National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for activity potential implications

  1. Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurgel, Angelo C.

    In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

  2. Federal Tax Incentives for PV: Potential Implications for Program Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Forthcoming. “EPAct 2005’s PV Tax Credits: What Are TheyAssumptions • Installed PV system costs exhibit economies ofFederal Tax Incentives for PV Potential Implications for

  3. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Unleashing the Potential of Renewable Energy in India.of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (

  4. Implications and Lessons from the 2007 Strategic Planning Activity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Implications and Lessons from the 2007 Strategic Planning Activity and Subsequent Events A Personal was intended to inform the development of a strategic plan (sometime, real soon) ­ It is important to talk as an important contributor to a strategic plan, it was not, by itself, such a plan. We wanted that plan

  5. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Khangura, Jagmeet

    2011-09-15

    We assess developable on-shore wind potential in India at three different hub-heights and under two sensitivity scenarios – one with no farmland included, the other with all farmland included. Under the “no farmland included” case, the total wind potential in India ranges from 748 GW at 80m hub-height to 976 GW at 120m hub-height. Under the “all farmland included” case, the potential with a minimum capacity factor of 20 percent ranges from 984 GW to 1,549 GW. High quality wind energy sites, at 80m hub-height with a minimum capacity factor of 25 percent, have a potential between 253 GW (no farmland included) and 306 GW (all farmland included). Our estimates are more than 15 times the current official estimate of wind energy potential in India (estimated at 50m hub height) and are about one tenth of the official estimate of the wind energy potential in the US.

  6. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    this study, wind energy potential for turbines at 80m, 100m,wind turbine technology that allows better extraction of energywind energy potential due to better technology in the form of higher efficiency, hub heights, and sizes of wind turbines.

  7. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    the Potential of Renewable Energy in India. Energy SectorWind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (2011), doi:10.1016/j.Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (2011), doi:10.1016/j.

  8. Saturation wind power potential and its implications for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Board August 14, 2012 (received for review May 31, 2012) Wind turbines convert kinetic to electrical linearly, but then converges to a saturation potential not identified previously from physical principles does not increase the generated power further. At the SWPP, winds still occur because individual

  9. Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

    1997-01-01

    There is a growing awareness of the serious problems associated with the provision of sufficient energy to meet human needs and to fuel economic growth world-wide. This has pointed to the need for energy and material efficiency, which would reduce air, water and thermal pollution, as well as waste production. Increasing energy and material efficiency also have the benefits of increased employment, improved balance of imports and exports, increased security of energy supply, and adopting environmentally advantageous energy supply. A large potential exists for energy savings through energy and material efficiency improvements. Technologies are not now, nor will they be, in the foreseeable future, the limiting factors with regard to continuing energy efficiency improvements. There are serious barriers to energy efficiency improvement, including unwillingness to invest, lack of available and accessible information, economic disincentives and organizational barriers. A wide range of policy instruments, as well as innovative approaches have been tried in some countries in order to achieve the desired energy efficiency approaches. These include: regulation and guidelines; economic instruments and incentives; voluntary agreements and actions, information, education and training; and research, development and demonstration. An area that requires particular attention is that of improved international co-operation to develop policy instruments and technologies to meet the needs of developing countries. Material efficiency has not received the attention that it deserves. Consequently, there is a dearth of data on the qualities and quantities for final consumption, thus, making it difficult to formulate policies. Available data, however, suggest that there is a large potential for improved use of many materials in industrialized countries.

  10. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options within a given market, and identifying the key drivers and thresholds for market viability of nuclear hydrogen options.

  11. Eucalyptus Rust: A Disease with the Potential for Serious International Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eucalyptus Rust: A Disease with the Potential for Serious International Implications Special Report. A.. Wingfield, M. J.. Alfenas, A. c.. and Crous. P. W. 1998. Eucalyptus rust: A dis- ease result in serious losses to this economically im- portant forest resource. Eucalyptus rust, caused

  12. Seismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    Seismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO Basin pilot test include acquisition of geophysical logs, time lapse VSP and analysis of 3D seismic data on the analysis of 3D seismic from the area. 3D seismic interpretation reveals that the Late Cretaceous Fruitland

  13. Active region emission measure distributions and implications for nanoflare heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargill, P. J., E-mail: p.cargill@imperial.ac.uk [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW, UKAND (United Kingdom); School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-20

    The temperature dependence of the emission measure (EM) in the core of active regions coronal loops is an important diagnostic of heating processes. Observations indicate that EM(T) ? T{sup a} below approximately 4 MK, with 2 < a < 5. Zero-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of nanoflare trains are used to demonstrate the dependence of a on the time between individual nanoflares (T{sub N} ) and the distribution of nanoflare energies. If T{sub N} is greater than a few thousand seconds, a < 3. For smaller values, trains of equally spaced nanoflares cannot account for the observed range of a if the distribution of nanoflare energies is either constant, randomly distributed, or a power law. Power law distributions where there is a delay between consecutive nanoflares proportional to the energy of the second nanoflare do lead to the observed range of a. However, T{sub N} must then be of the order of hundreds to no more than a few thousand seconds. If a nanoflare leads to the relaxation of a stressed coronal field to a near-potential state, the time taken to build up the required magnetic energy is thus too long to account for the EM measurements. Instead, it is suggested that a nanoflare involves the relaxation from one stressed coronal state to another, dissipating only a small fraction of the available magnetic energy. A consequence is that nanoflare energies may be smaller than previously envisioned.

  14. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  15. Transport of active ellipsoidal particles in ratchet potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao-quan Ai; Jian-chun Wu

    2015-05-10

    Rectified transport of active ellipsoidal particles is numerically investigated in a two-dimensional asymmetric potential. The out-of-equilibrium condition for the active particle is an intrinsic property, which can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the perfect sphere particle can facilitate the rectification, while the needlelike particle destroys the directed transport. There exist optimized values of the parameters (the self-propelled velocity, the torque acting on the body) at which the average velocity takes its maximal value. For the ellipsoidal particle with not large asymmetric parameter, the average velocity decreases with increasing the rotational diffusion rate, while for the needlelike particle (very large asymmetric parameter), the average velocity is a peaked function of the rotational diffusion rate. By introducing a finite load, particles with different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities) will move to the opposite directions, which is able to separate particles of different shapes (or different self-propelled velocities).

  16. Transverse extension of Guatemala active margin: implications for accretion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillen, K.J.

    1987-05-01

    The inner trench wall of the Middle America Trench off Guatemala does not show evidence of accretion, based on DSDP Legs 67 and 84. The presence of normal faults on the lower inner trench slope has resulted in various subsidence models for the margin. Fault traces would be expected to trend parallel to the margin (northwest-southeast) if margin subsidence had occurred. Instead, the faults trend north-south and occur in groups of faults downdropped to the east and to the west. The faults do not seem to be related to margin subsidence but rather to previously proposed Cenozoic Central American rifting. The rifting resulted from crustal bending as the Central American block rounded southern Mexico during differential North American/Caribbean plate motion. The rifts, which extend nearly to the trench axis, underlie the San Jose submarine canyon and align with the Guatemala City graben. Possible east-west accommodation zones, between fault zones that dip in opposite directions, exist near the shelf edge. These accommodation zones may have formed along lines of weakness where oceanic crust was previously emplaced into the margin during or prior to the Eocene. These rifts show that compressional and extension features can occur simultaneously with underthrusting on active margins.

  17. Analysis of Fuel Ethanol Transportation Activity and Potential Distribution Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Sujit; Peterson, Bruce E; Chin, Shih-Miao

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of fuel ethanol transportation activity and potential distribution constraints if the total 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel use by 2022 is mandated by EPA under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Ethanol transport by domestic truck, marine, and rail distribution systems from ethanol refineries to blending terminals is estimated using Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL s) North American Infrastructure Network Model. Most supply and demand data provided by EPA were geo-coded and using available commercial sources the transportation infrastructure network was updated. The percentage increases in ton-mile movements by rail, waterways, and highways in 2022 are estimated to be 2.8%, 0.6%, and 0.13%, respectively, compared to the corresponding 2005 total domestic flows by various modes. Overall, a significantly higher level of future ethanol demand would have minimal impacts on transportation infrastructure. However, there will be spatial impacts and a significant level of investment required because of a considerable increase in rail traffic from refineries to ethanol distribution terminals.

  18. Influencing Factors and a Proposed Evaluation Methodology for Predicting Groundwater Contamination Potential from Stormwater Infiltration Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Contamination Potential from Stormwater Infiltration Activities Shirley E. Clark and Robert Pitt Abstract To offset the detrimental effects of urbanization on groundwater recharge, stormwater managers are focusing

  19. Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

    1999-08-10

    Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

  20. Implications Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruess, Roger W.

    Implications of Warming Permafrostiv Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane emissions from thawing permafrost could and soil properties. Any location with annual average air temperatures below freezing can potentially form carbon feedback. Permafrost contains ~1700 gigatonnes (Gt) of carbon in the form of frozen organic matter

  1. Monitoring and Assessing Implications of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Potential Impacts of the Loop Current on Downstream Marine Ecosystems in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monitoring and Assessing Implications of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Potential Impacts and identifying the areas that can be affected by the oil spill. The assessments performed during this cruise.Lamkin@noaa.gov; 3053614226 1. Executive Summary. As part of NOAA's response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

  2. Shocks and dust survival in nearby active galaxies: implications for the alignment effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Villar-Martin; D. De Young; A. Alonso-Herrero; M. Allen; L. Binette

    2001-08-21

    One of the most popular explanations for the so-called alignment effect in high redshift (z>0.7) radio galaxies is the scattering by dust of the hidden quasar light. As shown by De Young (1998) a problem with the dust scattering model is that the short destruction time-scale for dust grains means that they will not survive the passage of the radio jet. We investigate the survival of dust in the extended ionised gas of nearby active galaxies with jet/gas interactions. We discuss the implications on the alignment effect of high redshift (>0.7) radio galaxies. We conclude that although shocks are likely to destroy dust grains in regions of interaction, dust might survive in enough quantities to scatter light from the active nucleus and produce alignment between scattered light and the radio structures. We propose an observational test to investigate the existence of dust in shocked regions based on the sensitivity of calcium to depletion onto dust grains.

  3. Proposed Evaluation Methodology for Predicting Groundwater Contamination Potential from Stormwater Infiltration Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    Stormwater Infiltration Activities Shirley E. Clark1 and Robert Pitt2 1 Penn State Harrisburg Environmental being encouraged, as a practical way to manage stormwater on site. To prevent potential groundwater

  4. The Potential for Integrating GIS in Activity-Based Forecasting Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNally, Michael G.

    1997-01-01

    3" (ENTERTAINMENT) Figure 4. A GIS-based Microsimulation ofDestinations Figure 5. A GIS-based Microsimulation ofPotential for Integrating GIS in Activity Based Forecasting

  5. Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan FebCubicFracking,MichiganThousand47,959.15

  6. Right Hemisphere Activation of Joke-related Information: An Event-related Brain Potential Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulson, Seana

    Right Hemisphere Activation of Joke-related Information: An Event-related Brain Potential Study-relevant information was more active in the right hemisphere. The anterior positivity was ob- served with RVF Seana Coulson and Ying Choon Wu Abstract & Two studies tested the hypothesis that the right hemi- sphere

  7. Predictive Simulations to Assess Potential Effect of Mining Activities on Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Predictive Simulations to Assess Potential Effect of Mining Activities on Groundwater Resource Effect of Mining Activities on Groundwater April 23, 2010 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Effect of Mining Operations on the Groundwater Flow System

  8. Potential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA...

  9. POTENTIAL METHODS TO COOL STREAMS CONTAINING APACHE TROUT IN THE WHITE MOUNTAINS OF ARIZONA AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonar, Scott A.

    AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE by Joy Elizabeth Price Copyright © Joy Elizabeth Price 2013 A Thesis Submitted grateful. #12;4 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 #12;5 LIST OF TABLES TABLE 1 - Sampled average upstream water temperature, estimated average

  10. Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: landscaping can quadruple potential activity time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: landscaping can quadruple potential activity time in an arid city Jeffrey W. Ackley1 & Michael J. Angilletta Jr.1 & Dale DeNardo1 of 3 °C warmer than the surrounding desert. With continuing urbanization and climate change, thermal

  11. Abstract--Brain activity generates electrical potentials that are spatio-temporal in nature. EEG is the least costly and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besio, Walter G.

    Abstract--Brain activity generates electrical potentials that are spatio-temporal in nature. EEG and selectivity of the surface electrical activity as it takes the second spatial derivative of the potential electrical activity by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET

  12. Development and use of innovative approaches to waste management and environmental restoration: Potential liability and its implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, W.L.

    1990-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established as its goal to have all of its facilities cleaned up and in compliance with all applicable environmental laws by the year 2019. As part of its plan to achieve that goal, DOE created, in November 1989, an Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and, within EM, an Office of Technology Development (OTD). Since the achievement of DOE's long-term objective in the area of waste management and environmental restoration is not possible utilizing only existing technology, the importance of OTD's mission is clear. A question has been raised regarding the nature of the potential liability associated with development, testing, and use of new technologies for waste management and environmental restoration; and the impact it may have on the ability or willingness of other parties to participate in DOE's technology development program. This report is intended to provide at least a preliminary answer to the question. Given the range of activities involved in the technology development process, there are many circumstances that could result in liability. Therefore, the discussion here is somewhat general. It may, however, provide a base for more detailed analysis, at a later time, of liability issues raised by specific circumstances.

  13. SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES, CORONAL POTENTIAL FIELD MODELS AND ERUPTION RATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, G. J. D.

    2013-05-10

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the National Solar Observatory's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun vector spectro-magnetograph, the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from Stanford University's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Polar field changes are found to be well correlated with active fields over most of the period studied, except between 2003 and 2006 when the active fields did not produce significant polar field changes. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The tilt of the solar dipole is therefore almost entirely due to active-region fields. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking, Solar Eruptive Event Detection System, and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003 and 2012 than for those between 1997 and 2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  14. Electrocatalytic Activity Studies of Select Metal Surfaces and Implications in Li-Air Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasteiger, Hubert A.

    Rechargeable lithium-air batteries have the potential to provide ?3 times higher specific energy of fully packaged batteries than conventional lithium rechargeable batteries. However, very little is known about the oxygen ...

  15. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  16. Stellar Activity and its Implications for Exoplanet Detection on GJ 176

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Paul; Henry, Gregory W; Cochran, William D; MacQueen, Phillip J; Williamson, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of stellar activity and its effects on radial velocity (RV) for the M2 dwarf GJ 176 based on spectra taken over 10 years from the High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. These data are supplemented with spectra from previous observations with the HIRES and HARPS spectrographs, and V- and R-band photometry taken over 6 years at the Dyer and Fairborn observatories. Previous studies of GJ 176 revealed a super-Earth exoplanet in an 8.8-day orbit. However, the velocities of this star are also known to be contaminated by activity, particularly at the 39-day stellar rotation period. We have examined the magnetic activity of GJ 176 using the sodium I D lines, which have been shown to be a sensitive activity tracer in cool stars. In addition to rotational modulation, we see evidence of a long-term trend in our Na I D index, which may be part of a long-period activity cycle. The sodium index is well correlated with our RVs, and we show that this activity trend drives ...

  17. The Potential for Activated Biochar to Remove Waterborne Viruses from Environmental Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florey, James

    2012-07-16

    The need for clean potable water and sustainable energy are two current and pressing issues with implications affecting the global population. Renewed interests in alternative energy have prompted researchers to investigate ...

  18. Regulatory Perspective on Potential Fuel Reconfiguration and Its Implication to High Burnup Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation - 13042

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhian; Rahimi, Meraj; Tang, David; Aissa, Mourad; Flaganan, Michelle; Wagner, John C.

    2013-07-01

    The recent experiments conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on high burnup fuel cladding material property show that the ductile to brittle transition temperature of high burnup fuel cladding is dependent on: (1) cladding material, (2) irradiation conditions, and (3) drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature) [1]. The experiment results also show that the ductile to brittle temperature increases as the fuel burnup increases. These results indicate that the current knowledge in cladding material property is insufficient to determine the structural performance of the cladding of high burnup fuel after it has been stored in a dry cask storage system for some time. The uncertainties in material property and the elevated ductile to brittle transition temperature impose a challenge to the storage cask and transportation packaging designs because the cask designs may not be able to rely on the structural integrity of the fuel assembly for control of fissile material, radiation source, and decay heat source distributions. The fuel may reconfigure during further storage and/or the subsequent transportation conditions. In addition, the fraction of radioactive materials available for release from spent fuel under normal condition of storage and transport may also change. The spent fuel storage and/or transportation packaging vendors, spent fuel shippers, and the regulator may need to consider this possible fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the packages' ability to meet the safety requirements of Part 72 and Part 71 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is working with the scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the impact of fuel reconfiguration on the safety of the dry storage systems and transportation packages. The NRC Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation has formed a task force to work on the safety and regulatory concerns in relevance to high burnup fuel storage and transportation. This paper discusses the staff's preliminary considerations on the safety implication of fuel reconfiguration with respect to nuclear safety (subcriticality control), radiation shielding, containment, the performance of the thermal functions of the packages, and the retrievability of the contents from regulatory perspective. (authors)

  19. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate-particles by OH: Implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thalman, R.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiphase OH and O? oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low soluble single-component OA by OH and O? can increase their water-solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water-solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate-particles exposed to OH andmore »O? is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, ?, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH/O? exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O? exposure. Following exposure to OH, ? of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~0.1, indicating that chemically-aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in ? was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. ? of the internally-mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1:1 by mass MNC: KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions, chemical aging has no significant impact on OA hygroscopicity. The organic compounds exhibiting low solubility behave as if they are infinitely soluble when mixed with a sufficient amount of water-soluble compounds. At and beyond this point, the particles' CCN activity is governed entirely by the water-soluble fraction and not influenced by the oxidized organic fraction. Our results have important implications for heterogeneous oxidation and its impact on cloud formation given that atmospheric aerosol is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic compounds exhibiting a wide-range of solubilities.« less

  20. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-09-14

    Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low-soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate particles exposed tomore »OH and O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, ?, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH and O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, ? of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~ 0.1, indicating that chemically aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in ? was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. ? of the internally mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH-exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions, chemical aging has no significant impact on OA hygroscopicity. The organic compounds exhibiting low solubility behave as if they are infinitely soluble when mixed with a sufficient number of water-soluble compounds. At and beyond this point, the particles' CCN activity is governed entirely by the water-soluble fraction and is not influenced by the oxidized organic fraction. Our results have important implications for heterogeneous oxidation and its impact on cloud formation given that atmospheric aerosol is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic compounds exhibiting a wide range of solubilities.« less

  1. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate-particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-03-06

    Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water-solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water-solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate-particles exposed to OH andmore »O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, ?, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH/O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, ? of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~0.1, indicating that chemically-aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in ? was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. ? of the internally-mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions, chemical aging has no significant impact on OA hygroscopicity. The organic compounds exhibiting low solubility behave as if they are infinitely soluble when mixed with a sufficient amount of water-soluble compounds. At and beyond this point, the particles' CCN activity is governed entirely by the water-soluble fraction and not influenced by the oxidized organic fraction. Our results have important implications for heterogeneous oxidation and its impact on cloud formation given that atmospheric aerosol is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic compounds exhibiting a wide-range of solubilities.« less

  2. Hemin potentiates the anti-hepatitis C virus activity of the antimalarial drug artemisinin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paeshuyse, Jan [Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Coelmont, Lotte [Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Vliegen, Inge [Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Hemel, Johan van [Kemin Pharma, Atealaan 4H, B-2200 Herentals (Belgium); Vandenkerckhove, Jan [Kemin Pharma, Atealaan 4H, B-2200 Herentals (Belgium); Peys, Eric [Kemin Pharma, Atealaan 4H, B-2200 Herentals (Belgium); Sas, Benedikt [Kemin Pharma, Atealaan 4H, B-2200 Herentals (Belgium); Clercq, Erik De [Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium); Neyts, Johan [Rega Institute for Medical Research, Minderbroedersstraat 10, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven (Belgium)]. E-mail: johan.neyts@rega.kuleuven.be

    2006-09-15

    We report that the antimalarial drug artemisinin inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon replication in a dose-dependent manner in two replicon constructs at concentrations that have no effect on the proliferation of the exponentially growing host cells. The 50% effective concentration (EC{sub 5}) for inhibition of HCV subgenomic replicon replication in Huh 5-2 cells (luciferase assay) by artemisinin was 78 {+-} 21 {mu}M. Hemin, an iron donor, was recently reported to inhibit HCV replicon replication [mediated by inhibition of the viral polymerase (C. Fillebeen, A.M. Rivas-Estilla, M. Bisaillon, P. Ponka, M. Muckenthaler, M.W. Hentze, A.E. Koromilas, K. Pantopoulos, Iron inactivates the RNA polymerase NS5B and suppresses subgenomic replication of hepatitis C virus, J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005) 9049-9057.)] at a concentration that had no adverse effect on the host cells. When combined, artemisinin and hemin resulted, over a broad concentration range, in a pronounced synergistic antiviral activity. Also at a concentration (2 {mu}M) that alone had no effect on HCV replication, hemin still potentiated the anti-HCV activity of artemisinin.

  3. Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

  4. IMPLICATIONS OF MASS AND ENERGY LOSS DUE TO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS ON MAGNETICALLY ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2013-02-20

    Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power-law relationships between the 1-8 A flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE = kE {sup -{alpha}}. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of {alpha} and are very large: M-dot {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and E-dot {approx}0.1 L{sub sun}. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence {approx}> 10{sup 31} erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energy budget is likely to be up to an order of magnitude larger than the canonical 10{sup -3} L {sub bol} X-ray saturation threshold. This raises the question of what is the maximum energy a magnetic dynamo can extract from a star? For an energy budget of 1% of L {sub bol}, the CME mass loss rate is about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  5. Obscuring Fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei: Implications from Radiation-driven Fountain Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wada, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are believed to be obscured by an optical thick "torus" that covers a large fraction of solid angles for the nuclei. However, the physical origin of the tori and the differences in the tori among AGNs are not clear. In a previous paper based on three-dimensional radiation-hydorodynamic calculations, we proposed a physics-based mechanism for the obscuration, called "radiation-driven fountains," in which the circulation of the gas driven by central radiation naturally forms a thick disk that partially obscures the nuclear emission. Here, we expand this mechanism and conduct a series of simulations to explore how obscuration depends on the properties of AGNs. We found that the obscuring fraction f_obs for a given column density toward the AGNs changes depending on both the AGN luminosity and the black hole mass. In particular, f_obs for N_H \\geq 10^22 cm^-2 increases from ~0.2 to ~0.6 as a function of the X-ray luminosity L_X in the 10^{42-44} ergs/s range, but f_obs becomes small (...

  6. Effects of Prenatal Methylmercury Exposure on Motor Coordination, Activity Levels and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adult Mice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Jessica

    2006-08-16

    METHYLMERCURY EXPOSURE ON MOTOR COORDINATION, ACTIVITY LEVELS AND MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANE POTENTIAL IN ADULT MICE A Senior Honors Thesis by JESSICA MARIE MACKEY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University... AND MITOCHONDRIAL MEMBRANE POTENTIAL IN ADULT MICE A Senior Honors Thesis by JESSICA MARIE MACKEY Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs & Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY...

  7. Removal of eye activity artifacts from visual event-related potentials in normal and clinical subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makeig, Scott

    Objectives: Electrical potentials produced by blinks and eye movements present serious problems for electroencephalographic (EEG) and event-related potential (ERP) data interpretation and analysis, particularly scalp channels. A generally applicable adaptive method for removing artifacts from EEG records based

  8. Electromagnetic wave propagation in an active medium and the equivalent Schrdinger equation with an energy-dependent complex potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic wave propagation in an active medium and the equivalent Schrödinger equation with an energy-dependent complex potential H. Bahlouli,* A. D. Alhaidari, and A. Al Zahrani Physics Department to provide an alternative, but equivalent, representation of plane electromagnetic em wave propagation

  9. Regulation of Glycosaminoglycan Function by Osmotic Potentials MEASUREMENT OF WATER TRANSFER DURING ANTITHROMBIN ACTIVATION BY HEPARIN*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yang

    Regulation of Glycosaminoglycan Function by Osmotic Potentials MEASUREMENT OF WATER TRANSFER DURING glycosaminoglycans can be regulated by osmotic potentials. Volume of water trans- ferred upon heparin binding was measured from differ- ences in free energy change, ( G), with osmotic stress, . Osmotic stress was induced

  10. Removal potential of toxic 2378-substituted PCDD/F from incinerator flue gases by waste-derived activated carbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A.; Williams, Paul T.

    2011-06-15

    The application of activated carbons has become a commonly used emission control protocol for the removal or adsorption of persistent organic pollutants from the flue gas streams of waste incinerators. In this study, the 2378-substituted PCDD/F removal efficiency of three types of activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of refuse derived fuel, textile waste and scrap tyre was investigated and compared with that of a commercial carbon. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor under a simulated flue gas at 275 deg. C with a reaction period of four days. The PCDD/F in the solid matrices and exhaust gas, were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the absence of activated carbon adsorbent, there was a significant increase in the concentration of toxic PCDD/F produced in the reacted flyash, reaching up to 6.6 times higher than in the raw flyash. In addition, there was a substantial release of PCDD/F into the gas phase, which was found in the flue gas trapping system. By application of the different commercial, refuse derived fuel, textile and tyre activated carbons the total PCDD/F toxic equivalent removal efficiencies in the exhaust gas stream were 58%, 57%, 64% and 52%, respectively. In general, the removal of the PCDDs was much higher with an average of 85% compared to PCDFs at 41%. Analysis of the reacted activated carbons showed that there was some formation of PCDD/F, for instance, a total of 60.6 {mu}g I-TEQ kg{sup -1} toxic PCDD/F was formed in the refuse derived fuel activated carbon compared to 34 {mu}g I-TEQ kg{sup -1} in the commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of waste, therefore, showed good potential as a control material for PCDD/F emissions in waste incinerator flue gases.

  11. Evidence for biological activity in mineralization of secondary sulphate deposits in a basaltic environment: implications for the search for life in the Martian subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Jill R. Scott

    2013-10-01

    Evidence of microbial activity associated with mineralization of secondary Na-sulphate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM), Idaho were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Peaks suggestive of bio/organic compounds were observed in the secondary Na-sulphate deposits by LD-FTICR-MS. FTIR provided additional evidence for the presence of bio/organic compounds. Sulphur fractionation was explored to assist in determining if microbes may play a role in oxidizing sulphur. The presence of bio/organic compounds associated with Na-sulphate deposits, along with the necessity of oxidizing reduced sulphur to sulphate, suggests that biological activity may be involved in the formation of these secondary minerals. The secondary Na-sulphate minerals probably form from the overlying basalt through leached sodium ions and sulphate ions produced by bio-oxidation of Fe-sulphide minerals. Since the COM basalts are one of the most comparable terrestrial analogues for their Martian counterparts, the occurrence of biological activity in the formation of sulphate minerals at COM has direct implications for the search for life on Mars. In addition, the presence of caves on Mars suggests the importance of these environments as possible locations for growth and preservation of microbial activity. Therefore, understanding the physiochemical pathways of abiotic and biotic mineralization in the COM subsurface and similar basaltic settings has direct implications for the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  12. Using GIS and Spatial Modeling to Examine Active Travel Potential in a University Town

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rybarczyk, Greg

    2014-11-19

    retention ? Universities are microcosms of society Greg Rybarczyk, Ph.D. 3 ?Universities and Active Transportation ? Benefits of increasing walking, bicycling, and mass transit utilization among a university population ? Reduce environmental externalities... ? Bicycle facilities ? Traffic Calming ? Programming ? City-wide partnerships ? Reducing parking demand ? Courses Greg Rybarczyk, Ph.D. 5 6Greg Rybarczyk, Ph.D. ?What about spatial and aspatial factors at the trip- origin? ? Neighborhood conditions ? Family...

  13. Frequency decoding of periodically timed action potentials through distinct activity patterns in a random neural network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Frequency discrimination is a fundamental task of the auditory system. The mammalian inner ear, or cochlea, provides a place code in which different frequencies are detected at different spatial locations. However, a temporal code based on spike timing is also available: action potentials evoked in an auditory-nerve fiber by a low-frequency tone occur at a preferred phase of the stimulus-they exhibit phase locking-and thus provide temporal information about the tone's frequency. In an accompanying psychoacoustic study, and in agreement with previous experiments, we show that humans employ this temporal information for discrimination of low frequencies. How might such temporal information be read out in the brain? Here we demonstrate that recurrent random neural networks in which connections between neurons introduce characteristic time delays, and in which neurons require temporally coinciding inputs for spike initiation, can perform sharp frequency discrimination when stimulated with phase-locked inputs. Alt...

  14. Interaction of interleukin-5 with its receptors on murine leukemic BCL1 cells and its implication in biological activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuruoka, N.; Funakoshi, K.; Kodama, S.; Tsujimoto, M. (Suntory Institute for Biomedical Research, Mishima, Osaka (Japan))

    1990-02-01

    Interaction of interleukin (IL)-5 with its receptors on murine leukemic cell line, BCL1 cells was examined. {sup 125}I-labeled recombinant murine IL-5(rmIL-5) bound specifically to high-affinity receptors on BCL1 cells. rmIL-5, which was about 2500-fold more active than recombinant human IL-5(rhIL-5) in IgM-inducing activity on BCL1 cells, also showed about 5000-fold higher affinity to receptors. These results suggest that the bioactivity of IL-5 correlates with its receptor-binding activity. When disulfide bond formation was blocked, rmIL-5 dissociated into a monomer and lost its biological activity. This monomeric form of rmIL-5 also lost its ability to bind to cells, suggesting that dimer formation is essential for the biological activity of IL-5.

  15. Cosmogenic-neutron activation of TeO2 and implications for neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara S. Wang; Eric B. Norman; Nicholas D. Scielzo; Alan R. Smith; Keenan J. Thomas; Stephen A. Wender

    2015-03-06

    Flux-averaged cross sections for cosmogenic-neutron activation of natural tellurium were measured using a neutron beam containing neutrons of kinetic energies up to $\\sim$800 MeV, and having an energy spectrum similar to that of cosmic-ray neutrons at sea-level. Analysis of the radioisotopes produced reveals that 110mAg will be a dominant contributor to the cosmogenic-activation background in experiments searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te, such as CUORE and SNO+. An estimate of the cosmogenic-activation background in the CUORE experiment has been obtained using the results of this measurement and cross-section measurements of proton activation of tellurium. Additionally, the measured cross sections in this work are also compared with results from semi-empirical cross-section calculations.

  16. Geochemical and Microbiological Characterization of the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer, a Potential CO2 Storage Reservoir; Implications for Hydraulic Separation and Caprock Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheffer, Aimee

    2012-12-31

    goals, implementation of GCS is almost certainly necessary. As a result, the Department of Energy has funded the examination of the Arbuckle saline aquifer, as well as other aquifers around the United States, to assess their potential as carbon storage...

  17. The combination of glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 with tamoxifen and its active metabolites potentiates their antiproliferative activity in mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro, Mariana P.C. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Nunes-Correia, Isabel [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Flow Cytometry Unit, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Santos, Armanda E., E-mail: aesantos@ci.uc.pt [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal); Custódio, José B.A. [Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, 3000-354 Coimbra (Portugal); Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-02-15

    Recent reports suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) blockade by MK-801 decreases tumor growth. Thus, we investigated whether other ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists were also able to modulate the proliferation of melanoma cells. On the other hand, the antiestrogen tamoxifen (TAM) decreases the proliferation of melanoma cells, and is included in combined therapies for melanoma. As the efficacy of TAM is limited by its metabolism, we investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 in combination with TAM and its active metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHTAM) and endoxifen (EDX). The NMDAR blockers MK-801 and memantine decreased mouse melanoma K1735-M2 cell proliferation. In contrast, the NMDAR competitive antagonist APV and the AMPA and kainate receptor antagonist NBQX did not affect cell proliferation, suggesting that among the iGluR antagonists only the NMDAR channel blockers inhibit melanoma cell proliferation. The combination of antiestrogens with MK-801 potentiated their individual effects on cell biomass due to diminished cell proliferation, since it decreased the cell number and DNA synthesis without increasing cell death. Importantly, TAM metabolites combined with MK-801 promoted cell cycle arrest in G1. Therefore, the data obtained suggest that the activity of MK-801 and antiestrogens in K1735-M2 cells is greatly enhanced when used in combination. - Highlights: • MK-801 and memantine decrease melanoma cell proliferation. • The combination of MK-801 with antiestrogens inhibits melanoma cell proliferation. • These combinations greatly enhance the effects of the compounds individually. • MK-801 combined with tamoxifen active metabolites induces cell cycle arrest in G1. • The combination of MK-801 and antiestrogens is an innovative strategy for melanoma.

  18. On the potential value of Ca II K spectroheliogram time-series for solar activity and irradiance studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ermolli; S. K. Solanki; A. G. Tlatov; N. A. Krivova; R. K. Ulrich; J. Singh

    2008-02-26

    Various observatories around the globe started regular full-disk imaging of the solar atmosphere in the Ca II K line since the early decades of the 20th century. The archives made by these observations have the potential of providing far more detailed information on solar magnetism than just the sunspot number and area records to which most studies of solar activity and irradiance changes are restricted. We evaluate the image contents of three Ca II K spectroheliogram time-series, specifically those obtained by the digitization of the Arcetri, Kodaikanal, and Mt Wilson photographic archives. We describe the main problems afflicting these data and analyze their quality by expressing the image contents through several quantities. We compare the results obtained with those for similar present-day observations taken with the Meudon spectroheliograph and with the Rome-PSPT. We show that historic data suffer from stronger geometrical distortions and photometric uncertainties than similar present-day observations. The latter uncertainties mostly originate from the photographic calibration of the original data and from stray-light effects. We also show that the image contents of the three analyzed series vary in time. These variations are probably due to instrument changes and aging of the spectrographs used, as well as changes of the observing programs. Our results imply that the main challenge for the analysis of historic data is their accurate photometric calibration. This problem must be solved before they can provide reliable information about solar magnetism and activity over the last century. Moreover, inter-calibration of results obtained from independent time-series is required to reliably trace changes of solar properties with time from the analysis of such data.

  19. Lunette dunes and yardangs of the Carson desert, Nevada: Implications for Holocene eolian activity in the northern Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, N. (Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV (United States). Quaternary Sciences Center)

    1993-04-01

    A large complex of lunette dunes consisting of two and locally three ridges up to 40 m high occurs on the northeast margin of the Carson Sink playa. The outer, or north-easterly, ridge consists of a core of fine and coarse and partially cemented by saline clay and silt (Unit 1) with avalanche face cross-beds dipping to the north-east at 25--30[degree], as well as planar sets of wind ripple laminae with dips to both the northeast and west at 2--5[degree]. Overlying this unit on the crest and lee side of the ridge is 2--5 m of mobile poorly sorted, very fine and coarse sand that forms an active avalanche face up to 25 m high on the east side of the ridge (Unit 3). At a number of localities, the indurated core of the larger dune ridge is carved into yardanges, or streamlined small hills with a lemniscate shape that result from wind erosion of homogeneous sediments. The dunes overlie, with an erosional contact, Late Pleistocene saline lacustrine clays of paleolake Lahontan. They represent at least two episodes of mid- to late-Holocene deflation of sediments from the Carson Sink playa. Erosion of the dunes and yardang formation suggests: (1) termination of sediment supply from the playa as a result of reduced sediment supply and runoff from the Carson River, (2) cementation of the dunes by clay and silt accumulation, and (3) modern eolian erosion through flow acceleration on dune windward slopes.

  20. The Miscoding Potential of 5-Hydroxycytosine Arises Due to Template Instability in the Replicative Polymerase Active Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahn, Karl E.; Averill, April; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie (Vermont)

    2012-07-18

    5-Hydroxycytosine (5-OHC) is a stable oxidation product of cytosine associated with an increased frequency of C {yields} T transition mutations. When this lesion escapes recognition by the base excision repair pathway and persists to serve as a templating base during DNA synthesis, replicative DNA polymerases often misincorporate dAMP at the primer terminus, which can lead to fixation of mutations and subsequent disease. To characterize the dynamics of DNA synthesis opposite 5-OHC, we initiated a comparison of unmodified dCMP to 5-OHC, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and 5-methylcytosine (5-MEC) in which these bases act as templates in the active site of RB69 gp43, a high-fidelity DNA polymerase sharing homology with human replicative DNA polymerases. This study presents the first crystal structure of any DNA polymerase binding this physiologically important premutagenic DNA lesion, showing that while dGMP is stabilized by 5-OHC through normal Watson-Crick base pairing, incorporation of dAMP leads to unstacking and instability in the template. Furthermore, the electronegativity of the C5 substituent appears to be important in the miscoding potential of these cytosine-like templates. While dAMP is incorporated opposite 5-OHC {approx}5 times more efficiently than opposite unmodified dCMP, an elevated level of incorporation is also observed opposite 5-FC but not 5-MEC. Taken together, these data imply that the nonuniform templating by 5-OHC is due to weakened stacking capabilities, which allows dAMP incorporation to proceed in a manner similar to that observed opposite abasic sites.

  1. An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    in California Energy Markets, Transportation Research BoardEnergy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATIONCalifornia Transportation Center UCTC-FR-2010-14 An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy

  2. Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Additive Manufacturing: Implications on Research and Manufacturing With recent developments, etc.), additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a transformative technology in innovation-based manufacturing. Agencies such as the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation

  3. Seismic Activity of the Earth, the Cosmological Vectorial Potential And Method of a Short-term Earthquakes Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Baurov; Yu. A. Baurov; Yu. A. Baurov Jr.; A. A. Spitalnaya; A. A. Abramyan; V. A. Solodovnikov

    2008-08-20

    To the foundation of a principally new short-term forecasting method there has been laid down a theory of surrounding us world's creation and of physical vacuum as a result of interaction of byuons - discrete objects. The definition of the byuon contains the cosmological vector-potential A_g - a novel fundamental vector constant. This theory predicts a new anisotropic interaction of nature objects with the physical vacuum. A peculiar "tap" to gain new energy (giving rise to an earthquake) are elementary particles because their masses are proportional to the modulus of some summary potential A_sum that contains potentials of all known fields. The value of A_sum cannot be larger than the modulus of A_g. In accordance with the experimental results a new force associated with A_sum ejects substance from the area of the weakened A_sum along a conical formation with the opening of 100 +- 10 and the axis directed along the vector A_sum. This vector has the following coordinates in the second equatorial coordinate system: right ascension alpha = 293 +- 10, declination delta = 36 +- 10. Nearly 100% probability of an earthquake (earthquakes of 6 points strong and more by the Richter scale) arises when in the process of the earth rotation the zenith vector of a seismically dangerous region and/or the vectorial potential of Earth's magnetic fields are in a certain way oriented relative to the vector A_g. In the work, basic models and standard mechanisms of earthquakes are briefly considered, results of processing of information on the earthquakes in the context of global spatial anisotropy caused by the existence of the vector A_g, are presented, and an analysis of them is given.

  4. Near-Sun Speed of CMEs and the Magnetic Non-potentiality of their Source Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K; Moore, Ronald L; Venkatakrishnan, P; Winebarger, Amy R; Khazanov, Igor G

    2015-01-01

    We show that the speed of the fastest coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that an active region (AR) can produce can be predicted from a vector magnetogram of the AR. This is shown by logarithmic plots of CME speed (from the SOHO LASCO CME catalog) versus each of ten AR-integrated magnetic parameters (AR magnetic flux, three different AR magnetic-twist parameters, and six AR free-magnetic-energy proxies) measured from the vertical and horizontal field components of vector magnetograms (from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager}) of the source ARs of 189 CMEs. These plots show: (1) the speed of the fastest CMEs that an AR can produce increases with each of these whole-AR magnetic parameters, and (2) that one of the AR magnetic-twist parameters and the corresponding free-magnetic-energy proxy each determine the CME-speed upper-limit line somewhat better than any of the other eight whole-AR magnetic parameters.

  5. The deep hydrogeologic flow system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation -- Assessing the potential for active groundwater flow and origin of the brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nativ, R.; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A.

    1997-08-01

    The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) contains contaminants such as radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds. The groundwater in the deep system is saline and has been considered to be stagnant in previous studies. This study was designed to address the following questions: is groundwater in the deep system stagnant; is contaminant migration controlled by diffusion only or is advection a viable mechanism; where are the potential outlet points? On the basis of existing and newly collected data, the nature of saline groundwater flow and potential discharge into shallow, freshwater systems was assessed. Data used for this purpose included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the deep system, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) spatial and temporal temperature variations at depth, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline groundwater. The observations suggest that the saline water contained at depth is old but not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active, freshwater-bearing units. Influx of recent water does occur. Groundwater volumes involved in this flow are likely to be small. The origin of the saline groundwater was assessed by using existing and newly acquired chemical and isotopic data. The proposed model that best fits the data is modification of residual brine from which halite has been precipitated. Other models, such as ultrafiltration and halite dissolution, were also evaluated.

  6. Potential for Electrified Vehicles to Contribute to U.S. Petroleum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Potential for Electrified Vehicles to Contribute to U.S. Petroleum and Climate Goals and Implications for Advanced Biofuels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Potential for...

  7. ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

    2008-06-27

    The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

  8. Malaria Proteins Implicated in Host-Parasite Interactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Laura Fay

    2007-01-01

    The invasive and transmission stages of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum express several proteins with domains implicated in host-parasite interactions, that are potential vaccine candidates or drug targets. The expression patterns of two...

  9. Density and water content of nanoscale solid C-S-H formed in alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste and implications for chemical shrinkage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Jeffrey J., E-mail: jthomas39@slb.com [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Allen, Andrew J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Jennings, Hamlin M. [CSHub, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste was analyzed using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The scattering response indicates that the microstructure consists of a uniform matrix of hydration product with a high surface area studded with unhydrated cores of slag particles. In contrast with portland cement paste, no surface fractal scattering regime was detected, and elevated temperature curing (at 60 Degree-Sign C) had no detectable effect on the microstructure at any length scale studied. The specific surface area of the AAS pastes is about 25% higher than that of a portland cement paste cured under the same conditions. The composition and mass density of the nanoscale solid C-S-H phase formed in the AAS paste was determined using a previously developed neutron scattering method, in conjunction with a hydration model. The result ((CaO){sub 0.99}-SiO{sub 2}-(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.06}-(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.97}, d = (2.73 {+-} 0.02) g/cm{sup 3}) is significantly lower in calcium and in water as compared to portland cement or pure tricalcium silicate paste. These values were used to calculate the chemical shrinkage that would result from complete hydration of the AAS paste. The result, (12.2 {+-} 1.5) cm{sup 3} of volumetric shrinkage per 100 g of unhydrated cement, is about twice the amount of chemical shrinkage exhibited by normal cement pastes.

  10. Review of Discrete X-Ray Sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Summary of the ASCA Results and Implication on the Recent Star Forming Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Yokogawa; Kensuke Imanishi; Masahiro Tsujimoto; Katsuji Koyama; Mamiko Nishiuchi

    2003-02-09

    We made 22 observations on the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and covered full regions by the end of the ASCA mission. We detected 106 discrete sources with a criterion of S/N > 5 and performed systematic analyses on all of the sources. We determined the source positions with an ~40'' error radius (90% confidence) for sources detected in the central 20' radius of the GIS. We detected coherent pulsations from 17 sources. Among them, eight were newly discovered during this study. We classified most of these pulsars as X-ray binary pulsars (XBPs) based on their properties, such as the flux variability and the existence of an optical counterpart. We detected X-ray emission from eight supernova remnants (SNRs). Among them, five SNRs showed emission lines in their spectra, hence we regarded the five as thermal SNRs. We found that XBPs and thermal SNRs in the SMC can be clearly separated by their spectral hardness ratio. Applying this empirical law to faint (thus unclassified) sources, we found 19 XBP candidates and four thermal SNR candidates. We also found several tens of candidates for active galactic nuclei, both from the hardness ratio and the logN--logS relation of extragalactic sources. Based on these ASCA results and further information from other sattelites, we compiled comprehensive catalogues of discrete X-ray sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud. Using the catalogues, we derived the spatial distributions of XBPs and SNRs. XBPs and SNRs were found to be concentrated in the main body and eastern wing, which resembles the distribution of young stars with ages of ~2e7yr. By comparing the source populations in the SMC and our Galaxy, we suggest that the star-forming rate (per unit mass) in the SMC was much higher than the Galaxy 1e7yr ago. We also discuss the recent change of the star-forming rate in the SMC.

  11. Implications of simultaneously mitigating and adapting to climate change: Initial experiments using GCAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2013-04-01

    Historically climate impacts research and climate mitigation research have been two separate and independent domains of inquiry. Climate mitigation research has investigated greenhouse gas emissions assuming that climate is unchanging. At the same time climate mitigation research has investigated the implications of climate change on the assumption that climate mitigation will proceed without affecting the degree of climate impacts or the ability of human and natural systems to adapt. The Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) has largely been employed to study climate mitigation. Here we explore the development of capabilities to assess climate change impacts and adaptation within the GCAM model. These capabilities are being developed so as to be able to simultaneously reconcile the joint implications of climate change mitigation, impacts and adaptive potential. This is an important step forward in that it enables direct comparison between climate mitigation activities and climate impacts and the opportunity to understand interactions between the two.

  12. Oxidative Modifications of Kynostatin-272, a Potent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Inhibitor: Potential Mechanism for Altered Activity in Monocytes/Macrophages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, David A.; Read-Connole, Elizabeth; Pearson, Kara; Fales, Henry M.; Newcomb, Fonda M.; Moskovitz, Jackob; Yarchoan, Robert

    2002-02-01

    Previous studies have indicated that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitors (PIs) are less active at blocking viral replication in HIV-1 infected peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages (M/M) than ...

  13. Policy implications of technologies for cognitive enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarewitz, Daniel R. (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ); Karas, Thomas H.

    2007-02-01

    The Advanced Concepts Group at Sandia National Laboratory and the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes at Arizona State University convened a workshop in May 2006 to explore the potential policy implications of technologies that might enhance human cognitive abilities. The group's deliberations sought to identify core values and concerns raised by the prospect of cognitive enhancement. The workshop focused on the policy implications of various prospective cognitive enhancements and on the technologies/nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science--that enable them. The prospect of rapidly emerging technological capabilities to enhance human cognition makes urgent a daunting array of questions, tensions, ambitions, and concerns. The workshop elicited dilemmas and concerns in ten overlapping areas: science and democracy; equity and justice; freedom and control; intergenerational issues; ethics and competition; individual and community rights; speed and deliberations; ethical uncertainty; humanness; and sociocultural risk. We identified four different perspectives to encompass the diverse issues related to emergence of cognitive enhancement technologies: (1) Laissez-faire--emphasizes freedom of individuals to seek and employ enhancement technologies based on their own judgment; (2) Managed technological optimism--believes that while these technologies promise great benefits, such benefits cannot emerge without an active government role; (3) Managed technological skepticism--views that the quality of life arises more out of society's institutions than its technologies; and (4) Human Essentialism--starts with the notion of a human essence (whether God-given or evolutionary in origin) that should not be modified. While the perspectives differ significantly about both human nature and the role of government, each encompasses a belief in the value of transparency and reliable information that can allow public discussion and decisions about cognitive enhancement. The practical question is how to foster productive discussions in a society whose attention is notably fragmented and priorities notably diverse. The question of what to talk about remains central, as each of the four perspectives is concerned about different things. Perhaps the key issue for initial clarification as a condition for productive democratic discussion has to do with the intended goals of cognitive enhancement, and the mechanisms for allowing productive deliberation about these goals.

  14. Therapeutic implications of iodine-125 cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomer, W.D.; McLaughlin, W.H.; Adelstein, S.J.

    1982-11-01

    The biological consequences of differential subcellular radionuclide accumulation within nuclear stuctures have important implications for the design and development of new therapeutic agents for cancer management. A growing body of experimental data demonstrates that localization of /sup 125/I within the genome results in marked cytotoxicity. Investigations of iodine-125 labeled iododeoxyuridine, DNA intercalators and tamoxifen are reviewed as representative of this new group of potential radiotherapeutic agents.

  15. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  16. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  17. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  18. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Wind Project Performance,”WindPower 2010, pp. 10-11. ErnestWind Project Performance,”WindPower 2010, pp. 10- Table 6:

  19. Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

    1997-01-01

    Michael. (1989), "Market Failure and Energy Policy,"Energy Policy 17 pp.397-406. Fog, M . H . and Nadkarni, K .Management Programs," Energy Policy 22 Levine, M.D. , Hirst,

  20. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    G. Sinden, A. Zervos, (2011): Wind Energy. In IPCC SpecialM. Hand, and A. Laxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and2009). Analysis of Impacts of Wind Integration in the Tamil

  1. Federal Tax Incentives for PV: Potential Implications for Program Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    C. Herig. 2004. “Are Solar Rebates and Grants for HomeownersDesign: Overall Findings • Rebate Levels: New/expandedProgram Design • Rebate levels • Rebate differentiation •

  2. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Wind Power Development Parameter Criteria for Exclusion Terrain slope Greater than 20 percent Elevation Greater than 1,500 m Protected areas 100 percent Water

  3. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    of variability of wind generation and costs related toLaxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.MW installed worldwide. 6 Wind energy costs in India are

  4. Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

    1997-01-01

    vacuum pumps, intermediate reboilers and condensers Fluid coking to gasification, turbine power recovery train at the FCC, hydraulic

  5. Federal Tax Incentives for PV: Potential Implications for Program Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    encourage demand for PV and value/cost/tax-efficiency of PBIAssumptions • Installed PV system costs exhibit economies ofPV above historical (pre-EPAct) levels • Recent increase in module costs (

  6. Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

    1997-01-01

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Proceedings,Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, pp. 1.76-Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Asilomar,

  7. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    wind generation) and electricity demand suggests that windin Wind Generation and Electricity Demand Source: Wind speeddata – CWET (2010). Electricity demand data – CEA (2011).

  8. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the UnitedScale Integration of Wind Power and on Transmission Networks11 Wind Power Density and Wind Speed

  9. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Laxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.wind tower structures and costs vary substantially as the depth of water in which these turbines

  10. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Model. Technical Report. NREL/TP-500-40566. December 2006National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) TechnicalReport NREL/TP-6A2-45834. Fingersh, L. M. Hand, and A.

  11. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (2011), doi:10.1016/j.Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (2011), doi:10.1016/j.most studies on India’s energy future have predicted only a

  12. Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

    1997-01-01

    Low Energy Path 1.2 Energy and Material Efficiency 1.3 Focusof improved efficiency of energy and material use.Reducing energy and material use per unit of economic output

  13. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    A. Zervos, (2011): Wind Energy. In IPCC Special Report onestimate the cost of wind energy and compare it with otherCMA (2006). The Report of Wind Energy Resource Assessment in

  14. Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

    1997-01-01

    plants Adjustable speed drives, coke oven gas compressors,heat recovery coke oven gases, and dry coke quenching

  15. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Central Electricity Regulatory Commission, CERC (2009). Terms and Conditions for Tariff determination from Renewable Energy

  16. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and ClimateWind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (2011), doi:10.1016/j.United States. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

  17. Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons ACES: Evaluation of Tissue Response to Inhaled 2007-Compliant Diesel Exhaust Iowa...

  18. Potential Implications for Cataract Formation - Redox Changes at the Sulfur

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgram Guidelines This document outlines the majorL.Posters9558-E-12BAtom

  19. Risk implications of the deployment of renewables for investments in electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisternes, Fernando J. de (Fernando José de Sisternes Jiménez)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores the potential risk implications that a large penetration of intermittent renewable electricity generation -such as wind and solar power- may have on the future electricity generation technology mix, ...

  20. Utilization Implications for Hardwoods Susceptible to Sudden Oak Death1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization Implications for Hardwoods Susceptible to Sudden Oak Death1 John R. Shelly2 The number (Lithocarpus densiflorus) utilization, one of the SOD susceptible species, provide valuable insight into the potential for utilizing SOD infected material. Tanoak was found to have very good woodworking properties

  1. Energy Crops and their Implications on Surface Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Atul K.

    Energy Crops and their Implications on Surface Energy and Water Balance Yang Song Rahul Barman Phenological differences Variation in water and thermal energy consumption #12;Objectives Examine potential crops on energy and water balance Temporal and spatial patterns of · Evapotranspiration · Radiation

  2. Mining-related ground deformation in Crescent Valley, Nevada: Implications for sparse GPS networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    Mining-related ground deformation in Crescent Valley, Nevada: Implications for sparse GPS networks. The analysis reveals areas of rapid deformation caused by mining and agricultural activities in the Crescent), Mining-related ground deformation in Crescent Valley, Nevada: Implications for sparse GPS networks

  3. Two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory with Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field reference function and spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Inkoo; Lee, Yoon Sup

    2014-10-28

    We report the formulation and implementation of KRCASPT2, a two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory based on Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field (KRCASSCF) reference function, in the framework of the spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential. The zeroth-order Hamiltonian is defined as the sum of nondiagonal one-electron operators with generalized two-component Fock matrix elements as scalar factors. The Kramers symmetry within the zeroth-order Hamiltonian is maintained via the use of a state-averaged density, allowing a consistent treatment of degenerate states. The explicit expressions are derived for the matrix elements of the zeroth-order Hamiltonian as well as for the perturbation vector. The use of a fully variational reference function and nondiagonal operators in relativistic multi-configurational perturbation theory is reported for the first time. A series of initial calculations are performed on the ionization potential and excitation energies of the atoms of the 6p-block; the results display a significant improvement over those from KRCASSCF, showing a closer agreement with experimental results. Accurate atomic properties of the superheavy elements of the 7p-block are also presented, and the electronic structures of the low-lying excited states are compared with those of their lighter homologues.

  4. Potential Ecological Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    · Fracking fluids (How many carcinogens?) · Produced water contaminated with organics, salts, heavy metals

  5. Self Potential At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Self Potential At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential...

  6. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric...

  7. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Implications of structural...

  8. Implications of Channelization and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    From Conner 1994 Water Oak Cow Oak Cherrybark Oak #12;5 Activities Impacting Wetlands · Dams · Highways · Globally rare Hatchie River burrowing crayfish · TNC "Last Great Place" list http

  9. Implications of LHCb measurements and future prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb collaboration; A. Bharucha; I. I. Bigi; C. Bobeth; M. Bobrowski; J. Brod; A. J. Buras; C. T. H. Davies; A. Datta; C. Delaunay; S. Descotes-Genon; J. Ellis; T. Feldmann; R. Fleischer; O. Gedalia; J. Girrbach; D. Guadagnoli; G. Hiller; Y. Hochberg; T. Hurth; G. Isidori; S. Jaeger; M. Jung; A. Kagan; J. F. Kamenik; A. Lenz; Z. Ligeti; D. London; F. Mahmoudi; J. Matias; S. Nandi; Y. Nir; P. Paradisi; G. Perez; A. A. Petrov; R. Rattazzi; S. R. Sharpe; L. Silvestrini; A. Soni; D. M. Straub; D. van Dyk; J. Virto; Y. -M. Wang; A. Weiler; J. Zupan. LHCb collaboration; :; R. Aaij; C. Abellan Beteta; A. Adametz; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; L. Anderlini; J. Anderson; R. Andreassen; M. Anelli; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; C. Baesso; W. Baldini; H. Band; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; J. Beddow; I. Bediaga; C. Beigbeder-Beau; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; A. Berezhnoy; F. Bernard; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; V. van Beveren; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; B. Bochin; H. Boer Rookhuizen; G. Bogdanova; E. Bonaccorsi; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; E. Bowen; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; L. Brarda; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; T. Cacérès; J. -P. Cachemiche; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; H. Carranza-Mejia; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; A. Casajus Ramo; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; L. Ceelie; B. Chadaj; H. Chanal; M. Charles; D. Charlet; Ph. Charpentier; M. Chebbi; P. Chen; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; P. Ciambrone; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; B. Corajod; G. Corti; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; D. Craik; S. Cunliffe; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; I. D'Antone; P. David; P. N. Y. David; I. De Bonis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; P. De Groen; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; G. Decreuse; H. Degaudenzi; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; A. Di Canto; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; M. Dogaru; F. Domingo Bonal; M. Domke; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; C. Drancourt; O. Duarte; R. Dumps; F. Dupertuis; P. -Y. Duval; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; I. El Rifai; Ch. Elsasser; D. Elsby; F. Evangelisti; A. Falabella; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; P. J. W. Faulkner; V. Fave; G. Felici; V. Fernandez Albor; F. Ferreira Rodrigues; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; C. Föhr; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; C. Fournier; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; R. Frei; M. Frosini; H. Fuchs; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J. Garofoli; P. Garosi; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; D. Gascon; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; E. Gersabeck; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; S. Gets; Ph. Ghez; A. Giachero; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; V. Golovtsov; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; G. Gong; H. Gong; H. Gordon; C. Gotti; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; V. Gromov; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; Z. Guzik; T. Gys; F. Hachon; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; S. Hall; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; S. T. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; B. van der Heijden; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; D. Hill; M. Hoballah; W. Hofmann; C. Hombach; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; N. Hussain; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; O. Jamet; E. Jans; F. Jansen; L. Jansen; P. Jansweijer; P. Jaton; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; O. Karavichev; T. M. Karbach; A. Kashchuk; T. Kechadi; I. R. Kenyon; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; T. Kihm; R. Kluit; O. Kochebina; V. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; J. Kos; A. Kozlinskiy

    2013-04-30

    During 2011 the LHCb experiment at CERN collected 1.0 fb-1 of sqrt{s} = 7 TeV pp collisions. Due to the large heavy quark production cross-sections, these data provide unprecedented samples of heavy flavoured hadrons. The first results from LHCb have made a significant impact on the flavour physics landscape and have definitively proved the concept of a dedicated experiment in the forward region at a hadron collider. This document discusses the implications of these first measurements on classes of extensions to the Standard Model, bearing in mind the interplay with the results of searches for on-shell production of new particles at ATLAS and CMS. The physics potential of an upgrade to the LHCb detector, which would allow an order of magnitude more data to be collected, is emphasised.

  10. Mining TCGA Data Using Boolean Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Subarna

    Boolean implications (if-then rules) provide a conceptually simple, uniform and highly scalable way to find associations between pairs of random variables. In this paper, we propose to use Boolean implications to find ...

  11. Energy conditions and their implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    Energy conditions and their implications Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint;#16;s (Los Alamos) Midwest Relativity 9 November 1999. #12; Abstract: The energy conditions of general- itational #12;elds and cosmological geometries. However, the energy conditions are beginning to look a lot

  12. REPORT NO. 3 health implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the effects of radiation on animals and man, the possible effects of low doses delivered at low dose rates on radiation doses and possible health effects of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. Before discussing Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;REPORT NO. 3 health implications of fallout from nuclear

  13. Myoelectric control is filled with potential to significantly change human-robot interaction. Humans desire compliant robots to safely interact in dynamic environments associated with daily activities. As surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy #12; activities. As surface electromyography non-invasively measures limb motion intent and correlates with joint, allowing users to learn efficient control through the refinement of unique muscle synergies while

  14. Renewable Energy Economic Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER This time with motivation: The implications of social neuroscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beer, Jennifer

    ORIGINAL PAPER This time with motivation: The implications of social neuroscience for research on motivated self- and other-perception (and vice versa) Jennifer S. Beer Published online: 11 November 2011 Ó objects. Self-evaluation was lauded as potentially unique partially because of motivational and affective

  16. Air-sea interaction at an oceanic front: Implications for frontogenesis and primary production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, .Dake

    winds at sharp oceanic fronts, suggesting a potentially important role played by local airAir-sea interaction at an oceanic front: Implications for frontogenesis and primary production Dake a significant air-sea interaction at the shelf- break front in the East China Sea. An idealized ocean

  17. Increasing homogeneity in global food supplies and the implications for food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Increasing homogeneity in global food supplies and the implications for food security Colin K Trust, 53115 Bonn, Germany; g CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security to the world's food supplies has been considered a potential threat to food security. However, changes

  18. Climate Change Risks and Conservation Implications for a Threatened Small-Range Mammal Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    Climate Change Risks and Conservation Implications for a Threatened Small-Range Mammal Species Naia: Climate change is already affecting the distributions of many species and may lead to numerous extinctions be used to assess climate sensitivity and potential climate change impacts, even for rare and cryptic

  19. Implications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR THE SITE- SPECIFIC

  20. The $?-?$ fishbone potential revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Day; J. E. McEwen; M. Elhanafy; E. Smith; R. Woodhouse; Z. Papp

    2011-05-30

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the $\\alpha-\\alpha$ fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-$\\alpha$ resonance energies, experimental phase shifts and three-$\\alpha$ binding energies. We found that essentially a simple gaussian can provide a good description of two-$\\alpha$ and three-$\\alpha$ experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  1. Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2005-04-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

  2. Field matric potential sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01

    A method of determining matric potential of a sample, the method comprising placing the sample in a container, the container having an opening; and contacting the sample with a tensiometer via the opening. An apparatus for determining matric potential of a sample, the apparatus comprising a housing configured to receive a sample; a portable matric potential sensing device extending into the housing and having a porous member; and a wall closing the housing to insulate the sample and at least a portion of the matric potential sensing device including the porous member.

  3. LOCAL ORGANIC FOOD: THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    Sustainable production and consumption has risen up the political agenda over the last ten years, to becomeLOCAL ORGANIC FOOD: THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION By Gill Seyfang CSERGE Working Paper EDM 04-09 #12;Local Organic Food: The Social Implications of Sustainable Consumption By Gill

  4. Geography, Income, and Voters Explanations and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    1/54 Geography, Income, and Voters Explanations and Implications Election 2008: What Really State, Blue State, Rich State, Poor State #12;2/54 Geography, Income, and Voters Explanations, Poor State #12;3/54 Geography, Income, and Voters Explanations and Implications Election 2008: What

  5. NEAMS Software Licensing, Release, and Distribution: Implications for FY2013 Work Package Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The vision of the NEAMS program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the analysis of nuclear systems. NEAMS anticipates issuing in FY 2018 a full release of its computational 'Fermi Toolkit' aimed at advanced reactor and fuel cycles. The NEAMS toolkit involves extensive software development activities, some of which have already been underway for several years, however, the Advanced Modeling and Simulation Office (AMSO), which sponsors the NEAMS program, has not yet issued any official guidance regarding software licensing, release, and distribution policies. This motivated an FY12 task in the Capability Transfer work package to develop and recommend an appropriate set of policies. The current preliminary report is intended to provide awareness of issues with implications for work package planning for FY13. We anticipate a small amount of effort associated with putting into place formal licenses and contributor agreements for NEAMS software which doesn't already have them. We do not anticipate any additional effort or costs associated with software release procedures or schedules beyond those dictated by the quality expectations for the software. The largest potential costs we anticipate would be associated with the setup and maintenance of shared code repositories for development and early access to NEAMS software products. We also anticipate an opportunity, with modest associated costs, to work with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) to clarify export control assessment policies for software under development.

  6. Statistics of solar microwave radio burst spectra with implications for operations of microwave radio systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .6 GHz to employ an adaptable mode wherein, if the prediction of solar activity suggested the possible [Hey, 1946], the understanding and prediction of solar events that might produce interfering noiseStatistics of solar microwave radio burst spectra with implications for operations of microwave

  7. Abiotic Oxidation Rate of Chalcopyrite: Implications for Seafloor Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilenker, Laura Danielle

    2011-01-01

    in Seawater: Implications for Mining Seafloor Hot Spring.American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and PetroleumImplications for Seafloor Mining A Thesis submitted in

  8. Interpretation of ageostrophic winds and implications for jet stream maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Interpretation of ageostrophic winds and implications for jet stream maintenance Article Published Version Blackburn, M. (1985) Interpretation of ageostrophic winds and implications for jet stream

  9. Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    New England Journal of Medicine 1993, 329, 7. S. v. Klot; A.34 of 42 Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered35 of 42 Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered

  10. Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012...

  11. Student Activities Student Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Solar Energy? Activity B How do Atmospheres Produce their Effect Upon Surface Temperatures? Activity C and populations found in developing countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Figure 4.3 illustrates the actual and projected growths in global population. 0Topic ,Real World Problem: Culprits of Climate Warming and Cooling

  12. Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzel, Michael

    2010-11-18

    stream_size 1487 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name ku_gis_day_2010_schaetzel.pdf.txt stream_source_info ku_gis_day_2010_schaetzel.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Mapping Biomass... Distribution Potential Michael Schaetzel Undergraduate ? Environmental Studies ? University of Kansas L O C A T S I O N BIOMASS ENERGY POTENTIAL o According to DOE, Biomass has the potential to provide 14% of the nation’s power o Currently 1% of...

  13. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  14. Logistic Map Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Curtright; Andrzej Veitia

    2010-05-27

    We develop and illustrate methods to compute all single particle potentials that underlie the logistic map, x --> sx(1-x) for 02. We illustrate the methods numerically for the cases s=5/2 and s=10/3.

  15. Analysis of the implications of the USSR providing reprocessing and MOX fabrication services to other countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This brief analysis, which is based on unclassified sources, seeks to identify what some of the implications would be if the Soviets started to move actively to try to provide reprocessing and MOX fabrication services to the US and other countries. While information on Soviet intentions is limited, it postulates that the Soviets would offer to reprocess spent LWR at competitive prices, fabricate the plutonium and reenrich the uranium, and sell these products back to the customer. Since it is not known whether they would insist on returning the waste from reprocessing or would be prepared to keep it, we comment briefly on what the implications of either of these actions might be.

  16. Measuring the Noble Metal and Iodine Composition of Extracted Noble Metal Phase from Spent Nuclear Fuel Using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palomares, R. I.; Dayman, Kenneth J.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Biegalski, Steven R.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Casella, Amanda J.; Brady Raap, Michaele C.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2015-04-01

    Mass quantities of noble metal and iodine nuclides in the metallic noble metal phase extracted from spent fuel are measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA). Nuclide presence is predicted using fission yield analysis, and mass quantification is derived from standard gamma spectroscopy and radionuclide decay analysis. The nuclide compositions of noble metal phase derived from two dissolution methods, UO2 fuel dissolved in nitric acid and UO2 fuel dissolved in ammonium-carbonate and hydrogen-peroxide solution, are compared. Lastly, the implications of the rapid analytic speed of instrumental NAA are discussed in relation to potential nuclear forensics applications.

  17. Research Articles Potential for Microbial Oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Clark M.

    research has suggested that Fe(II) in BG can serve as an energy source for chemolithotrophic microbial that may have served or may serve as energy sources for chemolithotrophic microbial activity. This specResearch Articles Potential for Microbial Oxidation of Ferrous Iron in Basaltic Glass Mai Yia Xiong

  18. A THETA FUNCTION IDENTITY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A THETA FUNCTION IDENTITY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS ZHI­GUO LIU Abstract. In this paper we prove, theta function identities, infinite products. 1 #12; 2 ZHI­GUO LIU Jacobi's theta function # 1 (z

  19. A THETA FUNCTION IDENTITY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A THETA FUNCTION IDENTITY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS ZHI-GUO LIU Abstract. In this paper we prove, 11F27, 33E05. Keywords: elliptic functions, theta function identities, infinite products. 1 #12;2 ZHI-GUO

  20. Economic and policy implications of pandemic influenza.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Starks, Shirley J.; Loose, Verne W.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-03-01

    Pandemic influenza has become a serious global health concern; in response, governments around the world have allocated increasing funds to containment of public health threats from this disease. Pandemic influenza is also recognized to have serious economic implications, causing illness and absence that reduces worker productivity and economic output and, through mortality, robs nations of their most valuable assets - human resources. This paper reports two studies that investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic flu outbreak. Policy makers can use the growing number of economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. Experts recognize that pandemic influenza has serious global economic implications. The illness causes absenteeism, reduced worker productivity, and therefore reduced economic output. This, combined with the associated mortality rate, robs nations of valuable human resources. Policy makers can use economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this paper economists examine two studies which investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Resulting policy implications are also discussed. The research uses the Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI) Policy Insight + Model. This model provides a dynamic, regional, North America Industrial Classification System (NAICS) industry-structured framework for forecasting. It is supported by a population dynamics model that is well-adapted to investigating macro-economic implications of pandemic influenza, including possible demand side effects. The studies reported in this paper exercise all of these capabilities.

  1. Potential of Renewable Energy to Reduce the Dependence of the State of Hawaii on Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Barnett, J.; Mosey, G.; Wise, A.

    2009-01-01

    Deriving nearly 90% of its primary energy resources from oil, the State of Hawaii is more dependent on oil than any other U.S. state. The price of electricity in Hawaii is also more than twice the U.S. average. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 directed assessment of the economic implications of Hawaii's oil dependence and the feasibility of using renewable energy to help meet the state's electrical generation and transportation fuel use. This paper is based on the assessments and report prepared in response to that directive.Current total installed electrical capacity for the State of Hawaii is 2,414 MWe, 83% of which is fuel-oil generated, but already including about 170 MWe of renewable capacity. The assessments identified about 2,133 MWe (plus another estimated 2,000 MWe of rooftop PV systems) of potential new renewable energy capacity. Most notable, in addition to the rooftop solar potential, is 750 MWe and 140 MWe of geothermal potential on Hawaii and Maui, respectively, 840 MWe of potential wind capacity, primarily on Lanai and Molokai, and one potential 285 MWe capacity specific solar project (PV or solar thermal) identified on Kauai. Important social, political, and electrical-grid infrastructure challenges would need to be overcome to realize this potential. Among multiple crop and acreage scenarios, biofuels assessment found 360,000 acres in Hawaii zoned for agriculture and appropriate for sugarcane, enough to produce 429 million gallons of ethanol-enough to meet about 64% of current 2005 Hawaiian gasoline use. Tropical oil seed crops-potentially grown on the same land-might meet a substantial portion of current diesel use, but there has been little experience growing such crops in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Hawaii initiated in January 2008 a program that seeks to reduce Hawaii's oil dependence and provide 70% of the state's primary energy from clean energy sources by 2030. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) activities will be concentrated in two areas: (1) HCEI Working Groups will be formed and made up of private, state, and U.S. government experts in the areas of Transportation and Fuels, Electricity Generation, Energy Delivery and Transmission, and End-Use Efficiency; and (2) Partnership Projects will be undertaken with local and mainland partners that demonstrate and commercialize new technologies and relieve technical barriers.

  2. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  3. Heating, Current Drive, Operations and Diagnostics Issues Understand implications of reduced repetition rate, is it adequate for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heating, Current Drive, Operations and Diagnostics Issues Operations · Understand implications of reduced repetition rate, is it adequate for the envisioned experimental program? · Evaluate the potential of ECRH to improve startup. Heating · ICRF is the base line heating system, compare with NBI and ECRH

  4. Life Cycle Energy and Climate Change Implication of Nanotechnologies: A Critical Review Hyung Chul Kim and Vasilis Fthenakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Life Cycle Energy and Climate Change Implication of Nanotechnologies: A Critical Review Hyung Center Dearborn, MI. Email: hkim41@ford.com Summary The potential environmental here often rely on inventory data estimated from literature values and parametric analyses based

  5. Life Extension of a Nuclear Facility: Export Control Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerschner, Harrison F.; Cunningham, Julia A.; Sportelli, James M.; Yarbro, Steve; Bedell, Jeffrey J.

    2010-04-11

    This paper discusses life extension upgrades to an operational nuclear research facility and identifies export control implications. The Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in a multi-year program of deactivating and decommissioning (D&D) the majority of the Hanford Site 300 Area facilities. In 2006, the DOE decided to retain the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL), which was on the D&D list. As part of the facility life-extension to ensure continued mission capability, the DOE decided to consolidate replacement hot cell capability into the RPL. Physical limitations within the facility dictated that new hot cell design and construction would be modularized—a process that allows for ease of fabrication and introduction into existing space. A review of the fabrication and installation techniques has identified potential export control issues.

  6. Scalar potential model progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Hodge

    2007-04-04

    Because observations of galaxies and clusters have been found inconsistent with General Relativity (GR), the focus of effort in developing a Scalar Potential Model (SPM) has been on the examination of galaxies and clusters. The SPM has been found to be consistent with cluster cellular structure, the flow of IGM from spiral galaxies to elliptical galaxies, intergalactic redshift without an expanding universe, discrete redshift, rotation curve (RC) data without dark matter, asymmetric RCs, galaxy central mass, galaxy central velocity dispersion, and the Pioneer Anomaly. In addition, the SPM suggests a model of past expansion, past contraction, and current expansion of the universe. GR corresponds to the SPM in the limit in which the effect of the Sources and Sinks approximate a flat scalar potential field such as between clusters and on the solar system scale, which is small relative to the distance to a Source.

  7. Binding of Alkylurea Inhibitors to Epoxide Hydrolase Implicates Active Site Tyrosines in Substrate Activation*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    19104-6323 and the ¶Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis, California 95616 transport and cause inflammatory responses (5, 6). Accordingly, sEH is a possible pharmaceutical target

  8. Cyclic Shape Invariant Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. P. Sukhatme; C. Rasinariu; A. Khare

    1997-06-08

    We formulate and study the set of coupled nonlinear differential equations which define a series of shape invariant potentials which repeats after a cycle of $p$ iterations. These cyclic shape invariant potentials enlarge the limited reservoir of known analytically solvable quantum mechanical eigenvalue problems. At large values of $x$, cyclic superpotentials are found to have a linear harmonic oscillator behavior with superposed oscillations consisting of several systematically varying frequencies. At the origin, cyclic superpotentials vanish when the period $p$ is odd, but diverge for $p$ even. The eigenvalue spectrum consists of $p$ infinite sets of equally spaced energy levels, shifted with respect to each other by arbitrary energies $\\omega_0,\\omega_1,\\...,\\omega_{p-1}$. As a special application, the energy spacings $\\omega_k$ can be identified with the periodic points generatedby the logistic map $z_{k+1}=r z_k (1 - z_k)$. Increasing the value of $r$ and following the bifurcation route to chaos corresponds to studying cyclic shape invariant potentials as the period $p$ takes values 1,2,4,8,...

  9. Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aizenman, Michael; Warzel, Simone

    2012-09-15

    We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

  10. Heavy Quark Kinetic Energy in B Mesons by a QCD Relativistic Potential Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. De Fazio

    1996-11-04

    The matrix element of the kinetic energy operator between B meson states is computed by means of a QCD relativistic potential model, with the result: $\\mu_\\pi^2=0.66 GeV^2$. A comparison with the outcome of other theoretical approaches and a discussion of the phenomenological implications of this result are carried out.

  11. Effective Potential Energy Expression for Membrane Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Finkel

    2007-02-11

    All living cells transport molecules and ions across membranes, often against concentration gradients. This active transport requires continual energy expenditure and is clearly a nonequilibrium process for which standard equilibrium thermodynamics is not rigorously applicable. Here we derive a nonequilibrium effective potential that evaluates the per particle transport energy invested by the membrane. A novel method is used whereby a Hamiltonian function is constructed using particle concentrations as generalized coordinates. The associated generalized momenta are simply related to the individual particle energy from which we identify the effective potential. Examples are given and the formalism is compared with the equilibrium Gibb's free energy.

  12. Eco-Certification of Natural Rubber: Demand, Supply, and Potential Implications of Private Global Environmental Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Rise of Private Global Environmental Governance The analysisof Private Global Environmental Governance Sean F. Kennedy,Governance Networks: Competing to Define the Rules of Sustainability Performance. ” Global Environmental

  13. Movement Restriction Implications on Potential Welfare Slaughter for Texas High Plains Feedlots 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galli, Monica

    2012-02-14

    the total cost of each strategy. This study examined direct disease management costs (indemnity payments, feed costs, marketing costs, surveillance costs, cleaning and disinfecting costs, appraisal cost, euthanasia costs, and disposal costs). Overall...

  14. Implications of Nutritional Potential of Anadromous Fish Resources of the Western Snake River Plain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plew, Mark G.

    1983-01-01

    Fishing on the Western Snake River Plain. Paper presented atResources of the Western Snake River Plain^ MARK G. PLEW HEon the western Snake River Plain, are energy expenditures of

  15. Environmental impact characterization of milling and implications for potential energy savings in industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Ninomiya, Kevin; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    Reduction Strategies for Milling Machine Tool Use. Proc ofconsumed by a 3-axis milling machine tool during processing.a model developed for a milling machine tool similar to that

  16. Environmental Impact Characterization of Milling and Implications for Potential Energy Savings in Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Ninomiya, Kevin; Noble, Joanna; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    Reduction Strategies for Milling Machine Tool Use. Proc ofconsumed by a 3-axis milling machine tool during processing.a model developed for a milling machine tool similar to that

  17. Environmental impact characterization of milling and implications for potential energy savings in industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Ninomiya, Kevin; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    China and India Account for Half of Global Energy GrowthIndia, two leading contributors to manufacturing, are projected to more than double their energy

  18. Environmental Impact Characterization of Milling and Implications for Potential Energy Savings in Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Ninomiya, Kevin; Noble, Joanna; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    China and India Account for Half of Global Energy GrowthIndia, two leading contributors to manufacturing, are projected to more than double their energy

  19. Environmental Impact Characterization of Milling and Implications for Potential Energy Savings in Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Ninomiya, Kevin; Noble, Joanna; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    The application of a coating on a cutting tool allowson coatings, we also conducted interviews with cutting toolcutting speeds and tool life. The effect of coatings on tool

  20. Environmental impact characterization of milling and implications for potential energy savings in industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Ninomiya, Kevin; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01

    The application of a coating on a cutting tool allowson coatings, we also conducted interviews with cutting toolcutting speeds and tool life. The effect of coatings on tool

  1. WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

  2. RESEARCH ARTICLE Shared and Idiosyncratic Cortical Activation Patterns in Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasson, Uri

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Shared and Idiosyncratic Cortical Activation Patterns in Autism Revealed Under been documented in individuals with autism, the functional implications of these alterations remain activity in adults with autism during free-viewing of a popular audio­visual movie. Whereas these complex

  3. Chronic Benzodiazepine Administration Potentiates High Voltage-Activated Calcium Currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Nader G.

    effects from drug withdrawal phenomena to dependence on a variety of drugs of abuse. High voltage benzodiazepine physical dependence. Benzodiazepines, a group of positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors legitimate prescription of benzodiazepines increases the proportion of patients who develop dependence

  4. Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    styles, namely: normal N-S; dextral NW-SE; strike slip ENE-WSW; and sinistral NE-SW. The previous studies did not recognize the existence of the sinistral oblique slip...

  5. Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    heat and power (CHP) applications in the United States cover a broad spectrum of market segments, from nursing homes requiring a few hundred kilowatts (kW) of power and an...

  6. Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation,EnergyAcrux

  7. Energy Resource Potential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S. DOE Office of99 Diagram4th, 2014Resource Potential

  8. The Fukushima Nuclear Event and its Implications for Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golay, Michael (MIT) [MIT

    2011-07-06

    The combined strong earthquake and super tsunami of 12 March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant imposed the most severe challenges ever experienced at such a facility. Information regarding the plant response and status remains uncertain, but it is clear that severe damage has been sustained, that the plant staff have responded creatively and that the offsite implications are unlikely to be seriously threatening to the health, if not the prosperity, of the surrounding population. Re-examination of the regulatory constraints of nuclear power will occur worldwide, and some changes are likely, particularly concerning reliance upon active systems for achieving critical safety functions and concerning treatments of used reactor fuel. Whether worldwide expansion of the nuclear power economy will be slowed in the long run is perhaps unlikely and worth discussion.

  9. The IAEA: Neutralizing Iraq's nuclear weapons potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zifferero, M.

    1993-04-01

    With support from UNSCOM and staff members from several countries, the IAEA has succeeded in identifying and destroying most of Iraq's nuclear weapons potential. IAEA activities in Iraq have also established a sound basis for long-term monitoring of Iraq. This will involve several procedures and techniques, including the periodic monitoring of Iraq's main bodies of water and unannounced visits of resident inspectors to plants, factories, and research centers.

  10. Activation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the reeptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

  11. Predicting Reduction Rates of Energetic Nitroaromatic Compounds Using Calculated One-Electron Reduction Potentials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra; Bylaska, Eric J.; Johnston, Hayley; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2015-02-11

    The evaluation of new energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) for use in green munitions formulations requires models that can predict their environmental fate. The susceptibility of energetic NACs to nitro reduction might be predicted from correlations between rate constants (k) for this reaction and one-electron reduction potentials (E1NAC) / 0.059 V, but the mechanistic implications of such correlations are inconsistent with evidence from other methods. To address this inconsistency, we have reevaluated existing kinetic data using a (non-linear) free-energy relationship (FER) based on the Marcus theory of outer-sphere electron transfer. For most reductants, the results are inconsistent with rate limitation bymore »an initial, outer-sphere electron transfer, suggesting that the strong correlation between k and E1NAC is justified only as an empirical model. This empirical correlation was used to calibrate a new quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) using previously reported values of k for non-energetic NAC reduction by Fe(II) porphyrin and newly reported values of E1NAC determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level with the COSMO solvation model. The QSAR was then validated for energetic NACs using newly measured kinetic data for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The data show close agreement with the QSAR, supporting its applicability to energetic NACs.« less

  12. Investigating the fate of saxitoxins in biologically active water treatment plant filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayal, N.; Newcombe, G.; Ho, L. [South Australian Water Corp., Salisbury, SA (Australia). Australian Water Quality Centre

    2008-12-15

    The saxitoxins are potent neurotoxins, which can be produced by freshwater cyanobacteria. This study assessed the fate of five saxitoxins variants through biologically active laboratory filters containing media sourced from the filters beds of two water treatment plants (WTPs). Decreases in the concentration of the less toxic variants coincided with increases in the concentrations of the more toxic variants through the filters containing anthracite sourced from two different WTPs. No changes in toxin concentrations were evident through parallel filters containing sand. The results strongly suggest that organisms within the biofilm of the anthracite filters possessed the ability to biotransform the saxitoxins variants, which has important implications for drinking water treatment, particularly since this has the potential to increase the toxicity of the filtered water.

  13. Alan Roback Policy Implications of Nuclear Winter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    and noncombatant nations alike. Nevertheless, nations of the world continue to produce nuclear weapons and make plans for their use. The number of nations with nuclear weapons continues to grow. Although the recent. The principal political implication of nuclear winter is that nuclear weapons cannot be used as an instrument

  14. Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy the deployment of CO2 storage technologies used in the marine environment. This paper will address some of the legal issues involved in ocean storage of carbon dioxide from a US perspective. The following paragraphs

  15. Engineering mesoscale structures with distinct dynamical implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering mesoscale structures with distinct dynamical implications Anne-Ly Do1 , Johannes H that there are certain mesoscale subgraphs that have precise and distinct consequences for the system-level dynamics. In particular, if mesoscale symmetries are present then eigenvectors of the Jacobian localise on the symmetric

  16. Climate Change: Implications for the PNW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    #12;#12;Climate Change: Implications for the PNW Nick Bond University of Washington NOAA/PMEL #12;Projected Impacts of Climate Change Source: Stern Review #12;Global Climate Change ­ Questions Is climate changing? What are greenhouse gases and do we understand their role in climate? What is the impact

  17. Energy Implications of Alternative Water Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Energy Implications of Alternative Water Futures First Western Forum on Energy & Water water, energy, and GHG emissions. Water-related energy use is expected to rise. Conservation canWaterUse(MAF) Historical Use More Resource Intensive Less Resource Intensive Current Trends #12;Water and Energy Link

  18. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

    2012-04-03

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  19. Climate Threat to the Planet:* Implications for Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Climate Threat to the Planet:* Implications for Energy Policy and Intergenerational Justice Jim implications for energy policy and intergenerational justice. The propriety of a scientist discussing these implications is self evident. Global Warming Story 1. Science Update - Climate Sensitivity - Faustian Bargain

  20. INTRODUCTION Requirements to monitor the effects of potentially environ-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranston, Peter S.

    the boundaries of which major deposits of uranium are subject to current and proposed mining activities. PerhapsINTRODUCTION Requirements to monitor the effects of potentially environ- mentally damaging mining well-regulated mining activity has left a legacy of discharged acidic and metallic wastes to several

  1. The potential of renewable energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    On June 27 and 28, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National Energy Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the laboratories. As a result of that meeting, interlaboratory teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead laboratory was designated for each core laboratory team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable energy technologies contribute to diversifying sources of energy supply What are the major barriers to greater renewable energy use and what is the potential timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications This report presents the results of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable energy. Scores of scientists, analysts, and engineers in the five core laboratories gave generously of their time over the past eight months to produce this document. Their generous, constructive efforts are hereby gratefully acknowledged. 126 refs., 44 figs., 32 tabs.

  2. Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Carroll, G.

    2007-04-01

    This paper examines the potential effects that emerging mandatory carbon markets have for voluntary markets for renewable energy, or green power markets. In an era of carbon regulation, green power markets will continue to play an important role because many consumers may be interested in supporting renewable energy development beyond what is supported through mandates or other types of policy support. The paper examines the extent to which GHG benefits motivate consumers to make voluntary renewable energy purchases and summarizes key issues emerging as a result of these overlapping markets, such as the implications of carbon regulation for renewable energy marketing claims, the demand for and price of renewable energy certificates (RECs), and the use of RECs in multiple markets (disaggregation of attributes). It describes carbon regulation programs under development in the Northeast and California, and how these might affect renewable energy markets in these regions, as well as the potential interaction between voluntary renewable energy markets and voluntary carbon markets, such as the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX). It also briefly summarizes the experience in the European Union, where carbon is already regulated. Finally, the paper presents policy options for policymakers and regulators to consider in designing carbon policies to enable carbon markets and voluntary renewable energy markets to work together.

  3. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. David Kotz 1 Technological Implications for Privacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotz, David

    personal information (financial records, medical records, criminal records, etc). More subtly, and perhaps it easier (cheaper) than every to track users' activities. By recording and analyzing user's activities

  5. Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    plant fuel. We examine potential biomass energy demand in the 5-county area, and then review cropBiomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy is thought to have significantly more potential than forest biomass energy (Perlack, Wright et al. 2005). One

  6. Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD SPECIAL REPORT 290 #12;#12;Committee on Climate Change and U Washington, D.C. 2008 www.TRB.org Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION

  7. RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

    2012-03-31

    Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of precipitation where sequestration begins to decrease.

  8. Next Generation Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants R&D...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of low-global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants. DOE commissioned this roadmap to establish a set of high-priority research and development (R&D) activities that...

  9. Scoping Calculations for Potential Groundwater Impacts from Operation of the APT Facility at SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibault, J.J.

    1999-10-07

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential travel times and paths of the postulated activated groundwater beneath the facility and to examine the fate and transport of this activated groundwater.

  10. Harmonic potential and hadron spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael Tumanyan

    2009-05-28

    The quark-gluon sea in the hadrons is considered as periodically correlated. Energy levels of Shrodinger equation with harmonic potential is used for describing of the spectrum of hadron masses. In the considered cases the effective potential operating on each particle of ensemble, under certain conditions becomes square-law on displacement from a equilibrium point. It can become an explanation of popularity of oscillator potential for the description of a spectrum of masses of elementary particles. The analysis shows that levels of periodic potential better agreed to the spectrum of hadron masses, than levels of other potentials used for an explanation of a spectrum of masses.

  11. Implications of Theoretical Ideas Regarding Cold Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afsar Abbas

    1995-03-29

    A lot of theoretical ideas have been floated to explain the so called cold fusion phenomenon. I look at a large subset of these and study further physical implications of the concepts involved. I suggest that these can be tested by other independent physical means. Because of the significance of these the experimentalists are urged to look for these signatures. The results in turn will be important for a better understanding and hence control of the cold fusion phenomenon.

  12. New Houston NOx Rules: Implications and Solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cascone, R.

    2002-01-01

    Rules: Implications and Solutions Impact ofNew NOx Regulations in the Houston Galveston Area (HGA) Ron Cascone - Mgr. Special Projects, Utilities &Environ. ABSTRACT New regulations drastically cut the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) allowed... monitored six key atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO), lead, nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM IO ), sulfur oxides, and volatile organic compounds (YOCs). Except for NOx, emissions of all have decreased significantly. NOx...

  13. 1 potential, 2 potentials, 3 potentials4: Untangling the UV photodissociation spectra of HI and DI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    1 potential, 2 potentials, 3 potentials­4: Untangling the UV photodissociation spectra of HI and DI coefficient and branching-ratio data for the UV photodissociation spectra of HI and DI has been used.1063/1.1513303 I. INTRODUCTION The UV photochemical decomposition of HI has been studied for more than a century,1

  14. Chapter 20: Electric Potential and Electric Potential Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    1 Chapter 20: Electric Potential and Electric Potential Energy 2. A 4.5 µC charge moves in a uniform electric field ( )5 ^4.1 10 N/C= ×E x . The change in electric potential energy of a charge that moves against an electric field is given by equation 20-1, 0U q Ed = . If the charge moves in the same

  15. Elucidating the organic-OMS interface and its implications for heterogeneous catalysts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Qingqing

    2012-07-16

    Organic – ordered mesoporous silica (OMS) hybrid materials have attracted great interest due to their potential applications for gas separations, and heterogeneous catalysis. Amine-functionalized OMS materials are active in a variety of base...

  16. Commercial Building Toplighting: Energy Saving Potential and Potential Paths Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, Tyson; Roth, Kurt W.

    2008-06-01

    This report documents the energy-saving potential of toplighting, a form of daylighting that combines skylights and electric lighting controls.

  17. With harmful ozone concentrations tied to meteorological conditions, EPA investigates the U.S. air quality implications of a changing climate.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    With harmful ozone concentrations tied to meteorological conditions, EPA investigates the U.S. air?" noting that ". . . changing climatic conditions could significantly affect the air quality in some quality implications of a changing climate. D iscussion of the potential sensitivity of air quality

  18. Analysis of pooling, equity capital and current assets of large producer marketing cooperatives with implications for export marketing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tough, Cynthia H

    1985-01-01

    users. This study quantitatively analyzes the effect of cooperative pools on equity capital and total current assets of large cooperatives. Information on the potential long-term financial effect of pooling could aid cooperative managers and markers...ANALYSIS OF POOLING, EQUITY CAPITAL AND CURRENT ASSETS OF LARGE PRODUCER MARKETING COOPERATIVES WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR EXPORT MARKETING A Thesis by CYNTHIA HEATHER TOUGH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial...

  19. Implications Of A Dark Sector U(1) For Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Banks; Willy Fischler; Dustin Lorshbough; Walter Tangarife

    2014-04-29

    We discuss the implications for gamma ray burst studies, of a dark unbroken $U(1)_D$ sector that couples predominantly through gravity to the visible sector. The dominant dark matter component remains neutral under $U(1)_D$. The collapsar model is assumed to explain the origin of long gamma ray bursts. The main idea is that by measuring the change in stellar black hole spin during the duration of the GRB, one can make inferences about the existence of a dark matter accretion disk. This could potentially provide evidence for the existence for a $U(1)_D$ sector.

  20. Charge Trapping in High Efficiency Alternating Copolymers: Implication...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charge Trapping in High Efficiency Alternating Copolymers: Implications in Organic Photovoltaic Device Efficiency Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Charge Trapping in...

  1. Noncommutative Black-Body Radiation: Implications On Cosmic Microwave Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir H. Fatollahi; Maryam Hajirahimi

    2006-07-12

    Including loop corrections, black-body radiation in noncommutative space is anisotropic. A direct implication of possible space noncommutativity on the Cosmic Microwave Background map is argued.

  2. Helium on Venus: Implications for uranium and thorium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ; Mcelroy, MB

    1983-01-01

    Implications for Uranium and Thorium Abstract. Helium isa wide range of uranium and thorium abundances. simi· lar toof crustal uranium and thorium. Studies of helium in Earth's

  3. Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2009-01-01

    actual (though subsidized) PV costs in some of the largestthough subsidized) PV costs. For two primary reasons, thisEmpirical Investigation of PV Cost Trends, and Implications

  4. Geologic Setting of the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt: Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt: Implications for Geothermal Resource Capacity and Sustainable Energy Production Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  5. Electric Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regimes in the United States: Implications for Investment PowerPoint presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee by Charles Whitmore, Senior Market Advisor at the Federal...

  6. Precision Higgs Boson Physics and Implications for Beyond the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Precision Higgs Boson Physics and Implications for Beyond the Standard Model Physics Theories Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Precision Higgs Boson Physics and...

  7. Precision Higgs Boson Physics and Implications for Beyond the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Precision Higgs Boson Physics and Implications for Beyond the Standard Model Physics Theories Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Precision Higgs Boson...

  8. The Human Genome Project and its Social Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Paul B

    1990-01-01

    The Human Genome Project and its Social Implications By Paulit is about the Human Genome Project. In a sense this isheredity. The Human Genome Project is concerned essentially

  9. Genomics and the human genome project: implications for psychiatry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsoe, J R

    2004-01-01

    300 Genomics and the Human Genome Project: implications forpast decade the Human Genome Project has made extraordinaryto each other. The Human Genome Project has approached human

  10. The Implications of Global Climate Change for Mountain Gorilla Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    The implication of projected climate change for freshwaterand P. Martens, 2004. Climate change and malaria: analysisEra for Conservation: Review of Climate Change Adaptation

  11. Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah: Implications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Management in Utah: Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development Unconventional fuel development will require scarce water resources. In an environment characterized by...

  12. Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-01-14

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  13. Implications of Low Electricity Demand Growth

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon Gas2Implications

  14. Quantification of the Potential Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Quantification of the Potential Energy from Residuals (EfR) in the UK Commissioned, by virtue of its biomass content, it can make a valuable contribution towards our renewable energy targets1 waste up to 2020. To determine the potential2 contribution that energy recovery from residual

  15. Scalar field potentials for cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor H. Cardenas; Sergio del Campo

    2004-01-05

    We discuss different aspects of modern cosmology through a scalar field potential construction method. We discuss the case of negative potential cosmologies and its relation with oscillatory cosmic evolution, models with a explicit interaction between dark energy and dark matter which address the coincidence problem and also the case of non-zero curvature space.

  16. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  17. Id1 expression promotes peripheral CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and survival upon TCR activation without co-stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chen; Jin, Rong [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)] [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Wang, Hong-Cheng [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Tang, Hui; Liu, Yuan-Feng; Qian, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Xiu-Yuan; Ge, Qing [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)] [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Sun, Xiao-Hong, E-mail: sunx@omrf.org [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Zhang, Yu, E-mail: zhangyu007@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)] [Department of Immunology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Id1 expression enables naïve T cell proliferation without anti-CD28 co-stimulation. •Id1 expression facilitates T cells survival when stimulated with anti-CD3. •Elevation of IL-2 production by Id1 contributes increased proliferation and survival. •Id1 potentiates NF-?B activation by anti-CD3 stimulation. -- Abstract: Although the role of E proteins in the thymocyte development is well documented, much less is known about their function in peripheral T cells. Here we demonstrated that CD4 promoter-driven transgenic expression of Id1, a naturally occurring dominant-negative inhibitor of E proteins, can substitute for the co-stimulatory signal delivered by CD28 to facilitate the proliferation and survival of naïve CD4{sup +} cells upon anti-CD3 stimulation. We next discovered that IL-2 production and NF-?B activity after anti-CD3 stimulation were significantly elevated in Id1-expressing cells, which may be, at least in part, responsible for the augmentation of their proliferation and survival. Taken together, results from this study suggest an important role of E and Id proteins in peripheral T cell activation. The ability of Id proteins to by-pass co-stimulatory signals to enable T cell activation has significant implications in regulating T cell immunity.

  18. Active Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freuder, Eugene C.

    A progress report on the work described in Vision Flashes 33 and 43 on recognition of real objects. Emphasis is on the "active" use of knowledge in directing the flow of visual processing.

  19. Completeness for sparse potential scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Zhongwei

    2014-01-15

    The present paper is devoted to the scattering theory of a class of continuum Schrödinger operators with deterministic sparse potentials. We first establish the limiting absorption principle for both modified free resolvents and modified perturbed resolvents. This actually is a weak form of the classical limiting absorption principle. We then prove the existence and completeness of local wave operators, which, in particular, imply the existence of wave operators. Under additional assumptions on the sparse potential, we prove the completeness of wave operators. In the context of continuum Schrödinger operators with sparse potentials, this paper gives the first proof of the completeness of wave operators.

  20. Joshua Klobas' interest in the implications of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Joshua Klobas' interest in the implications of climate change and the physical basis) particles contribute to many processes implicated in climate change. A challenge in describing SOA-climate University. Atmospheric particles have a disproportionally strong effect on the Earth's climate despite

  1. Switching Cells and Their Implications for Power Electronic Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Switching Cells and Their Implications for Power Electronic Circuits Leon M. Tolbert1 , Fang Zheng with their implications and applications in power electronic circuits. The concept of switching cells in power electronic cells function as the fundamental elements in power electronic circuits, which cannot be further broken

  2. Hertz Potentials and Differential Geometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouas, Jeffrey David

    2011-08-08

    , and I present techniques for introducing gauge terms of arbitrary order. Finally, I give a treatment of one application of Hertz potentials, namely calculating electromagnetic Casimir interactions for a couple of systems....

  3. Groundwater Contamination Potential from Stormwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Groundwater Contamination Potential from Stormwater Infiltration Robert Pitt, University (CSOs). Introduction (cont.) · Scattered information is available addressing groundwater impacts cities · EPA 1983 NURP work on groundwater beneath Fresno and Long Island infiltration basins · NRC 1994

  4. Zombie Apocalypse and GIS Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Daniel

    2013-01-15

    Zombie Apocalypse and GIS Potential Daniel Siegel Senior in Environmental Studies Minor in GIS KU GIS Day 2012 Playing Movie Director Point of infection (POI): Haworth Hall Zombies • Attracted to population centers • Move Easily... Zombie Apocalypse and GIS Potential Daniel Siegel Senior in Environmental Studies Minor in GIS KU GIS Day 2012 Playing Movie Director Point of infection (POI): Haworth Hall Zombies • Attracted to population centers • Move Easily...

  5. High Bandwidth Micro-Actuators for Active Flow John T Solomon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the mean flow. The potential of Hartmann tube or modified Hartmann resonators for active flow control has

  6. Strike-slip faulting as a trigger mechanism for overpressure release through piercement structures. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    . Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,*, A. Nermoen a , M. Krotkiewski a , Y 2009 Accepted 12 March 2009 Available online 19 March 2009 Keywords: Java, Indonesia Lusi mud volcano the newly formed Lusi mud volcano in Indonesia (Mazzini et al., 2007). Lusi became active the 29th of May

  7. Strike-slip faulting as a trigger mechanism for overpressure release through piercement structures. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    . Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,*, A. Nermoen a , M. Krotkiewski a , Y 2009 Accepted 12 March 2009 Available online xxx Keywords: Java, Indonesia Lusi mud volcano Faulting volcano in Indonesia (Mazzini et al., 2007). Lusi became active the 29th of May 2006 on the Java Island

  8. Using outcomes to inform social decision-making in schizophrenia: Implications for motivation and functioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campellone, Timothy Ryan

    2015-01-01

    the role of ability and motivation. Archives of GeneralImplications for motivation and functioning by Timothy RyanImplications for motivation and functioning by Timothy Ryan

  9. Kinetics of the Dissolution of Scheelite in Groundwater: Implications for Environmental and Economic Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Stephanie Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten, Its History, Geology, Ore-dressing, Metallurgy,5.1 Implications for Environmental Geology…………………………..26 5.2Implications for Economic Geology………………………………..27 6. Future

  10. CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES CONFRONTING THE BEIR III COMMITTEE---IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION Jacob I. Fabrikanl MayIMPLICATIONS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION ' Jacob I . F a b r iestablishing appropriate radiation protection guides, and

  11. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering Thomas R. Karl Lead, NOAA climate services Director, NOAA National Climatic Data Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change

  12. Implications of the Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitcher, P.

    1998-11-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP), launched in 1991, aims to map and sequence the human genome by 2006. During the fifteen-year life of the project, it is projected that $3 billion in federal funds will be allocated to it. The ultimate aims of spending this money are to analyze the structure of human DNA, to identify all human genes, to recognize the functions of those genes, and to prepare for the biology and medicine of the twenty-first century. The following summary examines some of the implications of the program, concentrating on its scientific import and on the ethical and social problems that it raises. Its aim is to expose principles that might be used in applying the information which the HGP will generate. There is no attempt here to translate the principles into detailed proposals for legislation. Arguments and discussion can be found in the full report, but, like this summary, that report does not contain any legislative proposals.

  13. Identifying Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Adrian S

    2009-01-01

    Identification of active constraints in constrained optimization is of interest from both practical and theoretical viewpoints, as it holds the promise of reducing an inequality-constrained problem to an equality-constrained problem, in a neighborhood of a solution. We study this issue in the more general setting of composite nonsmooth minimization, in which the objective is a composition of a smooth vector function c with a lower semicontinuous function h, typically nonsmooth but structured. In this setting, the graph of the generalized gradient of h can often be decomposed into a union (nondisjoint) of simpler subsets. "Identification" amounts to deciding which subsets of the graph are "active" in the criticality conditions at a given solution. We give conditions under which any convergent sequence of approximate critical points finitely identifies the activity. Prominent among these properties is a condition akin to the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification, which ensures boundedness of the set of...

  14. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yingting; Tissue Tech Inc., Miami, FL 33173 ; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER POTENTIAL C. P. Kumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER POTENTIAL C. P. Kumar Scientist National Institute of Hydrology Roorkee ­ 247667 (Uttaranchal) ABSTRACT Water balance techniques have been extensively used to make quantitative estimates of water resources and the impact of man's activities on the hydrologic cycle. On the basis

  16. Dirac Equations with Confining Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Noble; U. D. Jentschura

    2015-02-06

    This paper is devoted to a study of relativistic eigenstates of Dirac particles which are simultaneously bound by a static Coulomb potential and added linear confining potentials. It has recently been shown that, despite the addition of radially symmetric, linear confining potentials, some specific bound-state energies surprisingly retain their exact Dirac--Coulomb values (in the sense of an "exact symmetry"). This observation raises pertinent questions as to the generality of the cancellation mechanism. A Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation is used to find the relevant nonrelativistic physical degrees of freedom, which include additional spin-orbit couplings induced by the linear confining potentials. The matrix elements of the effective operators obtained from the scalar, and time-like confining potentials mutually cancel for specific ratios of the prefactors of the effective operators, which must be tailored to the cancellation mechanism. The result of the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation is used to explicitly show that the cancellation is accidental and restricted (for a given Hamiltonian) to only one reference state, rather than traceable to a more general relationship among the obtained effective low-energy operators. Furthermore, we show that the cancellation mechanism does not affect anti-particle (negative-energy) states.

  17. The Environmental Protection Agency's Safety Standards for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Potential Path Forward in Response to the Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future - 13388

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forinash, Betsy; Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom

    2013-07-01

    Following the decision to withdraw the Yucca Mountain license application, the Department of Energy created a Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future, tasked with recommending a national strategy to manage the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. The BRC issued its final report in January 2012, with recommendations covering transportation, storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); potential reprocessing; and supporting institutional measures. The BRC recommendations on disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) are relevant to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which shares regulatory responsibility with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC): EPA issues 'generally applicable' performance standards for disposal repositories, which are then implemented in licensing. For disposal, the BRC endorses developing one or more geological repositories, with siting based on an approach that is adaptive, staged and consent-based. The BRC recommends that EPA and NRC work cooperatively to issue generic disposal standards-applying equally to all sites-early in any siting process. EPA previously issued generic disposal standards that apply to all sites other than Yucca Mountain. However, the BRC concluded that the existing regulations should be revisited and revised. The BRC proposes a number of general principles to guide the development of future regulations. EPA continues to review the BRC report and to assess the implications for Agency action, including potential regulatory issues and considerations if EPA develops new or revised generic disposal standards. This review also involves preparatory activities to define potential process and public engagement approaches. (authors)

  18. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  19. Generalized Stillinger--David Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Zhyganiuk

    2012-02-20

    We present an improved version of the Stillinger--David polarization potential of the intermolecular interaction in water. A clear algorithm of construction of a function describing the oxygen-hydrogen interaction in water molecules is formulated. A new approach to the modeling of a function screening the charge-dipole interaction on small distances is developed. To describe the long-range asymptotics of the intermolecular potential, the bare Stillinger--David potential is supplemented by a term related to the interaction of dipole moments of oxygen ions. In addition, we introduce a term involving a deformation of the electron shells of oxygen ions to the polarization component. These corrections allow us to successfully reproduce all essential results of quantum mechanical calculations of the interaction energy for water molecules obtained by Clementi. Analyzing the behavior of the dipole moment of a water molecule as a function of the intermolecular distance, we obtain the estimate of irreducible two-particle effects in water.

  20. Kähler potentials for Planck inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roest, Diederik; Scalisi, Marco; Zavala, Ivonne E-mail: m.scalisi@rug.nl

    2013-11-01

    We assess which Kähler potentials in supergravity lead to viable single-field inflationary models that are consistent with Planck. We highlight the role of symmetries, such as shift, Heisenberg and supersymmetry, in these constructions. Also the connections to string theory are pointed out. Finally, we discuss a supergravity model for arbitrary inflationary potentials that is suitable for open string inflation and generalise it to the case of closed string inflation. Our model includes the recently discussed supergravity reformulation of the Starobinsky model of inflation as well as an interesting alternative with comparable predictions.

  1. Exotic static 3-body potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bicudo; M. Cardoso; O. Oliveira

    2008-11-06

    We study exotic static 3-body potentials, utilizing generalized Wilson Loops in SU(3) lattice QCD. For the quark-antiquark-gluon techniques we address the angles of 0, 45, 60, 90, 120, 135 and 180 degrees, between the quark-gluon and the antiquark-gluon segments. We calculate the form of the static potential and discuss whether, or not, two-body interactions exist between the three different bodies, and study the existence of repulsion between the strings. We also perform a first study of the interactions in the system of three gluon.

  2. The Implications of Global Climate Change for Mountain Gorilla Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    area. Biomass and Hydropower potential and demand in thestudy assessed the hydropower potential in the Albertinein order to identify potential hydropower sites. River flow

  3. Technical Potential for Solar Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    Technical Potential for Solar Photovoltaics in Illinois May 2013 #12;Authors ...................................................................................................... 1.1 Utility-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Systems in the U.S. ........................... 1.2 Previous ...................................................................................................... 3.1 Optimization Matrix for Large-Scale PV System Applications ......... 3.2 Photovoltaic

  4. POTENTIAL OF CLOUD-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason R.

    .!! Cover!photos!courtesy!of!the!National!Energy!Research!Scientific!Computing!Center!and!Google.! #12;! ! ! The Energy Efficiency Potential of Cloud-Based Software: A U.S. Case Study ! Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory June, 2013 Research Team Eric!Masanet! Arman!Shehabi! Jiaqi!Liang! Lavanya!Ramakrishnan! Xiao

  5. Three-loop static potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander V. Smirnov; Vladimir A. Smirnov; Matthias Steinhauser

    2010-04-12

    We compute the three-loop corrections to the potential of two heavy quarks. In particular we consider in this Letter the purely gluonic contribution which provides in combination with the fermion corrections of Ref. \\cite{Smirnov:2008pn} the complete answer at three loops.

  6. Quantum mechanics without potential function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Alhaidari; M. E. H. Ismail

    2015-06-26

    In the standard formulation of quantum mechanics, one starts by proposing a potential function that models the physical system. The potential is then inserted into the Schr\\"odinger equation, which is solved for the wave function, bound states energy spectrum and/or scattering phase shift. In this work, however, we propose an alternative formulation in which the potential function does not appear. The aim is to obtain a set of analytically realizable systems, which is larger than in the standard formulation and may or may not be associated with any given or previously known potential functions. We start with the wavefunction, which is written as a bounded infinite sum of elements of a complete basis with polynomial coefficients that are orthogonal on an appropriate domain in the energy space. Using the asymptotic properties of these polynomials, we obtain the scattering phase shift, bound states and resonances. This formulation enables one to handle not only the well-known quantum systems but also previously untreated ones. Illustrative examples are given for two- and there-parameter systems.

  7. A knowledge of the potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sali, Andrej

    is as important for understanding protein folding as is the potential surface for the H H2 reaction. estimated to protein folding, in which thousands of atoms take part. The under- standing of a reaction is based of experimental developments and theoretical advances.[1] By contrast, protein folding is so complex that even

  8. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  9. Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

    1994-07-01

    This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

  10. Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2012-07-09

    Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

  11. The Implications of Global Climate Change for Mountain Gorilla Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    a changing and uncertain climate. Frontiers in Ecology andother/ipcc_tar/? src=/climate/ipcc_tar/wg2/index.htm.The implication of projected climate change for freshwater

  12. Multiple, Simultaneous, Martensitic Transformations: Implications on Transformation Texture Intensities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    kind of martensite to be followed as a function of the steel temperature. The problem is relevantMultiple, Simultaneous, Martensitic Transformations: Implications on Transformation Texture, multiple martensitic transformations. Abstract. A theory is developed for martensite variants that have

  13. An assessment of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sequeira, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    An exploration of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations is made by assessing the results of a study of aviation's effects on United States air quality mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The ...

  14. TRANSBOUNDARY GROUNDWATER AND INTERNATIONAL LAW: PAST PRACTICES AND CURRENT IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    TRANSBOUNDARY GROUNDWATER AND INTERNATIONAL LAW: PAST PRACTICES AND CURRENT IMPLICATIONS By Kyoko........................................................................................................................................ 1 2. The Notion of Transboundary Groundwater................................................................................... 3 3. Evolution of International Groundwater Management in Environmental Law

  15. Financial market imperfections and their asset pricing implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayanakorn, Surapap

    2012-01-01

    This thesis consists of two studies on financial market imperfections. The first study (Chapters 2 and 3) investigates illiquidity, which is a reflection of different imperfections, and its pricing implications in the ...

  16. PARASITES OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS: FISHERY IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARASITES OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS: FISHERY IMPLICATIONS R. J. G. LESTER,' A. BARNES of the many examples see MacKenzie (1983). The skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, is one of the most valuable

  17. The Internet as recommendation engine : implications of online behavioral targeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Grieco, Anthony Nicoll

    2010-01-01

    This thesis discusses the economic implications of Internet behavioral advertising, which targets ads to individuals based on extensive detailed data about the specific websites users have visited. Previous literature on ...

  18. Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    shell chemistry of bivalves. I will discuss implications of carbon cycle changes for marine species, including insights from a coastal area where I have worked for more than 24...

  19. Future precipitation changes and their implications for tropical peatlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Future precipitation changes and their implications for tropical peatlands Wenhong Li,1 Robert E. Dickinson, R. Fu, G.-Y. Niu, Z.-L. Yang, and J. G. Canadell (2007), Future precipitation changes

  20. Serotonin Modulates Fast-Spiking Interneuron and Synchronous Activity in Prefrontal Cortex through 5-HT[subscript 1A] and 5-HT[subscript 2A] Receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watakabe, Akiya

    Alterations of the serotonergic system in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are implicated in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. Although abnormal synchronous activity is observed in the PFC of these ...

  1. Evolution of Clearance Standards and Implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;6 · At present, US market does not exist. · Steel and concrete industries and labor unions are opposing converting these materials into consumer products (cars, chairs, toys, spoons, etc) because of potential risk of radioactivity is not reasonable ­ Release of these materials can be accomplished with negligible or no risk

  2. Canonical quantum potential scattering theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Hussein; W. Li; S. Wuester

    2008-07-13

    A new formulation of potential scattering in quantum mechanics is developed using a close structural analogy between partial waves and the classical dynamics of many non-interacting fields. Using a canonical formalism we find non-linear first-order differential equations for the low energy scattering parameters like scattering length and effective range. They significantly simplify typical calculations, as we illustrate for atom-atom and neutron-nucleus scattering systems. A generalization to charged particle scattering is also possible.

  3. Nanobiocatalysis and Its Potential Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jungbae; Grate, Jay W.; Wang, Ping

    2008-11-01

    Nanobiocatalysis with enzymes incorporated into nanostructured materials have emerged as a rapidly growing area. Structures including nanoporous media, nanofibers, carbon nanotubes, and nanoparticles have been found to be efficient in manipulating the nanoscale environment of the enzyme and thus promising exciting advances in many areas of enzyme technology. This review will describe these recent developments in nanobiocatalysis and their potential applications in various fields such as trypsin digestion in proteomic analysis, antifouling, biofuel cells, and biosensors.

  4. Phylogenetic Distribution of Potential Cellulases in Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlemont, R.; Martiny, A. C

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic Distribution of Potential Cellulases incontent/79/5/1545 Phylogenetic Distribution of Potential3, 4). Thus, the phylogenetic distribution of en- zyme genes

  5. Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment September 24, 2013 | Tags: Biological and Environmental Research...

  6. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is...

  7. Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases in Safe and Responsible Production from Depleted U.S. Oil Fields Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential...

  8. Webinar: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen Production and Concentrating Solar Power: A Systems Analysis Webinar: Potential Strategies for Integrating Solar Hydrogen...

  9. Thermoelectric Generator (TEG) Fuel Displacement Potential using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Displacement Potential using Engine-in-the-Loop and Simulation Thermoelectric Generator (TEG) Fuel Displacement Potential using Engine-in-the-Loop and Simulation Assessment...

  10. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01

    Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

  11. Microbial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    , diversity, fungi pathogen, pink snow mould, phospholipid analysis, plant microorganism, turfgrass SummaryMicrobial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen Composting is the degradation of organic materials through the activities of diverse microorganisms

  12. Potential of Development and Application of Wave Energy Conversion Technology in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiberteau, K. L.; Liu, Y.; Lee, J.; Kozman, T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the potential and application of developing wave energy technology in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). The conditions (weather, wave climate, activity of the oil industry, etc.) in the GOM are assessed and the attributes of wave...

  13. Rheostat Re-Wired: Alternative Hypotheses for the Control of Thioredoxin Reduction Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bewley, Kathryn D.

    Thioredoxins are small soluble proteins that contain a redox-active disulfide (CXXC). These disulfides are tuned to oxidizing or reducing potentials depending on the function of the thioredoxin within the cell. The mechanism ...

  14. Natural gas vehicles - market potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-27

    Proponents of natural-gas fueled vehicles (NGVs) claim that the economic, environmental, and performance advantages have a potential market, particularly for large fleets. They also concede that obstacles in the form of price uncertainties, the lack of financial incentives, a weak service infrastructure, state and local taxes and regulations, the high cost of natural gas pumps, and competition from other fuel alternatives are major impediments. Gas utilities must promote the NGV market and the federal government must develop safety and environmental standards before the NGV industry can hope to develop a significant market. 6 references.

  15. Dirac solutions for quaternionic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano Giardino, Sergio

    2014-02-15

    The Dirac equation is solved for quaternionic potentials, i?V{sub 0} + j?W{sub 0} (V{sub 0}?R , W{sub 0}?C). The study shows two different solutions. The first one contains particle and anti-particle solutions and leads to the diffusion, tunneling, and Klein energy zones. The standard solution is recovered taking the complex limit of this solution. The second solution, which does not have a complex counterpart, can be seen as a V{sub 0}-antiparticle or |W{sub 0}|-particle solution.

  16. Effective potentials for Folding Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nan-yow Chen; Zheng-Yao Su; Chung-Yu Mou

    2006-01-28

    A coarse-grained off-lattice model that is not biased in any way to the native state is proposed to fold proteins. To predict the native structure in a reasonable time, the model has included the essential effects of water in an effective potential. Two new ingredients, the dipole-dipole interaction and the local hydrophobic interaction, are introduced and are shown to be as crucial as the hydrogen bonding. The model allows successful folding of the wild-type sequence of protein G and may have provided important hints to the study of protein folding.

  17. Policies to encourage private sector responses to potential climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantor, R.A.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.; Rayner, S. )

    1989-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently completed work on a report commissioned by the US Congress from the Department of Energy entitled A Compendium of Options for Government Policy to Encourage Private Sector Responses to Potential Climate Change'' (US DOE 1989). Four classes of incentives (regulatory, fiscal, informational, and RD D) were surveyed in the context of greenhouse-related activities in five economic sectors as depicted in Figure 1. As the example shows, for each activity general policies and specific options were considered. The paper presented here does not summarize the DOE study but identifies some of the lessons ORNL staff learned during the study about policies to deal with potential global warming. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Using a water balance model to analyze the implications of potential irrigation development in the Upper Blue Nile Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain Figueroa, Anjuli

    2012-01-01

    More than 200 rivers in the world cross at least one political border. Any development project including hydropower or irrigation that is implemented in a trans-boundary river is in essence a claim on the resource. Managing ...

  19. Volatile organic compounds from vegetation in southern Yunnan Province, China: Emission rates and some potential regional implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    in the genera Bambusa, Elaeis, Eucalyptus, Hevea, Pinus, ande.g. Bambusa spp. and Eucalyptus spp. ) are also projectedpotential such as Hevea, Eucalyptus, Arecaceae (Palmae),

  20. Pilot-scale manufacture and marketing of Quarg cheese: implications for future U.S. market potential 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battaglia, Ann Christine

    1986-01-01

    followed by refrlgeratlon. An lntermedlate culture wss made by aseptically transferlng 20 ml (1% v/v) of mother culture (pH 4. 6) into each of the two flasks of reconstituted NFDM warmed to 20 C. The Intermediate culture wss incubated approximately 16... production by direct ultrafiltration of skim milk and by the Pasilac process 12 4. Schematic diagram of pilot scale Quarg manufacture 24 5. Initial Quarg questionnaire 27 6. Promotional sign-1 used during Quarg demonstration 7. Promotional sign-2 used...

  1. Project Galaxy - Sustianable Resource Supply and Environmental Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark [ORNL; Wimmer, Robert [Toyota Motor Corp.

    2012-03-01

    Understanding what it takes to move from a corn-based liquid fuels industry to one that is cellulosic-based requires a complex transition over time. This transition implies, among other things, a shift from annual cropping systems considered under United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) policy as commodity crops, to perennial lignocellulosic crops that are herbaceous and wood-based. Because of changes in land use as well as biomass and other crop supplies, land-based environmental amenities such as water quality, soil health and tilth, air quality, and animal and avian species populations and their diversity change also. Environmental effects are measured as magnitudes (how much they are impacted), and direction of the impact (either positive or negative). By developing a series of quantitative and qualitative metrics, the larger issue of defining relative sustainability may be addressed, and this can be done at a finer detail of regional (scale) and environmental amenity-specific impacts. Although much literature exists about research relevant to specific environmental variables, there is no published, documented, nor research literature on direct application of environmental over-compliance with regards a 'biorefinery.' Our three goals were to (1) understand and quantify bioenergy sustainability and some key environmental effects in a generic set of examples; (2) explain the effort and means to define and quantify specific qualitative environmental measures, and to determine a way to understand changes in these measures over time and what their implications might be; and (3) use these outcomes to evaluate potential sites in any geographic area. This would permit assessment of candidate locations, combined with an understanding of co-production of fuels, chemicals, and electric power, to interpret sustainability measures and the relationship between environmental sustainability and economic sustainability. The process of determining environmental sustainability effects as a result of providing renewable energy is complex. We have only included in this report environmental effects as a result of producing biomass for the biorefinery, and the area represented by the footprint of the biorefinery itself. In doing this, we have defined critical environmental variables (water, soil, air, and flora and fauna) and discussed some measurable indicators used to quantify effects such as nitrate content, soil organic matter, air particulates, and avian species diversity, respectively. We also point out the need to perform specific sustainability risk assessments, and the need to continually evaluate the life cycle inventory with an accompanying life-cycle assessment. Only in this dynamic framework can environmental sustainability be determined, evaluated and assessed, and contrasted with economic sustainability goals of a firm or an industry.

  2. CARD6 Is a Modulator of NF-B Activation by Nod1-and Cardiak-mediated Pathways*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARD6 Is a Modulator of NF- B Activation by Nod1- and Cardiak-mediated Pathways* Received specific binding of this CARD6-encoding protein to Nod1 (CARD4), Cardiak (Rip2/Rick), NAC (NALP1/DEFCAP implicated in NF- B and caspase-1 activation but not to other CARD family proteins. Cardiak and Nod1 (but

  3. Humic acid in drinking well water induces inflammation through reactive oxygen species generation and activation of nuclear factor-?B/activator protein-1 signaling pathways: A possible role in atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hseu, You-Cheng [Department of Cosmeceutics, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX 77030 (United States); Senthil Kumar, K.J. [Department of Cosmeceutics, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chih-Sheng; Cho, Hsin-Ju; Lin, Shu-Wei; Shen, Pei-Chun [Institute of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lin, Cheng-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Lu, Fung-Jou [Institute of Medicine, Chun Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Yang, Hsin-Ling, E-mail: hlyang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Institute of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Humic acid (HA) has been implicated as one of the etiological factors in the peripheral vasculopathy of blackfoot disease (BFD) in Taiwan. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of BFD are not well defined. In this study, we used an in vitro and in vivo model, in which HA (25–200 ?g/mL) activated macrophages to produce pro-inflammatory molecules by activating their transcriptional factors. HA exposure induced NO and PGE{sub 2} production followed by induction of iNOS and COX-2 through NF-?B/AP-1 transactivation in macrophages. In addition, the production of TNF-? and IL-1? was significantly increased by HA. Moreover, HA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression were down-regulated by the NF-?B and AP-1 inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and Tanshinone, respectively. Furthermore, generations of ROS and nitrotyrosine, as well as activation of the AKT and MAPKs signaling cascades were observed after HA exposure. Specifically, HA-induced NF-?B activation was mediated by ROS and AKT, and that HA-induced AP-1 activation was mediated by JNK and ERK. Notably, HA-mediated AKT, JNK, and ERK activation was ROS-independent. The inflammatory potential of HA was correlated with increased expression of HO-1 and Nrf2. Furthermore, an in vivo study confirms that mice exposed to HA, the serum levels of TNF-? and IL-1? was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. This report marks the first confirmation that environmental exposure of HA induces inflammation in macrophages, which may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease. - Highlights: • Humic acid (HA) induce pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators in macrophages. • HA-induced inflammation is mediated by ROS and NF-?B/AP-1 signaling pathways. • The inflammatory potential of HA correlated with activation of Nrf2/HO-1 genes. • HA exposure to mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokines production in vivo. • HA may be one of the main causes of early atherogenesis in blackfoot disease.

  4. Implications of a PTC Extension on U.S. Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Steinberg, D.; Mendelsohn, M.; Zinaman, O.; James, T.; Porro, G.; Hand, M.; Mai, T.; Logan, J.; Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2014-04-01

    This analysis explores the potential effects of wind production tax credit expiration and various extension scenarios on future wind deployment with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS), a model of the U.S. electricity sector. The analysis does not estimate the potential implications on government tax revenue associated with the PTC. Key findings include: Under a scenario in which the PTC is not extended and all other policies remain unchanged, wind capacity additions are expected to be between 3 and 5 GW per year from 2013-2020; PTC extension options that ramp-down from the current level to zero-credit by year-end 2022 appear to be insufficient to support deployment at the recent historical average; Extending the PTC at its historical level may provide the best opportunity to support deployment consistent with recent levels across a range of potential market conditions; it therefore may also provide the best opportunity to sustain wind power installation and manufacturing sector at current levels.

  5. Generic implications of ATWS events at the Salem Nuclear Power Plant: generic implications. Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report is the first of two volumes. It documents the work of an interoffice, interdisciplinary NRC Task Force established to determine the generic implications of two anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) at the Salem Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1 on February 22 and 25, 1983. A second report will document the NRC actions to be taken based on the work of the Task Force. The Task Force was established to address three questions: (1) Is there a need for prompt action for similar equipment in other facilities. (2) Are NRC and its licensees learning the sefety-management lessons, and, (3) How should the priority and content of the ATWS rule be adjusted. A number of short-term actions were taken through Bulletins and an Information Notice. Intermediate-term actions to address the generic issues will be addressed in the separate report and implemented through appropriate regulatory mechanisms.

  6. Dynamic range implications for the effectiveness of semi-active tuned mass dampers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindh, Cory W

    2010-01-01

    The response of tall buildings subjected to dynamic wind loads has been widely studied. For excitations approaching the resonant frequencies of the structure, ensuring serviceability is a significant concern. One traditional ...

  7. The Personal City: The Experiential, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mondschein, Andrew Samuel

    2013-01-01

    a ten-dollar gift card to Starbucks, a vendor in the Hahna $10.00 gift card to Starbucks to participate in our study.everyone. Here is your Starbucks gift card. [If they have

  8. The Personal City: The Experimental, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mondschein, Andrew Samuel

    2012-01-01

    a ten-dollar gift card to Starbucks, a vendor in the Hahna $10.00 gift card to Starbucks to participate in our study.everyone. Here is your Starbucks gift card. [If they have

  9. The Personal City: The Experiential, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mondschein, Andrew Samuel

    2012-01-01

    a ten-dollar gift card to Starbucks, a vendor in the Hahna $10.00 gift card to Starbucks to participate in our study.everyone. Here is your Starbucks gift card. [If they have

  10. Impact of synaptic depression on network activity and implications for neural coding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Lawrence Christopher

    2011-11-24

    Short-term synaptic depression is the phenomena where repeated stimulation leads to a decreased transmission efficacy. In this thesis, the impact of synaptic depression on the responses and dynamics of network models of ...

  11. In vitro specificities of Arabidopsis co-activator histone acetyltransferases: implications for histone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pikaard, Craig

    , Leslie Hicks2 and Craig S. Pikaard1,* 1 Biology Department, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St

  12. Powering Triton's recent geological activity by obliquity tides: Implications for Pluto geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, F.; Spencer, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Strom, R. G. , 1995. The geology of Triton. In: Cruikshank,layering and instability. Geology 21, 299–302. Schenk, P.generating the surface geology and heat flow on Enceladus.

  13. IMPLICATIONS OF INFALLING Fe II-EMITTING CLOUDS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: ANISOTROPIC PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferland, Gary J. [Department of Physics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Hu Chen; Wang Jianmin [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Baldwin, Jack A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI (United States); Porter, Ryan L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Van Hoof, Peter A. M. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, 1180 Brussels (Belgium); Williams, R. J. R. [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-10

    We investigate consequences of the discovery that Fe II emission in quasars, one of the spectroscopic signatures of 'Eigenvector 1', may originate in infalling clouds. Eigenvector 1 correlates with the Eddington ratio L/L {sub Edd} so that Fe II/Hbeta increases as L/L {sub Edd} increases. We show that the 'force multiplier', the ratio of gas opacity to electron scattering opacity, is approx10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} in Fe II-emitting gas. Such gas would be accelerated away from the central object if the radiation force is able to act on the entire cloud. As had previously been deduced, infall requires that the clouds have large column densities so that a substantial amount of shielded gas is present. The critical column density required for infall to occur depends on L/L {sub Edd}, establishing a link between Eigenvector 1 and the Fe II/Hbeta ratio. We see predominantly the shielded face of the infalling clouds rather than the symmetric distribution of emitters that has been assumed. The Fe II spectrum emitted by the shielded face is in good agreement with observations thus solving several long-standing mysteries in quasar emission lines.

  14. Quaternary morphotectonic mapping of the Wadi Araba and implications for the tectonic activity of the southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klinger, Yann

    ., 2000a; Le Béon et al., 2010]. [3] South of the Dead Sea basin, the Dead Sea fault runs near the axis du Globe de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Diderot, UMR 7154, CNRS, Paris, France. 2

  15. Bumblebee vibration activated foraging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Dan Kuan-Nien

    2009-01-01

    SAN DIEGO Bumblebee vibration activated foraging: A ThesisOF THE THESIS Bumblebee vibration activated foraging by Danproduce brief bursts of vibration (foraging activation

  16. Intermediate Energy Infobook Activities (29 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Information about Intermediate Energy Infobook, 29 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8.

  17. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Parish (France)] [and others] [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Parish (France); and others

    1995-07-20

    The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Hypsometry of oceanic lithosphere with implications for Venus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, John Van Sant

    1982-01-01

    HYPSOMETRY OF OCEANIC LITHOSPHERE WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR VENUS A Thesis by JOHN VAN SANT HARV'Y Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August...) August 1982 111 ABSTRACT Hypsometry of Oceanic Lithosphere with Implications for Venus. (August 198Z ) John Van Sant Harvey, B. S. , Texas A&i1 Unive sity Chairman of Advisory Commi. tee: Dr. J. Michael Brown For a limited set of parameter value...

  19. The Electrochemical Surface Potential Due to Classical Point Charge Models Drives Anion Adsorption to the Air-Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcel D. Baer; Abraham C. Stern; Yan Levin; Douglas J. Tobias; Christopher J. Mundy

    2013-07-05

    We demonstrate that the driving forces for ion adsorption to the air-water interface for point charge models results from both cavitation and a term that is of the form of a negative electrochemical surface potential. We carefully characterize the role of the free energy due to the electrochemical surface potential computed from simple empirical models and its role in ionic adsorption within the context of dielectric continuum theory. Our research suggests that the electrochemical surface potential due to point charge models provides anions with a significant driving force to the air-water interface. This is contrary to the results of ab initio simulations that indicate that the average electrostatic surface potential should favor the desorption of anions at the air-water interface. The results have profound implications for the studies of ionic distributions in the vicinity of hydrophobic surfaces and proteins.

  20. Drawing driver's attention to potentially dangerous objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurugöl, Orc?un

    2008-01-01

    Drivers often have difficulties noticing potentially dangerous objects due to weather or lighting conditions or when their field of view is restricted. This thesis presents a display method for potentially dangerous objects ...

  1. Potential Energy and the Body Electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmreich, Stefan

    Physics tells us that potential energy is the capacity to do work that a body possesses as a result of its position in electric, magnetic, or gravitational fields. Thinking of “potentiality” in an electric idiom and with ...

  2. STRATIGRAPHY, STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY, AND TECTONIC IMPLICATIONS OF THE SHOO FLY COMPLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    STRATIGRAPHY, STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY, AND TECTONIC IMPLICATIONS OF THE SHOO FLY COMPLEX and Sciences COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 1985 #12;ABSTRACT Stratigraphy, Structural Geology, and Tectonic Implications form the basement to a middle Jurassic calc-alkaline plutonic arc (Jawbone granitoid sequence

  3. NATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    NATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION OR ELECTRICITY? CLIMATE CHANGE IMPLICATIONS Date: 27-Oct-11 Natural earlier this year encourages natural gas use for transportation and anticipates reductions in greenhouse Gas For Transportation or Electricity? Climate Change Implications Aranya Venkatesh, Paulina Jaramillo

  4. Porous compaction in transient creep regime and implications for melt, petroleum, and CO2 circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Edouard

    Porous compaction in transient creep regime and implications for melt, petroleum, and CO2 in transient creep regime and implications for melt, petroleum, and CO2 circulation, J. Geophys. Res., 113, B

  5. Quenching China's Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of China's Renewable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2014-01-01

    M.A. , 2009, Estimated use of water in the United States ins Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of China’ss Thirst For Renewable Power: Water Implications of China’s

  6. Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, David

    2008-01-01

    Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyMexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyA ccelerates Mexico’s crude oil production, which reached a

  7. Amino acid biosignatures : implications for the detection of extinct or extant microbial communities on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubrey, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    colonization in impact- generated hydrothermal sulphate deposits, Haughton impact structure, and implications for sulphates on Mars.colonization in impact- generated hydrothermal sulphate deposits, Haughton impact structure, and implications for sulphates on Mars.

  8. Amino Acid Biosignatures - Implications for the Detection of Extinct or Extant Microbial Communities on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubrey, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    colonization in impact- generated hydrothermal sulphate deposits, Haughton impact structure, and implications for sulphates on Mars.colonization in impact- generated hydrothermal sulphate deposits, Haughton impact structure, and implications for sulphates on Mars.

  9. Equivalent hydraulic conductivity of an experimental stratigraphy: Implications for basin-scale flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    Equivalent hydraulic conductivity of an experimental stratigraphy: Implications for basin by scaling up an experimental stratigraphy created by physical sedimentation processes and by assuming. Person (2006), Equivalent hydraulic conductivity of an experimental stratigraphy: Implications for basin

  10. Ytterholmen revisited implications for the Late Wenlock stratigraphy of Gotland and coeval extinctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ytterholmen revisited ­ implications for the Late Wenlock stratigraphy of Gotland and coeval: Ytterholmen revisited ­ implications for the Late Wenlock stratigraphy of Gotland and coeval extinctions. GFF, based on conodonts, lithology and stratigraphic boundaries, the stratigraphy of the Slite Group

  11. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Energy Efficient Technology Potentials. 31 Conclusions and Recommendations 42 References. 45 Glossary . 50 Appendix 51 ii List

  12. Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for Energycane Production Potential of Diazorphic, Endophytic Bacteria Associated with Sugarcane for Energycane...

  13. Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pienkos, P. T.

    2007-11-15

    Presentation on the potential for biofuels from algae presented at the 2007 Algae Biomass Summit in San Francisco, CA.

  14. Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact, Chapter 6 from the Clean Energy Finance Guide, Third Edition

  15. Planning implications of energy research in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osotimehin, S.O.A.; Benjamin, N.R.D.; Sanni, S.A.

    1980-12-01

    A survey of projects in research institutions and major public energy organizations was undertaken with a view to determining to what extent energy research activities are in consonance with national research objectives. Such a survey is also useful in developing an appropriate energy research policy for Nigeria. It appears that energy R and D efforts are concentrated in the area of alternative energy resources; this accounts for 66% of the total projects. Most of the local efforts are duplication of international research efforts. Even though the demand for energy research is well defined, the absence of proper coordination and adequate policy instruments have resulted in the unattainment of the research goals of the energy sector. Thus, the arguement adduced by some investigators that lack of demand for research is the main obstacle for designing and implementing a relevant science policy in a developing country does not hold for Nigerian conditions.

  16. The safety implications of emerging software paradigms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suski, G.J.; Persons, W.L.; Johnson, G.L.

    1994-10-01

    This paper addresses some of the emerging software paradigms that may be used in developing safety-critical software applications. Paradigms considered in this paper include knowledge-based systems, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and fuzzy systems. It presents one view of the software verification and validation activities that should be associated with each paradigm. The paper begins with a discussion of the historical evolution of software verification and validation. Next, a comparison is made between the verification and validation processes used for conventional and emerging software systems. Several verification and validation issues for the emerging paradigms are discussed and some specific research topics are identified. This work is relevant for monitoring and control at nuclear power plants.

  17. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

  18. Potential Energy Surfaces Donald G. Truhlar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    . Meyers (Academic Press, New York, 2001), Vol. 13, pages 9-17. httpPotential Energy Surfaces Donald G. Truhlar University of Minnesota I. Introduction II. Quantum Mechanical Basis for Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces III. Topology of Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces

  19. LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS In this lab you will continue the concepts of field and potential are abstract and difficult to visualize, this laboratory uses a computer and electric potential at any point in space. OBJECTIVES After successfully completing this laboratory, you

  20. Reduced MHD in Nearly Potential Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Hank

    Reduced MHD in Nearly Potential Magnetic Fields H.R. Strauss Courant Institute of Mathematical that the magnetic field is close to a potential field. The potential field can have an arbitrary three dimensional. It is also the case in solar and stellar coronal magnetic fields, and in regions of the geomagnetic field

  1. Kazakhstan's potential provides Western opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darnell, R. )

    1993-01-01

    While crude oil production continues to drop in the Russian Federation at a rate of 15% to 20% per year, Kazakhstan's output rose from 440,000 bopd in 1991 to 446,000 bopd, as of November 1992. Much of this increase was exported to the Russian Federation to supplement the latter's declining production. while Kazakhstan received needed Russian goods in exchange for this oil, it isn't getting the hard currency that will be required to upgrade its petroleum industry. This is a serious problem for Kazakh officials, since they are counting on revenues from petroleum exports to invigorate their overall plan for economic growth in this newly independent country. In order to convert Kazakhstan's hydrocarbon potential into economic reality, two critical issues must be addressed immediately. First, Kazakhstan must develop a tax and minerals law that gives multinational petroleum companies an incentive to invest in opening a dedicated crude oil export route through Russia, and at least one alternate export route to the Caspian Sea or Persian Gulf. At present, even the most successful petroleum venture inside Kazakhstan would have to weave its way through the Russian bureaucracy to utilize that existing and inadequate export pipeline system. This quandary, of course, has recently become the undoing of several Western petroleum operations that have managed to actually produce exportable oil inside the Russian Federation itself, but they can't get it out. In addition, three other variables should be considered by any party that is evaluating Kazakhstan as a future area (see map for current fields) of interest for petroleum operations. These are political stability, field operating conditions, and the country's natural gas crisis. Each of these factors, though not as critical as the legal regime and export access, can radically affect how an operator might approach negotiating the terms of its particular project.

  2. Pollution prevention cost savings potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celeste, J.

    1994-12-01

    The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

  3. Bimetric gravity doubly coupled to matter: theory and cosmological implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akrami, Yashar; Koivisto, Tomi S.; Mota, David F.; Sandstad, Marit E-mail: t.s.koivisto@astro.uio.no E-mail: marit.sandstad@astro.uio.no

    2013-10-01

    A ghost-free theory of gravity with two dynamical metrics both coupled to matter is shown to be consistent and viable. Its cosmological implications are studied, and the models, in particular in the context of partially massless gravity, are found to explain the cosmic acceleration without resorting to dark energy.

  4. Climatic unpredictability and parasitism of caterpillars: Implications of global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stireman III, John O.

    Climatic unpredictability and parasitism of caterpillars: Implications of global warming J. O that are associated with global warming (1, 2). Additional studies have demon- strated changes in ecological outbreaks are expected to increase in frequency and inten- sity with projected changes in global climate

  5. Global warming and its implications for conservation. 1. Overview.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    Global warming and its implications for conservation. 1. Overview. The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) consensus forecast for climate is an increase in global temperature by 2 - 5o C of atmospheric CO2 would yield an increase in global mean temperature of T2X = 3.5o C (6.7 o F, with 95

  6. Landfill Instability and Its Implications Operation, Construction, and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on geotechnical and stability analyses for the design of landfills and remedial closures. It is the mostLandfill Instability and Its Implications for Operation, Construction, and Design By: W. Douglas landfill waste slide, a 300,000 cubic yard landfill failure involving a geosynthetic clay liner, and a 100

  7. Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE 62.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE 62.2 Iain S. Walker and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division November 2007 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02

  8. Implications of Qualitative Restrictions in International Agricultural Trade. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, E. Wesley F.; Henry, Guy; Paggi, Mechel

    1988-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Import Tariffs Import Quotas and Voluntary Export Restraints Quality Restrictions III. The EC Hormone Ban and the Market for Edible Offals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 EC Policy... and the Market for Edible Offals Implications of the Hormone Ban for Edible Offals Iv. Conclusion.... ......... ........... ................. .... ... .... . . .. ......... . ... ............... .. . .... 11 References...

  9. The Value of Academic Libraries: Findings and Implications for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakleaf, Megan

    libraries in the future. #12;Recommendations #12; Define outcomes Create or adopt systems for assessment;Define outcomes. #12;Use existing data. #12;Develop systems to collect data on individual library userThe Value of Academic Libraries: Findings and Implications for the Profession Lisa Janicke

  10. Climate Threat to the Planet:* Implications for Intergenerational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Climate Threat to the Planet:* Implications for Intergenerational Equity and Justice Jim Hansen) - What is Known (public/policymakers) 2. Planetary Emergency - Climate Inertia Warming in Pipeline;#12;Why be concerned about human-made climate change? There have been huge climate changes during Earth

  11. Rootkits on Smart Phones: Attacks, Implications and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iftode, Liviu

    Rootkits on Smart Phones: Attacks, Implications and Opportunities Jeffrey Bickford Ryan O Smart phones are increasingly being equipped with operating sys- tems that compare in complexity with those on desktop comput- ers. This trend makes smart phone operating systems vulnerable to many

  12. Web Services as Product Experience Augmenters and the Implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieringa, Roel

    Web Services as Product Experience Augmenters and the Implications for Requirements Engineering. There is currently little insight into what requirement engi- neering for web services is and in which context services, namely web services that are used to augment the perceived value of a primary service or product

  13. Persistent pollutants urban rivers sediment survey: implications for pollution control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persistent pollutants urban rivers sediment survey: implications for pollution control C. Wilson.heal@ed.ac.uk) Abstract The impacts of diffuse urban sources of pollution on watercourses are quantified. A survey of nine urban streams in Scotland for persistent pollutants in stream sediments is described, together

  14. Developmental plasticity in plants: implications of non-cognitive behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novoplansky, Ariel

    Developmental plasticity in plants: implications of non- cognitive behavior ARIEL NOVOPLANSKY of interest in phenotypic plasticity in the last two decades. Most studies, however, are being carried out- logical and evolutionary approaches to the study of developmental plasticity. So as to focus

  15. Geophysical implications of the longwavelength topography of Rhea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    Geophysical implications of the longwavelength topography of Rhea F. Nimmo,1 B. G. Bills,2 P. C 16 October 2010. [1] We use limb profiles to investigate the longwavelength topography topography of Rhea. The degree 3 topography is large enough, if uncompensated, to contaminate estimates

  16. The Global Topography of Mars and Implications for Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauck II, Steven A.

    The Global Topography of Mars and Implications for Surface Evolution David E. Smith,1 * Maria T- accuracy global map of the topography of Mars. Dominant features include the low northern hemisphere-wavelength effect that has been shaped by an internal mechanism. The topography of Tharsis consists of two broad

  17. Adversarial Uses of Affective Computing and Ethical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .M., Media Arts and Sciences Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2001 B.S., Technical Communication to use information related to emotion to benefit users. Many technologies are used in situations information. These experiments extend existing work on ethical implications of polygraphs by considering

  18. 2007,KevinSkadron Implications of the Power Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    ©2007,KevinSkadron Implications of the Power Wall in a Manycore Era Sustaining Growth in Computing cost #12;5 ©2007,KevinSkadron Barriers to Performance Growth (2) · Power wall, ILP wall, and slow is a paradigm shift for parallel programming · Power wall will eventually constrain multicore too ­ If power per

  19. Modeling Dependency with Copula: Implications to Engineers and Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    1, . . . , Fd . Then there exists a copula C : [0, 1]d [0, 1] such that H(x1, . . . , xd ) = C(F1(xModeling Dependency with Copula: Implications to Engineers and Planners Haizhong Wang, Ph.D, Assistant Professor School of Civil and Construction Engineering Oregon State University, Corvallis

  20. Behavioral Implications of Big Data's Impact on Audit Judgment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behavioral Implications of Big Data's Impact on Audit Judgment and Decision Making and Future state of Big Data with regards to the audit environment · Information processing weaknesses and limitations that can impede the effective use of Big Data in an audit environment, with a focus on

  1. TESTING MODELS FOR BASALTIC VOLCANISM: IMPLICATIONS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    TESTING MODELS FOR BASALTIC VOLCANISM: IMPLICATIONS FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Eugene Smith 1 The determination of volcanic risk to the proposed high- level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain requires, then volcanism in the future may not be a significant threat to Yucca Mountain. On the other hand, if melting

  2. The implications of human metabolic network topology for disease comorbidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of different (and often disease-causing) genetic and epigenetic variations are not restricted but may spread, certain diseases, such as diabetes and obesity, or Gaucher disease and Parkinson disease, often cooccurThe implications of human metabolic network topology for disease comorbidity D.-S. Lee* , J. Park

  3. Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Implications of Personal Probability for Induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Implications of Personal Probability for Induction Author(s): Leonard J. Savage Source: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 64, No. 19, Sixty-Fourth Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division (Oct. 5, 1967), pp. 593-607 Published by: Journal of Philosophy, Inc

  4. Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios Marty Humphrey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mary R.

    Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios Marty Humphrey Computer Science. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing. 1 easy and secure ac- cess to the Grid's diverse resources. Infrastructure software such as Legion [6

  5. Future Space Missions and Biohazard Implications Karen J. Meech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meech, Karen Jean

    Future Space Missions and Biohazard Implications Karen J. Meech Institute for Astronomy, University for extra-terrestrial intelligence. Planned and proposed future NASA missions are more and more strongly: the NASA Deep Impact Mission, as well as the results from current Mars exploration and plans for future

  6. Reflections on Fusion's History and Implications for Fusion's Future*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reflections on Fusion's History and Implications for Fusion's Future* Robert Conn Fusion Energy, "Opportunities and Directions in Fusion Energy Science for the Next Decade", held July 11-23, 1999 in Snowmass, Colorado. #12;2 Abstract History shows that all the major opportunities to advance fusion research were

  7. Global Biofuel Production and Food Security: Implications for Asia Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Biofuel Production and Food Security: Implications for Asia Pacific 56th AARES Annual Conference Fremantle, Western Australia 7-10 February 2012 William T. Coyle #12;Global Biofuel Production and Food Security: Making the Connection --Past analysis and the evidence about biofuels and spiking

  8. Internet traffic growth: Sources and implications Andrew M. Odlyzko

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odlyzko, Andrew M.

    Internet traffic growth: Sources and implications Andrew M. Odlyzko University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA ABSTRACT The high tech bubble was inflated by myths of astronomical Internet traffic growth rates. Yet although these myths were false, Internet traffic was increasing very rapidly, close

  9. Design implications of fiber orientation in molded thermoplastic composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulios, Konstantinos Elephtherios

    1991-01-01

    for the degree of MASTERS OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DESIGN IMPLICATIONS OF FIBER ORIENTATION IN MOLDED THERMOPLASTIC COMPOSITES A Thesis by KONSTANTINOS ELEPHTHERIOS BOULIOS Approved as to style and content by: Alan... Test. PAGE . . . . 69 . . . . 76 IV MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR SIMULATION OF A COMPRESSION MOLDING FIBER REINFORCED STRUCTURE. . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IV. I Description of the Finite Element Model. IV. 2 Discussion...

  10. The FIR-Radio Correlation & Implications for GLAST Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    /2 GHz yr 104 1/2 GHzB -1/2 µG #12;The Minimum Energy Field From Local Spirals to Luminous Starbursts Energy Argument (synchrotron emission) · Rapid Electron Cooling in Starbursts ­ The Failure of the Minimum Energy Argument ­ The Origin of the FIR-Radio Correlation · Implications for GLAST #12;Starbursts

  11. Outlook for Energy and Implications for Irrigated Agriculture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patton, W. P.; Lacewell, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    that could have significant impacts on the future cost and availability of energy, and to show what the implications of those trends are for irrigated agriculture. The primary focus of this study will be on trends in natural gas, since natural gas...

  12. Implications of Security Enhancements and Interventions for Core Internet Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Implications of Security Enhancements and Interventions for Core Internet Infrastructure Sharon University of New Mexico First posted August 15, 2014. Last revised September 9, 2014. Abstract Security enhancements to the Internet are often implemented as hierarchical and centralizing structures grafted onto

  13. Social Neuroscience Progress and Implications for Mental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, David

    ,8 Marcia K. Johnson,9 Michael J. Kozak,10 Robert W. Levenson,11 Catherine Lord,12 Earl K. Miller,13Social Neuroscience Progress and Implications for Mental Health John T. Cacioppo,1 David G. Amaral of prefrontal to total cortical gray matter is no greater in humans than it is in nonhuman primates (e.g

  14. High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovendran, Radha

    High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry Scott A. Lintelman1 assurance CPS can mutually benefit aerospace and automotive industries. I. INTRODUCTION Commercial aviation]. In the automotive industry, recent trends in intelligent transportation systems can be evidently mapped to e

  15. IMPLICATIONS OF NON-MAXWELLIAN DISTRIBUTIONS ON BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    #12;IMPLICATIONS OF NON-MAXWELLIAN DISTRIBUTIONS ON BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS A Thesis by JOHN FUQUA ON BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS A Thesis by JOHN FUQUA Approved by: Advisor: Carlos Bertulani Committee-MAXWELLIAN DISTRIBUTIONS ON BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS John Fuqua, MS Texas A&M University-Commerce, 2013 Advisor: Carlos

  16. Saving and Using Encountered Information: Implications for Electronic Periodicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Cathy

    Saving and Using Encountered Information: Implications for Electronic Periodicals Catherine C of a focus on electronic publications, we undertook an exploratory study of how people saved and used study participants had examples of materials they had deliberately saved from periodicals, ranging from

  17. Living in a Smart Environment Implications for the Coming Ubiquitous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - ciplinary research project "Living in a Smart Environ- ment ­ Implications of Ubiquitous Computing". To show from a large-scale de- ployment of ubiquitous and pervasive computing tech- nologies. Second, it investigates issues of social compati- bility and dependability of future ubiquitous computing applications

  18. On Aggregation Bias in Sponsored Search Data: Existence and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiat, Amos

    used daily data from search engines containing measures such as average bid, average ad position, totalOn Aggregation Bias in Sponsored Search Data: Existence and Implications VIBHANSHU ABHISHEK have been estimated using such data and the results have helped re- searchers explore the factors

  19. Reactor Measurement of theta_12; Principles, Accuracies and Physics Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Minakata; H. Nunokawa; W. J. C. Teves; R. Zukanovich Funchal

    2005-01-07

    We discuss reactor measurement of \\theta_{12} which has a potential of reaching the ultimate sensitivity which surpasses all the methods so far proposed. The key is to place a detector at an appropriate baseline distance from the reactor neutrino source to have an oscillation maximum at around a peak energy of the event spectrum in the absence of oscillation. By a detailed statistical analysis the optimal distance is estimated to be \\simeq (50-70) km x [8 x 10^{-5} eV^2/\\Delta m^2_{21}], which is determined by maximizing the oscillation effect in the event number distribution and minimizing geo-neutrino background contamination. To estimate possible uncertainty caused by surrounding nuclear reactors in distance of \\sim 100 km, we examine a concrete example of a detector located at Mt. Komagatake, 54 km away from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant in Japan, the most powerful reactor complex in the world. The effect turns out to be small. Under a reasonable assumption of systematic error of 4% in the experiment, we find that sin^2{\\theta_{12}} can be determined to the accuracy of \\simeq 2% (\\simeq 3%), at 68.27% CL for 1 degree of freedom, for 60 GW_th kton yr (20 GW_th kton yr) operation. We also discuss implications of such an accurate measurement of \\theta_{12}.

  20. Potential synergy: the thorium fuel cycle and rare earths processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ault, T.; Wymer, R.; Croff, A.; Krahn, S. [Vanderbilt University: 2301 Vanderbilt Place/PMB 351831, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The use of thorium in nuclear power programs has been evaluated on a recurring basis. A concern often raised is the lack of 'thorium infrastructure'; however, for at least a part of a potential thorium fuel cycle, this may less of a problem than previously thought. Thorium is frequently encountered in association with rare earth elements and, since the U.S. last systematically evaluated the large-scale use of thorium (the 1970's,) the use of rare earth elements has increased ten-fold to approximately 200,000 metric tons per year. Integration of thorium extraction with rare earth processing has been previously described and top-level estimates have been done on thorium resource availability; however, since ores and mining operations differ markedly, what is needed is process flowsheet analysis to determine whether a specific mining operation can feasibly produce thorium as a by-product. Also, the collocation of thorium with rare earths means that, even if a thorium product stream is not developed, its presence in mining waste streams needs to be addressed and there are previous instances where this has caused issues. This study analyzes several operational mines, estimates the mines' ability to produce a thorium by-product stream, and discusses some waste management implications of recovering thorium. (authors)

  1. Air Activation Following an Atmospheric Explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2013-03-13

    In addition to thermal radiation and fission products, nuclear explosions result in a very high flux of unfissioned neutrons. Within an atmospheric nuclear explosion, these neutrons can activate the various elemental components of natural air, potentially adding to the radioactive signature of the event as a whole. The goal of this work is to make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total amount of air activation products that can result from an atmospheric nuclear explosion.

  2. Patterns of Brain Activity Associated With Variation in Voluntary Wheel-Running Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    Patterns of Brain Activity Associated With Variation in Voluntary Wheel- Running Behavior Justin S variation within and between species is unknown. This study used Fos immunoreactivity to compare brain, and striatum. Results implicate specific brain regions in motivation to run and others in control

  3. Oklo reactors and implications for nuclear science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. D. Davis; C. R. Gould; E. I. Sharapov

    2014-04-19

    We summarize the nuclear physics interests in the Oklo natural nuclear reactors, focusing particularly on developments over the past two decades. Modeling of the reactors has become increasingly sophisticated, employing Monte Carlo simulations with realistic geometries and materials that can generate both the thermal and epithermal fractions. The water content and the temperatures of the reactors have been uncertain parameters. We discuss recent work pointing to lower temperatures than earlier assumed. Nuclear cross sections are input to all Oklo modeling and we discuss a parameter, the $^{175}$Lu ground state cross section for thermal neutron capture leading to the isomer $^{176\\mathrm{m}}$ Lu, that warrants further investigation. Studies of the time dependence of dimensionless fundamental constants have been a driver for much of the recent work on Oklo. We critically review neutron resonance energy shifts and their dependence on the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ and the ratio $X_q=m_q/\\Lambda$ (where $m_q$ is the average of the $u$ and $d$ current quark masses and $\\Lambda$ is the mass scale of quantum chromodynamics). We suggest a formula for the combined sensitivity to $\\alpha$ and $X_q$ that exhibits the dependence on proton number $Z$ and mass number $A$, potentially allowing quantum electrodynamic and quantum chromodynamic effects to be disentangled if a broader range of isotopic abundance data becomes available.

  4. Freezing and extreme value statistics in a Random Energy Model with logarithmically correlated potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan V Fyodorov; Jean-Philippe Bouchaud

    2008-08-18

    We investigate some implications of the freezing scenario proposed by Carpentier and Le Doussal (CLD) for a random energy model (REM) with logarithmically correlated random potential. We introduce a particular (circular) variant of the model, and show that the integer moments of the partition function in the high-temperature phase are given by the well-known Dyson Coulomb gas integrals. The CLD freezing scenario allows one to use those moments for extracting the distribution of the free energy in both high- and low-temperature phases. In particular, it yields the full distribution of the minimal value in the potential sequence. This provides an explicit new class of extreme-value statistics for strongly correlated variables, manifestly different from the standard Gumbel class. -

  5. Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, Lee D.; Korte, N.; Baker, J.

    2005-12-14

    The objective of this work was to conduct laboratory and field experiments to determine the sensitivity of low frequency electrical measurements (resistivity and induced polarization) to the processes of corrosion and precipitation that are believed to limit permeable reactive barrier (PRB) performance. The research was divided into four sets of experiments that were each written up and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal: [1] A laboratory experiment to define the controls of aqueous chemistry (electrolyte activity; pH; valence) and total zero valent iron (Fe0) available surface area on the electrical properties of Fe0 columns. [2] A laboratory experiment to determine the impact of corrosion and precipitation on the electrical response of synthetic Fe0 columns as a result of geochemical reactions with NaSO4 and NaCO3 electrolytes. [3] Laboratory experiments on a sequence of cores retrieved from the Kansas City PRB to determine the magnitude of electrical and geochemical changes within a field active PRB after eight years of operation [4] Field-scale cross borehole resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of the Kansas City PRB to evaluate the potential of electrical imaging as a technology for non-invasive, long-term monitoring of indicators of reduced PRB performance This report first summarizes the findings of the four major experiments conducted under this research. The reader is referred to the four papers in Appendices 1-4 for a full description of each experiment, including motivation and significance, technical details, findings and implications. The deliverables of the project, including the publications, conference papers and new collaborative arrangements that have resulted are then described. Appendices 5-6 contain two technical reports written by co-PI Korte describing (1) supporting geochemical measurements, and (2) the coring procedure, conducted at the Kansas City PRB as part of this project.

  6. Static potentials for quarkonia at finite temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owe Philipsen

    2008-10-26

    We review non-perturbative static potentials commonly used in potential models for quarkonia at finite T. Potentials derived from Polyakov loop correlators are shown to be inappropriate for this purpose. The q\\bar{q} free energy is physical but has the wrong spatial decay and perturbative limit. The so-called singlet free energy is gauge dependent and unphysical. An appropriate static real time potential can be defined through a generalisation of pNRQCD to finite T. In perturbation theory, its real part reproduces the Debye-screened potential, its imaginary part accounts for Landau damping. Possibilities for its non-perturbative evaluation are discussed.

  7. Short distance physics with heavy quark potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zantow, F; Karsch, Frithjof; Petreczky, P

    2002-01-01

    We present lattice studies of heavy quark potentials in the quenched approximation of QCD at finite temperatures. Both, the color singlet and color averaged potentials are calculated. While the potentials are well known at large distances, we give a detailed analysis of their short distance behavior (from 0.015 fm to 1 fm) near the critical temperature. At these distances we expect that the T-dependent potentials go over into the zero temperature potential. Indeed, we find evidences that the temperature influence gets suppressed and the potentials starts to become a unique function of the underlying distance scale. We use this feature to normalize the heavy quark potentials at short distances and extract the free energy of the quark system in a gluonic heat bath.

  8. Secondary Energy Infobook Activities (19 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Information about Secondary Energy Infobook, 19 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8 and 9-12.

  9. Isolation, Preliminary Characterization and Preliminary Assessment of Scale-Up Potential of Photosynthetic Microalgae for the Production of Both Biofuels and Bio-Active Molecules in the U.S. and Canada: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-372

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pienkos, P.

    2012-09-01

    Combustion flue gases are a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions into the Earth's atmosphere, a factor that has been linked to the possible global climate change. It is, therefore, critical to begin thinking seriously about ways to reduce this influx into the atmosphere. Using carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion as a feedstock for the growth, photosynthetic microorganisms can provide a large sink for carbon assimilation as well as a feedstock for the production of significant levels of biofuels. Combining microalgal farming with fossil fuel energy production has great potential to diminish carbon dioxide releases into the atmosphere, as well as contribute to the production of biofuels (e.g., biodiesel, renewable diesel and gasoline and jet fuel) as well as valuable co-products such as animal feeds and green chemicals. CO2 capture may be a regulatory requirement in future new coal or natural gas power plants and will almost certainly become an opportunity for commerce, the results of such studies may provide industries in the US and Canada with both regulatory relief and business opportunities as well as the ability to meet environmental and regulatory requirements, and to produce large volumes of fuels and co-products.

  10. Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomplun, Marc

    Area Activation 1 Running Head: AREA ACTIVATION Advancing Area Activation towards a General Model at Boston 100 Morrissey Boulevard Boston, MA 02125-3393 USA Phone: 617-287-6485 Fax: 617-287-6433 e. Without great effort, human observers clearly outperform every current artificial vision system in tasks

  11. Green roofs: potential at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacheco, Elena M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Green roofs, roof systems that support vegetation, are rapidly becoming one of the most popular sustainable methods to combat urban environmental problems in North America. An extensive list of literature has been published in the past three decades recording the ecological benefits of green roofs; and now those benefits have been measured in enumerated data as a means to analyze the costs and returns of green roof technology. Most recently several studies have made substantial progress quantifying the monetary savings associated with storm water mitigation, the lessoning of the Urban Heat Island, and reduction of building cooling demands due to the implementation of green roof systems. Like any natural vegetation, a green roof is capable of absorbing the precipitation that falls on it. This capability has shown to significantly decrease the amount of storm water runoff produced by buildings as well as slow the rate at which runoff is dispensed. As a result of this reduction in volume and velocity, storm drains and sewage systems are relieved of any excess stress they might experience in a storm. For many municipalities and private building owners, any increase in storm water mitigation can result in major tax incentives and revenue that does not have to be spent on extra water treatments. Along with absorption of water, vegetation on green roofs is also capable of transpiration, the process by which moisture is evaporated into the air to cool ambient temperatures. This natural process aims to minimize the Urban Heat Island Effect, a phenomenon brought on by the dark and paved surfaces that increases air temperatures in urban cores. As the sun distributes solar radiation over a city's area, dark surfaces such as bitumen rooftops absorb solar rays and their heat. That heat is later released during the evening hours and the ambient temperatures do not cool as they normally would, creating an island of constant heat. Such excessively high temperatures induce heat strokes, heat exhaustion, and pollution that can agitate the respiratory system. The most significant savings associated with green roofs is in the reduction of cooling demands due to the green roof's thermal mass and their insulating properties. Unlike a conventional roof system, a green roof does not absorb solar radiation and transfer that heat into the interior of a building. Instead the vegetation acts as a shade barrier and stabilizes the roof temperature so that interior temperatures remain comfortable for the occupants. Consequently there is less of a demand for air conditioning, and thus less money spent on energy. At LANL the potential of green roof systems has already been realized with the construction of the accessible green roof on the Otowi building. To further explore the possibilities and prospective benefits of green roofs though, the initial capital costs must be invested. Three buildings, TA-03-1698, TA-03-0502, and TA-53-0031 have all been identified as sound candidates for a green roof retrofit project. It is recommended that LANL proceed with further analysis of these projects and implementation of the green roofs. Furthermore, it is recommended that an urban forestry program be initiated to provide supplemental support to the environmental goals of green roofs. The obstacles barring green roof construction are most often budgetary and structural concerns. Given proper resources, however, the engineers and design professionals at LANL would surely succeed in the proper implementation of green roof systems so as to optimize their ecological and monetary benefits for the entire organization.

  12. Expanding the Discovery Potential of VERITAS via Moonlight Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benbow, Wystan R. [PI

    2014-10-27

    This grant partially supported the base research efforts of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), Very-High-Energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray research group from 8/1/09 to 7/31/14. During the project period, the SAO gamma-ray group carried out a wide-range of research efforts, but focused on VHE observations of extragalactic sources with VERITAS. The SAO group led or co-lead nearly all VERITAS extragalactic working groups and the observations addressed themes in Particle Physics and Fundamental Laws, Cosmology, and Black Holes. The primary topics of this research were processes in exotic galaxies, especially active galactic nuclei and starburst galaxies, which have implications for cosmology and Lorentz invariance violation, as well as indirect dark matter detection via VERITAS observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In addition, the SAO group let the development of unique capabilities for VERITAS to observe during all periods of moonlight. Overall, this has increased the VERITAS data yield by 60% and these data are both scientifically useful and regularly published. This grant funded research that led to contributions towards the publication of 51 refereed journal articles during the project period, including several led by, or with significant contributions from, the SAO group.

  13. How Deep is the Antinucleon Optical Potential at FAIR energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Gaitanos; M. Kaskulov; H. Lenske

    2011-08-11

    The key question in the interaction of antinucleons in the nuclear medium concerns the deepness of the antinucleon-nucleus optical potential. In this work we study this task in the framework of the non-linear derivative (NLD) model which describes consistently bulk properties of nuclear matter and Dirac phenomenology of nucleon-nucleus interactions. We apply the NLD model to antinucleon interactions in nuclear matter and find a strong decrease of the vector and scalar self-energies in energy and density and thus a strong suppression of the optical potential at zero momentum and, in particular, at FAIR energies. This is in agreement with available empirical information and, therefore, resolves the issue concerning the incompatibility of G-parity arguments in relativistic mean-field (RMF) models. We conclude the relevance of our results for the future activities at FAIR.

  14. Radiolysis Model Formulation for Integration with the Mixed Potential Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, Edgar C.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2014-07-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level radioactive waste. Within the UFDC, the components for a general system model of the degradation and subsequent transport of UNF is being developed to analyze the performance of disposal options [Sassani et al., 2012]. Two model components of the near-field part of the problem are the ANL Mixed Potential Model and the PNNL Radiolysis Model. This report is in response to the desire to integrate the two models as outlined in [Buck, E.C, J.L. Jerden, W.L. Ebert, R.S. Wittman, (2013) “Coupling the Mixed Potential and Radiolysis Models for Used Fuel Degradation,” FCRD-UFD-2013-000290, M3FT-PN0806058

  15. Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from of work done by the field, W*= -W. Bring q1 from , W *= 0 since no electric F yet #12;Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from the work done by an external

  16. Integrated modeling for design of lightweight, active mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohan, Lucy E.

    Lightweight, active, silicon carbide mirrors have the potential to enable larger primary aperture, space-based optical systems, hence improving the resolution and sensitivity of such systems. However, due to the lack of ...

  17. The Active Wave-front Sampling based 3D endoscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, Hemanth

    2007-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of Active Wave-front Sampling (AWS) for real time quantified 3D endoscopy. AWS is a technique by which phase information from an aperture area of a lens is obtained by sampling ...

  18. Mechanical counter-pressure space suit design using active materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holschuh, Bradley Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suits have the potential to greatly improve the mobility of astronauts as they conduct planetary exploration activities; however, the underlying technologies required to provide ...

  19. Activity Based Costing

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  20. V-140: Apache ActiveMQ Bugs Let Remote Users Conduct Cross-Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0: Apache ActiveMQ Bugs Let Remote Users Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, Deny Service, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information V-140: Apache ActiveMQ Bugs Let Remote...

  1. A Note on Thermal Activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boyanovsky; Richard Holman; Da-Shin Lee; João P. Silva

    1994-03-10

    Thermal activation is mediated by field configurations that correspond to saddle points of the energy functional. The rate of probability flow along the unstable functional directions, i.e the activation rate, is usually obtained from the imaginary part of a suitable analytic continuation of the equilibrium free energy. In this note we provide a real-time, non-equilibrium interpretation of this imaginary part which is analogous to the real-time interpretation of the imaginary part of the one-loop effective potential in theories with symmetry breaking. We argue that in situations in which the system is strongly out of equilibrium the rate will be time dependent and illustrate this with an example.

  2. Bohm's Quantum Potential as an Internal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glen Dennis; Maurice de Gosson; Basil Hiley

    2014-12-15

    We pursue our discussion of Fermi's surface initiated in Dennis, de Gosson and Hiley and show that Bohm's quantum potential can be viewed as an internal energy of a quantum system. This gives further insight into the role it played by the quantum potential in stationary states. It also allows us to provide a physically motivated derivation of Schr\\"odinger's equation for a particle in an external potential.

  3. Pumped Storage and Potential Hydropower from Conduits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-02-25

    Th is Congressional Report, Pumped Storage Hydropower and Potential Hydropower from Conduits, addresses the technical flexibility that existing pumped storage facilities can provide to support intermittent renewable energy generation. This study considered potential upgrades or retrofit of these facilities, the technical potential of existing and new pumped storage facilities to provide grid reliability benefits, and the range of conduit hydropower opportunities available in the United States.

  4. Passive $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric couplers without complex optical potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yi-Chan; Chuang, You-Lin; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the implementation of parity-time ($\\mathcal{PT}$)-symmetric optical systems by carefully and actively controlling the gain and loss, we show that a $2\\times 2$ $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric Hamiltonian has a unitarily equivalent representation without complex optical potentials in the resulting optical coupler. Through the Naimark dilation in operator algebra, passive $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric couplers can thus be implemented with a refractive index of real values and asymmetric coupling coefficients. This opens up the possibility to implement general $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric systems with state-of-the-art asymmetric slab waveguides, dissimilar optical fibers, or cavities with chiral mirrors.

  5. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the...

  6. Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by 50% compared to today's best common practice - Alternative refrigerants with low global warming potential (GWP) are needed to achieve these goals - Provide guidance to the...

  7. Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, Hashem

    2008-01-01

    Finster. 2000. “The Urban Heat Island, Photochemical Smog,2001. “EPA/NASA Urban Heat Island Pilot Project,” GlobalSystem Urban Surfaces and Heat Island Mitigation Potentials

  8. Energy dependence of nucleon-nucleon potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinya Aoki; Janos Balog; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Noriyoshi Ishii; Keiko Murano; Hidekatsu Nemura; Peter Weisz

    2008-12-03

    We investigate the energy dependence of potentials defined through the Bethe-Salpeter wave functions. We analytically evaluate such a potential in the Ising field theory in 2 dimensions and show that its energy dependence is weak at low energy. We then numerically calculate the nucleon-nucleon potential at non-zero energy using quenched QCD with anti-periodic boundary condition. In this case we also observe that the potentials are almost identical at $E\\simeq 0$ and $E\\simeq 50$ MeV, where $E$ is the center of mass kinetic energy.

  9. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions. Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the...

  10. The Snell law for quaternionic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano; Ducati, Gisele C.

    2013-12-15

    By using the analogy between optics and quantum mechanics, we obtain the Snell law for the planar motion of quantum particles in the presence of quaternionic potentials.

  11. Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

  12. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2008-01-01

    6.1.4. Co-Seismic Electrokinetics The process of materialand creates a co-seismic self-potential, a process often

  13. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01

    6.1.4. Co-Seismic Electrokinetics The process of materialand creates a co-seismic self-potential, a process often

  14. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  15. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2008-01-01

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterMonitoring during hydraulic fracturing using the TG-2 well,fracture processes in hydraulic fracturing, Quarterly Report

  16. Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential for 'Novel' Financing Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Ways of...

  17. Guide for Conducting Energy Efficiency Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2007-11-01

    Provides guidance on determining the efficiency potential in a utility footprint, state, or region; evaluating efficiency as a supply-side resource; and developing detailed efficiency program plans.

  18. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    This report quantifies water and energy savings of the sixATIONAL L ABORATORY Potential Water and Energy Savings from4 Baseline Water and Energy Consumption …………………………….5

  19. Potential Thermoelectric Applications in Diesel Vehicles | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Applications in Diesel Vehicles Potential Thermoelectric Applications in Diesel Vehicles 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: BSST, LLC 2003deercrane.pdf More...

  20. NREL Research Identifies Increased Potential for Perovskites...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Identifies Increased Potential for Perovskites as a Material for Solar Cells October 30, 2015 Scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

  1. Investigations, Experiments, and Implications for using existing Pulse Magents for "TOPOFF" Operation at the Advanced Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    INVESTIGATIONS, EXPERIMENTS, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR USING EXISTING PULSE MAGNETS FOR "TOPOFF" OPERATION

  2. Towards a 'Thermodynamics' of Active Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sho C. Takatori; John F. Brady

    2014-11-21

    Self-propulsion allows living systems to display unusual collective behavior. Unlike passive systems in thermal equilibrium, active matter systems are not constrained by conventional thermodynamic laws. A question arises however as to what extent, if any, can concepts from classical thermodynamics be applied to nonequilibrium systems like active matter. Here we use the new swim pressure perspective to develop a simple theory for predicting phase separation in active matter. Using purely mechanical arguments we generate a phase diagram with a spinodal and critical point, and define a nonequilibrium chemical potential to interpret the "binodal." We provide a generalization of thermodynamic concepts like the free energy and temperature for nonequilibrium active systems. Our theory agrees with existing simulation data both qualitatively and quantitatively and may provide a framework for understanding and predicting the behavior of nonequilibrium active systems.

  3. Economic and Financial Implications of the ZEROS Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

    2011-01-01

    International, Inc. and holder of seven intellectual properties related to the ZEROS technology: ? ?ZEROS is a two-stage process. First stage is gasification and second stage is oxidation. It is this second stage and the fact that ZEROS has no smokestack... separation unit. SECO Contract Report, Contract CM918 TWRI TR-402, 2011 Economic and Financial Implications of the ZEROS Technology Final August 22, 2011 Rister, Lacewell, and Sturdivant page 4 of 62 Initial gasification?partial oxidation of the fuels...

  4. Linear systems solvers - recent developments and implications for lattice computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Frommer

    1996-08-14

    We review the numerical analysis' understanding of Krylov subspace methods for solving (non-hermitian) systems of equations and discuss its implications for lattice gauge theory computations using the example of the Wilson fermion matrix. Our thesis is that mature methods like QMR, BiCGStab or restarted GMRES are close to optimal for the Wilson fermion matrix. Consequently, preconditioning appears to be the crucial issue for further improvements.

  5. Distributional Implications of Halving Poverty in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tregenna, Fiona

    1 DISTRIBUTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF HALVING POVERTY IN SOUTH AFRICA FIONA TREGENNA† Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge. ABSTRACT The South African government has set as a policy objective the halving of poverty by 2014... poverty under various growth scenarios. Keywords: income distribution, poverty, inequality, South Africa. JEL codes: D30, D31, I32. † August 2008. Contact: fmt21@cam.ac.uk. This research...

  6. Conjecture on the physical implications of the scale anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Christopher T.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    Murray Gell-Mann, after co-inventing QCD, recognized the interplay of the scale anomaly, the renormalization group, and the origin of the strong scale, {Lambda}{sub QCD}. I tell a story, then elaborate this concept, and for the sake of discussion, propose a conjecture that the physical world is scale invariant in the classical, {h_bar}, limit. This principle has implications for the dimensionality of space-time, the cosmological constant, the weak scale, and Planck scale.

  7. Transient self-potential anomalies associated with recent lava flows at Piton de la Fournaise volcano (Runion Island, Indian Ocean)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duputel, Zacharie

    to understand the variation of self-potential signals in active geothermal areas and transient self with ore bodies or the metallic casing of boreholes or contaminant plumes that are rich in organic matter

  8. STATEWIDE ENERGY EFFICIENCY POTENTIAL ESTIMATES AND TARGETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rates of forecasted natural gas consumption, electricity consumption and peak electricity demand Kae C. Lewis Project Manager Sylvia Bender Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY ANALYSIS DIVISION B. B potential for electric consumption savings, 85 percent of the economic potential for peak demand savings

  9. Physics 321 Energy Conservation Potential Energy in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Physics 321 Hour 7 Energy Conservation ­ Potential Energy in One Dimension Bottom Line · Energy is conserved. · Kinetic energy is a definite concept. · If we can determine the kinetic energy at all points in space by knowing it at one point in space, we can invent a potential energy so that energy can

  10. Wave equations with energy dependent potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Formanek; R. J. Lombard; J. Mares

    2003-09-22

    We study wave equations with energy dependent potentials. Simple analytical models are found useful to illustrate difficulties encountered with the calculation and interpretation of observables. A formal analysis shows under which conditions such equations can be handled as evolution equation of quantum theory with an energy dependent potential. Once these conditions are met, such theory can be transformed into ordinary quantum theory.

  11. Renewable Energy Potential for Brownfield Redevelopment Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energy Potential for Brownfield Redevelopment Strategies Renewable energy resources are available throughout the United States.The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) performs analysis to identify high-potential sites for renewable energy technologies and can help determine those technologies

  12. Measuring Transport Protocol Potential for Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsaoussidis, Vassilis

    Measuring Transport Protocol Potential for Energy Efficiency S. Kontogiannis, L. Mamatas, I. Psaras. Several attempts have been made to measure the energy efficiency of trans- port protocols, (e.g. [10], [12-saving potential of transport pro- tocols. We focus on the system-related aspect of energy. Do we have to damage

  13. Neutrino matter potentials induced by Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Linder

    2006-01-15

    An instructive method of deriving the matter potentials felt by neutrinos propagating through matter on Earth is presented. This paper thoroughly guides the reader through the calculations involving the effective weak Hamiltonian for lepton and quark scattering. The matter potentials are well-known results since the late 70's, but a detailed and pedagogical calculation of these quantities is hard to find. We derive potentials due to charged and neutral current scattering on electrons, neutrons and protons. Intended readership is for undergraduates/graduates in the fields of relativistic quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. In addition to the derivation of the potentials for neutrinos, we explicitely study the origin of the reversed sign for potentials in the case of antineutrino-scattering.

  14. U.S.Geological Survey Grant No. 01HQGR0018 EARTHQUAKE POTENTIAL OF MAJOR FAULTS OFFSHORE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    U.S.Geological Survey Grant No. 01HQGR0018 EARTHQUAKE POTENTIAL OF MAJOR FAULTS OFFSHORE SOUTHERN;U.S.Geological Survey Grant No. 01HQGR0018 EARTHQUAKE POTENTIAL OF MAJOR FAULTS OFFSHORE SOUTHERN Major active faults offshore southern California are poorly known with respect to slip-rates and seismic

  15. Downhole Sensor Holds Transformative Potential | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    industrial-scale variable speed drive motors to power electronics for a modern electric grid. Testing of the components developed by GE with the active electronic devices and...

  16. Gravity as BF theory plus potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirill Krasnov

    2009-07-23

    Spin foam models of quantum gravity are based on Plebanski's formulation of general relativity as a constrained BF theory. We give an alternative formulation of gravity as BF theory plus a certain potential term for the B-field. When the potential is taken to be infinitely steep one recovers general relativity. For a generic potential the theory still describes gravity in that it propagates just two graviton polarizations. The arising class of theories is of the type amenable to spin foam quantization methods, and, we argue, may allow one to come to terms with renormalization in the spin foam context.

  17. Infinite potential well with a sinusoidal bottom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Alhaidari; H. Bahlouli

    2008-08-07

    We construct a tridiagonal matrix representation of the wave operator that maps the wave equation into a three-term recursion relation for the expansion coefficients of the wavefunction. Finding a solution of the recursion relation is equivalent to solving the original problem. Consequently, a larger class of solvable potentials is obtained. The usual diagonal representation constraint results in a reduction to the conventional class of solvable potentials. To exhibit the power of this approach, we give an exact solution for the infinite potential well with sinusoidal bottom.

  18. Adiabatic hyperspherical analysis of realistic nuclear potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M. Daily; Alejandro Kievsky; Chris H. Greene

    2015-03-20

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin $T=3/2$ contribution in our analysis.

  19. Atomistic Potentials for Palladium-Silver Hydrides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, L M; Zimmerman, J A; Zhou, X

    2013-01-01

    New EAM potentials for the ternary palladium-silver-hydrogen system are developed by extending a previously developed palladium-hydrogen potential. The ternary potentials accurately capture the heat of mixing and structural properties associated with solid solution alloys of palladium-silver. Stable hydrides are produced with properties that smoothly transition across the compositions. Additions of silver to palladium are predicted to alter the properties of the hydrides by decreasing the miscibility gap and increasing the likelihood of hydrogen atoms occupying tetrahedral interstitial sites over octahedral interstitial sites.

  20. Line Integral of the Electric Field 42 Potential Difference and the Potential Function 44

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    integrals of the (2) #12;THE ELECTRIC POTENTIAL 43 / / / / / / / / / //ro / -/ / / / / / / fields calculated2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Line Integral of the Electric Field 42 Potential Difference and the Potential Charged Disk 51 Divergence of a Vector Function 56 Gauss's Theorem and the Differential Form of Gauss

  1. Distributed Light Sensing with Convex Potential Fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Fabien

    We report on a photoconductive fiber that supports decaying and convex electrical potential profiles capable of localizing a point of illumination, and propose a scheme to perform distributed optical sensing.

  2. Quarkonium dissociation at finite chemical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uttam Kakade; Binoy Krishna Patra

    2015-07-24

    We have studied the dissociation of quarkonia states in a deconfined medium of quarks and gluons at the large baryon chemical potential and small temperature region. The aim of this study is to probe the dense baryonic medium expected to be produced at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research(FAIR), GSI Darmstadt. This is done by correcting both the short- and long-distance terms of the Cornell potential by a dielectric function, embodying the effects of deconfined quarks and gluons, at finite baryon chemical potential and temperature. It is found that $J/\\psi$ is dissociated approximately at 1.4$\\mu_c$ in the temperature range 20-50 $MeV$, which can indirectly help to locate the point on the QCD phase diagram at the large chemical potential and low-temperature zone.

  3. Applying supersymmetry to energy dependent potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yekken, R.; Lassaut, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the supersymmetry properties of energy dependent potentials in the D=1 dimensional space. We show the main aspects of supersymmetry to be preserved, namely the factorization of the Hamiltonian, the connections between eigenvalues and wave functions of the partner Hamiltonians. Two methods are proposed. The first one requires the extension of the usual rules via the concept of local equivalent potential. In this case, the superpotential becomes depending on the state. The second method, applicable when the potential depends linearly on the energy, is similar to what has been already achieved by means of the Darboux transform. -- Highlights: •Supersymmetry extended to energy dependent potentials. •Generalization of the concept of superpotential. •An alternative method used for linear E-dependence leads to the same results as Darboux transform.

  4. Lattice study of hybrid static potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Wolf; Marc Wagner

    2015-02-02

    We report about a recently started project with the aim to compute hybrid static potentials using lattice gauge theory. First preliminary results for pure SU(2) Yang-Mills theory are presented.

  5. Momentum space trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. B. Compean; M. Kirchbach

    2009-08-20

    We transform the trigonometric S wave Rosen-Morse potential to momentum space in employing its property of being a harmonic angular function on the three dimensional hypersphere S^3.

  6. Potential of geothermal energy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Peter On

    2010-01-01

    This thesis provides an overview of geothermal power generation and the potential for geothermal energy utilization in China. Geothermal energy is thermal energy stored in the earth's crust and currently the only ubiquitously ...

  7. Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    If these glass microspheres' walls could talk…They would explain how their tiny pores allow the potential for handling, storing and transporting a variety of materials, including drugs that have...

  8. Managing Milk Composition: Evaluating Herd Potential 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Sandra R.; Jordan, Ellen R.; Looper, Mike; Waldner, Dan

    2000-12-11

    : Evaluating Herd Potential Sandra R. Stokes, Dan N. Waldner, Ellen R. Jordan, and Michael L. Looper* * Respectively, Extension Dairy Specialist, The Texas A&M University System; Extension Dairy Specialist, Oklahoma State University; Ex- tension Dairy...

  9. Deriving effective mesoscale potentials from atomistic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirk Reith; Mathias Puetz; Florian Mueller-Plathe

    2002-11-20

    We demonstrate how an iterative method for potential inversion from distribution functions developed for simple liquid systems can be generalized to polymer systems. It uses the differences in the potentials of mean force between the distribution functions generated from a guessed potential and the true (simulated) distribution functions to improve the effective potential successively. The optimization algorithm is very powerful: convergence is reached for every trial function in few iterations. As an extensive test case we coarse-grained an atomistic all-atom model of poly (isoprene) (PI) using a 13:1 reduction of the degrees of freedom. This procedure was performed for PI solutions as well as for a PI melt. Comparisons of the obtained force fields are drawn. They prove that it is not possible to use a single force field for different concentration regimes.

  10. Energy saving potential of various roof technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

    2010-01-01

    Unconventional roof technologies such as cool roofs and green roofs have been shown to reduce building heating and cooling load. Although previous studies suggest potential for energy savings through such technologies, ...

  11. Potential Economic Value of Seasonal Hurricane Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

    This paper explores the potential utility of seasonal Atlantic hurricane forecasts to a hypothetical property insurance firm whose insured properties are broadly distributed along the U.S. Gulf and East Coasts. Using a ...

  12. Hydroxyl Radical is the Active Species in Photochemical DNA Strand Scission by Bis(peroxo)vanadium(V) Phenanthroline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanfreau, Guillaume

    Hydroxyl Radical is the Active Species in Photochemical DNA Strand Scission by Bis-N-oxide (DMPO) as spin-traps for singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical, respectively, implicated hydroxyl radical reactions were run on the same lane. These findings identify hydroxyl radical produced from

  13. Inflammation persistently enhances nocifensive behaviors mediated by spinal group I mGluRs through sustained ERK activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    sustained ERK activation Hita Adwanikara , Farzana Karima,b , Robert W. Gereau IVa,b,* a Division signaling pathways, which involve the extracellular signal- regulated kinases (ERKs), have been implicated but is associated with increased levels of phosphorylated ERK in dorsal horn neurons. We also tested whether

  14. Confining potential and mass of elementary particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. I. Buravov

    2014-11-21

    In this paper we consider a model in which the masses of elementary particles are formed and stabilized thanks to confining potential, which is caused by recoil momentum at emission of specific virtual bosons by particle itself. The calculation of this confining potential is carried out. It is shown that $\\Phi$(R) may be in the form const $R^3$ or const $R^2$ depending on continuous or discrete nature of the spectrum of emitted bosons.

  15. Industrial Energy Conservation Potentials in North Carolina 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barakat, M. G.; Singh, H.; Mallik, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    CONSERVATION POTENTIALS IN NORTH CAROLINA MONJED G. BARAKAT Chief Engineer Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center North Carolina A & T State University HARMOHINDAR SINGH Associate Professor Architectural Engineering Department North Carolina A... of payback periods less than a year. These energy conservation opportunities and their potential savings in the state of North Carolina are discussed in this paper. INTRODUCTION Maximizing profit and minimizing operating cost are the the major driving...

  16. On the Chemical Potential of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Pereira

    2008-06-23

    It is widely assumed that the observed universe is accelerating due to the existence of a new fluid component called dark energy. In this article, the thermodynamics consequences of a nonzero chemical potential on the dark energy component is discussed with special emphasis to the phantom fluid case. It is found that if the dark energy fluid is endowed with a negative chemical potential, the phantom field hypothesis becomes thermodynamically consistent with no need of negative temperatures as recently assumed in the literature.

  17. Missing solution in a Cornell potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, L.B.; Castro, A.S. de

    2013-11-15

    Missing bound-state solutions for fermions in the background of a Cornell potential consisting of a mixed scalar–vector–pseudoscalar coupling is examined. Charge-conjugation operation, degeneracy and localization are discussed. -- Highlights: •The Dirac equation with scalar–vector–pseudoscalar Cornell potential is investigated. •The isolated solution from the Sturm–Liouville problem is found. •Charge-conjugation operation, degeneracy and localization are discussed.

  18. Considering the Ethical Implications of Using VGI for Community-based Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Considering the Ethical Implications of Using VGI for Community-based Planning Laxmi project design did not consider ethics or VGI specifically Status Project completed, under final review

  19. Batoid Wing Skeletal Structure: Novel Morphologies, Mechanical Implications, and Phylogenetic Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summers, Adam P.

    Batoid Wing Skeletal Structure: Novel Morphologies, Mechanical Implications, and Phylogenetic pectoral fins are usually used as the primary locomotor propulsors (Klausewitz, 1964; Heine, 1992). Some

  20. Hydrologic diversity in Santa Cruz mountain creeks and implications for steelhead population survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    diversity in Santa Cruz mountain creeks and implications foroccurring in the Santa Cruz mountains and outlets in andto compare Santa Cruz mountain watershed responses to a

  1. Hazardous Waste Contamination: Implications for Commercial/Industrial Land Transactions in Silicon Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholz, Diane

    1989-01-01

    Magazine (October). Hazardous Waste Contamination, ScholzPatton. 1 988. State Hazardous Waste and Property TransferForbes. 1 985. "Hazardous Waste Problems: Implications for

  2. Implications of geographic diversity for short-term variability and predictability of solar power.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    diversity of PV, and the implications for the cost ofassess the costs and impacts of increasing PV penetration.assess the costs and impacts of increasing PV penetration.

  3. Verifying the Cosmological Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, R. S.

    2008-01-01

    Utility of Type Ia Supernovae: Implications of a Dispersionheadings: surveys – supernovae: general – cosmologicalparameters Introduction Supernovae of Type Ia (SNe Ia) are

  4. Implications of a PTC Extension on U.S. Wind Deployment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implications of a PTC Extension on U.S. Wind Deployment Eric Lantz, Daniel Steinberg, Michael Mendelsohn, Owen Zinaman, Ted James, Gian Porro, Maureen Hand, Trieu Mai, Jeffrey...

  5. Quenching China's Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of China's Renewable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2014-01-01

    tower plant in China. ” Renewable and Sustainable Energyby plant in Guangxi. ” Renewable and Sustainable EnergyChina’s Thirst for Renewable Power: Water Implications of

  6. Constraining bubble dynamics and mixing with dissolved gases: Implications for productivity measurements by oxygen mass balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamme, Roberta C

    2006-01-01

    Implications for productivity measurements by oxygen masszone. Because the productivity measurement in the mixedproductivity estimates from continuous O 2 /Ar ratio measurements

  7. Alteration of Sediments by Hyperalkaline KRich Cement Leachate: Implications for Strontium Adsorption and Incorporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    Alteration of Sediments by Hyperalkaline KRich Cement Leachate: Implications for Strontium pH cementitious leachate, there is significantly enhanced Sr retention in sediments due to changes

  8. Contaminant Stratigraphy of the Ballville Reservoir, Sandusky River, NW Ohio: Implications for Dam Removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    Contaminant Stratigraphy of the Ballville Reservoir, Sandusky River, NW Ohio: Implications for Dam, Ohio 43606. 182 #12;Contaminant Stratigraphy of the

  9. GAS METHANE HYDRATES-RESEARCH STATUS, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, AND ENERGY IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Sorensen; Jaroslav Solc; Bethany Bolles

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this task as originally conceived was to compile an assessment of methane hydrate deposits in Alaska from available sources and to make a very preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of producing methane from these deposits for remote power generation. Gas hydrates have recently become a target of increased scientific investigation both from the standpoint of their resource potential to the natural gas and oil industries and of their positive and negative implications for the global environment After we performed an extensive literature review and consulted with representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Canadian Geological Survey, and several oil companies, it became evident that, at the current stage of gas hydrate research, the available information on methane hydrates in Alaska does not provide sufficient grounds for reaching conclusions concerning their use for energy production. Hence, the original goals of this task could not be met, and the focus was changed to the compilation and review of published documents to serve as a baseline for possible future research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). An extensive annotated bibliography of gas hydrate publications has been completed. The EERC will reassess its future research opportunities on methane hydrates to determine where significant initial contributions could be made within the scope of limited available resources.

  10. Cosmological implications of quantum entanglement in the multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugumi Kanno

    2015-06-25

    We explore the cosmological implications of quantum entanglement between two causally disconnected universes in the multiverse. We first consider two causally separated de Sitter spaces with a state which is initially entangled. We derive the reduced density matrix of our universe and compute the spectrum of vacuum fluctuations. We then consider the same system with an initially non-entangled state. We find that scale dependent modulations may enter the spectrum for the case of initially non-entangled state due to quantum interference. This gives rise to the possibility that the existence of causally disconnected universes may be experimentally tested by analyzing correlators in detail.

  11. Energy and IAQ Implications of Residential Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the energy, humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of residential ventilation cooling in all U.S. IECC climate zones. A computer modeling approach was adopted, using an advanced residential building simulation tool with airflow, energy and humidity models. An economizer (large supply fan) was simulated to provide ventilation cooling while outdoor air temperatures were lower than indoor air temperatures (typically at night). The simulations were performed for a full year using one-minute time steps to allow for scheduling of ventilation systems and to account for interactions between ventilation and heating/cooling systems.

  12. Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Oil Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon Gas2Implications of

  13. MILLISECOND PULSAR AGES: IMPLICATIONS OF BINARY EVOLUTION AND A MAXIMUM SPIN LIMIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiziltan, Buelent; Thorsett, Stephen E., E-mail: bulent@astro.ucsc.ed [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California and UCO/Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2010-05-20

    In the absence of constraints from the binary companion or supernova remnant, the standard method for estimating pulsar ages is to infer an age from the rate of spin-down. While the generic spin-down age may give realistic estimates for normal pulsars, it can fail for pulsars with very short periods. Details of the spin-up process during the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) phase pose additional constraints on the period (P) and spin-down rates ( P-dot ) that may consequently affect the age estimate. Here, we propose a new recipe to estimate millisecond pulsar (MSP) ages that parametrically incorporates constraints arising from binary evolution and limiting physics. We show that the standard method can be improved by this approach to achieve age estimates closer to the true age while the standard spin-down age may overestimate or underestimate the age of the pulsar by more than a factor of {approx}10 in the millisecond regime. We use this approach to analyze the population on a broader scale. For instance, in order to understand the dominant energy loss mechanism after the onset of radio emission, we test for a range of plausible braking indices. We find that a braking index of n = 3 is consistent with the observed MSP population. We demonstrate the existence and quantify the potential contributions of two main sources of age corruption: the previously known 'age bias' due to secular acceleration and 'age contamination' driven by sub-Eddington progenitor accretion rates. We explicitly show that descendants of LMXBs that have accreted at very low rates ( m-dot << M-dot{sub Edd}) will exhibit ages that appear older than the age of the Galaxy. We further elaborate on this technique, the implications and potential solutions it offers regarding MSP evolution, the underlying age distribution, and the post-accretion energy loss mechanism.

  14. Empirical Analysis of the Variability of Wind Generation in India: Implications for Grid Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, NIkit; Rao, Poorvi

    2014-06-17

    We analyze variability in load and wind generation in India to assess its implications for grid integration of large scale wind projects using actual wind generation and load data from two states in India, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. We compare the largest variations in load and net load (load ?wind, i.e., load after integrating wind) that the generation fleet has to meet. In Tamil Nadu, where wind capacity is about 53percent of the peak demand, we find that the additional variation added due to wind over the current variation in load is modest; if wind penetration reaches 15percent and 30percent by energy, the additional hourly variation is less than 0.5percent and 4.5percent of the peak demand respectively for 99percent of the time. For wind penetration of 15percent by energy, Tamil Nadu system is found to be capable of meeting the additional ramping requirement for 98.8percent of the time. Potential higher uncertainty in net load compared to load is found to have limited impact on ramping capability requirements of the system if coal plants can me ramped down to 50percent of their capacity. Load and wind aggregation in Tamil Nadu and Karnataka is found to lower the variation by at least 20percent indicating the benefits geographic diversification. These findings suggest modest additional flexible capacity requirements and costs for absorbing variation in wind power and indicate that the potential capacity support (if wind does not generate enough during peak periods) may be the issue that has more bearing on the economics of integrating wind

  15. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subsurface. In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could...

  16. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive...

  17. Interactions between Biomaterials and the Sclera: Implications on Myopia Progression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, James

    2009-01-01

    feasibility that “smart” biomaterials have a potential roledensity characterization of peptide-modified biomaterials.Biomaterials 26: 6897-6905. Barocas VH, Balachandran RK,

  18. A Self-Sequestered Calmodulin-like Ca2+ of Mitochondrial SCaMC Carrier and Its Implication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, James

    .10.018 SUMMARY The mitochondrial carriers play essential roles in energy metabolism. The short Ca2+ -binding mito house essential components of energy metabolism in cell. Since the matrices are closed compartments activities are driven by substrate concen- tration gradient and membrane potential across the inner mem

  19. KPA Activity Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 2002 Page 1 KPA Activity Number KPA Activity SEM Section SME Work Product SQSE Web Site http:cio.doe.govsqse REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT RM-1 The software engineering...

  20. Does the thermal disc instability operate in active galactic nuclei?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Burderi; A. R. King; E. Szuszkiewicz

    1998-03-19

    We examine all possible stationary, optically thick, geometrically thin accretion disc models relevant for active galactic nuclei (AGN) and identify the physical regimes in which they are stable against the thermal-viscous hydrogen ionization instability. Self-gravity and irradiation effects are included. We find that most if not all AGN discs are unstable. Observed AGN therefore represent the outburst state, although some or all quasars could constitute a steady population having markedly higher fuelling rates than other AGN. It has important implications for the AGN mass supply and for the presence of supermassive black holes in nearby spirals.

  1. Effect of a relativistic correction to the Coulomb potential on the energy levels of hydrogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harihar Behera

    2012-01-10

    Based on classical electrodynamics, it is argued that the Coulomb potential (which is strictly valid for two point charges at rest), commonly used in the study of energy levels of hydrogen atom is not the correct one, because the electron in the hydrogen atom moves with relativistic speeds with respect to the nucleus. Retardation effect has to be considered in accordance with Li\\'{e}nard-Wiechert (or retarded) potential of a moving charge or the relativistic electrodynamics. However, such a consideration introduces a correction to the Coulomb potential, whose quantum mechanical expectation value is estimated at $E_{ret} = - \\frac{mc^2\\alpha ^4}{2n^3(l+1/2)}$, which is of the same order as the fine structure of hydrogen atom and hence added to the standard energy eigenvalue values of H-atom. This correction lifts the $l$-degeneracy in the spectra of H-atom and hence modifies the standard result. The result disturbs the existing agreement between the theory and experiments on H-atom and hence requires further theoretical and experimental re-examination. The implications of this result for the Kepler-problem in general is also discussed in the context of Heaviside's gravity, which seems to offer an alternative explanation for the non-Newtonian perihelion advance of Mercury without invoking the space-time curvature formalism of Einstein's general theory of relativity.

  2. Using a Potential Game for Power Reduction in Distributed Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    Using a Potential Game for Power Reduction in Distributed Storage Systems Koji Hasebe, Takumi--We present a game-theoretic approach for power reduction in large-scale distributed storage systems. The key the running time of the disks in active mode by 12.7­18.7%, with an overall average response time of 50­190 ms

  3. A non-equilibrium potential function to study competition in neural systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mejias, Jorge F. [Department of Physics and Centre for Neural Dynamics, University of Ottawa, K1N 6N5 Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-03-24

    In this work, I overview some novel results concerning the theoretical calculation of a non-equilibrium potential function for a biologically motivated model of a neural network. Such model displays competition between different populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, which is known to originate synchronous dynamics, fast activity oscillations, and other nontrivial behavior in more sophisticated models of neural media.

  4. Development/Plasticity/Repair Simultaneous NMDA-Dependent Long-Term Potentiation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Menahem

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Simultaneous NMDA-Dependent Long-Term Potentiation of EPSCs and Long activity-dependent long-term plasticity of neuronal networks is the interplay between excitatory, whereas a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor was ineffec- tive. Finally, network-induced plasticity

  5. Depth determinations of shallow hydrothermal systems by self-potential and multi-scale wavelet tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams-Jones, Glyn

    to significantly enhance our ability to locate geothermal systems and monitor active volcanoes. © 2010 Elsevier BDepth determinations of shallow hydrothermal systems by self-potential and multi-scale wavelet studies, the depth of the hydrothermal system is always required, but rarely known via traditional

  6. Heat and Chemical Shock Potentiation of Glucocorticoid Receptor Transactivation Requires Heat Shock Factor (HSF) Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham, Nader G.

    of Ohio, Toledo, Ohio 43614 Heat shock and other forms of stress increase glu- cocorticoid receptor (GR to suggest a relationship between these responses includes the ability of heat shock or chemical stress in the process of stress-induced apoptosis in leukemic cells (11). In the presence of hormone, heat shock has

  7. Facile synthesis, characterization, and antimicrobial activity of cellulosechitosanhydroxyapatite composite material: A potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran, Chieu D.

    be overcome by blending HAp with organic components thereby mimick- ing the extracellular matrix Biomed Mater Res Part A 2013:00A:000­000. INTRODUCTION Hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main component of teeth

  8. Facile synthesis, characterization, and antimicrobial activity of cellulosechitosanhydroxyapatite composite material: A potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    . These limitations can be overcome by blending HAp with organic components thereby mimick- ing the extracellular component of teeth and bones has received considerable attention as suitable mate- rial for bone tissue

  9. Silvicultural Activities in Relation to Water Quality in Texas: An Assesment of Potential Problems and Solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburn, W. H.; Hickman, C. A.; deSteiguer, J. E.; Jackson, B. D.; Blume, T. A.; DeHaven, M. G.

    1978-02-01

    Southern forests are expected to supply a large portion of the Nation's future timber requirement. Projected demands on southern forests continue to exceed allowable cut. As an outgrowth of this demand, intensive management ...

  10. Strong Bond Activation with Late Transition-Metal Pincer Complexes as a Foundation for Potential Catalysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yanjun

    2012-07-16

    pincer ligands include ECE (E = P, S, N, etc.) ligands (A),8 Fryzuk's PNP ligand (B)9, the NNN 3 ligand from the Peters' group (C),10 diarylamido based PNP ligands (D)11 and the most recently developed PBP (E)12 and PSiP (F)13 ligands. The second... (TM). For example, our group reported the synthesis of a series Group 4 (PNP)MLn complexes via the TM of (PNP)Li salt with MCl4 metal precursors (Scheme 1-3).16 The soft metal salt [(PNP)Ag]2 17 has also been developed and shown the ability...

  11. Activation of the retina's regenerative potential by embryonic stem cell-derived microvesicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsman, Diana

    2012-01-01

    software for image processing. In BrdU-retinal marker co-and processing of the Z-stacked images. Electroretinography: Bilateral ERGs were recorded to assess the baseline retinal

  12. Activation of the retina's regenerative potential by embryonic stem cell-derived microvesicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsman, Diana

    2012-01-01

    2012) Embryonic stem cell-derived microvesicles induce geneby embryonic stem cell-derived microvesicles induces changesby embryonic stem cell derived-microvesicles induces

  13. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDF

  14. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  15. IMPLICATIONS OF THE RECENT LOW SOLAR MINIMUM FOR THE SOLAR WIND DURING THE MAUNDER MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockwood, M.; Owens, M. J., E-mail: m.lockwood@reading.ac.uk [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    The behavior of the Sun and near-Earth space during grand solar minima is not understood; however, the recent long and low minimum of the decadal-scale solar cycle gives some important clues, with implications for understanding the solar dynamo and predicting space weather conditions. The speed of the near-Earth solar wind and the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) embedded within it can be reliably reconstructed for before the advent of spacecraft monitoring using observations of geomagnetic activity that extend back to the mid-19th century. We show that during the solar cycle minima around 1879 and 1901 the average solar wind speed was exceptionally low, implying the Earth remained within the streamer belt of slow solar wind flow for extended periods. This is consistent with a broader streamer belt, which was also a feature of the recent low minimum (2009), and yields a prediction that the low near-Earth IMF during the Maunder minimum (1640-1700), as derived from models and deduced from cosmogenic isotopes, was accompanied by a persistent and relatively constant solar wind of speed roughly half the average for the modern era.

  16. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  17. Analytic models of plausible gravitational lens potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune, E-mail: eabaltz@slac.stanford.edu, E-mail: pjm@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: oguri@slac.stanford.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, PO Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, PO Box 20450, MS29, Stanford, CA 94309 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modelled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasising that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential. We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modelled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  18. On The Potential of Minimal Flavour Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alonso; M. B. Gavela; L. Merlo; S. Rigolin

    2011-06-06

    Assuming the Minimal Flavour Violation hypothesis, we derive the general scalar potential for fields whose background values are the Yukawa couplings. We analyze the minimum of the potential and discuss the fine-tuning required to dynamically generate the mass hierarchies and the mixings between different quark generations. Two main cases are considered, corresponding to Yukawa interactions being effective operators of dimension five or six (or, equivalently, resulting from bi-fundamental and fundamental scalar fields, respectively). At the renormalizable and classical level, no mixing is naturally induced from dimension five Yukawa operators. On the contrary, from dimension six Yukawa operators one mixing angle and a strong mass hierarchy among the generations result.

  19. The three-baryon $?NN$ potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Usmani

    1995-03-27

    Using a three-baryon $\\Lambda NN$ potential having a spin-independent dispersive and a two-pion exchange components, realistic variational Monte Carlo calculations have been performed for the $\\Lambda$-seperation energy for $^{5}_{\\Lambda}$He. A relationship between strengths associated with both pieces of $\\Lambda NN$ force giving exact experimental $\\Lambda$-seperation energy has been obtained which then combined with our previous study on $^{17}_{\\,\\,\\Lambda}$O hypernucleus determines a unique and acceptable set of strength parameters for $\\Lambda NN$ potential. The $\\Lambda NN$ force is found important for the core polarization.

  20. Fly Ash Characteristics and Carbon Sequestration Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Amonette, James E.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Daniels, William L.

    2007-07-20

    Concerns for the effects of global warming have lead to an interest in the potential for inexpensive methods to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2). One of the proposed methods is the sequestration of carbon in soil though the growth of crops or forests.4,6 If there is an economic value placed on sequestration of carbon dioxide in soil there may be an an opportunity and funding to utilize fly ash in the reclamation of mine soils and other degraded lands. However, concerns associated with the use of fly ash must be addressed before this practice can be widely adopted. There is a vast extent of degraded lands across the world that has some degree of potential for use in carbon sequestration. Degraded lands comprise nearly 2 X 109 ha of land throughout the world.7 Although the potential is obviously smaller in the United States, there are still approximately 4 X 106 ha of degraded lands that previously resulted from mining operations14 and an additional 1.4 X 108 ha of poorly managed lands. Thus, according to Lal and others the potential is to sequester approximately 11 Pg of carbon over the next 50 years.1,10 The realization of this potential will likely be dependent on economic incentives and the use of soil amendments such as fly ash. There are many potential benefits documented for the use of fly ash as a soil amendment. For example, fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, HCO3-, Cl- and basic cations, although some effects are notably decreased in high-clay soils.8,13,9 The potential is that these effects will promote increased growth of plants (either trees or grasses) and result in greater carbon accumulation in the soil than in untreated degraded soils. This paper addresses the potential for carbon sequestration in soils amended with fly ash and examines some of the issues that should be considered in planning this option. We describe retrospective studies of soil carbon accumulation on reclaimed mine lands, leaching studies of fly ash and carbon sorption studies of fly ash.

  1. Correlation of action potentials in adjacent neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shneider, M N

    2015-01-01

    A possible mechanism for the synchronization of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons (ephaptic coupling) is considered. It is shown that this mechanism is similar to the salutatory conduction of the action potential between the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons. The proposed model allows us to estimate the scale of the correlation, i.e., the distance between neurons in the nervous tissue, wherein their synchronization becomes possible. The possibility for experimental verification of the proposed model of synchronization is discussed.

  2. Quantum Electric Field Fluctuations and Potential Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haiyun Huang; L. H. Ford

    2015-03-10

    Some physical effects of time averaged quantum electric field fluctuations are discussed. The one loop radiative correction to potential scattering are approximately derived from simple arguments which invoke vacuum electric field fluctuations. For both above barrier scattering and quantum tunneling, this effect increases the transmission probability. It is argued that the shape of the potential determines a sampling function for the time averaging of the quantum electric field operator. We also suggest that there is a nonperturbative enhancement of the transmission probability which can be inferred from the probability distribution for time averaged electric field fluctuations.

  3. Quantum Electric Field Fluctuations and Potential Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiyun

    2015-01-01

    Some physical effects of time averaged quantum electric field fluctuations are discussed. The one loop radiative correction to potential scattering are approximately derived from simple arguments which invoke vacuum electric field fluctuations. For both above barrier scattering and quantum tunneling, this effect increases the transmission probability. It is argued that the shape of the potential determines a sampling function for the time averaging of the quantum electric field operator. We also suggest that there is a nonperturbative enhancement of the transmission probability which can be inferred from the probability distribution for time averaged electric field fluctuations.

  4. Understanding the dominance of unilateral CDMs in China: Its origins and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    Understanding the dominance of unilateral CDMs in China: Its origins and implications for governing;Understanding the dominance of unilateral CDMs in China: Its origins and implications for governing carbon market The Tyndall Centre, University of East Anglia Wei Shen Wei.Shen@uea.ac.uk Theme: Energy Tyndall

  5. The Economic Implications of Adding Wind Capacity to a Bulk Power Transmission Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Economic Implications of Adding Wind Capacity to a Bulk Power Transmission Network by Tim Mount. * Corresponding author, tdm2@cornell.edu. #12;2 The Economic Implications of Adding Wind Capacity to a Bulk Power limitations of solving large AC Optimal Power Flows (OPF) for real networks, system operators typically use

  6. Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications by Richard J Friedman Fall 2010 #12;Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications Copyright 2010 by Richard J. Plevin #12;1 Abstract Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels

  7. Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Peter A.

    Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model on the valuation and optimal operation of natural gas storage facilities. We calibrate the model parameters to both

  8. Lightning-Driven Electric and Magnetic Fields Measured in the Stratosphere: Implications for Sprites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    Lightning-Driven Electric and Magnetic Fields Measured in the Stratosphere: Implications-Driven Electric and Magnetic Fields Measured in the Stratosphere: Implications for Sprites Jeremy Norman Thomas et al., 2004b], in which the lightning-driven electric and magnetic field changes were rare, while

  9. Origin and Evolution of the Western Snake River Plain: Implications From Stratigraphy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervais, John W.

    Origin and Evolution of the Western Snake River Plain: Implications From Stratigraphy, Faulting.J. McGee, 2002, Origin and evolution of the western Snake River Plain: Implications from stratigraphy, and Michael McCurry, eds., Tectonic and Magmatic Evolution of the Snake River Plain Volcanic Province: Idaho

  10. Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate Pushker A. Kharecha1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate Pushker A. Kharecha1 and James E environments. If conventional oil production peaks within the next few decades, it may have a large effect., and J. E. Hansen (2008), Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate, Global Biogeochem

  11. Alpha Backgrounds and Their Implications for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments Using HPGe Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    Alpha Backgrounds and Their Implications for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments Using HPGe and Their Implications for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments Using HPGe Detectors Robert A. Johnson Chair of the Supervisory Committee: Professor John F. Wilkerson Physics The observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay

  12. Organic nitrogen in aerosols and precipitation at Barbados and Miami: Implications regarding sources, transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    Organic nitrogen in aerosols and precipitation at Barbados and Miami: Implications regarding time series sites: Barbados and Miami. WSON total deposition rates ranged from 17.9 mmol m-2 yr-1 to 49), Organic nitrogen in aerosols and precipitation at Barbados and Miami: Implications regarding sources

  13. Physics potentials of pp and pep solar neutrino fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Calabresu; G. Fiorentini; M. Lissia

    1996-02-09

    Experimental determinations of the pp and pep fluxes have great potentialities. We briefly review the reasons that make such measurements privileged tests of neutrino properties. We discuss the predictions for these fluxes given by four good solutions to the solar neutrino problem: small- and large-angle MSW and Just-So oscillations into active neutrinos, and small-angle MSW oscillations into sterile neutrinos. In addition, we examine the impact of the planned Hellaz detector, which should measure separately the nu_e and nu_mu fluxes in the pp energy window and the signal from the pep neutrinos, for distinguishing among the different solutions and for determining the solar central temperature.

  14. Frequent sexual reproduction and high intraspecific variation in Salix arctica: Implications for a terrestrial feedback to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hufbauer, Ruth A.

    Frequent sexual reproduction and high intraspecific variation in Salix arctica: Implications ecosystems respond to climate change. Here, we characterized genetic and phenotypic variation in Salix and high intraspecific variation in Salix arctica: Implications for a terrestrial feedback to climate

  15. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M.; Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W.

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

  16. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  17. ANAEROBIC RUMEN FUNGI: POTENTIAL AND APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Gareth

    between counts of rumen anaerobic fungi and the voluntary intake of low digestibility herbage suggestsANAEROBIC RUMEN FUNGI: POTENTIAL AND APPLICATIONS 1 2 Ravinder Nagpal, Anil Kumar Puniya*, Gareth, National Dairy Research Institute, Karnal-132001, India. (*puniya1234@rediffmail.com) Anaerobic fungi

  18. ESTIMATING LIQUEFACTION POTENTIAL IN MID-AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    construction and even more important for retrofit/remedial studies for existing construction because of the potential cost to improve liquefiable soils. The cone penetration test (CPT) offers many advantages over and soil index properties. Relationships were presented for clean sands, silty sands, and silty sands

  19. Hydropower Potential Studies Reviewed for Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feasibility Study on Five Potential Hydroelectric Power Generation Locations, North Unit Irrigation District B/ENERGY STORAGE PROJECTS C1 Assessment of Opportunities for New US Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Plants Using Hydroelectric Pumped Storage for Enabling Variable Energy Resources within the FCRPS C4 Technical Analysis

  20. 2015 Winter and Spring Fire Potential Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015 Winter and Spring Fire Potential Assessment For the Grass Dominant Fuels on the Western Plains Factors · Fine Fuel Conditions · Drought · Seasonal Temperature and Precipitation #12;Grass Dominant Fuels Grass dominant fuels are generally found west of the red line shown on the map. During the dormant