GCxGC/MS) Techniques — Phase III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is intended to inform scientists and engineers concerned with assessing and remediating former manufactured gas plants and other coal tar-contaminated sites. Although the report focuses on coal tar in sediment, the results are equally applicable to studies investigating and remediating coal tar, crude oil, and their by-products in the vadose zone or in ground or pore waters, as well as marine animals. The data provided in this report should allow more accurate analyses to better direct remedi...

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

472

Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Evaluation of the Super ESPC Program: Level 2 -- Recalculated Cost Savings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of Level 2 of a three-tiered evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program's Super Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) Program. Level 1 of the analysis studied all of the Super ESPC projects for which at least one Annual Measurement & Verification (M&V) Report had been produced by April 2006. For those 102 projects in aggregate, we found that the value of cost savings reported by the energy service company (ESCO) in the Annual M&V Reports was 108% of the cost savings guaranteed in the contracts. We also compared estimated energy savings (which are not guaranteed, but are the basis for the guaranteed cost savings) to the energy savings reported by the ESCO in the Annual M&V Report. In aggregate, reported energy savings were 99.8% of estimated energy savings on the basis of site energy, or 102% of estimated energy savings based on source energy. Level 2 focused on a random sample of 27 projects taken from the 102 Super ESPC projects studied in Level 1. The objectives were, for each project in the sample, to: repeat the calculations of the annual energy and cost savings in the most recent Annual M&V Report to validate the ESCO's results or correct any errors, and recalculate the value of the reported energy, water, and operations and maintenance (O&M) savings using actual utility prices paid at the project site instead of the 'contract' energy prices - the prices that are established in the project contract as those to be used by the ESCO to calculate the annual cost savings, which determine whether the guarantee has been met. Level 3 analysis will be conducted on three to five projects from the Level 2 sample that meet validity criteria for whole-building or whole-facility data analysis. This effort will verify energy and cost savings using statistical analysis of actual utility use, cost, and weather data. This approach, which can only be used for projects meeting particular validity criteria, is described in Shonder and Florita (2003) and Shonder and Hughes (2005). To address the first objective of the Level 2 analysis, we first assembled all the necessary information, and then repeated the ESCOs' calculations of reported annual cost savings. Only minor errors were encountered, the most common being the use of incorrect escalation rates to calculate utility prices or O&M savings. Altogether, our corrected calculations of the ESCO's reported cost savings were within 0.6% of the ESCOs' reported cost savings, and errors found were as likely to favor the government as they were the ESCO. To address the second objective, we gathered data on utility use and cost from central databases maintained by the Department of Defense and the General Services Administration, and directly from some of the sites, to determine the prices of natural gas and electricity actually paid at the sites during the periods addressed by the annual reports. We used these data to compare the actual utility costs at the sites to the contract utility prices. For natural gas, as expected, we found that prices had risen much faster than had been anticipated in the contracts. In 17 of the 18 projects for which the comparison was possible, contract gas prices were found to be lower than the average actual prices being paid. We conclude that overall in the program, the estimates of gas prices and gas price escalation rates used in the Super ESPC projects have been conservative. For electricity, it was possible to compare contract prices with the actual (estimated) marginal prices of electricity in 20 projects. In 14 of these projects, the overall contract electricity price was found to be lower than the marginal price of electricity paid to the serving utility. Thus it appears that conservative estimates of electricity prices and escalation rates have been used in the program as well. Finally we calculated the value of the reported energy savings using the prices of utilities actually paid by the sites instead of the contract prices. In 16 of the 22 projects (

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Ion exchange separation of plutonium and gallium (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent, and (3) facility size  

SciTech Connect

The following report summarizes an effort intended to estimate within an order-of-magnitude the (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent amounts, and (3) facility size, for ion exchange (IX) separation of plutonium and gallium. This analysis is based upon processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr. The technical basis for this summary is detailed in a separate document, {open_quotes}Preconceptual Design for Separation of Plutonium and Gallium by Ion Exchange{close_quotes}. The material balances of this separate document are based strictly on stoichiometric amounts rather than details of actual operating experience, in order to avoid classification as Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. This approximation neglets the thermodynamics and kinetics which can significantly impact the amount of reagents required. Consequently, the material resource requirements and waste amounts presented here would normally be considered minimums for processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr; however, the author has compared the inventory estimates presented with that of an actual operating facility and found them similar. Additionally, the facility floor space presented here is based upon actual plutonium processing systems and can be considered a nominal estimate.

DeMuth, S.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

475

Home Consumer Perceptions about Landscape Water Conservation and Relationships with Historical Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is considered to be one of the most limited and precious resources on Earth. Due to this scarcity, water conservation has become essential in order to preserve water resources. Landscape plant material brings quality to urban and suburban lifestyles and increases value to home properties. Yet it has been shown that an excess amount of water is often applied to landscapes when the plant material does not in fact need the supplemental irrigation. A researcher based survey, the Landscape Water Conservation Survey, was sent to 799 single family homes in the College Station, TX. Data collection occurred from November 2005 through August 2006 with a 27% return. The survey asked the recipients 14 questions on water use and home consumers? perceptions. Historical landscape water usage was compiled from 2000-2002 which included actual water use, taxable value, of the residence, heated area, and the water meter identification number for these selected households supplied by The City of College Station Water Utilities. The survey indicates a strong disconnect between the amount of irrigation landscape plant materials need and the quantity of water that is actually applied. Surveyed home consumer perceptions demonstrate excessive amounts of irrigation were normally applied to landscape plant material when no irrigation was needed due to rainfall. Many respondents to The Landscape Water Management Survey indicated that they believed to have efficient irrigation practices in place when in actuality they do not. Educational resources are needed to teach the public on the amounts of irrigation landscape plant materials actually need, how to apply measured home irrigation practices, the principles of water conservation, and meeting the water requirements of varied landscape plant material. If these could be established and implemented, there would be a higher rate of conserving water and providing plant material with the sufficient amount of irrigation required.

Milberger, Whitney F.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Data:58b0a8fd-3885-44c2-907c-77c5b1b85e73 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a8fd-3885-44c2-907c-77c5b1b85e73 a8fd-3885-44c2-907c-77c5b1b85e73 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Rita Blanca Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Seasonal Fence Chargers Sector: Residential Description: *Additional Charge: 35kWh billed at power cost. 120 volt service will be furnished at transformer pole only and any material and/or labor necessary to connect to fence charger will be paid by Member. The Cooperative applies an adjustment factor each month to recover the amount paid to its supplier for fuel to generate electricity during the preceding month.

477

Blood Money: Incentives for Violence in NHL Hockey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The level of violence in the National Hockey League (NHL) reached its highest point in 1987 and has reduced somewhat since then, although to levels much larger than before the first team expansions in 1967. Using publicly available information from several databases 1996-2007, the incentives for violence in North American ice hockey are analyzed. We examine the role of penalty minutes and more specifically, fighting, during the regular season in determining wages for professional hockey players and team-level success indicators. There are substantial returns paid not only to goal scoring skills but also to fighting ability, helping teams move higher in the playoffs and showing up as positive wage premia for otherwise observed low-skill wing players. These estimated per-fight premia, depending on fight success ($10,000 to $18,000), are even higher than those for an additional point made. By introducing a ”fight fine ” of twice the maximum potential gain ($36,000) and adding this amount to salaries paid for the team salary cap (fines would be 6.7 % of the team salary cap or the average wage of two players), all involved would have either little or no incentives to allow fighting to continue.

John P. Haisken-denew; Matthias Vorell

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Grays Harbor PUD - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grays Harbor PUD - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Grays Harbor PUD - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Grays Harbor PUD - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Verifiable Savings: up to 70% of project cost Heat Pumps/Air Conditioners: 50% of actual project cost Economizers: 50% of actual economizer system installed cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Verifiable Savings: $0.17/kWh, based upon annual kilowatt-hours saved Heat Pumps/Air Conditioners: $200 per ton X minimum or actual SEER

479

Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate reflects actual operator experience. However, the timing for peaks for different fields need not coincide. Also, actual available maximum capacity for any storage facility may exceed its reported maximum storage level over the last 5 years, and is virtually certain to do so in the case of newly commissioned or expanded facilities. Therefore, this measure provides a conservative indicator of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored.

480

Funny Energy Stories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a series of hilarious true stories that demonstrate how easy it often is to save huge amounts of energy by relatively small and simple operating changes. The savings in most of these stories were documented by seeing the actual electric and gas bills go down. All of the situations were apparently invisible to the building operating and maintenance staffs, but readily apparent to the severely trained energy engineer. Stories also include a few where a well meaning, but misunderstanding, operating person inadvertently defeated “the best laid plans of mice and men” resulting in huge extra costs on the energy bills. The series of stories illustrates the importance of actually going out to look at the equipment using the energy and talking to the actual people operating them.

Thomas, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "actual amount paid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

GL Report BU 355 CRSP CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONSOLIDATED BUDGET ACTIVITY REPORT RECAP JUNE 2013 ( IN THOUSANDS) FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 13 REGION ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS ACTUALS BUDGET ACTUALS ACTUAL TARGET O&M...

482

PRESTRESSING A TWO-LAYER PRESSURE VESSEL BY CONTROLLED YIELDING OF THE INNER LAYER  

SciTech Connect

A method of designing a two-layer pressure vessel is presented wherein contact between the layers is produced by controlled yielding of the inner vessel by internal pressure. The amount of prestress depends upon the dimensions of the vessel, the properties of the material of construction, and the prestressing pressure. The method takes into account the actual stress-strain curve of the material and satisfies the rales of plastic flow with work hardening. (auth)

Schneider, R.W.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

PRESTRESSING A TWO-LAYER PRESSURE VESSEL BY CONTROLLED YIELDING OF THE INNER LAYER  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented for designing a two-layer pressure vessel wherein contact between the layers is produced by controlled yielding of the inner vessel by internal pressure. The amount of prestress depends upon the dimensions of the vessel, the properties of the material of construction, and the prestressing pressure. The method takes into account the actual stress-strain curve of the material and satisfies the rules of plastic flow with work hardening. (auth)

Schneider, R.W.

1964-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

484

Predicting makeup torque of threaded tapered connections and evaluation of coefficients of friction  

SciTech Connect

This paper will show how it is possible to generate a general purpose formula to determine the amount of torque required to make up non-shouldering tapered threaded connections as are commonly used on tubing and casing connections. In addition, by manipulating this algorithm, values for the dynamic coefficient of friction of thread compounds may be derived. This algorithm allows any type of thread form to be analyzed and was verified through actual testing.

Hawke, M.C.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Geospatial Information System Documentation Retrieval: Development and Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field technicians are routinely trained in a wide variety of activities; however, there may be an extensive amount of time between receiving this training and the actual execution of the related fieldwork. If a quick and easily retrievable training refresher were available for the asset in question, the technician could review this in the field prior to executing work. Most of this material exists in a variety of electronic formats, but a majority of the documentation is on the utility’s ...

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

486

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 12270 of 26,764 results. 61 - 12270 of 26,764 results. Download Energy Savings Performance Contracts Summary EM enters into contracts where the contractor is paid based on the amount of savings EM realizes due to lower energy costs as a result of upgrades the contractor provides. Learn more about this... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/energy-savings-performance-contracts-summary Article Summary of Decisions- February 18, 2013-February 22, 2013 Decisions were issued on: - Application for Exception http://energy.gov/oha/articles/summary-decisions-february-18-2013-february-22-2013 Article Energy Department Announces New Awards to Small Businesses to Accelerate Commercialization of Clean Energy Technologies Editor's Note: This progress alert was originally posted on The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's website

487

General Mining Act of 1872 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mining Act of 1872 Mining Act of 1872 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name General Mining Act of 1872 Year 1890 Url Generalmininglaw1872.jpg Description The seminal law regarding mineral management on federal lands in the United States. References General Mining Act of 1872[1] FORTY-SECOND CONGRESS. Sess. II Ch. 149, 152. 1872 91 fied person: Provided, That all the persons availing themselves of the provisions of this section shall be required to pay, and there shall be collected from them, at the time of making payment for their land, interest on the total amounts paid by them, respectively, at the rate of five per centum per annum, from the date at which they would have been required to make payment under the act of July fifteenth, eighteen hundred and seventy. until the

488

Xcel Energy - Solar Production Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Xcel Energy - Solar Production Incentive Xcel Energy - Solar Production Incentive Xcel Energy - Solar Production Incentive < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 1/1/2014 Expiration Date 12/31/2018 State Minnesota Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount To be determined Provider Xcel Energy Beginning in 2014, Xcel must offer a solar production incentive for systems 20 kW-DC or less. The customer's system capacity may not be more than 120% of the customer's on-site annual energy consumption. The incentive rate has not yet been determined; the Public Utilities Commission must approve the incentive rate. The incentive will be based on the system's production and will be paid to the customer for 10 years. Each year for the 5 years of the

489

Data:3075917d-998f-4949-bdb9-a222e0023614 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7d-998f-4949-bdb9-a222e0023614 7d-998f-4949-bdb9-a222e0023614 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Ripley, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial GSA1 Sector: Industrial Description: We buy our electricity from the Tennessee Valley Authority, which has a history of providing lower-cost electric power. The purchase of electricity, in fact, is a large amount of Ripley Power & Light's electric cost. About 82 cents of every dollar paid by our customers for electricity is used to purchase energy from TVA. (Less than 51 KW)

490

Data:5407f9d7-30ef-456f-9cd0-6bd674cb9d7e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f9d7-30ef-456f-9cd0-6bd674cb9d7e f9d7-30ef-456f-9cd0-6bd674cb9d7e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Rita Blanca Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2009/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Large Power Sector: Industrial Description: *The Cooperative applies an adjustment factor each month to recover the amount paid to its supplier for fuel to generate electricity during the preceding month. Subject to Power Factor Adjustment. Source or reference: http://ritablancaelectric.com/page5.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

491

Data:35623bd1-c4cc-4c9f-abf5-44ee5f654188 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bd1-c4cc-4c9f-abf5-44ee5f654188 bd1-c4cc-4c9f-abf5-44ee5f654188 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Ripley, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial SDEMSB Sector: Commercial Description: SDEMSB 5,001-15,000 kW We buy our electricity from the Tennessee Valley Authority, which has a history of providing lower-cost electric power. The purchase of electricity, in fact, is a large amount of Ripley Power & Light's electric cost. About 82 cents of every dollar paid by our customers for electricity is used to purchase energy from TVA.

492

Data:3ee393c7-8838-4b92-9036-8f9b64ceb0a0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

93c7-8838-4b92-9036-8f9b64ceb0a0 93c7-8838-4b92-9036-8f9b64ceb0a0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Ripley, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial GSA3 Sector: Industrial Description: We buy our electricity from the Tennessee Valley Authority, which has a history of providing lower-cost electric power. The purchase of electricity, in fact, is a large amount of Ripley Power & Light's electric cost. About 82 cents of every dollar paid by our customers for electricity is used to purchase energy from TVA. (1001-5000 KW)

493

Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products Income Tax Deduction for Energy-Efficient Products < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Not to exceed $500 Program Info Start Date 3/23/2007 Expiration Date 07/01/2017 State Virginia Program Type Personal Deduction Rebate Amount 20% of the sales tax paid by an individual Provider Virginia Department of Taxation This incentive is available for dishwashers, clothes washers, air conditioners, ceiling fans, compact fluorescent light bulbs, dehumidifiers, programmable thermostats or refrigerators that meet or exceed federal Energy Star standards. Purchases of fuel cells that generate electricity

494

National Grid (Electric) - Small Business Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Grid (Electric) - Small Business Energy Efficiency National Grid (Electric) - Small Business Energy Efficiency Program National Grid (Electric) - Small Business Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Electric Efficiency Rebates: 70% of project costs can be paid through a rebate. Custom Electric Efficiency Loans: The remaining 30% can be financed by National Grid with a 0% interest loan for 24 months. National Grid's Small/Mid-Sized Business Program is for business customers with an average demand of 200 kilowatts or less per month. The program aids qualifying business customers in installing energy efficient equipment. National Grid provides a free energy audit and report of

495

Agency datasets monthly list | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initial Disability Insurance Applications filed via the Internet This dataset provides monthly data at the national level from federal fiscal year 2008 - 2011 for initial Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) applications filed via the Internet. The dataset includes only SSDI initial receipts. SSDI initial receipt represent a worker in covered employment long enough and recently enough to be "insured", meaning paid Social Security taxes. Social Security work credits are based on total yearly wages or self-employment income. The amount needed for a credit changes from year to year. The number of work credits needed to qualify for disability benefits depends on age at disability onset. Generally, 40 credits are needed, 20 of which were earned in the last 10 years ending with the year of disability onset. SSA Social Insurance and Human Services 2013-02-07 14:10:00

496

Data:101b59a4-598e-44b6-b47d-5b600aa73466 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a4-598e-44b6-b47d-5b600aa73466 a4-598e-44b6-b47d-5b600aa73466 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Ripley, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial GSA2 Sector: Industrial Description: We buy our electricity from the Tennessee Valley Authority, which has a history of providing lower-cost electric power. The purchase of electricity, in fact, is a large amount of Ripley Power & Light's electric cost. About 82 cents of every dollar paid by our customers for electricity is used to purchase energy from TVA. Source or reference: http://www.ripleypower.com/commercial/rates.php

497

Data:Ac4af87a-7bc7-47a4-970b-0a1ae7780f67 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af87a-7bc7-47a4-970b-0a1ae7780f67 af87a-7bc7-47a4-970b-0a1ae7780f67 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Ripley, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial TDGSA Sector: Industrial Description: We buy our electricity from the Tennessee Valley Authority, which has a history of providing lower-cost electric power. The purchase of electricity, in fact, is a large amount of Ripley Power & Light's electric cost. About 82 cents of every dollar paid by our customers for electricity is used to purchase energy from TVA.

498

Data:4e0bf764-d2c0-47f2-a180-25564dac2478 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bf764-d2c0-47f2-a180-25564dac2478 bf764-d2c0-47f2-a180-25564dac2478 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Ripley, Tennessee (Utility Company) Effective date: 2013/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial TDMSA Sector: Industrial Description: We buy our electricity from the Tennessee Valley Authority, which has a history of providing lower-cost electric power. The purchase of electricity, in fact, is a large amount of Ripley Power & Light's electric cost. About 82 cents of every dollar paid by our customers for electricity is used to purchase energy from TVA.

499

Decreasing Utility Contract Interest through Annual Payments | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decreasing Utility Contract Interest through Annual Payments Decreasing Utility Contract Interest through Annual Payments Decreasing Utility Contract Interest through Annual Payments October 7, 2013 - 2:23pm Addthis Federal agencies can leverage annual payments to get the best value from utility energy service contracts by decreasing total interest paid. Annual payments allow Federal agencies to pay for an entire fiscal year (12 months) of payments in advance. This method is attractive to finance companies and may also fit Federal budget and funding constraints, saving a substantial amount of interest expense. Savings are generated because financing is amortized faster and less interest accrues over the term of the project funding. It is important to note that the interest rate used for a monthly amortization is lower than that used for an annual amortization

500

SMUD - PV Residential Retrofit Buy-Down | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PV Residential Retrofit Buy-Down PV Residential Retrofit Buy-Down SMUD - PV Residential Retrofit Buy-Down < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate No maximum limit Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $0.20/watt AC. Incentive is adjusted based on expected performance. The incentive can be paid directly to the customer or to the installer. Provider Sacramento Municipal Utility District SMUD offers an incentive of $0.20 per watt (W) AC to residential customers who install grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems. Customers do not have to contract directly with SMUD-approved contractors for the purchase and installation of the system, however this is recommended. All systems must be permitted and installed by B, C-10, or C-46 contractors. The incentive