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1

Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reductions in Northeast Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets December 2011 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy

2

Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

Gurgel, Angelo C.

3

Potential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - Environmental and human health salt (Proprietary) 10.0 - 30.0% #12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale ActivitiesPotential Health Effects of Marcellus Shale Activities: The Need for Public Health Surveillance

Sibille, Etienne

4

The Public Health Implications of Marcellus Shale Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INCIDENT #12;#12;#12;Implications of the Gulf Oil Spill to Marcellus Shale Activities - EnvironmentalThe Public Health Implications of Marcellus Shale Activities Bernard D. Goldstein, MD Department using Data.FracTracker.org. #12;Drilling Rig in Rural Upshur County, WV Source: WVSORO, Modern Shale Gas

Sibille, Etienne

5

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (Report http://ies.lbl.gov/India_Wind_Potential Disclaimeron-shore wind potential in India at three different hub-

Phadke, Amol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Potential for Wind Farms in India, RenewableNetworks for Offshore Wind Farms, Bremen, Germany, 14-15Assessment of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable

Phadke, Amol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We assess developable on-shore wind potential in India at three different hub-heights and under two sensitivity scenarios – one with no farmland included, the other with all farmland included. Under the “no farmland included” case, the total wind potential in India ranges from 748 GW at 80m hub-height to 976 GW at 120m hub-height. Under the “all farmland included” case, the potential with a minimum capacity factor of 20 percent ranges from 984 GW to 1,549 GW. High quality wind energy sites, at 80m hub-height with a minimum capacity factor of 25 percent, have a potential between 253 GW (no farmland included) and 306 GW (all farmland included). Our estimates are more than 15 times the current official estimate of wind energy potential in India (estimated at 50m hub height) and are about one tenth of the official estimate of the wind energy potential in the US.

Phadke, Amol; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Khangura, Jagmeet

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

planning, policies, and programs, wind energy can be a coreof Wind Integration in the Tamil Nadu Grid. Energy PolicyEnergy Technologies Division Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy

Phadke, Amol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing awareness of the serious problems associated with the provision of sufficient energy to meet human needs and to fuel economic growth world-wide. This has pointed to the need for energy and material efficiency, which would reduce air, water and thermal pollution, as well as waste production. Increasing energy and material efficiency also have the benefits of increased employment, improved balance of imports and exports, increased security of energy supply, and adopting environmentally advantageous energy supply. A large potential exists for energy savings through energy and material efficiency improvements. Technologies are not now, nor will they be, in the foreseeable future, the limiting factors with regard to continuing energy efficiency improvements. There are serious barriers to energy efficiency improvement, including unwillingness to invest, lack of available and accessible information, economic disincentives and organizational barriers. A wide range of policy instruments, as well as innovative approaches have been tried in some countries in order to achieve the desired energy efficiency approaches. These include: regulation and guidelines; economic instruments and incentives; voluntary agreements and actions, information, education and training; and research, development and demonstration. An area that requires particular attention is that of improved international co-operation to develop policy instruments and technologies to meet the needs of developing countries. Material efficiency has not received the attention that it deserves. Consequently, there is a dearth of data on the qualities and quantities for final consumption, thus, making it difficult to formulate policies. Available data, however, suggest that there is a large potential for improved use of many materials in industrialized countries.

Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options within a given market, and identifying the key drivers and thresholds for market viability of nuclear hydrogen options.

Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options within a given market, and identifying the key drivers and thresholds for market viability of nuclear hydrogen options.

Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

12

Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Integrated Geophysical Mapping Of The Magadi Fault System, Southern Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences From Integrated Geophysical Mapping Of The Magadi Fault System, Southern Kenya Rift Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Southern Kenya Rift has been known as a region of high geodynamic activity expressed by recent volcanism, geothermal activity and high rate of seismicity. The active faults that host these activities have not been investigated to determine their subsurface geometry, faulting intensity and constituents (fluids, sediments) for proper characterization of tectonic

13

Emerging Technologioes in Instrumentation and Controls and Their Potential Regulatory Implications for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a summary of eight instrumentation and control (&C) technology areas, with applications in nuclear power plants (NPPs), that were the focus of a recent study performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC.) The state of the technology s application in NPPs, along with potential regulatory impact(s), are discussed. The technology focus areas are: (1) sensors and measurement systems, (2) communications media and networking, (3) microprocessors and other integrated circuits, (4) computational platforms, (5) surveillance, diagnostics, and prognostics, (6) human-system interactions, (7) high-integrity software, and (8) I&C architectures in new plants. The regulatory implications of these focus areas with regard to their application in NPPs are also discussed.

Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Bobrek, Miljko [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Ewing, Paul D [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Howlader, Mostofa [ORNL; Killough, Stephen M [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Loebl, Andy [ORNL; Moore, Michael Roy [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL; Shourbaji, Ayman A [ORNL; Wilson, Thomas L [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

''Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry'' focuses on the potential for microbial communities that could be active in repository emplacement drifts to influence the in-drift bulk chemical environment. This report feeds analyses to support the inclusion or exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), but this work is not expected to generate direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. The purpose was specified by, and the evaluation was performed and is documented in accordance with, ''Technical Work Plan For: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Analyses'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172402], Section 2.1). This report addresses all of the FEPs assigned by the technical work plan (TWP), including the development of exclusion arguments for FEPs that are not carried forward to the TSPA-LA. Except for an editorial correction noted in Section 6.2, there were no other deviations from the TWP. This report documents the completion of all assigned tasks, as follows (BSC 2004 DIRS 172402, Section 1.2.1): (1) Perform analyses to evaluate the potential for microbial activity in the waste emplacement drift under the constraints of anticipated physical and chemical conditions. (2) Evaluate uncertainties associated with these analyses. (3) Determine whether the potential for microbes warrants a feed to TSPA-LA to account for predicted effects on repository performance. (4) Provide information to address the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NUREG-1804) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) and Key Technical Issues and agreements, as appropriate. (5) Develop information for inclusion or exclusion of FEPs.

Y. Wang

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 19 Conjugated Linoleic Acids in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Implications and Potential Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 19 Conjugated Linoleic Acids in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Implications and Potential Mechanisms Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS

16

Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Urban Flooding: Implications for Transportation Infrastructure and Travel Disruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Research Council (NRC) 2008. Potential Impacts ofNational Research Council (NRC) 2005. Assessing and managingNational Research Council (NRC). 1999. The Costs of Natural

Chang, Heejun; Lafrenz, Martin; Jung, II-Won; Figliozzi, Miguell; Platman, Deena

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Analysis of Fuel Ethanol Transportation Activity and Potential Distribution Constraints  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an analysis of fuel ethanol transportation activity and potential distribution constraints if the total 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel use by 2022 is mandated by EPA under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Ethanol transport by domestic truck, marine, and rail distribution systems from ethanol refineries to blending terminals is estimated using Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL s) North American Infrastructure Network Model. Most supply and demand data provided by EPA were geo-coded and using available commercial sources the transportation infrastructure network was updated. The percentage increases in ton-mile movements by rail, waterways, and highways in 2022 are estimated to be 2.8%, 0.6%, and 0.13%, respectively, compared to the corresponding 2005 total domestic flows by various modes. Overall, a significantly higher level of future ethanol demand would have minimal impacts on transportation infrastructure. However, there will be spatial impacts and a significant level of investment required because of a considerable increase in rail traffic from refineries to ethanol distribution terminals.

Das, Sujit [ORNL; Peterson, Bruce E [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

Raman spectroscopy in hot compressed hydrogen and nitrogen - implications for the intramolecular potential  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raman measurements of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) have been made under simultaneous conditions of high temperature and high static pressure. Measurements have been made on H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} to 50 GPa and 1600 K, and on N{sub 2} to 50 GPa and 2000 K. In all three materials the familiar molecular stretching mode (vibron) is accompanied in the high-temperature Raman spectra by one or more lower-frequency peaks due to transitions from excited vibrational states. We find that the frequency differences between these bands decreases with pressure, implying that the anharmonicity of the corresponding part of the intramolecular potential also decreases. This is accompanied by an increase in the measured linewidths of the bands that is consistent with a decrease of the depth of the potential and an approaching molecular dissociation.

Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

Chronic Benzodiazepine Administration Potentiates High Voltage-Activated Calcium Currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.aspetjournals.orgDownloadedfrom #12;other drugs of abuse has been reported to enhance high voltage-activated calcium channels (HVAs

Brand, Paul H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Potential of Malaysian activated carbon in dual purpose adsorption system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption capability of some locally produced activated charcoal (coconut shell) samples with methanol were taken under laboratory conditions. An experimental test rig was set up; data obtained from the experiments were fitted to Dubinin-Radushkevitch ... Keywords: Malaysian activated carbon, adsorption properties, coefficient of performance (COP), dual purpose system

M. A. Alghoul; M. Y. Sulaiman; K. Sopian; M. Yahya; Azami Zaharim

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Movement Restriction Implications on Potential Welfare Slaughter for Texas High Plains Feedlots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is regarded as one of the greatest biological threats to the U.S. livestock industry because of its potential to cause catastrophic economic damages and massive livestock depopulation. Current U.S. contingency plans call for "stamping out" of FMD. An integral component of a "stamping out" policy is movement restrictions. The main purpose for movement restrictions is to stop the spread of disease, but they also disrupt the agribusiness sector. Welfare slaughter, the depopulation of healthy quarantined animals, is a possibility if movement restrictions are kept in place for prolonged periods of time. Many studies have analyzed the economic consequences of alternative mitigation strategies, but generally these studies have ignored the costs that might arise because of movement restrictions affecting uninfected premises located within the quarantine zone. Ultimately this study seeks to improve preparedness in the event of a FMD outbreak. It does this by developing information for those formulating plans on the costs associated with movement restrictions regarding quarantined, uninfected large feedlots located in the Texas High Plains Region. To accomplish this objective two strategies were compared: an unrestricted feed strategy, where feed is allowed to be brought onto uninfected premises and finished cattle are sold; and a welfare slaughter strategy, where feed isn't allowed to be brought onto the uninfected premises so animals are depopulated. In addition, seasonal differences in total costs were examined. This study expanded on the High Plains Study conducted by M. Ward, L. Highfield, P. Vongseng, and M. Garner by using their epidemiological data combined with a cost accounting framework to estimate the total cost of each strategy. This study examined direct disease management costs (indemnity payments, feed costs, marketing costs, surveillance costs, cleaning and disinfecting costs, appraisal cost, euthanasia costs, and disposal costs). Overall, the unrestricted feed strategy was less expensive than the welfare slaughter strategy, costing on average $22.6 million compared to $48.5 million, respectively. Disease outbreak timing did impact the overall cost of both strategies. The results suggest the policy makers should strongly consider creating movement policies that address feed supply and finished cattle movement for uninfected large feedlots in prolonged quarantine zones; as such policies appear to reduce outbreak related costs for stakeholder and the U.S. government.

Galli, Monica

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA The interaction of an ion-collecting sphere at floating potential with a flowing colli- sionless plasma is investigated using the "Specialized Coordinate Electrostatic Particle and Thermals In Cell" particle-in-cell code SCEPTIC[1, 2]. Code calculations are given of potential and the total force exerted on the sphere by the flowing plasma. This force is of crucial importance to the problem of dusty plasmas, and the present results are the first for a collisionless plasma to take account of the full self-consistent potential. They reveal discrepancies amounting to as large as 20% with the standard analytic expressions, in parameter regimes where the analytic approximations might have been expected

24

Calculation of Potential Broadband Biologically Active and Thermal Solar Radiation above Vegetation Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectral model was assembled and used to compute the potential solar irradiance in five broad bands, that is, ultraviolet-B (280?320 nm in wavelength), ultraviolet-A (320?400 nm), photosynthetically active (400?700 nm), near infrared (700?1500 ...

Xiusheng Yang; David R. Miller

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Potential for Activated Biochar to Remove Waterborne Viruses from Environmental Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for clean potable water and sustainable energy are two current and pressing issues with implications affecting the global population. Renewed interests in alternative energy have prompted researchers to investigate the full capacity of biofuels. These interests have led to not only the examination of current method limitations, but also to the investigation of new conversion methods. One promising method for bioenergy production is pyrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks. Through pyrolysis, a single crop may produce ethanol, bio-oil, and/or gaseous energy (syngas). The remaining solid phase product is a black carbon dubbed 'biochar'. In the current study, biochar was used as a both an unamended sorbent and a precursor to form powdered activated carbons (PACs) capable of removing waterborne viruses. Biochar was activated with KOH, ZnCl2, and H3PO4 and analyzed using the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) method, a combination of Kjeldahl digest and ICP-MS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sorbents were tested in batch studies using phosphate buffered saline (PBS), surface water, and groundwater. Bacteriophages MS2 and thetaX174 served as viral surrogates. All activation treatments significantly increased surface area, up to 1495.5 m2/g (KOH-activated). While the non-activated biochar was not effective in virus removal, the KOH-activated PAC had tremendous removal in the PBS/MS2 batch (mean 98.7% removal, up to 6.2 x 109 particles/mL, as compared to the Darco S-51: 82.3%). As evidenced by this study, sorption efficiency will be governed by viral species, carbon type and concentration, and water quality. The results of this study indicate that biochar can serve as a precursor for a highly porous and effective PAC, capable of removing waterborne viruses from environmental waters.

Florey, James

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Active Transport of Bile Acids Decreases Mucin 2 in Neonatal Ileum: Implications for Development of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency of premature infants, but its etiology remains unclear. We have previously shown that mucin 2 (Muc2) positive goblet cells are significantly decreased in NEC. We have also shown that ileal bile acids (BAs) are significantly increased during the development of this disease. Because BAs can affect mucins, we hypothesized that elevated ileal BAs contribute to decreased Muc2 in experimental NEC. The role of Muc2 in NEC was evaluated in Winnie +/+ mice, a strain that produces aberrant Muc2. Muc2 and trefoil factor 3 (Tff3) were assessed in neonatal rats subjected to the NEC protocol when bile acids were removed, and in ileal explants from newborn and older rats cultured with and without BAs. Further, the role of active transport of BAs was determined using neonatal rats given the apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter (Asbt) inhibitor SC-435 and in neonatal Asbt knockout mice subjected to the NEC protocol. Mice with aberrant Muc2 had significantly greater incidence and severity of NEC. Using both in vivo and ex vivo techniques, we determined that BAs decrease Muc2 positive cells in neonatal but not older ileum. However, Tff3 positive cells are not decreased by BAs. In addition, active transport of BAs is required for BAs to decrease Muc2 in immature ileum. These data show that functional Muc2 plays a critical role in the prevention of NEC and BAs can potentiate the decreased Muc2 in disease development. Further, BAs have a more profound effect on Muc2 in immature

Necrotizing Enterocolitis; Nina A. Martin; Sarah K. Mount Patrick; Teresa E. Estrada; Harrison A. Frisk; Daniel T. Rogan; Melissa D. Halpern

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Electrocatalytic Activity Studies of Select Metal Surfaces and Implications in Li-Air Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rechargeable lithium-air batteries have the potential to provide ?3 times higher specific energy of fully packaged batteries than conventional lithium rechargeable batteries. However, very little is known about the oxygen ...

Gasteiger, Hubert A.

28

Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Active construction of experience through mobile media: a field study with implications for recording and sharing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fully appreciate the opportunities provided by interactive and ubiquitous multimedia to record and share experiences, we report on an ethnographic investigation on the settings and nature of human memory and experience at a large-scale event. We studied ... Keywords: Active spectators, Constructive memory, Ethnographic field study, Large-scale events, Mobile and ubiquitous multimedia, Sharing experiences

Giulio Jacucci; Antti Oulasvirta; Antti Salovaara

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Thiorphan, an inhibitor of endopeptidase 24. 11, potentiates the natriuretic activity of atrial natriuretic peptide  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the role of endopeptidase 24.11 in metabolism of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in vivo, we examined the effect of thiorphan, an inhibitor of this enzyme, on plasma ANP concentrations and the cardiovascular and renal actions of ANP(99-126). Thiorphan alone produced a modest increase in urinary sodium excretion in anesthetized rats; however, urine flow, arterial pressure, and basal plasma ANP concentrations were unchanged. When administered during an infusion of ANP(99-126) (330 ng/kg/min i.v.), thiorphan increased the plasma concentration of ANP and enhanced the diuretic and natriuretic activity of this hormone. The effects on urine flow and urinary sodium excretion were most pronounced immediately after the inhibitor was administered and later diminished in magnitude. Thiorphan did not alter the depressor activity of exogenous ANP(99-126). These data suggest that endopeptidase 24.11 participates in metabolism of ANP(99-126) and that thiorphan potentiates the renal actions of this hormone by inhibiting its degradation.

Trapani, A.J.; Smits, G.J.; McGraw, D.E.; Spear, K.L.; Koepke, J.P.; Olins, G.M.; Blaine, E.H. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

Burton, B.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Strong Bond Activation with Late Transition-Metal Pincer Complexes as a Foundation for Potential Catalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong bond activation mediated by pincer ligated transiton-metal complexes has been the subject of intense study in recent years, due to its potential involvement in catalytic transformations. This dissertation has focused on the net heterolytic cleavage of B-H and B-B bonds across the N-Pd bond in a cationic (PNP)Pd fragment, the C-H oxidative addition to a (PNP)Ir center and the recent results on the C-H and C-O oxidative addition in reactions of aryl carboxylates with the (PNP)Rh fragment. Transition metal carbene and carbyne complexes are of great interest because of their role in a wide variety of catalytic reactions. Our work has resulted in the isolation of a rhodium(I) difluorocarbene. Reaction of the rhodium difluorocarbene complex with a silylium salt led to the C-F bond cleavage and the formation of a terminal fluorocarbyne complex. Reductive elimination is a critical step of cross coupling reactions. In order to examine the effect of the pincer ligand on the reductive elimination reactions from Rh(III), the first pi-accepting PNP ligand bearing pyrrolyl substituents was prepared and installed onto the rhodium center. Arylhalide (halide = Br, I) oxidative addition was achieved in the presence of donor ligands such as acetonitrile to form stable six-coordinate Rh(III) compounds. The C-O reductive elimination reactions in this system were also explored.

Zhu, Yanjun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Electrically Active Convection in Tropical Easterly Waves and Implications for Tropical Cyclogenesis in the Atlantic and East Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors investigated the characteristics of tropical easterly wave convection and the possible implications of convective structure on tropical cyclogenesis and intensification over the Atlantic Ocean and the east Pacific Ocean. ...

Kenneth D. Leppert II; Walter A. Petersen; Daniel J. Cecil

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications Title Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications Publication...

35

Silvicultural Activities in Relation to Water Quality in Texas: An Assesment of Potential Problems and Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern forests are expected to supply a large portion of the Nation's future timber requirement. Projected demands on southern forests continue to exceed allowable cut. As an outgrowth of this demand, intensive management of pine forests enabled the South to produce 45 percent of the Nation's timber harvest in 1970 (USDA, Forest Service, 1973). The Southern Forest Resource Analysis Committee (1969) stated that, if projected timber needs of the year 2000 are to be met, at least ten million acres of bare or poorly stocked land must be planted with pine by 1985 and another twenty million acres converted from low-grade hardwoods to pine. The challenge facing forestry in the South is how to meet this increased demand and maintain an acceptable forest environment in the face of increased taxes, rising labor and equipment costs and predicted petroleum shortages. Undisturbed forests are generally recognized as primary sources of high quality water. Although the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 (Public Law No. 92-500) make pollution from forest practices increasingly more important, the effects of these practices on water quality are not known for East Texas. The quality of streamflow from forested watersheds fluctuates constantly in response to natural stress, and can be influenced greatly by man's activities. Forest management practices can potentially influence the following water quality parameters: (1) sediment, (2) nutrients, (3) temperature, (4) dissolved oxygen/organic matter, and (5) introduced chemicals. It must be realized from the onset that sediment due to geologic erosion is a natural component of fresh water streams and that high concentrations may have occurred naturally for short periods due to perturbations in the ecosystem such as wildfires. Sediment is not necessarily a pollutant and only becomes one when it can be demonstrated that it is exceeding natural levels and is interfering with the beneficial use of water. A certain amount of sediment and nutrients are needed in Gulf Bays and Estuaries to maintain their productivity (Mathewson and Minter, 1976; Diener, 1964; Ketchum, 1967). Texas does not have a stream water quality standard for sediment and due to the complexities involved will probably not develop one. Thus, sediment as used in this report, becomes important: (1) as a carrier of plant nutrients and forest chemicals, and (2) in that practices which reduce sediment loss will usually reduce nutrient, organic matter and introduced chemical losses and prevent water temperature increases, as well. This report is the result of an interagency contract between Texas Department of Water Resources, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Texas Water Resources Institute to: (1) develop an overview of commercial forests and forestry operations in Texas, (2) identify, describe and characterize control strategies for nonpoint sources of pollution from silvicultural activities, and (3) develop and demonstrate a methodology for selecting control strategies in given problem situations. The following topics are covered: (1) an overview of forestry in East Texas, (2) silvicultural practices and nonpoint sources of pollution, (3) control strategies, (4) methodology for the selection of control strategies, (5) institutional aspects of controlling silvicultural nonpoint source pollution, (6) ongoing research and research needs, and (7) hydrology of East Texas. It is important to recognize that this report does not specify that nonpoint pollution from forestlands in East Texas is a problem. Likewise, the report does not set pollution control goals or criteria that should be met by a control plan, since this is the responsibility of the State. In areas where a potential nonpoint pollution problem exists; the suggested control strategies should be useful in selecting control measures that are appropriate to the special conditions imposed by differences in climate, soil, topography, and forest practice.

Blackburn, W. H.; Hickman, C. A.; deSteiguer, J. E.; Jackson, B. D.; Blume, T. A.; DeHaven, M. G.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Perverting Activism: Cyberactivism and Its Potential Failures In Enhancing Democratic Institutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the impact of new technologies on a range of practices related to activism. The first section shows how the functioning of democratic institutions can be impaired by scarce political accountability connected with the emergence of ... Keywords: Cyberactivism, Democracy, Internet, Moral Hazard, Perverted Activism, Political Accountability

Lorenzo Magnani; Emanuele Bardone; Tommaso Bertolotti

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

STRATIGRAPHIC ARCHITECTURE OF THE FLOYD (NEAL) SHALE IN THE BLACK WARRIOR BASIN OF ALABAMA AND MISSISSIPPI: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGIONAL EXPLORATION POTENTIAL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The Floyd (Neal) Shale is an organic-rich black shale in the Black Warrior Basin that is being explored for its unconventional gas potential. To… (more)

Caton, Matthew MacGregor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Low pressure storage of methane on interlayered clays for potential vehicular applications. [Comparison with activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Inexpensive, high surface area sorbents were prepared by treating naturally occurring hectorite and bentonite clays with aluminum chlorohydroxide, zirconium chlorohydroxide, or silica-sol solutions. Data were obtained comparing these interlayered clays with activated carbons and zeolites as sorbents for the low pressure storage of methane onboard natural gas powered vehicles. Methane sorption at pressures up to 7 MPa (1000 psig) resembled a Langmuir-type curve with a saturation sorption equal to about six micromoles of methane per square meter of surface area. Even at low pressures, methane sorption capacity was largely determined by surface area. At 2.2 MPa (300 psig), the best interlayered clay sorbed less than one-third the methane sorbed by an equal volume of Witco grade 9JXC activated carbon. Both the activated carbons and interlayered clays exhibited excellent release-on-demand capability. Driving ranges were calculated for a 2500-lb automobile equipped with three, 35-liter fuel tanks filled with sorbent and pressurized to 3.6 MPa (500 psig) with methane. Enough methane was stored with the best interlayered clay to travel 41 km (25 mi). With 9JXC carbon, one could travel 82 km (51 mi). The same vehicle equipped with high pressure (2400 psig) fuel tanks having the same volume but containing no sorbent would have a 190 km (118 mi) range.

Innes, R.A.; Lutinski, F.E.; Occelli, M.L.; Kennedy, J.V.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Supply Implications  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Supply Implications. European export gasoline volumes likely to remain unchanged Uncertainties are weighted towards less availability But the quality of the available ...

40

MAGNETIC NON-POTENTIALITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS AND PEAK X-RAY FLUX OF THE ASSOCIATED FLARES  

SciTech Connect

Predicting the severity of solar eruptive phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections remains a great challenge despite concerted efforts to do so over the past several decades. However, the advent of high-quality vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP) has increased the possibility of meeting this challenge. In particular, the spatially averaged signed shear angle (SASSA) seems to be a unique parameter for quantifying the non-potentiality of active regions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the SASSA for predicting flare severity. For this purpose, we present case studies of the evolution of magnetic non-potentiality using 115 vector magnetograms of four active regions, namely, ARs NOAA 10930, 10960, 10961, and 10963 during 2006 December 8-15, 2007 June 3-10, 2007 June 28-July 5, and 2007 July 10-17, respectively. The NOAA ARs 10930 and 10960 were very active and produced X and M class flares, respectively, along with many smaller X-ray flares. On the other hand, the NOAA ARs 10961 and 10963 were relatively less active and produced only very small (mostly A- and B-class) flares. For this study, we have used a large number of high-resolution vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP). Our analysis shows that the peak X-ray flux of the most intense solar flare emanating from the active regions depends on the magnitude of the SASSA at the time of the flare. This finding of the existence of a lower limit of the SASSA for a given class of X-ray flares will be very useful for space weather forecasting. We have also studied another non-potentiality parameter called the mean weighted shear angle (MWSA) of the vector magnetograms along with the SASSA. We find that the MWSA does not show such distinction as the SASSA for upper limits of the GOES X-ray flux of solar flares; however, both the quantities show similar trends during the evolution of all active regions studied.

Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay, E-mail: pvk@prl.res.i, E-mail: sgosain@prl.res.i [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur 313 001 (India)

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Volcanology and volcanic activity with a primary focus on potential hazard impacts for the Hawaii geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography reviews published references about potential volcanic hazards on the Island of Hawaii that are pertinent to drilling and operating geothermal wells. The first two sections of this annotated bibliography list the most important publications that describe eruptions of Kilauea volcano, with special emphasis on activity in and near the designated geothermal subzones. References about historic eruptions from Mauna Loa`s northeast rift zone, as well as the most recent activity on the southern flank of dormant Mauna Kea, adjacent to the Humu`ula Saddle are described. The last section of this annotated bibliography lists the most important publications that describe and analyze deformations of the surface of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes.

Moore, R.B. [Federal Center, Denver, CO (United States); Delaney, P.T. [2255 North Gemini Drive, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Kauahikaua, J.P. [Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Correction of Doi-Edwards' Green Function for a Chain in a Harmonic Potential and its Implication for the Stress-Optical Rule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a corrected Green's function for a polymer chain trapped in a two-dimensional anisotropic harmonic potential with a fixed boundary condition. This Green's function is a modified version of what Doi and Edwards first derived to describe the polymer chain confined in the tube-like domain of surrounding entangled polymers [J. Chem. Soc. Farad. Trans. II 74 (1978) 1802]. In contradiction to the results found by Ianniruberto and Marrucci (IM) when applying the Doi-Edwards Green function [J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 79 (1998) 225], we find that the stress-optical rule is violated for any tube potential either circular or elliptic if the corrected Green's function is used. The violation is due to the presence of the virtual springs to confine the chain in the tube rather than the anisotropy of the confinement potential. On the other hand, Doi and Edwards used their Green's function only for estimation of the monomer density along the primitive path where we find just a small correction. Since they did not use it for rheological calculations, the stress-optic rule appears to be safe for the Doi-Edwards model.

Jay D. Schieber; Tsutomu Indei

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

43

ISD97, a computer program to analyze data from a series of in situ measurements on a grid and identify potential localized areas of elevated activity  

SciTech Connect

A computer program, ISD97, was developed to analyze data from a series of in situ measurements on a grid and identify potential localized areas of elevated activity. The ISD97 code operates using a two-step process. A deconvolution of the data is carried out using the maximum entropy method, and a map of activity on the ground that fits the data within experimental error is generated. This maximum entropy map is then analyzed to determine the locations and magnitudes of potential areas of elevated activity that are consistent with the data. New deconvolutions are then carried out for each potential area of elevated activity identified by the code. Properties of the algorithm are demonstrated using data from actual field measurements.

Reginatto, M.; Shebell, P.; Miller, K.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The Miscoding Potential of 5-Hydroxycytosine Arises Due to Template Instability in the Replicative Polymerase Active Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5-Hydroxycytosine (5-OHC) is a stable oxidation product of cytosine associated with an increased frequency of C {yields} T transition mutations. When this lesion escapes recognition by the base excision repair pathway and persists to serve as a templating base during DNA synthesis, replicative DNA polymerases often misincorporate dAMP at the primer terminus, which can lead to fixation of mutations and subsequent disease. To characterize the dynamics of DNA synthesis opposite 5-OHC, we initiated a comparison of unmodified dCMP to 5-OHC, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and 5-methylcytosine (5-MEC) in which these bases act as templates in the active site of RB69 gp43, a high-fidelity DNA polymerase sharing homology with human replicative DNA polymerases. This study presents the first crystal structure of any DNA polymerase binding this physiologically important premutagenic DNA lesion, showing that while dGMP is stabilized by 5-OHC through normal Watson-Crick base pairing, incorporation of dAMP leads to unstacking and instability in the template. Furthermore, the electronegativity of the C5 substituent appears to be important in the miscoding potential of these cytosine-like templates. While dAMP is incorporated opposite 5-OHC {approx}5 times more efficiently than opposite unmodified dCMP, an elevated level of incorporation is also observed opposite 5-FC but not 5-MEC. Taken together, these data imply that the nonuniform templating by 5-OHC is due to weakened stacking capabilities, which allows dAMP incorporation to proceed in a manner similar to that observed opposite abasic sites.

Zahn, Karl E.; Averill, April; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie (Vermont)

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

45

NRP/Optineurin Cooperates with TAX1BP1 to Potentiate the Activation of NF-kB by Human T-Lymphotropic Virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NRP/Optineurin Cooperates with TAX1BP1 to Potentiate the Activation of NF-kB by Human T Nuclear factor (NF)-kB is a major survival pathway engaged by the Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein. Tax1 activation of NF-kB occurs predominantly in the cytoplasm, where Tax1 binds NF-kB

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

46

Seismic Activity of the Earth, the Cosmological Vectorial Potential And Method of a Short-term Earthquakes Forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To the foundation of a principally new short-term forecasting method there has been laid down a theory of surrounding us world's creation and of physical vacuum as a result of interaction of byuons - discrete objects. The definition of the byuon contains the cosmological vector-potential A_g - a novel fundamental vector constant. This theory predicts a new anisotropic interaction of nature objects with the physical vacuum. A peculiar "tap" to gain new energy (giving rise to an earthquake) are elementary particles because their masses are proportional to the modulus of some summary potential A_sum that contains potentials of all known fields. The value of A_sum cannot be larger than the modulus of A_g. In accordance with the experimental results a new force associated with A_sum ejects substance from the area of the weakened A_sum along a conical formation with the opening of 100 +- 10 and the axis directed along the vector A_sum. This vector has the following coordinates in the second equatorial coordinate system: right ascension alpha = 293 +- 10, declination delta = 36 +- 10. Nearly 100% probability of an earthquake (earthquakes of 6 points strong and more by the Richter scale) arises when in the process of the earth rotation the zenith vector of a seismically dangerous region and/or the vectorial potential of Earth's magnetic fields are in a certain way oriented relative to the vector A_g. In the work, basic models and standard mechanisms of earthquakes are briefly considered, results of processing of information on the earthquakes in the context of global spatial anisotropy caused by the existence of the vector A_g, are presented, and an analysis of them is given.

Yu. A. Baurov; Yu. A. Baurov; Yu. A. Baurov Jr.; A. A. Spitalnaya; A. A. Abramyan; V. A. Solodovnikov

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

Federal environmental standards of potential importance to operations and activities at US Department of Energy sites. Draft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is now engaged in a program of environmental restoration nationwide across its 45 sites. It is also bringing its facilities into compliance with environmental regulations, decontaminating and decommissioning unwanted facilities, and constructing new waste management facilities. One of the most difficult questions that DOE must face in successfully remediating its inactive waste sites, decontaminating and decommissioning its inactive facilities, and operating its waste management facilities is: ``What criteria and standards should be met?`` Acceptable standards or procedures for determining standards will assist DOE in its conduct of ongoing waste management and pending cleanup activities by helping to ensure that those activities are conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations and are accepted by the regulatory community and the public. This document reports on the second of three baseline activities that are being conducted as prerequisites to either the development of quantitative standards that could be used by DOE, or consistent procedures for developing such standards. The first and third baseline activities are also briefly discussed in conjunction with the second of the three activities.

Fowler, K.M.; Bilyard, G.R.; Davidson, S.A.; Jonas, R.J.; Joseph, J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Implications for National Policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The World Is Flat: Making Materials Matter. National Policy Implications. Toni Marechaux. Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. National Research ...

49

Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Adequacy Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations December 2011 RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS iii Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................... V CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 2. ALIGNMENT OF POTENTIAL COMPLIANCE PATHWAYS WITH REGULATORY DEADLINES ......... 5 CHAPTER 3. RESOURCE ADEQUACY.......................................................................................................... 15 APPENDIX A: NERC REGIONS ................................................................................................................... 26

50

A theoretical model for {sup 222}Rn adsorption on activated charcoal canisters in humid air based on Polanyi`s potential theory  

SciTech Connect

Water vapor interferes with adsorption {sup 222}Rn gas by passive activated charcoal devices used to estimate indoor air concentrations. The {sup 222}Rn adsorption coefficient is the fundamental parameter characterizing charcoal`s ability to adsorb {sup 222}Rn. The Dubinin-Radushkevich equation, based on Polanyi`s potential theory, was modified to include two terms quantifying the effect of both water vapor and sampling time on the {sup 222}Rn adsorption coefficient of passive charcoal devices. A single equation was derived that quantities the {sup 222}Rn adsorption coefficients at any temperature, humidity and exposure time using six experimentally determined physical constants that are unique for a particular passive charcoal device. The theoretical model was verified with published experimental data, and it showed a good correlation between theory and experiment. The model proved to be consistent with experimental data, provided that the amount of water vapor adsorbed by the charcoal device during sampling remains below a critical level, termed the breakpoint. 44 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Scarpitta, S.C. [Dept. of Energy, New York, NY (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Antagonism of antiviral and allogeneic activity of a human public CTL clonotype by a single altered peptide ligand: implications for allograft rejection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alloreactive T lymphocytes are central mediators of graft-versus-host disease and allograft rejection. A public CTL clonotype with specificity for the alloantigens HLA-B*4402 and B*4405 is often expanded to large numbers in healthy HLA-B*0801{sup +} individuals, driven by cross-reactive stimulation with the common, persistent herpesvirus EBV. Since such alloreactive memory CTL expansions have the potential to influence transplantation outcome, altered peptide ligands (APLs) of the target HLA-B*0801-binding EBV peptide, FLRGRAYGL, were screened as specific antagonists for this immunodominant clonotype. One APL, FLRGRFYGL, exerted powerful antagonism of a prototypic T cell clone expressing this immunodominant TCR when costimulated with target cells presenting HLA-B*0801{sup FLRGRAYGL}. Significantly, this APL also reduced the lysis of allogeneic target cells expressing HLA-B*4402 by up to 99%. The affinities of the agonist and antagonist complexes for the public TCR, measured using solution and solid-phase assays, were 8 and 138 {micro}M, respectively. Surprisingly, the half-life of the agonist and antagonist complexes was similar, yet the association rate for the antagonist complex was significantly slower. These observations were further supported by structural studies that suggested a large conformational hurdle was required to ligate the immunodominant TCR to the HLA-B*0801 antagonist complex. By defining an antagonist APL against an immunodominant alloreactive TCR, these findings raise the prospect of exploiting such peptides to inhibit clinical alloreactivity, particularly against clonal T cell expansions that react with alloantigens.

Ely, Lauren K.; Green, Katherine J.; Beddoe, Travis; Clements, Craig S.; Miles, John J.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Zernich, Danielle; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Burrows, Scott R. (Monash)

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

53

activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

54

Potential Release Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRS PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and the town of Los Alamos at which hazardous materials from past activities have been found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators sumps firing ranges

55

Transportation and Climate Change: The Potential for Hydrogen Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New technologies are being developed to serve the growing energy needs of the transportation sector without the environmental impacts observed with conventional technologies. In a world where emissions of carbon are severely constrained, hydrogen-powered vehicles (using fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or other) may be the best alternative for meeting societal needs. Programs to develop these technologies have emerged as high priorities for the automotive and energy industries, as well as governments worldwide. There are a number of challenges that must be faced, however, before we can effectively transition the current fossil fuel based system to a future hydrogen (H2) based system for the mobility industry. Full conversion of the existing transportation system will require concurrent availability of appropriate fuel sources and related infrastructure at acceptable costs and with a clear understanding of their environmental implications. This paper provides a framework for evaluating the challenges and potential pathways for the transition from our current petroleum-based energy sources for transportation systems to a future hydrogen-based system. A preliminary evaluation of the implications of moving to a hydrogen-based transportation system was conducted using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) integrated assessment model that evaluates the economic and environmental implications of various technology options. Future research activities will focus on alternative development pathways that consider infrastructure requirements and impacts as well as sequential, complementary and competitive technology development interactions.

Geffen, Charlette A.; Edmonds, James A.; Kim, Son H.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Activities on ORR have the potential to release small quantities of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals to the environment. These releases could expose members of the public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to radiation from nuclides deposited inside the body are called internal exposures. This distinction these potential exposure pathways combined was estimated to be about 3 mrem. DOE O 458.1, Radiation Protection Exposures to radiation from nuclides located outside the body are called external exposures; exposures

Pennycook, Steve

57

Policy implications of technologies for cognitive enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Concepts Group at Sandia National Laboratory and the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes at Arizona State University convened a workshop in May 2006 to explore the potential policy implications of technologies that might enhance human cognitive abilities. The group's deliberations sought to identify core values and concerns raised by the prospect of cognitive enhancement. The workshop focused on the policy implications of various prospective cognitive enhancements and on the technologies/nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science--that enable them. The prospect of rapidly emerging technological capabilities to enhance human cognition makes urgent a daunting array of questions, tensions, ambitions, and concerns. The workshop elicited dilemmas and concerns in ten overlapping areas: science and democracy; equity and justice; freedom and control; intergenerational issues; ethics and competition; individual and community rights; speed and deliberations; ethical uncertainty; humanness; and sociocultural risk. We identified four different perspectives to encompass the diverse issues related to emergence of cognitive enhancement technologies: (1) Laissez-faire--emphasizes freedom of individuals to seek and employ enhancement technologies based on their own judgment; (2) Managed technological optimism--believes that while these technologies promise great benefits, such benefits cannot emerge without an active government role; (3) Managed technological skepticism--views that the quality of life arises more out of society's institutions than its technologies; and (4) Human Essentialism--starts with the notion of a human essence (whether God-given or evolutionary in origin) that should not be modified. While the perspectives differ significantly about both human nature and the role of government, each encompasses a belief in the value of transparency and reliable information that can allow public discussion and decisions about cognitive enhancement. The practical question is how to foster productive discussions in a society whose attention is notably fragmented and priorities notably diverse. The question of what to talk about remains central, as each of the four perspectives is concerned about different things. Perhaps the key issue for initial clarification as a condition for productive democratic discussion has to do with the intended goals of cognitive enhancement, and the mechanisms for allowing productive deliberation about these goals.

Sarewitz, Daniel R. (Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ); Karas, Thomas H.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Federal Tax Incentives for PV: Potential Implications for Program Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Federal ITC Section 48 Resource: PV, CSP, solar heating/25D Resource: PV and solar water heating used in dwellingcooling, solar lighting (no pool heating, and no passive

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michael. (1989), "Market Failure and Energy Policy,"Energy Policy 17 pp.397-406. Fog, M . H . and Nadkarni, K .Management Programs," Energy Policy 22 Levine, M.D. , Hirst,

Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices for solar projects selected via competitive bidding in India are Rs 11-12/kWh Levelized tariff for wind power

Phadke, Amol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Federal Tax Incentives for PV: Potential Implications for Program Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than purchase price • In cases where PV programs providethe purchase price in an arms-length transaction Most PVprice, the grant is still considered to be from the PV

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis. Further, turbines with higher rotor diameter havethe wind turbine, the average hub-height and rotor diameterand larger rotor diameters allows wind turbines to sweep

Phadke, Amol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam reforming of natural gas. Ammonia production technology has significantly improved in the last three decades, improving economies

Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate the cost of wind energy and compare it withMW installed worldwide. 6 Wind energy costs in India areof levelized cost were estimated (See Figure 7: Wind Energy

Phadke, Amol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the day reaching maximum demand during late afternoon andthe day reaching maximum demand during late afternoon and

Phadke, Amol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chart of the World (DCW), and Center for International Earthand resolution. See Table 3. DCW data is relatively old, ofDigital Chart of the World (DCW) Center for International

Phadke, Amol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Utility Home Energy Audit (RCS) Programs," inface-to-face [Nadel,1991]. Energy audit programs are a moreadvertising. Residential energy audits performed in the US

Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Federal Tax Incentives for PV: Potential Implications for Program Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis Department Impact of State and Federal IncentivesEnergy Analysis Department Federal (and State) Solar Tax IncentivesEnergy Analysis Department Federal Tax Incentives Should Impact How States

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

CF[sub 3] chemistry: Potential implications for stratospheric ozone  

SciTech Connect

The authors address questions about the chemistry of CF[sub 3] bearing compounds in the atmosphere, and the impact that the existence of and reaction rate constants for such species may have on stratospheric ozone. Species considered include CF[sub 3], CF[sub 3]O, CF[sub 3]O[sub 2], CF[sub 3]OH, CF[sub 3]OOH, CF[sub 3]ONO[sub 2], CF[sub 3]O[sub 2]NO[sub 2], and CF[sub 3]OOCl. Based on their calculational results, the authors suggest a number of experimental measurements which should substantially decrease uncertainties associated with the role of CF[sub 3] species in atmospheric chemistry related to ozone.

Ko, M.K.W.; Sze, N.D.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Weistenstein, D.K.; Heisey, C.W. (Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Wayne, R.P.; Biggs, P.; Canosa-Mas, C.E. (Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Sidebottom, H.W.; Treacy, J. (Univ. College, Dublin (Ireland))

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy use. In other countries, such as Thailand and Mexico,energy efficient technologies (for example the ILUMEX project between Mexico,63% in Mexico in the late 1980s [Bates, 1993]. Energy prices

Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

POTENTIAL USE OF ACTIVATED CARBON TO RECOVER TC-99 FROM 200 WEST AREA GROUNDWATER AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO MORE EXPENSIVE RESINS HANFORD SITE RICHLAND WASNINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Recent treatability testing performed on groundwater at the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, has shown that Purolite{reg_sign} A530E resin very effectively removes Tc-99 from groundwater. However, this resin is expensive and cannot be regenerated. In an effort to find a less expensive method for removing Tc-99 from the groundwater, a literature search was performed. The results indicated that activated carbon may be used to recover technetium (as pertechnetate, TCO{sub 4}{sup -}) from groundwater. Oak Ridge National Laboratory used activated carbon in both batch adsorption and column leaching studies. The adsorption study concluded that activated carbon absorbs TCO{sub 4}{sup -} selectively and effectively over a wide range of pH values and from various dilute electrolyte solutions (< 0.01 molarity). The column leaching studies confirmed a high adsorption capacity and selectivity of activated carbon for TCO{sub 4}{sup -}. Since activated carbon is much less expensive than Purolite A530E resin, it has been determined that a more extensive literature search is warranted to determine if recent studies have reached similar conclusions, and, if so, pilot testing of 200-ZP-1 groundwater wi11 likely be implemented. It is possible that less expensive, activated carbon canisters could be used as pre-filters to remove Tc-99, followed by the use of the more expensive Purolite A530E resin as a polishing step.

BYRNES ME; ROSSI AJ; TORTOSO AC

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

72

REPORT NO. 3 health implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT NO. 3 health implications of fallout from nuclear weapons testing through 1961 May 1962 Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;REPORT NO. 3 health implications of fallout from nuclear............................................................................................. 10 iii #12;REPORT OF THE FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF FALLOUT FROM NUCLEAR

73

Self Potential At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date 2006 Usefulness not...

74

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Water Implications of Biofuels Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Implications of Biofuels Production Water Implications of Biofuels Production Project Summary Full Title: Water Implications of Biofuels Production in the United States Project ID: 227 Principal Investigator: William S. Logan Brief Description: The National Research Council conducted a workshop and wrote a report examining the potential effects of biofuels production in the U.S. on water and related land resources. Purpose Examine the possible effects of biofuel development on water and related land resources. The central questions are how water use and water quality are expected to change as the U.S. agricultural portfolio shifts to include more energy crops and as overall agricultural production potentially increases. Such questions are considered within the context of U.S. policy and also the expected advances in technology and agricultural practices

78

ACTILOG: An Agent Activation Language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ACTILOG is a language to write generalized condition ¿ action activation rules. We propose it as an alternative and a complement to OPENLOG [6], another agent logic programming language for an abductive reasoner. We want to show how implications (conditional ...

Jacinto A. Dávila

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Self Potential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential Self Potential Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Self Potential Details Activities (20) Areas (20) Regions (4) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electrical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection and tracing of faults. Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface. Thermal: Location of near-surface thermal anomalies: thermoelectric coupling processes due to variations in temperature in the subsurface.

80

Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Before Getting There: Potential and Actual Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the concepts of Actual and Potential Collaboration Spaces. The former applies to the space where collaborative activities are performed, while the second relates to the initial space where opportunities for collaboration are ... Keywords: Doc2U, PIÑAS, casual and informal interactions, potential and actual collaboration spaces, potential collaboration awareness

Alberto L. Morán; Jesús Favela; Ana María Martínez Enríquez; Dominique Decouchant

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Details Activities (8) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: Lithium/magnesium, lithium/sodium, and to a lesser extent, potassium/magnesium ratios in calcium carbonate tufa columns provide a fingerprint for distinguishing tufa columns formed from thermal spring waters versus those formed from non-thermal spring waters. These ratios form the basis of the Mg/Li, Na/Li, and K/Mg fluid geothermometers commonly used in geothermal exploration, which are based on the fact that at elevated temperatures, due to mineral-fluid equilibria, lithium

83

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in eastern California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. The East Flank of this field is currently under study as a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. This paper summarizes petrologic and geologic investigations on two East Flank wells, 34A-9 and 34-9RD2 conducted as part of a continuing effort to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydraulic and thermal stimulation. Well 34A-9

84

Energy harvesting sensor nodes: Survey and implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensor networks with battery-powered nodes can seldom simultaneously meet the design goals of lifetime, cost, sensing reliability and sensing and transmission coverage. Energy-harvesting, converting ambient energy to electrical energy, has emerged as an alternative to power sensor nodes. By exploiting recharge opportunities and tuning performance parameters based on current and expected energy levels, energy harvesting sensor nodes have the potential to address the conflicting design goals of lifetime and performance. This paper surveys various aspects of energy harvesting sensor systems — architecture, energy sources and storage technologies and examples of harvesting-based nodes and applications. The study also discusses the implications of recharge opportunities on sensor node operation and design of sensor network solutions. 1

Sujesha Sudevalayam; Purushottam Kulkarni

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Energy conditions and their implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conditions and their implications Matt Visser Physics Department Washington University Saint;#16;s (Los Alamos) Midwest Relativity 9 November 1999. #12; Abstract: The energy conditions of general- itational #12;elds and cosmological geometries. However, the energy conditions are beginning to look a lot

Visser, Matt

86

CNF and DNF Considered Harmful for Computing Prime Implicants/Implicates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods to compute the prime implicants and the prime implicates of a negation normal form (NNF) formula are developed and implemented. An algorithm PI is introduced that is an extension to negation normal form of an algorithm given by ... Keywords: dissolution, prime implicants/implicates

Anavai Ramesh; George Becker; Neil V. Murray

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Economic Growth in Urban Regions: Implications for Future Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications for Future Transportation Robert Cervero,implications for future transportation policy. The collapseimplications for future transportation policy. Smart

Cervero, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print Phosphatases, enzymes that remove a phosphate group from amino-acid substrates, can be subdivided according to their substrate specificity. Myriad evidence has demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a family of serine/threonine-specific (Ser/Thr) phosphatases, regulates many, if not most, aspects of cellular activities and is a critical tumor suppressor. A team at the University of Washington recently determined the first crystal structure of a PP2A holoenzyme (a form sufficient for full catalytic activity) composed of three different subunits (i.e., a heterotrimer). Their structure provides a foundation for understanding PP2A regulation, satisfactory mechanistic explanations for human tumorigenic mutations, and the structural basis for understanding PP2A substrate recruitment and specificity, a critical issue, given the high number of PP2A substrates.

89

The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print Phosphatases, enzymes that remove a phosphate group from amino-acid substrates, can be subdivided according to their substrate specificity. Myriad evidence has demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a family of serine/threonine-specific (Ser/Thr) phosphatases, regulates many, if not most, aspects of cellular activities and is a critical tumor suppressor. A team at the University of Washington recently determined the first crystal structure of a PP2A holoenzyme (a form sufficient for full catalytic activity) composed of three different subunits (i.e., a heterotrimer). Their structure provides a foundation for understanding PP2A regulation, satisfactory mechanistic explanations for human tumorigenic mutations, and the structural basis for understanding PP2A substrate recruitment and specificity, a critical issue, given the high number of PP2A substrates.

90

On the optimal contact potential of proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analytically derive the lower bound of the total conformational energy of a protein structure by assuming that the total conformational energy is well approximated by the sum of sequence-dependent pairwise contact energies. The condition for the native structure achieving the lower bound leads to the contact energy matrix that is a scalar multiple of the native contact matrix, i.e., the so-called Go potential. We also derive spectral relations between contact matrix and energy matrix, and approximations related to one-dimensional protein structures. Implications for protein structure prediction are discussed.

Kinjo, Akira R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Lifting hydro's potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities are taking another look at potential sites for hydroelectric installations, reevaluating sites that had been uneconomic to develop and those that can be renovated or expanded. Both large- and small-scale facilities now offer the advantages of free fuel, no air or thermal pollution, and no waste - making hydro an attractive way to increase utility capacity. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is participating in screening studies which evaluate the unique characteristics of specific sites and recommend technical improvements for better water control and a higher output. Pumped-hydro facilities are increasing, with new attention going to underground storage as new aboveground sites become harder to find. The institutional hurdles of licensing and regulation, interference with recreational and shoreline activities, down-stream water temperature changes, fish migration, and insurance are often in conflict. EPRI's screening program includes a simplified cost/benefit analysis and a site characterization, which utilities can use for their evaluation. Future research will explore a new financing arrangement that will lower front-end costs. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Ferreira, A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Piecewise Potential Vorticity Inversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The treatment of the potential vorticity (PV) distribution as a composite of individual perturbations is central to the diagnostic and conceptual utility of PV. Nonlinearity in the inversion operator for Ertel's potential vorticity renders ...

Christopher A. Davis

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Implications of Regional Transmission Organization Design for Renewable Energy Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the development of Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs) and assesses the potential implications of market rules for renewable energy technologies. The report focuses on scheduling provisions, as these have proved problematic in some cases for intermittent renewable energy technologies. Market rules of four RTOs-the Pennsylvania-Maryland-New Jersey ISO, the ERCOT ISO, the Midwest ISO and the New York ISO (NYISO)-were examined to determine the impact on intermittent renewable energy projects such as wind energy generators. Also, a more general look was taken at how biomass power may fare in RTOs, specifically whether these technologies can participate in ancillary service markets. Lastly, an assessment was made regarding the implications for renewable energy technologies of a Northeast-wide RTO that would combine the three existing Northeast ISOs (the aforementioned PJM and NYISOs, as well as ISO New England).

Porter, K.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hydropower potential in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turkey has a total hydropower potential of 433 GW that is equal to 1.2% of the total hydropower potential of the world and to 14% of European hydropower potential. Only 125 GW of the total hydroelectric potential of Turkey can be economically used. By the commissioning of new hydropower plants, which are under construction, 34% of the economically usable potential of the country would be tapped. At the present, hydropower energy is an important energy source for Turkey due to its useful characteristics such as being renewable, clean, and less of an impact on the environment, and a cheap and domestic energy source.

Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Biological Implications of The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure The Biological Implications of the PP2A Crystal Structure Print Wednesday, 30 January 2008 00:00 Phosphatases, enzymes that remove a phosphate group from amino-acid substrates, can be subdivided according to their substrate specificity. Myriad evidence has demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a family of serine/threonine-specific (Ser/Thr) phosphatases, regulates many, if not most, aspects of cellular activities and is a critical tumor suppressor. A team at the University of Washington recently determined the first crystal structure of a PP2A holoenzyme (a form sufficient for full catalytic activity) composed of three different subunits (i.e., a heterotrimer). Their structure provides a foundation for understanding PP2A regulation, satisfactory mechanistic explanations for human tumorigenic mutations, and the structural basis for understanding PP2A substrate recruitment and specificity, a critical issue, given the high number of PP2A substrates.

96

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications of China's 20 % Energy Intensity Reduction Target Speaker(s): Jiang Lin Date: March 13, 2007 - 12:00pm Location:...

97

Energy Resource Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Potential Resource Potential of Methane Hydrate Energy Resource Potential An introduction to the science and energy potential of a unique resource Disclaimer Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

98

Interatomic Potentials Repository Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... potentials appropriate for simulation of liquid and glass properties of ... Superalloy," Sandia National Laboratories Report Number SAND-95-8549C ...

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

Environmental implications of increased biomass energy use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study reviews the environmental implications of continued and increased use of biomass for energy to determine what concerns have been and need to be addressed and to establish some guidelines for developing future resources and technologies. Although renewable biomass energy is perceived as environmentally desirable compared with fossil fuels, the environmental impact of increased biomass use needs to be identified and recognized. Industries and utilities evaluating the potential to convert biomass to heat, electricity, and transportation fuels must consider whether the resource is reliable and abundant, and whether biomass production and conversion is environmentally preferred. A broad range of studies and events in the United States were reviewed to assess the inventory of forest, agricultural, and urban biomass fuels; characterize biomass fuel types, their occurrence, and their suitability; describe regulatory and environmental effects on the availability and use of biomass for energy; and identify areas for further study. The following sections address resource, environmental, and policy needs. Several specific actions are recommended for utilities, nonutility power generators, and public agencies.

Miles, T.R. Sr.; Miles, T.R. Jr. (Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Implications of beam phase and RFSUM measured near transition  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the transition-crossing process is crucial for improving Booster performance at high intensity. The synchronous phase appears to drop toward 90{sup o} right after transition regardless of beam intensity, more so at higher beam intensity. The implication is that the effective rf voltage (RFSUM) will run into a limit right after transition when the synchronous phase reaches 90{sup o} for high intensity beam. A reduction in RFSUM is also observed at the same time. Solutions, such as raising the rf voltage during the transition period or controlling the RFSUM reduction by increasing longitudinal emittance before transition, are potentially important for high intensity operation.

Xi Yang; James MacLachlan

2004-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Economic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary and Motor Vehicle Fuel Cell Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); and · Similarly, use of PEM fuel cell waste heat for hot water heating would require careful integration with hot consider cogeneration of hot water to be a potential competitive advantage of stationary fuel cellsPWP-092 Economic Implications of Net Metering for Stationary and Motor Vehicle Fuel Cell Systems

Kammen, Daniel M.

102

ITL Bulletin Security Implications of Active Content, March ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... be attached to electronic mail or down- loaded from a ... Users of plug-ins should be cautioned to ... print before agreeing to down- load executables and ...

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

103

Potential Conservation Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that potential conservation laws have characteristics depending only on local variables if and only if they are induced by local conservation laws. Therefore, characteristics of pure potential conservation laws have to essentially depend on potential variables. This statement provides a significant generalization of results of the recent paper by Bluman, Cheviakov and Ivanova [J. Math. Phys., 2006, V.47, 113505]. Moreover, we present extensions to gauged potential systems, Abelian and general coverings and general foliated systems of differential equations. An example illustrating possible applications of proved statements is considered. A special version of the Hadamard lemma for fiber bundles and the notions of weighted jet spaces are proposed as new tools for the investigation of potential conservation laws.

Michael Kunzinger; Roman O. Popovych

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Safety implications of a large LNG tanker spill over water.  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for natural gas in the United States could significantly increase the number and frequency of marine LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports. Although many studies have been conducted to assess the consequences and risks of potential LNG spills, the increasing importance of LNG imports suggests that consistent methods and approaches be identified and implemented to help ensure protection of public safety and property from a potential LNG spill. For that reason the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, requested that Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) develop guidance on a risk-based analysis approach to assess and quantify potential threats to an LNG ship, the potential hazards and consequences of a large spill from an LNG ship, and review prevention and mitigation strategies that could be implemented to reduce both the potential and the risks of an LNG spill over water. Specifically, DOE requested: (1) An in-depth literature search of the experimental and technical studies associated with evaluating the safety and hazards of an LNG spill from an LNG ship; (2) A detailed review of four recent spill modeling studies related to the safety implications of a large-scale LNG spill over water; (3) Evaluation of the potential for breaching an LNG ship cargo tank, both accidentally and intentionally, identification of the potential for such breaches and the potential size of an LNG spill for each breach scenario, and an assessment of the potential range of hazards involved in an LNG spill; (4) Development of guidance on the use of modern, performance-based, risk management approaches to analyze and manage the threats, hazards, and consequences of an LNG spill over water to reduce the overall risks of an LNG spill to levels that are protective of public safety and property.

Hightower, Marion Michael; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Self Potential At Dixie Hot Springs Area (Combs 2006) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "MT, EM sounding, SP?; SP data and reservoir model may be...

106

Heart and Electric Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heart and Electric Potential Name: Pete Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What is the electrical output that the SA Node andor AV Node put out when emitting an...

107

Daylighting potential in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Daylighting has good potential for application in tropical climates. It can help save electric energy as well as reduce the daytime power demand substantially. It can bring another dimension of energy efficiency in addition to efficient lighting technology, as well as aesthetic value. Its integration with continuous-dimming electric lighting is found to be acceptable. However, fundamental research as well as daylighting application technology are required to realize the potential.

Chirarattananon, S.; Limmechokchai, B. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Lithium Diffusion in Graphitic Carbon and Implications for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon and Implications for the Rate Capability of Anodes Title Lithium Diffusion in Graphitic Carbon and Implications for the Rate Capability of Anodes Publication Type Journal...

109

Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Demand Response National Trends: Implications for the West? Committee on Regional Electric Power Cooperation. San...

110

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and...

111

Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change? Print E-mail Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change? Friday, September 20, 2013 Featured by...

112

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar Power Title Implications of Wide-Area Geographic Diversity for Short- Term Variability of Solar...

113

Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers Title Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers...

114

Public Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publicactivities_header.jpg publicactivities_header.jpg Public Activities Citizens are encouraged to learn about the Department of Energy's programs through a variety of activities that are open to the public. Our goal is to educate citizens and seek their meaningful involvement. If you are visiting the area, the American Museum of Science and Energy in Oak Ridge is the best starting point for exhibits and information about DOE programs in science, environmental management, nuclear fuel supply, and national security. Tours are conducted of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Y-12 National Security Complex and East Tennessee Technology Park during the summer months departing from the Museum. For those with more specific interests in our programs, each month we publish a calendar of public involvement activities, which identifies announcements, comment periods and public meetings of potential interest. Our Environmental Management Program has a Site Specific Advisory Board composed of area citizens who meet the second Wednesday of each month.

115

NEAMS Software Licensing, Release, and Distribution: Implications for FY2013 Work Package Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vision of the NEAMS program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the analysis of nuclear systems. NEAMS anticipates issuing in FY 2018 a full release of its computational 'Fermi Toolkit' aimed at advanced reactor and fuel cycles. The NEAMS toolkit involves extensive software development activities, some of which have already been underway for several years, however, the Advanced Modeling and Simulation Office (AMSO), which sponsors the NEAMS program, has not yet issued any official guidance regarding software licensing, release, and distribution policies. This motivated an FY12 task in the Capability Transfer work package to develop and recommend an appropriate set of policies. The current preliminary report is intended to provide awareness of issues with implications for work package planning for FY13. We anticipate a small amount of effort associated with putting into place formal licenses and contributor agreements for NEAMS software which doesn't already have them. We do not anticipate any additional effort or costs associated with software release procedures or schedules beyond those dictated by the quality expectations for the software. The largest potential costs we anticipate would be associated with the setup and maintenance of shared code repositories for development and early access to NEAMS software products. We also anticipate an opportunity, with modest associated costs, to work with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) to clarify export control assessment policies for software under development.

Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential Well Log Spontaneous Potential Well Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Spontaneous Potential Well Log Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: -Formation bed thickness and boundaries -Detection and tracing of faults -Permeability and porosity Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface.

117

Potential energy for quarks  

SciTech Connect

It is argued on theoretical and phenomenological grounds that confinement of quarks is intrinsically a many-body interaction. The Born-Oppenheimer approximation to the bag model is shown to give rise to a static potential energy that consists of a sum of two-body Coulomb terms and a many-body confining term. Following the success of this potential in heavy Q anti Q systems it is being applied to Q/sup 2/ anti Q/sup 2/. Preliminary calculations suggest that dimeson bound states with exotic flavor, such as bb anti s anti s, exist. 13 refs., 5 figs.

Heller, L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Issues Related to Seismic Activity Induced by the Injection of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISSUES RELATED TO SEISMIC ACTIVITY INDUCED BY THE INJECTION ISSUES RELATED TO SEISMIC ACTIVITY INDUCED BY THE INJECTION OF CO 2 IN DEEP SALINE AQUIFERS Joel Sminchak (sminchak@battelle.org; 614-424-7392) Neeraj Gupta (gupta@battelle.org; 614-424-3820) Battelle Memorial Institute 505 King Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43201 Charles Byrer (a) and Perry Bergman (b) National Energy Technology Laboratory (a) P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV, 26507-0880 (b) P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236-0940 Abstract Case studies, theory, regulation, and special considerations regarding the disposal of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into deep saline aquifers were investigated to assess the potential for induced seismic activity. Formations capable of accepting large volumes of CO 2 make deep well injection of CO 2 an attractive option. While seismic implications must be considered for injection

119

TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

Minnesota, University of

120

Self Potential At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Self Potential At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geophysical surveys that have been conducted specifically for the geothermal program at Blue Mountain include a self-potential (SP) survey, and additional IP/electrical resistivity traversing. These surveys were conducted under a cooperative program between Noramex Corporation and the Energy and Geosciences Institute (EGI), University of Utah, with funding

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Economic and policy implications of pandemic influenza.  

SciTech Connect

Pandemic influenza has become a serious global health concern; in response, governments around the world have allocated increasing funds to containment of public health threats from this disease. Pandemic influenza is also recognized to have serious economic implications, causing illness and absence that reduces worker productivity and economic output and, through mortality, robs nations of their most valuable assets - human resources. This paper reports two studies that investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic flu outbreak. Policy makers can use the growing number of economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. Experts recognize that pandemic influenza has serious global economic implications. The illness causes absenteeism, reduced worker productivity, and therefore reduced economic output. This, combined with the associated mortality rate, robs nations of valuable human resources. Policy makers can use economic impact estimates to decide how much to spend to combat the pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this paper economists examine two studies which investigate both the short- and long-term economic implications of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Resulting policy implications are also discussed. The research uses the Regional Economic Modeling, Inc. (REMI) Policy Insight + Model. This model provides a dynamic, regional, North America Industrial Classification System (NAICS) industry-structured framework for forecasting. It is supported by a population dynamics model that is well-adapted to investigating macro-economic implications of pandemic influenza, including possible demand side effects. The studies reported in this paper exercise all of these capabilities.

Smith, Braeton J.; Starks, Shirley J.; Loose, Verne W.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Acoustically Induced Streaming Flows near a Model Cod Otolith and their Potential Implications for Fish Hearing  

SciTech Connect

The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear s sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8 24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280 830 Hz. Phaselocked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species.

Kotas, Charlotte W [ORNL; Rogers, Peter [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yoda, Minami [Georgia Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Heat Budget of a Midlatitude Squall Line and Implications for Potential Vorticity Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water and heat budgets for a midlatitude squall line are estimated from single- and dual-Doppler-radar data and thermodynamic data from rawinsonde and thermodynamic retrieval (from dual-Doppler winds). These data, along with models to ...

Scott A. Braun; Robert A. Houze Jr.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The implications of potential `lock-in` markets for renewable energy  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear economic effects can cause unpredictable and sometimes undesirable outcomes in the marketplace. Increasing returns can lead to self-reinforcing situation in which increasing market share lead to a more attractive product, which leads in turn to further increases in market share. This results in ``lock-in`` of a technology, which cannot be overcome except by a significant shift in technology, consumer tastes, or other market factors.

Cowan, R.; Kline, D.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Urban Flooding: Implications for Transportation Infrastructure and Travel Disruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrology. Transportation infrastructure and travel patternsnot only damaged various infrastructures but also disruptednot hold true in new infrastructure design and management (

Chang, Heejun; Lafrenz, Martin; Jung, II-Won; Figliozzi, Miguell; Platman, Deena

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Potential Igneous Processes Relevant to the Yucca Mountain Repository: Extrusive-Release Scenario: Analysis and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is moving to prepare and submit a license application to initiate construction of the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. As part of the application, the DOE must provide estimates of the dose risk to a local population caused by low probability igneous eruptions that may occur through the repository after closure. To date, published estimates of such dose risks have included a large number of conservative assumptions such that it appears as if igneous eruptions provide ...

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Seismic Evaluation of the Fruitland Formation with Implications on Leakage Potential of Injected CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and coal-bed methane). The Energy for Sustainable Development l Volume VII No. 4 l December 2003 Overview 5 to diesel fuel and gasoline. 7. Including small reserves of natural gas and coal-bed methane far fromTransforming coal for sustainability: a strategy for China Report by the Task Force on Energy

Wilson, Thomas H.

128

US Agri-Environmental Programs and their Potential Implications for Agricultural Trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Security Program (CSP) • Land Preservation –EQIP and predecessors, CSP, and WHIP) Land Retirement (CRPincrease production. Slide 21 CSP: small production impacts

Cooper, Joseph

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Potential Predictability and AMIP Implications of Midlatitude Climate Variability in Two General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensembles of extended Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) runs from the general circulation models of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (formerly the National Meteorological Center) and the Max-Planck Institute (...

T. P. Barnett; K. Arpe; L. Bengtsson; M. Ji; A. Kumar

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Oxidation-specific epitopes are targets of innate natural antibodies : potential implications in health and disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Disease by Meng-Yun Sandy Chou Doctor of Philosophy inSciences by Meng-Yun Sandy Chou Committee in charge:Victor Nizet Copyright Meng-Yun Sandy Chou, 2009 All rights

Chou, Meng-Yun Sandy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Potential for Energy Efficiency. Prepared for The EnergyIndustrial Sector Energy Efficiency Potential Study - DraftIndustrial Energy Efficiency Market Characterization Study.

Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; Rafael Friedmann; Rufo, Mike

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Vector potential photoelectron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

A new class of electron microscope has been developed for the chemical microanalysis of a wide range of real world samples using photoelectron spectroscopy. Highly structured, three-dimensional samples, such as fiber mats and fracture surfaces can be imaged, as well as insulators and magnetic materials. The new microscope uses the vector potential field from a solenoid magnet as a spatial reference for imaging. A prototype instrument has demonstrated imaging of uncoated silk, magnetic steel wool, and micron-sized single strand tungsten wires.

Browning, R. [R. Browning Consultants, 14 John Street, Shoreham, New York 11786 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

134

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Temperatures of 100°C are measured at 3 km depth in a well located on the resurgent dome in the center of Long Valley Caldera, California, despite an assumed >800°C magma chamber at 6-8 km depth. Local downflow of cold meteoric water as a process for cooling the resurgent dome is ruled out by a Peclet-number analysis of temperature logs. These analyses reveal zones with fluid circulation at the upper and lower

135

Chaos and Noise in Galactic Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABBREVIATED ABSTRACT: This paper summarises an investigation of the effects of weak friction and noise in time-independent, nonintegrable potentials which admit both regular and stochastic orbits. The aim is to understand the qualitative effects of internal and external irregularities associated, e.g., with discreteness effects or couplings to an external environment, which stars in any real galaxy must experience. The two principal conclusions are: (1) These irregularities can be important on time scales much shorter than the natural relaxation time scale t_R associated with the friction and noise. For stochastic orbits friction and noise induce an average exponential divergence from the unperturbed Hamiltonian trajectory at a rate set by the value of the local Lyapunov exponent. Even weak noise can make a pointwise interpretation of orbits suspect already on time scales much shorter than t_R. (2) The friction and noise can also have significant effects on the statistical properties of ensembles of stochastic orbits, these also occurring on time scales much shorter than t_R. Potential implications for galactic dynamics are discussed, including the problem of shadowing.

Salman Habib; Henry E. Kandrup; M. Elaine Mahon

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

Potential of Renewable Energy to Reduce the Dependence of the State of Hawaii on Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deriving nearly 90% of its primary energy resources from oil, the State of Hawaii is more dependent on oil than any other U.S. state. The price of electricity in Hawaii is also more than twice the U.S. average. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 directed assessment of the economic implications of Hawaii's oil dependence and the feasibility of using renewable energy to help meet the state's electrical generation and transportation fuel use. This paper is based on the assessments and report prepared in response to that directive.Current total installed electrical capacity for the State of Hawaii is 2,414 MWe, 83% of which is fuel-oil generated, but already including about 170 MWe of renewable capacity. The assessments identified about 2,133 MWe (plus another estimated 2,000 MWe of rooftop PV systems) of potential new renewable energy capacity. Most notable, in addition to the rooftop solar potential, is 750 MWe and 140 MWe of geothermal potential on Hawaii and Maui, respectively, 840 MWe of potential wind capacity, primarily on Lanai and Molokai, and one potential 285 MWe capacity specific solar project (PV or solar thermal) identified on Kauai. Important social, political, and electrical-grid infrastructure challenges would need to be overcome to realize this potential. Among multiple crop and acreage scenarios, biofuels assessment found 360,000 acres in Hawaii zoned for agriculture and appropriate for sugarcane, enough to produce 429 million gallons of ethanol-enough to meet about 64% of current 2005 Hawaiian gasoline use. Tropical oil seed crops-potentially grown on the same land-might meet a substantial portion of current diesel use, but there has been little experience growing such crops in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Hawaii initiated in January 2008 a program that seeks to reduce Hawaii's oil dependence and provide 70% of the state's primary energy from clean energy sources by 2030. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) activities will be concentrated in two areas: (1) HCEI Working Groups will be formed and made up of private, state, and U.S. government experts in the areas of Transportation and Fuels, Electricity Generation, Energy Delivery and Transmission, and End-Use Efficiency; and (2) Partnership Projects will be undertaken with local and mainland partners that demonstrate and commercialize new technologies and relieve technical barriers.

Arent, D.; Barnett, J.; Mosey, G.; Wise, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Implication of a large ?_13 for the Tokai to Kamioka and Korea setup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, I present the implications of the large value of \\theta_13 on the Tokai to Kamioka and Korea setup (T2KK). I study the sensitivity of T2KK when using a 750 kW beam (the design luminosity of T2K planned to be achieved by 2017) and a potential 1.66 MW upgraded beam. In addition I compare the capability of the T2KK setup with the T2HK letter of intent.

Fanny Dufour

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

Toward a national plan for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy: the implications of a national commitment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the expected benefits, costs, and implications of three levels of federal commitment and subsidy for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy. It includes estimates of potential solar use representing 16 to 23 percent of the nation's energy supply in the year 2000. Projections are based on data available as of early 1979.

Bennington, G.; Bohannon, M.; Gerstein, R.; Hartzler, R.; Kannan, N.; Miller, G.; Rebibo, K.; Shulman, M.; Spewak, P.; Taul, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

Aizenman, Michael [Departments of Physics and Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Warzel, Simone [Zentrum Mathematik, TU Munich, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85747 Garching (Germany)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Gravity and the quantum potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review some material connecting gravity and the quantum potential and provide a few new observations.

Robert Carroll

2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Efficiency Potential Assessment: (Appendices)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the appendices to EPRI Report 1008911, "Energy Efficiency Potential Assessment."

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ground potential rise monitor  

SciTech Connect

A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

143

Controlled-Potential Electrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Metals determined by controlled-potential coulometry...27 Silver Pt Ag + â?? Ag(s) 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 14 , 28 Technetium Hg Tc 7+ â?? Tc 3+ Acetate-tripolyphosphate 29 Thallium Pt Tl + â?? Tl 3+ 1 M HCl 30 Tin Hg Sn 4+ Sn(Hg) 3 M KBr, 0.2 M HBr 31 Titanium Hg Ti 4+ â?? Ti 3+ 6â??9 M H 2 SO 4 32 Uranium Hg U 6+ â?? U 4+ 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 33 Vanadium Pt V 5+ â?? V 4+ V 4+ â?? V 5+ 1.5...

144

Effective Potential Energy Expression for Membrane Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All living cells transport molecules and ions across membranes, often against concentration gradients. This active transport requires continual energy expenditure and is clearly a nonequilibrium process for which standard equilibrium thermodynamics is not rigorously applicable. Here we derive a nonequilibrium effective potential that evaluates the per particle transport energy invested by the membrane. A novel method is used whereby a Hamiltonian function is constructed using particle concentrations as generalized coordinates. The associated generalized momenta are simply related to the individual particle energy from which we identify the effective potential. Examples are given and the formalism is compared with the equilibrium Gibb's free energy.

Robert W. Finkel

2007-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

Energy Implications of Alternative Water Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Implications of Alternative Water Futures First Western Forum on Energy & Water water, energy, and GHG emissions. Water-related energy use is expected to rise. Conservation canWaterUse(MAF) Historical Use More Resource Intensive Less Resource Intensive Current Trends #12;Water and Energy Link

Keller, Arturo A.

146

Active Fault Segments As Potential Earthquake Sources- Inferences...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Browse Latinoamrica Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy...

147

Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

receipt of crude oil at idled refineries require considerable modification before they can be used to receive products. Moreover, ...

148

India's Energy Efficiency Potential and Scope for LBNL Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

national goals of access to energy for all, reduced vulnerability to shocks in energy imports; and better urban air quality. Additionally, as a co-benefit, these actions also...

149

RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of precipitation where sequestration begins to decrease.

Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Global climate change: Implications, challenges and mitigation measures  

SciTech Connect

The present volume discusses topics in the fields of natural climatic fluctuations, the greenhouse effect, climate modeling, the biophysical and socioeconomic impacts of climate change, climate-change effect mitigation and adaptation strategies, and domestic (US) and international perspectives on regulation of climate-affecting activities. Attention is given to past climates as a guide to the future, the certainty of contemporary global warming, the physics of the greenhouse effect, the global carbon cycle, general circulation model studies of global warming, the implications of sea-level rise, forests' role in global climate change, the ecological effects of rapid climate change, predicted effects of climate change on agriculture, the impact of global warming on human health, energy supply technologies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the U.N.'s 1992 Earth Summit Conference.

Majumdar, S.K.; Kalkstein, L.S.; Yarnal, B.M.; Miller, E.W.; Rosenfeld, L.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Fukushima Nuclear Event and its Implications for Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect

The combined strong earthquake and super tsunami of 12 March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant imposed the most severe challenges ever experienced at such a facility. Information regarding the plant response and status remains uncertain, but it is clear that severe damage has been sustained, that the plant staff have responded creatively and that the offsite implications are unlikely to be seriously threatening to the health, if not the prosperity, of the surrounding population. Re-examination of the regulatory constraints of nuclear power will occur worldwide, and some changes are likely, particularly concerning reliance upon active systems for achieving critical safety functions and concerning treatments of used reactor fuel. Whether worldwide expansion of the nuclear power economy will be slowed in the long run is perhaps unlikely and worth discussion.

Golay, Michael (MIT)

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

152

The potential of renewable energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On June 27 and 28, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National Energy Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the laboratories. As a result of that meeting, interlaboratory teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead laboratory was designated for each core laboratory team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable energy technologies contribute to diversifying sources of energy supply What are the major barriers to greater renewable energy use and what is the potential timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications This report presents the results of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable energy. Scores of scientists, analysts, and engineers in the five core laboratories gave generously of their time over the past eight months to produce this document. Their generous, constructive efforts are hereby gratefully acknowledged. 126 refs., 44 figs., 32 tabs.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the potential effects that emerging mandatory carbon markets have for voluntary markets for renewable energy, or green power markets. In an era of carbon regulation, green power markets will continue to play an important role because many consumers may be interested in supporting renewable energy development beyond what is supported through mandates or other types of policy support. The paper examines the extent to which GHG benefits motivate consumers to make voluntary renewable energy purchases and summarizes key issues emerging as a result of these overlapping markets, such as the implications of carbon regulation for renewable energy marketing claims, the demand for and price of renewable energy certificates (RECs), and the use of RECs in multiple markets (disaggregation of attributes). It describes carbon regulation programs under development in the Northeast and California, and how these might affect renewable energy markets in these regions, as well as the potential interaction between voluntary renewable energy markets and voluntary carbon markets, such as the Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX). It also briefly summarizes the experience in the European Union, where carbon is already regulated. Finally, the paper presents policy options for policymakers and regulators to consider in designing carbon policies to enable carbon markets and voluntary renewable energy markets to work together.

Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Carroll, G.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Topics Covered: Department of Energy Approach to Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design (Seismic) Design Basis and Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events Seismic Risk Implications - Key Parameters and Insights Conclusions Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk More Documents & Publications DOE's Approach to Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis and Management Results from Beyond Design Basis Event Pilots Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor Probabilistic Risk

155

Summary of Chernobyl followup research activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In NUREG-1251, Implications of the Accident at Chernobyl for Safety Regulation of Commercial Nuclear Power Plants in the United States,'' April 1989, the NRC staff concluded that no immediate changes in NRC's regulations regarding design or operation of US commercial reactors were needed; however, it recommended that certain issues be considered further. NRC's Chernobyl followup research program consisted of the research tasks undertaken in response to the recommendations in NUREG-1251. It included 23 tasks that addressed potential lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl accident. This report presents summaries of NRC's Chernobyl followup research tasks. For each task, the Chernobyl-related issues are indicated, the work is described, and the staff's findings and conclusions are presented. More detailed reports concerning the work are referenced where applicable. This report closes out NRC's Chernobyl followup research program as such, but additional research will be conducted on some issues as needed. The report includes remarks concerning significant further activity with respect to the issues addressed.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Summary of Chernobyl followup research activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In NUREG-1251, ``Implications of the Accident at Chernobyl for Safety Regulation of Commercial Nuclear Power Plants in the United States,`` April 1989, the NRC staff concluded that no immediate changes in NRC`s regulations regarding design or operation of US commercial reactors were needed; however, it recommended that certain issues be considered further. NRC`s Chernobyl followup research program consisted of the research tasks undertaken in response to the recommendations in NUREG-1251. It included 23 tasks that addressed potential lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl accident. This report presents summaries of NRC`s Chernobyl followup research tasks. For each task, the Chernobyl-related issues are indicated, the work is described, and the staff`s findings and conclusions are presented. More detailed reports concerning the work are referenced where applicable. This report closes out NRC`s Chernobyl followup research program as such, but additional research will be conducted on some issues as needed. The report includes remarks concerning significant further activity with respect to the issues addressed.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Climate impacts on agriculture: Implications for crop production  

SciTech Connect

Changes in temperature, CO2, and precipitation under the scenarios of climate change for the next 30 years present a challenge to crop production. This review focuses on the impact of temperature, CO2, and ozone on agronomic crops and the implications for crop production. Understanding these implications for agricultural crops is critical for developing cropping systems resilient to stresses induced by climate change. There is variation among crops in their response to CO2, temperature, and precipitation changes and, with the regional differences in predicted climate, a situation is created in which the responses will be further complicated. For example, the temperature effects on soybean could potentially cause yield reductions of 2.4% in the South but an increase of 1.7% in the Midwest. The frequency of years when temperatures exceed thresholds for damage during critical growth stages is likely to increase for some crops and regions. The increase in CO2 contributes significantly to enhanced plant growth and improved water use efficiency; however, there may be a downscaling of these positive impacts due to higher temperatures plants will experience during their growth cycle. A challenge is to understand the interactions of the changing climatic parameters because of the interactions among temperature, CO2, and precipitation on plant growth and development and also on the biotic stresses of weeds, insects, and diseases. Agronomists will have to consider the variations in temperature and precipitation as part of the production system if they are to ensure the food security required by an ever increasing population.

Hatfield, Jerry L.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Kimball, B. A.; Ziska, Lewis A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Ort, Don; Thomson, Allison M.; Wolfe, David W.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

158

Implications of Theoretical Ideas Regarding Cold Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lot of theoretical ideas have been floated to explain the so called cold fusion phenomenon. I look at a large subset of these and study further physical implications of the concepts involved. I suggest that these can be tested by other independent physical means. Because of the significance of these the experimentalists are urged to look for these signatures. The results in turn will be important for a better understanding and hence control of the cold fusion phenomenon.

Afsar Abbas

1995-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

159

Baryogenesis and its implications to fundamental physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this talk I shall explain some basic concepts of baryogenesis and leptogenesis theory, and a new idea of experimental method of verification of fundamental ingredients of leptogenesis theory; the Majorana nature and the absolute magnitude of neutrino masses. Both of these are important to the quest of physics beyond the standard theory, and have far reaching implications irrespective of any particular medel of leptogenesis. If this new method works ideally, there is even a further possibility of detecting relic neutrinos.

Yoshimura, M. [Center of Quantum Universe and Department of Physics, Okayama University Tsushima-naka 3-1-1 Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

160

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012 and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012 and 2013 A stuy of the potential impact of commerical markets of the Department of Energy's authoriziaton of uranium transfers to fund accelerated cleanup activities at the Portsmouth Site in Piketon, Ohio ERI_2142_07_1001_DOE_Potential_Market_Impact_Dec2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012, and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or Benzo(C)fluorine, PAH with possible human health implications. (To BAP or not to BAP) Speaker(s): Larry Goldstein Date: November 7, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants with potential health consequences. Essentially all the cancer risk from exposure to coal tar, cigarette smoke and other products of incomplete combustion is thought to reflect the contributions of PAHs with 4 or more fused rings. In risk assessment as currently practiced the major contributor to overall risk is the 5-ring PAH benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P).However, recent studies using a lifetime feeding protocol indicate that B(a)P does not meet criteria for application to risk assessment since it does not induce lung tumors, the endpoint upon which risk assessments

162

Cell-Based Proteome Profiling of Potential Dasatinib Targets by Use of Affinity-Based Probes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, where they have been reported to control a myriad of cellular processes including proliferation bioavailability. It has been used for the treatment of imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Most transduction and regulate a variety of cellular processes. Dysregulation of kinase activities is implicated

Yao, Shao Q

163

Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Spontaneous Potential Well Log At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bidwell Area Exploration Technique Spontaneous Potential Well Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric Imaging, G. Michael Hoversten. The project title derived from its inception. The project however moved from the application of MT on Kilauea in 2003 to the use of combined SP and conductivity mapping (MT) in 2004. The beginning of 2004 saw the completions of the Kilauea MT experiment by the acquisition of an additional 45 MT stations on Kilauea. We therefore decided to use the funds available to work at the Fort Bidwell

164

General inflaton potentials in supergravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a way to construct supergravity models with an arbitrary inflaton potential V ({\\phi}) and show that all other scalar fields in this class of models can be stabilized at the inflationary trajectory by a proper choice of the K\\"ahler potential.

Renata Kallosh; Andrei Linde; Tomas Rube

2010-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

General inflaton potentials in supergravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a way to construct supergravity models with an arbitrary inflaton potential V ({\\phi}) and show that all other scalar fields in this class of models can be stabilized at the inflationary trajectory by a proper choice of the K\\"ahler potential.

Kallosh, Renata; Rube, Tomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The search for the average person - implications for site cleanup  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee Nuclear Power Station is located in Rowe, Massachusetts, on a 2000 acre site. Approximately 10 acres of the site are developed for plant use. Commercial power operation at the 185-MW (electric) plant began in 1961. In February 1992, the decision was made to permanently cease power operations. Decommissioning activities were initiated immediately and are continuing today. Initial dose assessments have been completed to determine the potential extent of the cleanup effort.

Littlefield, P.S.; Cumming, E.R.; Bellini, F.X.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning Agency/Company /Organization: Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Sector: Energy Topics: Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications User Interface: Other Website: cdkn.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/CDKN-Guide-to-Green-Growth.pdf Cost: Free Language: English CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning Screenshot References: CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning[1] Logo: CDKN-Green Growth: Implications for Development Planning "This guide by CDKN aims to support national planners and policy makers in

168

Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

colonization of newly available tree-species habitat under climate change: an analysis for five eastern US species

Louis R. Iverson; M. W. Schwartz; Anantha M. Prasad

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EIA-Revisions to Gross Domestic product and Implications for the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2008) Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons The concept of GDP is a commonly used measure of economic activity. It can be expressed in nominal dollars or, with the use of a matched price index to remove inflation, in "real" terms. Movements in nominal GDP show how the value of goods and services produced by the United States changes over time, while real GDP is a measure of how the physical production of the economy has grown. While simple in concept, the projecting of nominal and real GDP and the interpretation of these projected measures relative to "history" is not simple or straightforward. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) within the U.S. Department of Commerce continually adjusts the National Income and Product Accounts data, with comprehensive revisions completed every 4 or 5 years. The last four major revisions (1985, 1991, 1995, and 1999) incorporated definitional and statistical changes, as well as emphasizing new ways of presenting the data. Also, prior to AEO1993 aggregate economic activity was measured and projected on the basis of Gross National Product (GNP) as opposed to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). For the period from 1984 through 2004, nominal GNP is on average approximately 0.45 percent above nominal GDP.

170

esource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

adequacy implications of these rules under conservative assumptions. Specifically, this report focuses on whether, under the Stringent Test Case, there would be sufficient...

171

Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

adequacy implications of these rules under conservative assumptions. Specifically, this report focuses on whether, under the Stringent Test Case, there would be sufficient...

172

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper:...

173

A synopsis of collective alpha effects and implications for ITER  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following: Alpha Interaction with Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes; Alpha Interaction with Ballooning Modes; Alpha Interaction with Fishbone Oscillations; and Implications for ITER.

Sigmar, D.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Electric Wholesale Market Regimes in the United States: Implications...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regimes in the United States: Implications for Investment PowerPoint presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee by Charles Whitmore, Senior Market Advisor at the Federal...

175

Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Series II. Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry vol. 88, I.Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter depositionleading to arcs and the physics of the arcing events

Anders, Andre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Implications of Cost Effectiveness Screening Practices in a Low...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Cost Effectiveness Screening Practices in a Low Natural Gas Price Environment: Case Study of a Midwestern Residential Energy Upgrade Program NOTICE Due to the...

177

Environmental implications of increased biomass energy use. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study reviews the environmental implications of continued and increased use of biomass for energy to determine what concerns have been and need to be addressed and to establish some guidelines for developing future resources and technologies. Although renewable biomass energy is perceived as environmentally desirable compared with fossil fuels, the environmental impact of increased biomass use needs to be identified and recognized. Industries and utilities evaluating the potential to convert biomass to heat, electricity, and transportation fuels must consider whether the resource is reliable and abundant, and whether biomass production and conversion is environmentally preferred. A broad range of studies and events in the United States were reviewed to assess the inventory of forest, agricultural, and urban biomass fuels; characterize biomass fuel types, their occurrence, and their suitability; describe regulatory and environmental effects on the availability and use of biomass for energy; and identify areas for further study. The following sections address resource, environmental, and policy needs. Several specific actions are recommended for utilities, nonutility power generators, and public agencies.

Miles, T.R. Sr.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ~ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

M. Ono, M.G. Bell, R.E. Bell, R. Kaita, H.W. Kugel, B.P. LeBlanc, J.M. Canik, S. Diem, S.P.. Gerhardt, J. Hosea, S. Kaye, D. Mansfield, R. Maingi, J. Menard, S. F. Paul, R. Raman, S.A. Sabbagh, C.H. Skinner, V. Soukhanovskii, G. Taylor, and the NSTX Research Team

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

Chaos and noise in galactic potentials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an investigation of the effects of weak friction and noise in time-independent, nonintegrable two-dimensional potentials that admit both regular and stochastic orbits. The aim is to understand the qualitative effects of internal and external irregularities associated with discreteness effects or couplings to an external environment, which stars in any real galaxy must experience. It is found that these irregularities can be important already on timescales much shorter than the natural relaxation timescale t{sub R} associated with two-body relaxation. In particular, for stochastic orbits friction and noise result in an exponential divergence from the unperturbed Hamiltonian trajectory, at a rate set by the value of the local Lyapunov exponent, which persists even for relatively large deviations from the unperturbed trajectory. Friction and noise can also have significant effects on the {ital statistical} properties of ensembles of stochastic orbits. Stochastic orbits may be divided into two classes, confined or sticky stochastic orbits which are trapped near islands of regularity, and unconfined or filling stochastic orbits that travel unimpeded throughout a stochastic sea. In the absence of friction and noise, transitions between confined and filling stochastic orbits are very slow. However, even very weak friction and noise can drastically accelerate such transitions, leading to an approach toward a statistical equilibrium on timescales {lt}t{sub R}. In the two-dimensional models studied in this paper, there are cases for which t{sub R} exceeds 10{sup 6} crossing times where friction and noise can induce transitions for more than half the orbits within 100 crossing times, this corresponding in galaxies to a Hubble time t{sub H}. Implications for galactic dynamics are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

Habib, S. [T-6, Theoretical Astrophysics, and T-8, Elementary Particles and Field Theory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [T-6, Theoretical Astrophysics, and T-8, Elementary Particles and Field Theory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kandrup, H.E. [Department of Astronomy and Institute for Fundamental Theory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Institute for Fundamental Theory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Mahon, M.E. [Department of Astronomy and Institute for Fundamental Theory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Institute for Fundamental Theory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. FORESTRY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. FORESTRY G. Marland' Ahsiract.--It is widcly agrccd that thc concentration of greenhouse gases in the earth's atmosphcrc is increasing, that this increase is a consequence of man's activities, and that there is signilicant risk that this will lead to changes in the earth's climate. T h c qucstion is now k i n g discusscd what, if anything, we should be doing to minimize and/or adapt to changes in climate. Virtually evcry statcmcnt on this matter; from the G.S. Oflice of Tcchnology Assessment. to the National Acadcmy of Science, to the Nairobi Declaration on Climatic Change. includes some recommendation for planting and protecting forests. In fact, forestry is intimately involved in the climate change

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Genetic and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems G.A. Tuskan (tuskanga@ornl.gov; 865-576-8141) S.D. Wullschleger (wullschlegsd@ornl.gov; 865-574-7839) A.W. King (kingaw@ornl.gov; 865-576-3436) T.J. Tschaplinski (tschaplinstj@ornl.gov; 865-574-4597) L.E. Gunter (gunterle@ornl.gov; 865-574-4020) A.M. Silletti (sillettia@ornl.gov; 865-574-5397) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 M. Davis (Mark_Davis@nrel.gov; 303-384-6140) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3322 Introduction Carbon sequestration in terrestrial vegetation and soils is a poorly understood process, but ultimately represents a summation of biological activities including the initial incorporation of

182

Spontaneous potential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Spontaneous potential Author NA Published NA, The date "NA" was not understood.The date "NA" was not understood....

183

Available Potential Energy: A Clarification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to clarify some inconsistencies in the literature, on ocean energetics, the evaluation of the available potential energy (APE) is reconsidered. Attention is focused on the baroclinic APE under conditions in which the hydrostatic ...

R. O. Reid; B. A. Elliott; D. B. Olson

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Potential Vorticity Diagnostics of Cyclogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assumption of dynamically balanced flow allows one to completely encase the dynamics of extratropical cyclones in a potential vorticity (PV) framework. This approach offers a conceptually simple interpretation of dynamics because PV is a ...

Christopher A. Davis; Kerry A. Emanuel

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Solar Energy Potential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Solar Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential Addthis Browse By...

186

Solar Energy Potential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential Solar Energy Potential Addthis Browse By Topic TOPICS Energy Efficiency ---Home Energy Audits --Design & Remodeling -Vehicles --Alternative...

187

Market potential for electrolytic hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

By the year 2000, the potential market for advanced-technology electrolytic hydrogen among specialty users is projected to be about half of what the merchant hydrogen market would be in the absence of electrolytic hydrogen. This potential market, representing an annual demand of about 16 billion SCF of hydrogen, will develop from market penetrations of electrolyzers assumed to begin in the early 1980s. 6 refs.

Fein, E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Economic potential of inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect

Beyond the achievement of scientific feasibility, the key question for fusion energy is: does it have the economic potential to be significantly cheaper than fission and coal energy. If fusion has this high economic potential then there are compelling commercial and geopolitical incentives to accelerate the pace of the fusion program in the near term, and to install a global fusion energy system in the long term. Without this high economic potential, fusion's success depends on the failure of all alternatives, and there is no real incentive to accelerate the program. If my conjectures on the economic potential of inertial fusion are approximately correct, then inertial fusion energy's ultimate costs may be only half to two-thirds those of advanced fission and coal energy systems. Relative cost escalation is not assumed and could increase this advantage. Both magnetic and inertial approaches to fusion potentially have a two-fold economic advantage which derives from two fundamental properties: negligible fuel costs and high quality energy which makes possible more efficient generation of electricity. The wining approach to fusion may excel in three areas: electrical generating efficiency, minimum material costs, and adaptability to manufacture in automated factories. The winning approach must also rate highly in environmental potential, safety, availability factor, lifetime, small 0 and M costs, and no possibility of utility-disabling accidents.

Nuckolls, J.H.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Self Potential At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, Self Potential At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A separate geophysical analysis performed on the Koolau caldera area (Kauahikaua, 1981 a) synthesized existing self-potential, gravity, seismic and aeromagnetic data with recently acquired resistivity soundings. An analysis of the observed remnant magnetization within the caldera complex suggested that subsurface temperatures ranged from less than 300degrees C to no more than 540degrees C. The resistivity data indicated that the electrical basement, to a depth of 900 m, had resistivities ranging from 42 ohm.m to more than 1000 ohm.m, which is considered to be within the

191

Coal bed methane global market potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide increases in energy prices, as well as the increased potential for project financing derived from emissions credits, have renewed focus on coal bed methane (CBM) and coal mine methane (CMM) projects in coal-producing countries around the world. Globally, CBM utilization projects (in the operational, development, or planning stages) capture and utilize methane from gassy underground coal mines in at least 13 countries. The total methane emission reductions that could be achieved by these projects are approximately 135 billion cubic feet per year (equal to 14.8 million tons of carbon equivalent per year). This global activity level reflects a growing awareness of the technological practicality and the economic attractiveness of coal mine methane recovery and use. This report outlines the potential of the global CBM market. Contents: An overview of CBM; Challenges and issues; Technologies to generate power from CAM; Global CBM/CMM utilization; Country highlights; Ranking of countries with the largest CMM development potential (Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, USA, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Africa); Planning CBM/CMM projects; Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies; Demonstration projects; Development plan and application process; Equity and debt; Carbon financing; Government sponsors; Private sponsors; Project risk reduction support; Examples of integrated project financing; Glossary.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

192

Self Potential Measurements At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measurements At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Measurements At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential Measurements At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Measurements Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Self-potential measurements before and during injection tests at Raft River KGRA, Idaho indicate a small negative change. The magnitude of the change (5 to 10 mV) is near the noise level (5 mV) but they extend over a fairly broad area. The presence of a cathodic protection system clouds the issue of the validity of the changes, however the form of the observed changes cannot be explained by any simple change in the current strength of the

193

Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden"

194

Climate Threat to the Planet:* Implications for Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Threat to the Planet:* Implications for Energy Policy and Intergenerational Justice Jim Policy-Related Statements are Personal Opinion I changed the title of my talk. Global warming has implications for energy policy and intergenerational justice. The propriety of a scientist discussing

Hansen, James E.

195

Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE 62.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE 62.2 Iain S. Walker and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;1 Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE Standard 62.2 ABSTRACT The first and only nation-wide standard for residential ventilation in the United States is ASHRAE

196

Activation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

197

Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL/TM-200015 ORNL/TM-200015 MANAGED BY UT-BATTELLE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY A Vector Approach to Regression Analysis and Its Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions November 2000 Prepared by H. 1. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrolton, Illinois R. W. Crawford R.W. Crawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee - UT-BATTELLE -. ORNL-27 (4.00) II ORNL/TM-200015 A VECTOR APPROACH TO REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND ITS APPLICATION TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS H. T. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrollton, Illinois R. W. Crawford RWCrawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee November 2000 Prepared for Office of Energy Effkiency and Renewable Energy

198

Evolution of Clearance Standards and Implications for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

converting these materials into consumer products (cars, chairs, toys, spoons, etc) because of potential risk/April 2003. #12;8 ARIES-CS Z-Pinch Net Electric Power 1000 MWe 1000 MWe Target Yield --- 3000 MJ Rep Rate

199

Business implications of knowledge-based systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two part paper explores management issues raised by expert systems (ES). In the first section, a brief history of ES is presented, and the competitive potential of ES is analyzed from a business policy perspective. The second section, appearing ...

John J. Sviokla

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Light-Front Holographic QCD and the Confinement Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light-Front Hamiltonian theory, derived from the quantization of the QCD Lagrangian at fixed light-front time \\tau = t+z/c, provides a rigorous frame-independent framework for solving nonperturbative QCD. The eigenvalues of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian predict the hadronic mass spectrum, and the eigensolutions provide the light-front wavefunctions describing hadron structure. The valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a single-variable relativistic equation of motion, analogous to the nonrelativistic radial Schrodinger equation, with an effective confining potential U which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. The potential U has a unique form if one requires that the action for zero quark mass remains conformally invariant. The holographic mapping of gravity in AdS space to QCD with a specific soft-wall dilaton yields the same light-front Schrodinger equation. It also gives a precise relation between the bound-state amplitudes in the fifth dimension z of AdS space and the boost-invariant light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons in physical space-time. The elastic and transition form factors of the pion and the nucleons are found to be well described in this framework. The predictions include a zero-mass pion in the chiral limit, and linear Regge trajectories with the same slope in the radial quantum number n and orbital angular momentum L. The light-front AdS/QCD holographic approach thus gives a frame-independent representation of color-confining dynamics and the excitation spectra of light-quark hadrons in terms of a single mass parameter. We also discuss the implications of the underlying conformal template of QCD for renormalization scale-setting and the implications of light-front quantization for the value of the cosmological constant.

Stanley J. Brodsky; Guy F. de Téramond; Hans Günter Dosch

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Immigration: Patterns, Issues, and Outlook, 2008. No.Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyMexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy

Shields, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

HCMV pUS28 initiates pro-migratory signaling via activation of Pyk2 kinase  

SciTech Connect

The HCMV-encoded chemokine receptor US28 mediates smooth muscle cell (SMC) and macrophage motility and this activity has been implicated in the acceleration of vascular disease. US28 induced SMC migration involves the activation of the protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) Src and Focal adhesion kinase as well as the small GTPase RhoA. In the current study, we examined the involvement of the PTK Pyk2 in US28-induced cellular motility. Expression of a Pyk2 lacking the autophosphorylation site (Tyr-402) blocks US28-mediated SMC migration in response to RANTES, while the kinase-inactive mutant failed to elicit the same negative effect on migration. US28 stimulation with RANTES results in ligand-dependent and calcium-dependent phosphorylation of Pyk2 Tyr-402 and induced the formation of an active Pyk2 kinase complex containing several novel Pyk2 binding proteins. Interestingly, expression of the autophosphorylation site mutant Pyk2 F402Y did not abrogate the formation of an active Pyk2 kinase complex, but instead prevented US28-mediated activation of RhoA. These findings represent the first demonstration that US28 signals through Pyk2 and that this PTK participates in US28-mediated cellular motility via activation of RhoA. Additionally, US28 activated RhoA via Pyk2 in the U373 glioblastoma cells. Interestingly, the Pyk2 kinase complex in U373 contained several proteins known to participate in glioma tumorigenesis. These results provide a potential mechanistic link between HCMV-US28 and glioblastoma cell activation and motility.

Vomaske, Jennifer; Varnum, Susan M.; Melnychuk, Ryan; Smith, Patricia; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Streblow, Daniel N.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

203

Stochastic Resonance in Washboard Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the mobility of an overdamped particle in a periodic potential tilted by a constant force. The mobility exhibits a stochastic resonance in inhomogeneous systems with space dependent friction coefficient. The result indicates that the presence of oscillating external field is not essential for the observability of stochastic resonance, at least in the inhomogenous medium. I.

Debasis Dan A; Mangal C. Mahato; A. M. Jayannavar B

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

Schweik, Charles M.

205

China-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural Renewable Energy China-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural Renewable Energy Agency/Company /Organization Asian Development Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Biomass, - Biofuels, Agriculture Topics Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, Resource assessment, Background analysis Website http://www.adb.org/Documents/R Country China UN Region Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References China-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural Renewable Energy[1] China-Status and Potential for the Development of Biofuels and Rural Renewable Energy Screenshot Overview "The goals of this project are to better understand biofuel development in the PRC; assess the implications of the biofuel program on food prices,crop

206

The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: Ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 {mu}M) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca{sup 2+} efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP{sup +} transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. - Graphical abstract: Guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane and induces cancer cell death Display Omitted Highlights: > We addressed the involvement of mitochondria in guttiferone (GA) toxicity toward cancer cells. > GA promoted membrane permeabilization, membrane potential dissipation, NAD(P)H depletion, ROS accumulation and ATP depletion. > These actions could be implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds.

Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L., E-mail: gilbertopardo@infomed.sld.cu [Centro de Estudio para las Investigaciones y Evaluaciones Biologicas, Instituto de Farmacia y Alimentos, Universidad de La Habana, ave. 23 21425 e/214 and 222, La Coronela, La Lisa, CP 13600, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Cafe s/n, 14040-903 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Nunez-Figueredo, Yanier [Centro para las Investigaciones y Desarrollo de Medicamentos, Ave 26, No. 1605 Boyeros y Puentes Grandes, CP 10600, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Tudella, Valeria G. [Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Cafe s/n, 14040-903 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Farmacia y Alimentos, Universidad de La Habana, ave. 23 21425 e/214 and 222, La Coronela, La Lisa, CP 13600, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Rodrigues, Fernando P.; Pestana, Cezar R. [Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Cafe s/n, 14040-903 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Uyemura, Sergio A.; Leopoldino, Andreia M. [Departamento de Analises Clinicas, Toxicologicas e Bromatologicas, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Cafe s/n, 14040-903 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Alberici, Luciane C.; Curti, Carlos [Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Cafe s/n, 14040-903 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Active security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce active security, a new methodology which introduces programmatic control within a novel feedback loop into the defense infrastructure. Active security implements a unified programming environment which provides interfaces ... Keywords: central management, digital forensics, network security

Ryan Hand, Michael Ton, Eric Keller

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Electroluminescence from Strained Ge membranes and Implications for an Efficient Si-Compatible Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate room-temperature electroluminescence (EL) from light-emitting diodes (LED) on highly strained germanium (Ge) membranes. An external stressor technique was employed to introduce a 0.76% bi-axial tensile strain in the active region of a vertical PN junction. Electrical measurements show an on-off ratio increase of one order of magnitude in membrane LEDs compared to bulk. The EL spectrum from the 0.76% strained Ge LED shows a 100nm redshift of the center wavelength because of the strain-induced direct band gap reduction. Finally, using tight-binding and FDTD simulations, we discuss the implications for highly efficient Ge lasers.

Nam, Donguk; Cheng, Szu-Lin; Roy, Arunanshu; Huang, Kevin Chih-Yao; Brongersma, Mark; Nishi, Yoshio; Saraswat, Krishna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hydrous oxide activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for preparing of an ion exchanger, comprising: treating an ionically inert activated charcoal porous support with an aqueous solution of metal oxychloride selected from the group consisting of zirconium and titanium oxychlorides so as to impregnate the pores of the support with the solution; separating the treated support from excess metal oxychloride solution; converting the metal oxychloride to a hydrous metal oxide precipitate in the pores of the support at a pH above 8 and above the pH whereat the hydrous metal oxide and activated charcoal support have opposite zeta potentials and sufficient to hydrolyze the metal oxychloride. It also describes a process for preparing an ion exchanger comprising: treating granulated activated charcoal with a concentrated solution of a metal oxychloride from the group consisting of zirconium and titanium oxychlorides, degassing the mixture; and treating the resultant mixture with a base selected from the group consisting of ammonium hydroxide and alkali metal hydroxides so as to precipitate the oxychloride within the pores of the activated carbon granules as hydrous metal oxide at a pH above 8 and above the pH whereat the hydrous metal oxide and activated charcoal have opposite zeta potentials.

Weller, J.P.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Oil Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Implications of Increasing U.S. Crude Oil Production By John Powell June 18, 2013 U.S. crude oil production is up dramatically since 2010 and will continue to grow rapidly; this has implications for: John Powell June 18, 2013 2 * Refinery operations * Refinery investment * Logistics infrastructure investment * Exports of petroleum products * Exports of crude oil Increased U.S. crude oil production has resulted in: John Powell June 18, 2013 3 * Declines in U.S. crude imports * Changes to refinery operations * Logistical constraints in moving crude from production areas to refining areas * Discounted prices for domestic "landlocked" crude vs. international seaborne crude

211

Renewable Energy Technical Potential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Technical Potential Energy Technical Potential Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Renewable Energy Technical Potential: Renewable energy technical potential represents the achievable energy generation of a particular technology given system performance, topographic limitations, environmental, and land-use constraints. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle The primary benefit of assessing technical potential is that it establishes an upper-boundary estimate of development potential.[1] Multiple Types of Potential Defining RE Potential There are multiple types of potential, each with their own assumptions. In addition to technical potential, resource, economic, and market potentials are also considered when assessing the overall development potential of a given technology. (See 'Defining RE Potential' to the right).

212

Potential Uses of Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM POTENTIAL USES OF DEPLETED URANIUM Robert R. Price U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20874 M. Jonathan Haire and Allen G. Croff Chemical Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6180 June 2000 For American Nuclear Society 2000 International Winter and Embedded Topical Meetings Washington, D.C. November 12B16, 2000 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. _________________________

213

California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial energy efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic potential, the study examines achievable program potential undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, theEnergy Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing Energy ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable potential over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of energy savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable potential estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.

Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Propagation in nonlocal optical potentials  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that a nonlocal optical potential implies multiple eigenmode propagation. This is important when the mean free path becomes of the order of the nonlocality, such as in the strong absorption situation occurring for pion scattering near the 3-3 resonance, and consequently the propagation cannot be described reasonably by one complex wave number. The eigenmode structure can be seen most directly in quasielastic scattering.

Lenz, F.; Moniz, E.J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Peak load management: Potential options  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews options that may be alternatives to transmission construction (ATT) applicable both generally and at specific locations in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Some of these options have potential as specific alternatives to the Shelton-Fairmount 230-kV Reinforcement Project, which is the focus of this study. A listing of 31 peak load management (PLM) options is included. Estimated costs and normalized hourly load shapes, corresponding to the respective base load and controlled load cases, are considered for 15 of the above options. A summary page is presented for each of these options, grouped with respect to its applicability in the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. The report contains comments on PLM measures for which load shape management characteristics are not yet available. These comments address the potential relevance of the options and the possible difficulty that may be encountered in characterizing their value should be of interest in this investigation. The report also identifies options that could improve the efficiency of the three customer utility distribution systems supplied by the Shelton-Fairmount Reinforcement Project. Potential cogeneration options in the Olympic Peninsula are also discussed. These discussions focus on the options that appear to be most promising on the Olympic Peninsula. Finally, a short list of options is recommended for investigation in the next phase of this study. 9 refs., 24 tabs.

Englin, J.E.; De Steese, J.G.; Schultz, R.W.; Kellogg, M.A.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Economic implications of anaerobic digesters on dairy farms in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, air and water have been considered common property resources and, therefore, over utilized as waste receptors. Dairy waste is a leading environmental concern in the North Bosque River watershed in Texas. Changing societal attitudes are forcing dairies and policymakers to balance environmental concerns with farm profitability. Dairies are entering a realm filled with technologies to combat waste concerns. Anaerobic digester technology may play a role in helping dairies balance profit and the environment. Digesters capture methane from livestock waste and transform it into electricity which can be sold to utilities or used on-farm. Because a digester facility is confined, air and water pollution can be reduced. Technological advancement and institutional factor changes allowing the sale of on-farm produced electricity and green power requirements have increased the economic feasibility of digesters. The study of the economic implications of anaerobic digesters for Texas dairies provides producers and policymakers with information to make good decisions concerning adoption and subsidization of this technology. At the beginning of this study, no digesters were operating in Texas. Dairies operating digesters in four states, therefore, were interviewed on-site to provide necessary data. The expected net present value, E(NPV), of a plug-flow digester is negative with and without selling electricity, indicating it should not be constructed based strictly on its financial contribution. At the current electricity-selling price, digesters are less economically feasible than current waste management strategies, lagoons, even after considering potential environmental penalties. However, selling electricity and capturing by-product heat for cost savings makes the digester's E(NPV) less negative than lagoons. The E(NPV) of a covered lagoon digester is positive. This indicates digesters are a potentially feasible waste management strategy. For plug-flow digesters to show a positive E(NPV), the selling price needs to be approximately 82.38% higher than the current price. The breakeven selling price is 12% higher than the current price. Below the breakeven price, lagoons have a larger E(NPV) than plug-flow digesters, therefore making lagoons the preferred waste management strategy. Results suggest changes in rules and technology efficiency make digesters economically competitive with current waste management systems.

Jackson, Randy Scott, Jr.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Neutrino factories: realization and physics potential  

SciTech Connect

Neutrino Factories offer an exciting option for the long-term neutrino physics program. This new type of neutrino facility will provide beams with unique properties. Low systematic uncertainties at a Neutrino Factory, together with a unique and precisely known neutrino flavor content, will enable neutrino oscillation measurements to be made with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Over recent years, the resulting neutrino factory physics potential has been discussed extensively in the literature. In addition, over the last six years the R&D necessary to realize a Neutrino Factory has been progressing, and has developed into a significant international activity. It is expected that, within about five more years, the initial phase of this R&D program will be complete and, if the community chooses to build this new type of neutrino source within the following decade, neutrino factory technology will be ready for the final R&D phase prior to construction. In this paper (1) an overview is given of the technical ingredients needed for a Neutrino Factory, (2) beam properties are described, (3) the resulting neutrino oscillation physics potential is summarized, (4) a more detailed description is given for one representative Neutrino Factory design, and (5) the ongoing R&D program is summarized, and future plans briefly described.

Geer, S.; /Fermilab; Zisman, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

IMPLICATIONS OF THEORETICAL IDEAS REGARDING COLD FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lot of theoretical ideas have been floated to explain the so called cold fusion phenomenon. I look at a large subset of these and study further physical implications of the concepts involved. I suggest that these can be tested by other independent physical means. Because of the significance of these the experimentalists are urged to look for these signatures. The results in turn will be important for a better understanding and hence control of the cold fusion phenomenon. 1 Since the initial claims, counterclaims and confusion of 1989 the field of ” cold fusion ” has settled down as a reasonably well pursued field all over the world as evidenced by several recent conferences and publications [1-7]. Perhaps not surprisingly it has turned out to be a tough field experimentally as much as the results viewed globally are quite sporadic and the optimum conditions are still unknown. However the bottomline is that whether conventional cold fusion or not excess heat and/or neutron and/or He 4 etc are

unknown authors

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Examining the Potential of Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect

This outreach document goes to potential partners for NREL's Renewable Energy Potential Initiative, which will explore the long-term potential of Renewable Energy to meet a substantial share of U.S. energy needs.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for Regional Assessments and Initiatives Project scope: Comparative analysis of recent resource plans filed by 14 utilities in the Western U.S. and Canada. Analyze treatment of conventional & emerging resource options-including energy efficiency (EE)-Assess risk analysis & portfolio management -Develop more standardized methods and conventions for resource assessment-Summarize how issues are handled in resource plans; identify "best practices" and offer recommendations-Create information tools for CREPC that facilitate work on related projects (e.g. regional transmission planning) Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans Implications for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change? Print E-mail Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change? Print E-mail Temperature and Violent Crime: Implications of Climate Change? Friday, September 20, 2013 Featured by EPA, a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program Is there a link between climate change and violent crimes? Scientists at EPA and the Emory University School of Medicine are investigating whether hotter temperatures affect violent crimes, such as assault, robbery, rape, and murder. In a recent paper published in the Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change, researchers examined the relationship between daily temperature and daily incidence of violent crime in Dallas from 1993 to 1999.

222

Financial market imperfections and their asset pricing implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of two studies on financial market imperfections. The first study (Chapters 2 and 3) investigates illiquidity, which is a reflection of different imperfections, and its pricing implications in the ...

Rayanakorn, Surapap

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

IMBALANCED RADIATION ENTROPY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR REMOTE SENSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMBALANCED RADIATION ENTROPY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR REMOTE SENSING Yangang Liu, Wei Wu and Warren and radiation entropy is needed to close the system. A new remote sensing approach is presented

Johnson, Peter D.

224

An assessment of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exploration of the health implications of aviation emissions regulations is made by assessing the results of a study of aviation's effects on United States air quality mandated by the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The ...

Sequeira, Christopher J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

TY JOUR T1 Efficiency Improvement Opportunities in TVs Implications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities in TVs Implications for Market Transformation Programs JF Energy Policy A1 Won Young Park A1 Amol Phadke A1 Nihar Shah A1 Virginie E Letschert...

226

Strike-slip faulting as a trigger mechanism for overpressure release through piercement structures. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,*, A. Nermoen a , M. Krotkiewski a , Y 2009 Accepted 12 March 2009 Available online xxx Keywords: Java, Indonesia Lusi mud volcano Faulting volcano in Indonesia (Mazzini et al., 2007). Lusi became active the 29th of May 2006 on the Java Island

Podladchikov, Yuri

227

The potential for renewable energy technologies in the rural postharvest food system in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

This report examines energy demand and potential renewable energy technologies for postharvest food processing with particular emphasis on technologies related to grain. Postharvest activities (harvesting, drying, threshing, winnowing, shelling, hulling, grinding, storage, refrigeration, canning, cooking) and the techniques used in these activities are explored. Possible renewable sources include fuelwood, charcoal, solar cookers, ovens, and crop dryers, photovoltaics, animal draft, pedal power, wind power, hydropower, biogas, and alcohol fuels; some of these, it is noted, also have potential applicability beyond postharvest activities.

Lindblad, C.J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Analysis of Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybridization and Implications for Energy Storage Devices (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents an analysis of hybridization and implications energy storage devices concerning fuel cell vehicles.

Zolot, M.; Markel, T.; Pesaran, A.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Interpretation of self-potential measurements during injection tests at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

self-potential measurements during injection tests at self-potential measurements during injection tests at Raft River, Idaho. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Interpretation of self-potential measurements during injection tests at Raft River, Idaho. Final report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Self-potential measurements before and during injection tests at Raft River KGRA, Idaho indicate a small negative change. The magnitude of the change (5 to 10 mV) is near the noise level (5 mV) but they extend over a fairly broad area. The presence of a cathodic protection system clouds the issue of the validity of the changes, however the form of the observed changes cannot be explained by any simple change in the current strength of the protection system. Furthermore, similar changes are observed for two

230

Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional To Basin-Scale Relationship Between Geodetic Strain And Geological Structures Details Activities (9) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: We apply a new method to target potential geothermal resources on the regional scale in the Great Basin by seeking relationships between geologic structures and GPS-geodetic observations of regional tectonic strain. First, we establish a theoretical basis for underst~dingh ow the rate of fracture opening can be related to the directional trend of faults

231

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Activity Monitoring Technologies | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as ... Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and

232

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and Activity Monitoring Technologies | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as ... Commercial Products Show Potential to serve as Nuclear Material and

233

Research highlights potential for improved solar cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential for improved solar cells Research highlights potential for improved solar cells Research has shown that carrier multiplication is a real phenomenon in tiny semiconductor...

234

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Title Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48258 Year of...

235

Tribal Renewable Energy Development Potential Webinar | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Renewable Energy Development Potential Webinar Tribal Renewable Energy Development Potential Webinar February 21, 2013 - 1:35pm Addthis Learn about opportunities for...

236

QCD based static potential between heavy quarks  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the static potential between a quark-anti quark pair using dual potentials to describe long-distance Yang-Mills theory.

Baker, M. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Ball, J.S. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Zachriasen, R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

239

Scientific Potential of Einstein Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Einstein gravitational-wave Telescope (ET) is a design study funded by the European Commission to explore the technological challenges of and scientific benefits from building a third generation gravitational wave detector. The three-year study, which concluded earlier this year, has formulated the conceptual design of an observatory that can support the implementation of new technology for the next two to three decades. The goal of this talk is to introduce the audience to the overall aims and objectives of the project and to enumerate ET's potential to influence our understanding of fundamental physics, astrophysics and cosmology.

B. Sathyaprakash; M. Abernathy; F. Acernese; P. Amaro-Seoane; N. Andersson; K. Arun; F. Barone; B. Barr; M. Barsuglia; M. Beker; N. Beveridge; S. Birindelli; S. Bose; L. Bosi; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; T. Bulik; E. Calloni; G. Cella; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; A. Chincarini; J. Clark; E. Coccia; C. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; S. Danilishin; K. Danzmann; R. De. Salvo; T. Dent; R. De. Rosa; L. Di. Fiore; A. Di. Virgilio; M. Doets; V. Fafone; P. Falferi; R. Flaminio; J. Franc; F. Frasconi; A. Freise; D. Friedrich; P. Fulda; J. Gair; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; K. Glampedakis; C. Gräf; M. Granata; H. Grote; G. Guidi; A. Gurkovsky; G. Hammond; M. Hannam; J. Harms; D. Heinert; M. Hendry; I. Heng; E. Hennes; S. Hild; J. Hough; S. Husa; S. Huttner; G. Jones; F. Khalili; K. Kokeyama; K. Kokkotas; B. Krishnan; T. G. F. Li; M. Lorenzini; H. Lück; E. Majorana; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; M. Mantovani; I. Martin; C. Michel; Y. Minenkov; N. Morgado; S. Mosca; B. Mours; H. Müller-Ebhardt; P. Murray; R. Nawrodt; J. Nelson; R. Oshaughnessy; C. D. Ott; C. Palomba; A. Paoli; G. Parguez; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; L. Pinard; W. Plastino; R. Poggiani; P. Popolizio; M. Prato; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; J. Read; T. Regimbau; H. Rehbein; S. Reid; L. Rezzolla; F. Ricci; F. Richard; A. Rocchi; S. Rowan; A. Rüdiger; L. Santamaria; B. Sassolas; R. Schnabel; C. Schwarz; P. Seidel; A. Sintes; K. Somiya; F. Speirits; K. Strain; S. Strigin; P. Sutton; S. Tarabrin; A. Thüring; J. van den Brand; M van Veggel; C. Van Den Broeck; A. Vecchio; J. Veitch; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; S. Vyatchanin; B. Willke; G. Woan; K. Yamamoto

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

New oilseeds boast feedstock potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers in the United States are investigating the chemical potential of the Chinese tallow tree and the buffalo gourd. It is estimated that the Houston area of Texas could yield up to 70lb of seeds per tree per year. The oily component of the seed is recovered by solvent extraction and the product may some day compete with petroleum-based waxes or fats. In contrast to the Chinese tallow tree, which grows near swamps and marshes, the buffalo gourd is a desert plant. Experiments are underway aimed at improving the yield of the plant by hybridization and other genetic manipulations, and also to come up with an efficient harvesting technique.

Not Available

1982-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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241

Equivalence of Local Potential Approximations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent papers it has been noted that the local potential approximation of the Legendre and Wilson-Polchinski flow equations give, within numerical error, identical results for a range of exponents and Wilson-Fisher fixed points in three dimensions, providing a certain ``optimised'' cutoff is used for the Legendre flow equation. Here we point out that this is a consequence of an exact map between the two equations, which is nothing other than the exact reduction of the functional map that exists between the two exact renormalization groups. We note also that the optimised cutoff does not allow a derivative expansion beyond second order.

Tim R. Morris

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Self Potential At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Self Potential At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Self-potential surveys conducted over the summit and flank of Hualalai (Jackson and Sako, 1982; D. B. Jackson, pers. commun., 1983) indicate an elongate self-potential anomaly extending across the summit and down the northwest rift to Kaupulehu Crater. The positively polarized anomaly extends over an area of approximately 6 km 2 and has been interpreted to be the result of one or more buried high-temperature intrusive bodies (Jackson

244

Electrostatic Potentials in Rhodopseudomonas Wiridis Reaction Centers: Implications for the Driving Force and Directionality of Electron Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Force and Directionality of Electron Transfer M. R. Gunner* Department of Physics, City College of New membrane protein to have a structure solved to atomic resolu- tion.4,5 Since then a higher resolution

Gunner, Marilyn

245

Using a water balance model to analyze the implications of potential irrigation development in the Upper Blue Nile Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than 200 rivers in the world cross at least one political border. Any development project including hydropower or irrigation that is implemented in a trans-boundary river is in essence a claim on the resource. Managing ...

Jain Figueroa, Anjuli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Catalyst activator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

McAdon, Mark H. (Midland, MI); Nickias, Peter N. (Midland, MI); Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Schwartz, David J. (Lake Jackson, TX)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on Public Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report represents an initial activity of the Bureau of Land Managements (BLM) proposed National Energy Policy Implementation Plan: identify and evaluate renewable energy resources on federal lands and any limitations on accessing them. Ultimately, BLM will prioritize land-use planning activities to increase industrys development of renewable energy resources. These resources include solar, biomass, geothermal, water, and wind energy. To accomplish this, BLM and the Department of Energys National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) established a partnership to conduct an assessment of renewable energy resources on BLM lands in the western United States. The objective of this collaboration was to identify BLM planning units in the western states with the highest potential for private-sector development of renewable resources. The assessment resulted in the following findings: (1) 63 BLM planning units in nine western states have high potential for one or more renewable energy technologies; and (2) 20 BLM planning units in seven western states have high potential for power production from three or more renewable energy sources. This assessment report provides BLM with information needed to prioritize land-use planning activities on the basis of potential for the development of energy from renewable resources.

Not Available

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Conditionally Exactly Solvable Potentials and Supersymmetric Transformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general procedure is presented to construct conditionally solvable (CES) potentials using the techniques of supersymmetric quantum mechanics.The method is illustrated with potentials related to the harmonic oscillator problem.Besides recovering known results,new CES potentials are also obtained within the framework of this general approach.The conditions under which this method leads to CES potentials are also discussed.

Geza Levai; Pinaki Roy

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Waste Cleanup: Status and Implications of Compliance Agreements Between DOE and Its Regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses compliance agreements that affect the Department of Energy's (DOE) cleanup program. Compliance agreements are legally enforceable documents between DOE and its regulators, specifying cleanup activities and milestones that DOE has agreed to achieve. Over the years, these compliance agreements have been used to implement much of the cleanup activity at DOE sites, which is carried our primarily under two federal laws - the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 0f 1976, as amended (RCRA). Our objectives were to determine the types of compliance agreements in effect at DOE cleanup sites, DOE's progress in achieving the milestones contained in the agreements, whether the agreements allowed DOE to prioritize work across sites according to relative risk, and possible implications the agreements have on DOE's efforts to improve the cleanup program.

Jones, G. L.; Swick, W. R.; Perry, T. C.; Kintner-Meyer, N.K.; Abraham, C. R.; Pollack, I. M.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

250

CROSS-STREAM COMPARISON OF SUBSTRATE-SPECIFIC DENITRIFICATION POTENTIAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Headwater streams have a demonstrated ability to denitrify a portion of their nitrate (NO(3) (-)) load but there has not been an extensive consideration of where in a stream this process is occurring and how various habitats contribute to total denitrification capability. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiment II (LINX II) we measured denitrification potential in 65 streams spanning eight regions of the US and draining three land-use types. In each stream, potential denitrification rates were measured in common substrate types found across many streams as well as locations unique to particular streams. Overall, habitats from streams draining urban and agricultural land-uses showed higher potential rates of denitrification than reference streams draining native vegetation. This difference among streams was probably driven by higher ambient nitrate concentrations found in urban or agricultural streams. Within streams, sandy habitats and accumulations of fine benthic organic matter contributed more than half of the total denitrification capacity (mg N removed m(-2) h(-1)). A particular rate of potential denitrification per unit area could be achieved either by high activity per unit organic matter or lower activities associated with larger standing stocks of organic matter. We found that both small patches with high rates (hot spots) or more widespread but less active areas (cool matrix) contributed significantly to whole stream denitrification capacity. Denitrification estimated from scaled-up denitrification enzyme assay (DEA) potentials were not always dramatically higher than in situ rates of denitrification measured as (15)N gas generation following 24-h (15)N-NO(3) tracer additions. In general, headwater streams draining varying land-use types have significant potential to remove nitrate via denitrification and some appear to be functioning near their maximal capacity.

Findlay, Stuart [Institute of Ecosystem Studies; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Hamilton, Stephen [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tank, Jennifer [University of Notre Dame, IN; Bernot, Melody [Ball State University; Burgin, Amy [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Crenshaw, Chelsea [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Grimm, Nancy [Arizona State University; McDowell, William [University of Hew Hampshire; Potter, Jody [University of New Hampshire; Sobota, Daniel [Oregon State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Semiconductor Nanoclusters as Potential Photocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Power Electronics Based on the 2-Dimensional Electron Gas in GaN High Power Electronics Based on the 2-Dimensional Electron Gas in GaN Heterostructures by S. R. Kurtz, A. A. Allerman, and D. Koleski Motivation-GaN-based electronics offer miniaturization potential of radical proportions for microwave power amplifiers. GaN's large bandgap, high breakdown field, high electron velocity, and excellent thermal properties have led to high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) with up to 10x the power density of GaAs and other traditional semiconductors at frequencies up to 20 GHz. Further contributing to the outstanding performance of GaN-based amplifiers is the highly conducting, 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) used for the HEMT channel. Intrinsic polarization and piezoelectric properties of GaN materials can produce a 2DEG at an

252

Semiconductor Nanoclusters as Potential Photocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0001 0001 Transport and Kinetic Processes in GaN Epitaxial Lateral Overgrowth M. E. Coltrin and C. C. Mitchell Motivation-GaN is a wide band gap semi- conductor with a broad range of potential appli- cations, e.g., high-temperature electronics, op- telectronics, chemical or biological sensors. GaN thin films usually have a high defect den- sity, leading to poor performance. Epitaxial Lat- eral Overgrowth (ELO) has been shown to greatly reduce defect densities, often by factors of 100 or more. We are conducting fundamental studies of GaN growth kinetics during ELO. Accomplishment-In ELO, a mask pattern of dielectric material is deposited on top of a GaN buffer layer. Further growth of GaN occurs se- lectively on exposed areas of the underlying buffer layer, and not on the dielectric material.

253

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book provides background information on the agroenergetic potential of 65 countries and offers summaries of major crops planted, total area planted, yield per hectare, and total production. Total land area is categorized as to agriculture, forest, and woodland, and is discussed with demographic statistics for each country. The potential for agricultural by-products and biomass to contribute to energy availability is explored, with reference to each major crop. Vegetation and/or economic activity, or soil maps are presented for most countries, as are climatic data, with crop yields and residues which are compared with production elsewhere.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Magmatic Degassing And Implications For The Origin Of The Geysers Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Magmatic Degassing And Implications For The Origin Of The Geysers Geothermal Field Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Noble gas isotope abundances in steam from the Coldwater Creek field of the Northwest Geysers, California, show mixing between a nearly pure mid-ocean ridge (MOR) type magmatic gas with high 3He/4He and low radiogenic 40*Ar (R/Ra > 8.3 and 40*Ar/4He < 0.07), and a magmatic gas diluted with crustal gas (R/Ra 0.25). The

255

Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect

Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Project Galaxy - Sustianable Resource Supply and Environmental Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding what it takes to move from a corn-based liquid fuels industry to one that is cellulosic-based requires a complex transition over time. This transition implies, among other things, a shift from annual cropping systems considered under United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) policy as commodity crops, to perennial lignocellulosic crops that are herbaceous and wood-based. Because of changes in land use as well as biomass and other crop supplies, land-based environmental amenities such as water quality, soil health and tilth, air quality, and animal and avian species populations and their diversity change also. Environmental effects are measured as magnitudes (how much they are impacted), and direction of the impact (either positive or negative). By developing a series of quantitative and qualitative metrics, the larger issue of defining relative sustainability may be addressed, and this can be done at a finer detail of regional (scale) and environmental amenity-specific impacts. Although much literature exists about research relevant to specific environmental variables, there is no published, documented, nor research literature on direct application of environmental over-compliance with regards a 'biorefinery.' Our three goals were to (1) understand and quantify bioenergy sustainability and some key environmental effects in a generic set of examples; (2) explain the effort and means to define and quantify specific qualitative environmental measures, and to determine a way to understand changes in these measures over time and what their implications might be; and (3) use these outcomes to evaluate potential sites in any geographic area. This would permit assessment of candidate locations, combined with an understanding of co-production of fuels, chemicals, and electric power, to interpret sustainability measures and the relationship between environmental sustainability and economic sustainability. The process of determining environmental sustainability effects as a result of providing renewable energy is complex. We have only included in this report environmental effects as a result of producing biomass for the biorefinery, and the area represented by the footprint of the biorefinery itself. In doing this, we have defined critical environmental variables (water, soil, air, and flora and fauna) and discussed some measurable indicators used to quantify effects such as nitrate content, soil organic matter, air particulates, and avian species diversity, respectively. We also point out the need to perform specific sustainability risk assessments, and the need to continually evaluate the life cycle inventory with an accompanying life-cycle assessment. Only in this dynamic framework can environmental sustainability be determined, evaluated and assessed, and contrasted with economic sustainability goals of a firm or an industry.

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Wimmer, Robert [Toyota Motor Corp.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Chemical Activation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Activation of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Adsorption Milton R. Smith, Jr., 1 Edward W. Bittner, 1 Wei Shi, 1, 2 J. Karl Johnson, 1, 2 and Bradley C....

258

Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the ITC Title Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the ITC Publication Type Case Study Year of Publication 2008 Authors Bolinger, Mark, Galen L. Barbose, and Ryan H. Wiser Secondary Title Case Studies of State Support for Renewable Energy Publisher LBNL Place Published Berkeley Pagination 12 Date Published 11/2008 Abstract In early 2006, Berkeley Lab published an LBNL/CESA case study that examined the financial impact of EPAct 2005's solar tax credits on PV system owners, in light of the $2,000 cap on the residential credit, as well as the fact that most PV systems in the U.S. also receive cash incentives from state-, local-, or utility-administered PV programs, and that these cash incentives may reduce the value of federal tax credits in certain situations. That case study was subsequently revised in February 2007 to reflect new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) guidance. The findings of that case study, which are briefly recapped in the next section, remained relevant up until October 2008, when the Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 extended both solar credits for an unprecedented eight years, removed the $2,000 cap on the residential credit, and eliminated restrictions on the use of both credits in conjunction with the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). These significant changes, which apply to systems placed in service on or after January 1, 2009, will increase the value of the solar credits for residential system owners in particular, and are likely to spur significant growth in residential, commercial, and utility-scale PV installations in the years ahead. In light of these substantial changes to the solar ITC, this report takes a fresh look at the value of these revised credits, focusing specifically on the Section 25D residential credit. After first setting the stage by briefly reviewing our previous findings, the document proceeds to cover four specific areas in which the removal of the $2,000 cap on the residential ITC will have significant implications for PV program administrators, PV system owners, and the PV industry that go beyond the obvious market growth potential created by these more-lucrative federal incentives. These four areas include:

259

Asymptotically safe gravity as a scalar-tensor theory and its cosmological implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study asymptotically safe gravity with Einstein-Hilbert truncation taking into account the renormalization group running of both gravitational and cosmological constants. We show the classical behavior of the theory is equivalent to a specific class of Jordan-Brans-Dicke theories with vanishing Brans-Dicke parameter, and potential determined by the renormalization group equation. The theory may be reformulated as an $f(R)$ theory. In the simplest cosmological scenario, we find large--field inflationary solutions near the Planck scale where the effective field theory description breaks down. Finally, we discuss the implications of a running gravitational constant to background dynamics via cosmological perturbation theory. We show that compatibility with General Relativity requires contributions from the running gravitational constant to the stress energy tensor to be taken into account in the perturbation analysis.

Yi-Fu Cai; Damien A. Easson

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

Geohydrologic data and models of Rainier Mesa and their implications to Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geohydrologic data collected at Rainier Mesa provide the only extensive observations in tunnels presently available on flow and transport in tuff units similar to those of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This information can, therefore, be of great value in planning the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) testing in underground drifts at Yucca Mountain. In this paper, we compare the geohydrologic characteristics of tuff units of these two sites and summarize the hydrochemical data indicating the presence of nearly meteoric water in Rainier Mesa tunnels. A simple analytic model is used to evaluate the possibility of propagating transient pulses of water along fractures or faults through the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff unit to reach the tunnel beds below. The results suggest that fast flow could occur without significant mixing between meteoric fracture water and matrix pore water. The implications of these findings on planning for the ESF Calico Hills study at Yucca Mountain are discussed.

Wang, J.S.Y.; Cook, N.G.W.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Carnahan, C.L.; Javandel, I.; Tsang, C.F.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy, economic and environmental implications of production of grasses as biomass feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Perennial prairie grasses offer many advantages to the developing biofuels industry. High yielding varieties of native prairie grasses such as switchgrass, which combine lower levels of nutrient demand, diverse geographical growing range, high net energy yields and high soil and water conservation potential indicate that these grasses could and should supplement annual row crops such as corn in developing alternative fuels markets. Favorable net energy returns, increased soil erosion prevention, and a geographically diverse land base that can incorporate energy grasses into conventional farm practices will provide direct benefits to local and regional farm economies and lead to accelerated commercialization of conversion technologies. Displacement of row crops with perennial grasses will have major agricultural, economic, sociologic and cross-market implications. Thus, perennial grass production for biofuels offers significant economic advantages to a national energy strategy which considers both agricultural and environmental issues.

Downing, M.; McLaughlin, S.; Walsh, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Implications of the greenhouse effect for the Midwest economy  

SciTech Connect

Although a great deal of research effort has been devoted to determining potential future changes in carbon dioxide concentrations, global temperature changes and ecosystem effects, relatively little attention has thus far been paid to potential regional impacts and the formulation of coherent policies to combat the problems. This paper will discuss how the Midwest might fare under conditions of higher mean temperatures or a major federal control program; it also discusses some of the research and development activities underway at Argonne National Laboratory that could help develop a balanced portfolio of technologies for combating the greenhouse effect. For the purposes of this paper we have defined a six-state region--consisting of the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin--to typify the Midwest. These are the same states that comprise Federal Region 5. Temperatures were averaged for the thirty-year period 1950--1980 and do not include some of the higher summer temperatures we have been experiencing in the 1980s. 15 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Streets, D.G.; Bloyd, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Real Time Monitoring of Self Assembled Monolayers Using ATR: Implications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real Time Monitoring of Self Assembled Monolayers Using ATR: Implications Real Time Monitoring of Self Assembled Monolayers Using ATR: Implications to Atmospheric Organic Surfaces Speaker(s): Yael Dubowski Date: December 10, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Most studies of heterogeneous reactions on aerosols have focused on their implications for gas phase species. Less attention, however, has been given to the modification of aerosol surfaces during such reactions. Alteration of aerosol surface species may affect their hygroscopic and radiative properties as well as their reactivity toward other atmospheric trace species. In the present study, we use self-assembled organic monolayers (SAM) as proxies for atmospheric organic aerosols. Detection of even very short carbon chains (i.e., C3) as well as continuous monitoring of the SAMs

264

London Congestion Pricing: Implications for Other Cities | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

London Congestion Pricing: Implications for Other Cities London Congestion Pricing: Implications for Other Cities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: London Congestion Pricing: Implications for Other Cities Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Focus Area: Standards - Incentives - Policies - Regulations Topics: Best Practices Website: www.vtpi.org/london.pdf Congestion charging has reduced traffic congestion, improved bus and taxi service, and generated substantial revenues. There is now support to expand the program to other parts of London and other cities in the United Kingdom. This is the first congestion pricing program in a major European city, and its success suggests that congestion pricing may become more politically feasible elsewhere. How to Use This Tool

265

Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Implications of Carbon Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. ASG6.1005 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

266

Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Implications of Carbon Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Implications of Carbon Regulation for Green Power Markets Lori Bird National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Holt Ed Holt & Associates Inc. Ghita Carroll, Research Participant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. ASG6.1005 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41076 April 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

267

Mapping Geothermal Potential In The Western United States | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Potential In The Western United States Geothermal Potential In The Western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mapping Geothermal Potential In The Western United States Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an updated assessment of geothermal resources in the United States. An important component of the assessment is the estimate of the spatial distribution and quantity of undiscovered geothermal resources. Weights of evidence and logistic regression models have been applied through a Geographic Information System (GIS) framework to produce maps of geothermal favorability. These maps provide the basis for characterizing the undiscovered geothermal resource base and could guide future exploration

268

A Spectrum Of Potentially Diamondiferous Lamproites And Minettes From The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Potentially Diamondiferous Lamproites And Minettes From The Of Potentially Diamondiferous Lamproites And Minettes From The Jharia Coalfield, Eastern India Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Spectrum Of Potentially Diamondiferous Lamproites And Minettes From The Jharia Coalfield, Eastern India Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Abundant Cretaceous (approximately 110 Ma) lamprophyric sills in the Gondwana coalfields show a comagmatic continuum from olivine-lamproites to lamproites and minettes. Four sills in the Jharia coalfield have exotic mineralogy, dominated by olivine (Fo85-92) and phlogopite (5-10% TiO2, 5-13% Al2O3), with subordinate potassium (titanian) richterite and/or arfvedsonite, and spectacularly zoned Sr-rich apatite (up to 20% SrO). Accessory to minor phases include clinopyroxene (titanian diopside to

269

Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area (Richards, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Princeton Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used to map fracture and fluid flow patterns. References K. Richards, A. Revil, A. Jardani, F. Henderson, M. Batzle, A. Haas (2010) Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs, Colorado, Using Geoelectrical Methods Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Self_Potential_At_Mt_Princeton_Hot_Springs_Area_(Richards,_Et_Al.,_2010)&oldid=388680"

270

Self Potential At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1979) 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes More recently, Zablocki (1976) has reported the results of an extensive self-potential survey of the summit area of Kilauea. Unusually large positive potential differences (1000--2000 mV) are present over known fumarolic areas and recent eruptive fissures, as well as in areas without surface expression K539of high heat flow but where subsurface intrusions are probably present. A large negative anomaly (Fig. 1) in self-potential (-2000 mV) is coincident with the area of inflation, low resistivity, and

271

Geology and hydrocarbon potentials of Arafura Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arafura Sea is a continental-shelf sea located between Irian Jaya (western New Guinea) and the northern part of the Australian continent. On the south it adjoins the stable Australian craton, and on the north it is bordered by the Tertiary collision zone between the Australian craton and the northern Irian Jaya island arc. On the west and northwest it is bounded by the active Banda arc collision zone, whereas on the east it is bordered by the northern extension of the Gulf of Carpentaria that also forms the western limit of the zone of late Paleozoic granites. Shelf sediments, ranging in age from late Paleozoic to Cenozoic, predominate in the Arafura Sea continental shelf, and are underlain by granitic basement. Gas shows have been reported from Jurassic to Cretaceous fine-grained marine limestones and sandstones, and gas and condensate also are present in Cretaceous sediments and Middle Jurassic fine-grained sandstones. At the north, the most prospective area seems to be the hinge zone of the Aru high, where a combination of traps and reservoir rocks presumably exists. On the south, the Money Shoal area is considered a significant prospect. In the Arafura basin, stratigraphic traps seem to be the most promising target for hydrocarbon exploration as tectonics seems not to have played an important role in the area. The sedimentary area occupied by the eastern extension of the Tarera-Aiduna wrench fault should also be investigated in detail for its hydrocarbon potential.

Katili, J.A.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Executive Summary Executive Summary December 2011 Resource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulations RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Executive Summary This report presents the results of an independent assessment by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of the adequacy of U.S. electric generation resources under air pollution regulations being finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This report does not estimate the economic impacts of EPA regulations, nor does it provide detailed reliability assessments that planning authorities and other stakeholders will need to conduct to ensure deliverability of power and grid reliability during implementation of EPA rules.

273

Potential Vorticity in a Moist Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential vorticity principle for a nonhydrostatic, moist, precipitating atmosphere is derived. An appropriate generalization of the well-known (dry) Ertel potential vorticity is found to be P = ??1(2? + × u)?·???, where ? is the total ...

Wayne H. Schubert; Scott A. Hausman; Matthew Garcia; Katsuyuki V. Ooyama; Hung-Chi Kuo

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

An Alternative Form for Potential Vorticity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A form of potential vorticity is described that has conservation properties similar to those of Ertel's potential vorticity (EPV) but removes the exponential variation with height displayed by EPV. This form is thus more suitable for inspecting ...

Leslie R. Lait

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Tracers and Potential Vorticities in Ocean Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ertel potential vorticity theorem for stratified viscous fluids in a rotating system is analyzed herein. A set of “tracers,” that is, materially conserved scalar quantities, and the corresponding Ertel potential vorticities are used to obtain ...

Michael V. Kurgansky; Giorgio Budillon; Ettore Salusti

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Available Potential Energy for MODE Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available, potential energy (APE) is defined as the difference between total potential plus internal energy of a fluid in a gravity field and a corresponding reference field in which the fluid is redistributed (leveled) adiabatically to have ...

N. A. Bray; N. P. Fofonoff

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Potential Vorticity Anomalies Associated with Squall Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study involves observations and model simulations of potential vorticity anomalies in the wake of midlatitude squall lines. Using data from the Oklahoma–Kansas PRE-STORM experiment, we analyze potential vorticity fields near two squall lines—...

Rolf F. A. Hertenstein; Wayne H. Schubert

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Potential Vorticity Distribution in the North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical sections and maps of potential vorticity ??1f??/?z for the North Pacific are presented. On shallow isopycnals, high potential vorticity is found in the tropics, subpolar gyre, and along the eastern boundary of the subtropical gyre, all ...

Lynne D. Talley

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

ANL Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activities of the DOD Activities of the DOD Project Office focus today on the Navy's Free Electron Laser Program Argonne Accelerator Institute Meeting June 16, 2009 2 Several Beam Activities and Interests Ongoing  Terahertz sources and applications  Navy Free Electron Laser (Focus area today)  Free Electron Laser Applications  Electromagnetic Interference Technology Review Committees  Novel Fiber Optic Materials with Army Research Lab  Optical Diagnostics for next-generation light sources  Neutron detection schemes  NATO Sensors and Electronics Panel, international field tests of directed energy source applications  Controls  Radiation Oncology 3 Background, Naval Directed Energy History The U.S Navy has been investigating utility of lasers since the 1960's and the

280

Encoding of brain state changes in local field potentials modulated by motor behaviors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Local field potentials (LFPs) measure aggregate neural activity resulting from the coordinated firing of neurons within a local network. We hypothesized that state parameters associated with the underlying brain dynamics ...

Stamoulis, Catherine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Use of a Genesis Potential Index to Diagnose ENSO Effects on Tropical Cyclone Genesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ENSO (El Niño–Southern Oscillation) has a large influence on tropical cyclone activity. The authors examine how different environmental factors contribute to this influence, using a genesis potential index developed by Emanuel and Nolan. Four ...

Suzana J. Camargo; Kerry A. Emanuel; Adam H. Sobel

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Potential Vorticity Dynamics of Boundary Currents in a Quasi-geostrophic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boundary layer potential vorticity dynamics for a quasi-geostrophic, eddy-resolving general circulation ocean model are studied using both Lagrangian and Eulerian analyses. Active western boundary layers are found not only in the upper wind-...

M. Susan Lozier; Stephen C. Riser

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Event-related Potential Evidence of Form and Meaning Coding during Online Speech Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is still a matter of debate whether initial analysis of speech is independent of contextual influences or whether meaning can modulate word activation directly. Utilizing event-related brain potentials (ERPs), we tested the neural correlates of speech ...

Claudia K. Friedrich; Sonja A. Kotz

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Modelling Carbon with Transferable Empirical Potentials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complexities associated with hybridization and anisotropy meant that transferable potentials for carbon were slow to emerge, lagging decades behind similar ...

285

Potential for Biofuels from Algae (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on the potential for biofuels from algae presented at the 2007 Algae Biomass Summit in San Francisco, CA.

Pienkos, P. T.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Self Potential At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, Self Potential At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes An extensive network of self-potential surveys have been performed over the summit and flanks of Kilauea as part of the HGP exploration surveys and in separate studies of the source mechanism for the potential anomalies observed (Zablocki, 1976, 1977). The geothermal exploration surveys were performed primarily on the lower East Rift Zone and identified four separate self-potential anomalies (Fig. 59) (Zablocki, 1977). The source mechanism for the anomalies observed was inferred to be the result of electrokinetic phenomena; thermal groundwater escaping from a geothermal

287

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Visualizing Motion in Potential Wells* Pratibha Jolly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Visualizing Motion in Potential Wells* Pratibha Jolly Department of Physics, University of Delhi well potential diagrams using either the velocity data and assuming conservation of energy or the force wells on the one hand and establishing the relationship between the operative forces and the potential

Zollman, Dean

289

On the design of potential collaboration spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce the concepts of Potential and Actual Collaboration Spaces. The former applies to the initial space where opportunities for collaboration are identified and an initial interaction is established, while the latter relates to ... Keywords: Doc2U, casual and informal interactions, potential collaboration awareness, potential collaboration spaces

Alberto L. Moran; Jesus Favela; Ana M. Martinez Enriquez; Dominique Decouchant

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

Activity report  

SciTech Connect

This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

Yu, S W

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

292

Azo Dyes and Their Interfacial Activity: Implications for Multiphase Flow Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media (Neustadter 1984; Tuck et al. 1988). For instance, several dimensionless numbers have been developed to express important force ratios applicable to multiphase flow in porous media (Morrow and Songkran 1981; Chatzis and Morrow 1984; Wardlaw 1988; Pennell et al. 1996; Dawson and Roberts 1997). These force ratios emphasize the importance of interfacial properties. Our objectives are to provide chemical information regarding the dyes commonly used in multiphase flow visualization studies and to show the surface chemistry effects of the most commonly used dye, Sudan IV, in the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system

Tuck, D.M.

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

Wet Microburst Activity over the Southeastern United States: Implications for Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic properties of wet-microburst-producing days, as observed during the 1986 MIST (MIcroburst and Severe Thunderstorm) field project, conducted in northern Alabama, have been examined and are shown to exhibit common characteristics. ...

Nolan T. Atkins; Roger M. Wakimoto

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Astrophysical Implications of the QCD Phase Transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possible role of a first order QCD phase transition at nonvanishing quark chemical potential and temperature for cold neutron stars and for supernovae is delineated. For cold neutron stars, we use the NJL model with a nonvanishing color superconducting pairing gap, which describes the phase transition to the 2SC and the CFL quark matter phases at high baryon densities. We demonstrate that these two phase transitions can both be present in the core of neutron stars and that they lead to the appearance of a third family of solution for compact stars. In particular, a core of CFL quark matter can be present in stable compact star configurations when slightly adjusting the vacuum pressure to the onset of the chiral phase transition from the hadronic model to the NJL model. We show that a strong first order phase transition can have a strong impact on the dynamics of core collapse supernovae. If the QCD phase transition sets in shortly after the first bounce, a second outgoing shock wave can be generated which leads to an explosion. The presence of the QCD phase transition can be read off from the neutrino and antineutrino signal of the supernova.

Schaffner-Bielich, J. [Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Heidelberg, Germany; Sagert, I. [Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany; Hempel, M. [Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany; Pagliara, G. [Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Heidelberg, Germany; Fischer, T. [University of Basel; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl W. [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Liebendoerfer, Matthias [Universitat Basel, Switzerland

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Predicting Atlantic Basin Seasonal Tropical Cyclone Activity by 1 August  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 90% of all seasonal Atlantic tropical cyclone activity typically occurs after 1 August. A strong predictive potential exists that allows seasonal forecasts of Atlantic basin tropical cyclone activity to be issued by 1 August, prior to ...

William M. Gray; Christopher W. Landsea; Paul W. Mielke Jr.; Kenneth J. Berry

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Green roofs: potential at LANL  

SciTech Connect

Green roofs, roof systems that support vegetation, are rapidly becoming one of the most popular sustainable methods to combat urban environmental problems in North America. An extensive list of literature has been published in the past three decades recording the ecological benefits of green roofs; and now those benefits have been measured in enumerated data as a means to analyze the costs and returns of green roof technology. Most recently several studies have made substantial progress quantifying the monetary savings associated with storm water mitigation, the lessoning of the Urban Heat Island, and reduction of building cooling demands due to the implementation of green roof systems. Like any natural vegetation, a green roof is capable of absorbing the precipitation that falls on it. This capability has shown to significantly decrease the amount of storm water runoff produced by buildings as well as slow the rate at which runoff is dispensed. As a result of this reduction in volume and velocity, storm drains and sewage systems are relieved of any excess stress they might experience in a storm. For many municipalities and private building owners, any increase in storm water mitigation can result in major tax incentives and revenue that does not have to be spent on extra water treatments. Along with absorption of water, vegetation on green roofs is also capable of transpiration, the process by which moisture is evaporated into the air to cool ambient temperatures. This natural process aims to minimize the Urban Heat Island Effect, a phenomenon brought on by the dark and paved surfaces that increases air temperatures in urban cores. As the sun distributes solar radiation over a city's area, dark surfaces such as bitumen rooftops absorb solar rays and their heat. That heat is later released during the evening hours and the ambient temperatures do not cool as they normally would, creating an island of constant heat. Such excessively high temperatures induce heat strokes, heat exhaustion, and pollution that can agitate the respiratory system. The most significant savings associated with green roofs is in the reduction of cooling demands due to the green roof's thermal mass and their insulating properties. Unlike a conventional roof system, a green roof does not absorb solar radiation and transfer that heat into the interior of a building. Instead the vegetation acts as a shade barrier and stabilizes the roof temperature so that interior temperatures remain comfortable for the occupants. Consequently there is less of a demand for air conditioning, and thus less money spent on energy. At LANL the potential of green roof systems has already been realized with the construction of the accessible green roof on the Otowi building. To further explore the possibilities and prospective benefits of green roofs though, the initial capital costs must be invested. Three buildings, TA-03-1698, TA-03-0502, and TA-53-0031 have all been identified as sound candidates for a green roof retrofit project. It is recommended that LANL proceed with further analysis of these projects and implementation of the green roofs. Furthermore, it is recommended that an urban forestry program be initiated to provide supplemental support to the environmental goals of green roofs. The obstacles barring green roof construction are most often budgetary and structural concerns. Given proper resources, however, the engineers and design professionals at LANL would surely succeed in the proper implementation of green roof systems so as to optimize their ecological and monetary benefits for the entire organization.

Pacheco, Elena M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and Energy Options for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyMexico’s Deteriorating Oil Outlook: Implications and EnergyA ccelerates Mexico’s crude oil production, which reached a

Shields, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

General combinatorical structure of truth tables of bracketed formulae connected by implication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the general combinatorical structure of the truth tables of all bracketed formulae with n distinct variables connected by the binary connective of implication, an m-implication.

Yildiz, Volkan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Architectural Implications for Spatial Object Association Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial object association, also referred to as cross-match of spatial datasets, is the problem of identifying and comparing objects in two or more datasets based on their positions in a common spatial coordinate system. In this work, we evaluate two crossmatch algorithms that are used for astronomical sky surveys, on the following database system architecture configurations: (1) Netezza Performance Server R, a parallel database system with active disk style processing capabilities, (2) MySQL Cluster, a high-throughput network database system, and (3) a hybrid configuration consisting of a collection of independent database system instances with data replication support. Our evaluation provides insights about how architectural characteristics of these systems affect the performance of the spatial crossmatch algorithms. We conducted our study using real use-case scenarios borrowed from a large-scale astronomy application known as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

Kumar, V S; Kurc, T; Saltz, J; Abdulla, G; Kohn, S R; Matarazzo, C

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

300

Chemopreventive Potential of Sorghum with Different Phenolic Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiological evidence has correlated consumption of sorghum with reduced incidences of gastrointestinal (GI) tract cancer, especially esophageal cancer. There is little evidence on how phenols of sorghum may affect chemoprevention. Seventeen sorghum varieties were screened for phenolic profiles and antioxidant capacity. The ability of crude sorghum extracts to induce NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QR, a phase II protective enzyme), and inhibit proliferation of colon (HT-29) and esophageal (OE33) carcinoma cells using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and PicoGreen assays, were determined in vitro. 3- Deoxyanthocyanidins, apigeninidin, luteolinidin and their methoxylated derivatives were also investigated for antioxidant capacity, QR inducing and antiproliferative potential. Tannin sorghum generally showed higher antioxidant capacity than non-tannin sorghum varieties. Sorghum varieties containing extractable condensed tannins did not show any significant QR inducing potential; on the other hand, non-tannin sorghums increased QR activity by 1.5-2.7 times; black sorghum (Tx430) was most potent (doubled QR activity at 25 mg/mL, 2.7-fold increase at 100 mg/mL). All sorghum extracts showed relatively strong antiproliferation activity with IC50s (the concentration needed to inhibit cancer cell growth by 50%) of 49.7-883 mg/mL. Tannin-containing sorghums had stronger cancer cell proliferation inhibitory potential (IC50s 49.7-131 mg/mL) than non-tannin sorghums (IC50s 141-883 mg/mL). Total phenol content and antioxidant capacity of crude sorghum extracts positively correlated with their antiproliferative potential (r2 0.71-0.97). Among tested 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, methoxylation on A-ring improved QR inducing potency. 5,7-Dimethoxyluteolinidin had the greatest QR inducing potency (4.3- fold at 100 mM). Methoxylation also improved their antiproliferation potential; the IC50s trend was di-methoxylated (8.3-105 mM) > mono-methoxylated (40.1-192 mM) > apigeninidin and luteolinidin (81.5-284 mM). This study provides information for how phenolic compositions of sorghum and 3-deoxyanthocyanidin structure affect their capacity to induce QR activity and inhibit GI tract cancer cell proliferation. The information is useful to promote the utilization of sorghum in functional foods, beverages, dietary supplements, and other health-related industries. Further study will focus on, fractioned and isolated sorghum phenols, the effect of food processing on their chemopreventive potential, as well as cellular mechanisms involved.

Yang, Liyi

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Electrochemical Surface Potential Due to Classical Point Charge Models Drives Anion Adsorption to the Air-Water Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate that the driving forces for ion adsorption to the air-water interface for point charge models results from both cavitation and a term that is of the form of a negative electrochemical surface potential. We carefully characterize the role of the free energy due to the electrochemical surface potential computed from simple empirical models and its role in ionic adsorption within the context of dielectric continuum theory. Our research suggests that the electrochemical surface potential due to point charge models provides anions with a significant driving force to the air-water interface. This is contrary to the results of ab initio simulations that indicate that the average electrostatic surface potential should favor the desorption of anions at the air-water interface. The results have profound implications for the studies of ionic distributions in the vicinity of hydrophobic surfaces and proteins.

Marcel D. Baer; Abraham C. Stern; Yan Levin; Douglas J. Tobias; Christopher J. Mundy

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: New doses, risks, and their implications  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes the recent re-evaluations of the dose and risk of cancer among survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It addresses briefly their limitations, and describes some of their implications for the lifetime projection of the risk of a fatal cancer following exposure to ionizing radiation.

Schull, W.J.; Shimizu, Y.; Kato, H. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Enterprises as systems: Context, boundaries, and practical implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this paper is to describe the domain of enterprise analysis. This is accomplished through an exploration of relevant definitions, a discussion on boundaries, and a summary of practical implications for researchers and practitioners. Specifically, ... Keywords: Enterprise boundaries, enterprise analysis, enterprise architecting, enterprise integration, enterprise transformation, lean

Ricardo Valerdi; Deborah Nightingale; Craig Blackburn

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Gravity Waves in Shear and Implications for Organized Convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravity Waves in Shear and Implications for Organized Convection Samuel N. Stechmann Department, Los Angeles, CA 90095­1555. E-mail: stechmann@math.ucla.edu #12;ABSTRACT It is known that gravity, the gravity waves can create a more favorable environment on one side of preexisting convection than the other

Stechmann, Samuel N.

305

Climate Threat to the Planet * Implications for Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Threat to the Planet * Implications for Energy Policy Jim Hansen 3 June 2008 PACON International Honolulu, Hawaii *Any statements relating to policy are personal opinion #12;Global Warming Status Definitions 1. Tipping Level - Climate forcing (greenhouse gas amount) reaches a point such that no additional

Hansen, James E.

306

The Economic Value of Biomass Implications for policy and practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic Value of Biomass Implications for policy and practice David Clubb and Ben Tansey Rural England and Yorkshire #12;The research ·No previous study of biomass value ·Important to demonstrate ·Carbon ·Externalities #12;Largescale biomass ·Electricity generation inefficient (

307

Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or phase space. In this work we con- sider the trajectory of sea ice in the ice thickness phase space. We175 Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications Geophysical Is the Trajectory of Arctic Sea Ice? Harry L. Stern and Ronald W. Lindsay Polar Science Center, Applied Physics

Lindsay, Ron

308

Edible Oleogels: Structure and Health Implications Chapter 13 Ethylcellulose Oleogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edible Oleogels: Structure and Health Implications Chapter 13 Ethylcellulose Oleogels Food Science eChapters Food Science & Technology E90583405E8C0F0257AD78FC2FE4C285 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1

309

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Potential Health Hazards of Radiation More Documents &...

310

Laboratory Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

311

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Role of TNF-α as a Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of TNF-α as a Potential Signaling Mediator of Role of TNF-α as a Potential Signaling Mediator of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Human Vascular Cells. Authors: Mohan Natarajan, Sumathy Mohan, Catherine Gibbons, Yan Bo and Munira A. Kadhim Institutions: Departments of Radiation Oncology and Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas; Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside; Radiation and Genomic Stability Unit, Medical research Council, Oxford, United Kingdom Identifying reliable and sensitive signaling pathways that are implicated in adverse health effects after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation would allow us to understand the scientific basis of low dose-induced signaling pathways and their downstream phenotypic expression. This

312

Elliptic flow splitting as a probe of the QCD phase structure at finite baryon chemical potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a partonic transport model based on the 3-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and a relativistic hadronic transport model to describe, respectively, the evolution of the initial partonic and the final hadronic phase of heavy-ion collisions at energies carried out in the Beam-Energy Scan program of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, we have studied the effects of both the partonic and hadronic mean-field potentials on the elliptic flow of particles relative to that of their antiparticles. We find that to reproduce the measured relative elliptic flow differences between nucleons and antinucleons as well as between kaons and antikaons requires a vector coupling constant as large as 0.5 to 1.1 times the scalar coupling constant in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Implications of our results in understanding the QCD phase structure at finite baryon chemical potential are discussed.

Jun Xu; Taesoo Song; Che Ming Ko; Feng Li

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

313

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Implications of Thermonuclear-Fusion Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of “points ” highlighting the strategic-political and militarytechnical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and foster further nuclear proliferation throughout the world. The safety and environmental problems related to the operation of largescale fusion facilities such as ITER (which contain massive amounts of hazardous and/or radioactive materials such as tritium, lithium, and beryllium, as well as neutron-activated structural materials) are not addressed in this paper.

André Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Simulation of the GHG Abatement Potentials in the U.S. Building Sector by 2050  

SciTech Connect

Given the substantial contribution of the U.S. building sector to national carbon emissions, it is clear that to address properly the issue of climate change, one must first consider innovative approaches to understanding and encouraging the introduction of new, low-carbon technologies to both the commercial and residential building markets. This is the motivation behind the development of the Stochastic Lite Building Module (SLBM), a long range, open source model to forecast the impact of policy decisions and consumer behavior on the market penetration of both existing and emerging building technologies and the resulting carbon savings. The SLBM, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is part of the Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS) project, a multi-laboratory effort undertaken in conjunction with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and private companies. The primary purpose of SEDS is to track the performance of different U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Research and Development (R&D) activities on technology adoption, overall energy efficiency, and CO{sub 2} reductions throughout the whole of the U.S. economy. The tool is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with a number of characteristics to distinguish it from existing energy forecasting models. SEDS has been written explicitly to incorporate uncertainty in its inputs leading to uncertainty bounds on the subsequent forecasts. It considers also passive building systems and their interactions with other building service enduses, including the cost savings for heating, cooling, and lighting due to different building shell/window options. Such savings can be compared with investments costs in order to model real-world consumer behavior and forecast adoption rates. The core objective of this paper is to report on the new window and shell features of SLBM and to show the implications of various USDOE research funding scenarios on the adoption of these and other building energy technologies. The results demonstrate that passive technologies contain significant potential for carbon reductions - exceeding 1165 Mt cumulative savings between 2005 and 2050 (with 50% likelihood) and outperforming similar R&D funding programs for distributed photovoltaics and high efficiency solid-state lighting.

Stadler, Michael; DeForest, Nicholas; Marnay, Chris; Bonnet, Florence; Lai, Judy; Phan, Trucy

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Resource Potential  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Resource Potential Offshore Maps Community-Scale Maps Residential-Scale Maps Anemometer Loan Programs & Data Wind Resource Potential State Wind Resource Potential Tables Find state wind resource potential tables in three versions: Microsoft Excel 2007, 2003, and Adobe Acrobat PDF. 30% Capacity Factor at 80-Meters Microsoft 2007 Microsoft 2003 Adobe Acrobat PDF Additional 80- and 100-Meter Wind Resource Potential Tables Microsoft 2007 Microsoft 2003 Adobe Acrobat PDF The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) estimated the windy land area and wind energy potential for each state using AWS Truepower's gross capacity factor data. This provides the most up to date estimate of how wind energy can support state and national energy needs. The table lists the estimates of windy land area with a gross capacity of

316

Geochemical Implications of Gas Leakage Associated with Geologic CO2 Storage - A Qualitative Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is considered the major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of CO2. Different schools of thought exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. We reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of overlying potable aquifers. Results from experimental and modeling studies point to the potential for both beneficial (e.g. contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g. contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion into potable groundwater. However, there are significant discrepancies between studies particularly concerning, what contaminants are of concern and the geochemical processes involved. These discrepancies reflected the lack of a consensus on CO2-induced changes in subsurface geochemical processes and subsequent effects on groundwater chemistry. The development of consistent experimental protocols and the identification of pertinent factors driving CO2-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface were identified as key research needs. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why a standardization of experimental protocols and the consideration of experimental factors such as gas leakage rates, redox status and the influence of co-transported gases are pertinent. The role of analog studies, reactions occurring in the vadose zone, and the influence of organic contaminants are also discussed.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Lee, Gie Hyeon; Amonette, James E.; Brown, Christopher F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Modeling of geomechanical proceses during injection in amultilayered reservoir-caprock system and implications on sitecharacterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present results of a numerical simulationof the potential for fault reactivation and hydraulic fracturingassociated with CO2 injection in a multilayered reservoir-caprock system,and discuss its implications on site characterization. The numericalsimulation is performed using the coupled processes simulator TOUGH-FLAC(Rutqvist et al. 2002, Rutqvist and Tsang, 2003), and is an extension ofearlier numerical studies of a single caprock system (Rutqvist and Tsang,2002). In this study, CO2 is injected for 30 years in a 200 meter thickpermeable saline water formation located at 1600 meters depth (Figure 1).The injection formation is overlaid by several layers of caprocks, whichare intersected by a permeable fault zone allowing upward migration ofthe CO2 within the multilayered system (see Table 1 for materialproperties). The potential for fault slip or fracturing are calculated,based on the time-dependent evolution and local distribution of fluidpressure and the three-dimensional stress field, including importantporo-elastic stresses.The numerical results are discussed with respect tothe site-characterization strategy that would be recommended forevaluation of maximum sustainable injection pressure at an industrial CO2injection site.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thermodynamic potential for compactified bosonic strings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the inclusion of chemical potentials of the Kaluza-Klein charges in the partition function of the bosonic string with a compactified dimension on a circle. The construction of the thermodynamic potential is achieved by the path integral method at one-loop level. Duality symmetry in the dependence on compactification scale is examined. A modular-invariant expression for the thermodynamic potential is also presented.

Kiyoshi Shiraishi

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

QCD Phase Diagram with Imaginary Chemical Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report our recent results on the QCD phase diagram obtained from the lattice QCD simulation. The location of the phase boundary between hadronic and QGP phases in the two-flavor QCD phase diagram is investigated. The imaginary chemical potential approach is employed, which is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the QCD with imaginary chemical potential and analytic continuation to the real chemical potential region.

Nagata, Keitaro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterMonitoring during hydraulic fracturing using the TG-2 well,fracture processes in hydraulic fracturing, Quarterly Report

Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy,  Industrial Technologies Program, Washington, D.C.    GlossaryEnergy Efficient Technology Potentials. 31 Conclusions and Recommendations 42 References. 45 Glossary .

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Downhole Sensor Holds Transformative Potential - Energy ...  

SiC is a class of wide-bandgap semiconducting material that holds transformative potential not only for high-temperature electronics but also for ...

324

Variability in electricity demand highlights potential roles ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These technologies convert electricity into another form of energy for storage: the potential energy in water pumped uphill to a reservoir and in compressed air, ...

325

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which will help California energy and policy analysts and KEMA (2008).  California Energy Efficiency Potential Final Report.  California Energy Commission, Sacramento, 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Discrete Choice Analysis: Hydrogen FCV Demand Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Choice Analysis: H 2 FCV Demand Potential Cory Welch H 2 Scenario Analysis Workshop Washington, D.C. , January 31, 2007 2 Overview * Motivation for work * Methodology * Relative...

327

Exactly Solvable Potentials and Quantum Algebras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-similar potentials and corresponding symmetry algebras are briefly discussed. Talk presented at the XIXth ICGTMP, Salamanca, 29 June - 4July 1992.

Spiridonov, V P

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Higgs discovery potential of ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higgs boson production and decay at the LHC is described, together with related ATLAS search channels, in order to provide an overview of the ATLAS Higgs discovery potential.

Christopher Collins-Tooth

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

OpenEI - renewable energy potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm8560 en Offshore Wind Resource http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode921

Global Wind Potential Supply Curves by Country, Class, and...

330

Energy dependence of nucleon-nucleon potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the energy dependence of potentials defined through the Bethe-Salpeter wave functions. We analytically evaluate such a potential in the Ising field theory in 2 dimensions and show that its energy dependence is weak at low energy. We then numerically calculate the nucleon-nucleon potential at non-zero energy using quenched QCD with anti-periodic boundary condition. In this case we also observe that the potentials are almost identical at $E\\simeq 0$ and $E\\simeq 50$ MeV, where $E$ is the center of mass kinetic energy.

Sinya Aoki; Janos Balog; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Noriyoshi Ishii; Keiko Murano; Hidekatsu Nemura; Peter Weisz

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

331

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool (EX-ACT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Brazil-Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the...

332

Atomistic Potentials and the Future of Nanomaterials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... It is therefore essential that engineers and researchers know which interatomic potentials are available and how well they ... Facilities/Tools Used: ...

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

333

Self Potential At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Self Potential At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Final SP reports indicate there may be low-amplitude anomalies in the Deadman Lake area. These low-amplitude anomalies, however, are not indicative of a production-size resource. The amplitudes of the anomalies are somewhat smaller than those reported for moderate and high-temperature geothermal areas identified in the Great Basin and elsewhere

334

Self Potential At Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Southwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Self Potential At Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Field surveys in the South Point area were limited to a series of Schlumberger soundings and a self-potential traverse across the rift zone. The absence of groundwater wells and time and funding constraints precluded any geochemical field surveys. References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Self_Potential_At_Mauna_Loa_Southwest_Rift_Area_(Thomas,_1986)&oldid=389751

335

Evolutionary sequences and hydrocarbon potential of Kenya sedimentary basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kenya basins have evolved primarily through extension related to episodic continental rifting. In eastern Kenya, thick accumulations of sediments formed within grabens during the prerift phase (Precambrian to Carboniferous) of the Gondwana breakup. Synrift sedimentation (Late Carboniferous to Middle Jurassic) occurred within a north-south rift system, which included the Mandera basin, South Anza basin, and Lamu embayment. During the Early Jurassic, a marine transgression invaded the margins of the eastern Kenya rift basins, resulting in the deposition of platform carbonates and shales. A Callovian-aged salt basin formed in the offshore regions of the Lamu embayment. Intermittent tectonic activity and eustatic sea-level changes controlled sedimentation, which produced marine shales, carbonates or evaporites, and fluvio-deltaic to lacustrine sandstones. From the Early Cretaceous to recent, continental sediments were deposited within the North Anza and Turkana basins. These fluvial-lacustrine sediments are similar to the Lower Cretaceous sequences that have produced oil in the Mesozoic Sudanese Abu Gabra rift. Although exploration activities began in the early 1950s, significant occurrences of potential reservoir, source, and seal lithologies as well as trapping configurations remain in many areas. Favorable structures and sequences of reservoir sandstones and carbonates overlain by potentially sealing lacustrine or marine shales, evaporites, or volcanics have been noted. Potential source beds are believed to be present within shales of the lacustrine or marine depositional environments.

Cregg, A.K. (Western Atlas International, Inc., Carrollton, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

DNA Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Activity DNA Activity Name: Sara Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is DNA an anion or a cation? I thought since it was negatively charged it was an anion but mt teacher in class today said it was a cation because negatively charged molecules logically migrate to the positively charged plate of the cathode, ie molecules that migrate towards a cathode are cations. Where is the error in my logic or there error in my logic? Replies: DNA is negatively charged due to the phosphate ions present in the ribose-phosphate backbone. It moves towards the positive pole during electrophoresis. The definition kation/anion is confusing because: 1. a cation moves to the cathode 2. the cathode is negative, thus 3. a cation is positive DNA is an anion. The confusion is that a cathode is negative, but a cation is positively charged. For that reason these terms are not generally used in this context.

337

Measurement and Modeling Implications of Transfer and Transformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Modeling Implications of Transfer and Transformation Measurement and Modeling Implications of Transfer and Transformation Processes at the Plant/Air Interface Speaker(s): Randy Maddalena Date: October 13, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro To understand the chemodynamic role of vegetation in a multimedia system, the rate and extent of chemical partitioning from adjacent environmental media and the rate of chemical transformation associated with vegetation need to be determined. An exposure system was used to isolate and expose above ground vegetation to semi-volatile air contaminants. Measurements of phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene in the chamber air and the plant tissue were collected during both the uptake and clearance phase of exposure events. The measurements were fitted to the mass balance of the

338

esource Adequacy Implications of Forthcoming EPA Air Quality Regulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESOURCE ADEQUACY IMPLICATIONS OF FORTHCOMING EPA AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Executive Summary This report presents the results of an independent assessment by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) of the adequacy of U.S. electric generation resources under air pollution regulations being finalized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This report does not estimate the economic impacts of EPA regulations, nor does it provide detailed reliability assessments that planning authorities and other stakeholders will need to conduct to ensure deliverability of power and grid reliability during implementation of EPA rules. This report considers two EPA regulations, the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) and the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), that are widely expected to have the greatest impact on

339

Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport Sector |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport Sector Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Implications for the Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Bridging the Gap: Copenhagen Accord NAMA Submissions Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ, Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), Transport Research Laboratory(TRL), International Association for Public Transport (UITP), Veolia Transport Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Case studies/examples Website: www.transport2012.org/bridging/ressources/files/1/586,NAMA-submissions Country: Armenia, Botswana, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Jordan, Republic of Macedonia, Madagascar, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Papua New Guinea, Sierra Leone, Singapore

340

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications of Mitigating Climate Change through Energy Efficiency: Implications of China's 20 % Energy Intensity Reduction Target Speaker(s): Jiang Lin Date: March 13, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 China's rapid economic growth in the last few years has spurred a construction boom for power plants on an unprecedented scale. In 2006 alone, 102 GW of generating capacity was brought online, 90 GW of which are from coal-fired power plants. Further, energy has grown faster than GDP since 2001, reversing a two-decade trend of declining energy intensity from 19080 to 2000. The ramifications of this reversal are far-reaching for global energy market and environment. China has since set an ambitious target of reducing its energy intensity by 20% by the year 2010, with a first-year goal of 4% reduction for 2006. This presentation will discuss

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design Optimization Evaluation of Generic EBS Design Concepts and Process Models Implications to EBS Design Optimization The assessment of generic Engineered Barrier System (EBS) concepts and design optimization to harbor various disposal configurations and waste types needs advanced approaches and methods to analyze barrier performance. The report addresses: 1) Overview of the importance of Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) processes to barrier performance, and international collaborations; 2) THMC processes in clay barriers; 3) experimental studies of clay stability and clay-metal interactions at high temperatures and pressures; 4) thermodynamic modeling and database development; 5) Molecular Dynamics (MD) study of clay

342

Outlook for Energy and Implications for Irrigated Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agriculture uses large quantities of energy to pump groundwater for irrigation. This means the cost of energy has important implications for the industry in terms of costs and profitability. Increases in the prices of energy sources such as natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas and diesel can cause economic hardship for irrigators, particularly if those increases are unanticipated. The purpose of this paper is to briefly summarize important trends in the current domestic energy situation that could have significant impacts on the future cost and availability of energy, and to show what the implications of those trends are for irrigated agriculture. The primary focus of this study will be on trends in natural gas, since natural gas is the major fuel used for irrigation in the Great Plains states.

Patton, W. P.; Lacewell, R. D.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Doxycycline potentiates antitumor effect of cyclophosphamide in mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclophosphamide (CPA) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug in neoplasias. It is a DNA and protein alkylating agent that has a broad spectrum of activity against variety of neoplasms including breast cancer. The therapeutic effectiveness of CPA is limited by the high-dose hematopoietic, renal, and cardiac toxicity that accompanies the systemic distribution of liver-derived activated drug metabolites. The present study examines the potential of combining well-tolerated antibiotic doxycycline (DOX) with CPA and understanding the mechanism of cell killing. Interestingly, we found that DOX significantly enhances the tumor regression activity of CPA on xenograft mice model bearing MCF-7 cells. DOX also potentiates MCF-7 cell killing by CPA in vitro. In presence of DOX (3 {mu}g/ml), the IC{sub 50} value of CPA decreased significantly from 10 to 2.5 mM. Additional analyses indicate that the tumor suppressor p53 and p53-regulated proapoptotic Bax were upregulated in vivo and in vitro following CPA treatment in combination with DOX, suggesting that upregulation of p53 may contribute to the enhancement of antitumor effect of CPA by DOX. Furthermore, downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 was observed in animals treated with CPA and CPA plus DOX when compared to untreated or DOX-treated groups. Our results raise the possibility that this combination chemotherapeutic regimen may lead to additional improvements in treatment of breast cancer.

Chhipa, Rishi Raj [National Centre for Cell Science, Pune University, Campus Ganeshkhind, Pune, Maharashtra, 411 007 (India); Singh, Sandeep [National Centre for Cell Science, Pune University, Campus Ganeshkhind, Pune, Maharashtra, 411 007 (India); Surve, Sachin V. [National Centre for Cell Science, Pune University, Campus Ganeshkhind, Pune, Maharashtra, 411 007 (India); Vijayakumar, Maleppillil Vavachan [National Centre for Cell Science, Pune University, Campus Ganeshkhind, Pune, Maharashtra, 411 007 (India); Bhat, Manoj Kumar [National Centre for Cell Science, Pune University, Campus Ganeshkhind, Pune, Maharashtra, 411 007 (India)]. E-mail: manojkbhat@nccs.res.in

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The new business potential with mobile commerce  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile commerce (m-commerce) has become the latest topic for today. Business organisations have been restlessly evaluating the revenue potential of the m-commerce market and developing business models to exploit the huge profit potential ... Keywords: e-commerce, m-commerce, mobile commerce, mobile communications, wireless electronic commerce

Chang-tseh Hsieh; Charlotte Jones; Binshan Lin

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MRCI (configuration interaction) calculations were used to examine possible pathways for the O{sub 2} + CCH reaction. The H{sub 2} + CN potential surface was examined. An initial survey was made of the HCl + CN potential energy surface at a low level of theory.

Harding, L.B.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Dynamical Higgs potentials with a landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider one-loop effective potentials for adjoint Higgs fields that originate from flat holonomies in toroidal compactification of gauge theories. We show that such potentials are "landscape-like" for large gauge groups and generic non-supersymmetric matter representations. In particular, there is a large number of vacua with similar local properties, scanning a broad band of vacuum energies.

J. L. F. Barbon; C. Hoyos

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

347

Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads  

SciTech Connect

This paper estimates the benefits and costs of six water reduction scenarios. Benefits and costs of showerhead scenarios are ranked in this paper by an estimated water reduction percentage. To prioritize potential water and energy saving scenarios regarding showerheads, six scenarios were analyzed for their potential water and energy savings and the associated dollar savings to the consumer.

Biermayer, Peter J.

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

348

Isolation, Preliminary Characterization and Preliminary Assessment of Scale-Up Potential of Photosynthetic Microalgae for the Production of Both Biofuels and Bio-Active Molecules in the U.S. and Canada: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-372  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion flue gases are a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions into the Earth's atmosphere, a factor that has been linked to the possible global climate change. It is, therefore, critical to begin thinking seriously about ways to reduce this influx into the atmosphere. Using carbon dioxide from fossil fuel combustion as a feedstock for the growth, photosynthetic microorganisms can provide a large sink for carbon assimilation as well as a feedstock for the production of significant levels of biofuels. Combining microalgal farming with fossil fuel energy production has great potential to diminish carbon dioxide releases into the atmosphere, as well as contribute to the production of biofuels (e.g., biodiesel, renewable diesel and gasoline and jet fuel) as well as valuable co-products such as animal feeds and green chemicals. CO2 capture may be a regulatory requirement in future new coal or natural gas power plants and will almost certainly become an opportunity for commerce, the results of such studies may provide industries in the US and Canada with both regulatory relief and business opportunities as well as the ability to meet environmental and regulatory requirements, and to produce large volumes of fuels and co-products.

Pienkos, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

IEEE Std 929-2000 - Background, implications and requirements  

SciTech Connect

The newly revised standard, IEEE Std 929-2000, has significant positive implications for those designing inverters for utility-interconnected PV systems and for designers and installers of such systems. A working group of roughly 20 people, including PV systems designers/installers, PV inverter manufacturers and utility engineers spent close to 3 years developing a standard that would be useful and beneficial to all.

STEVENS III,JOHN W.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hypothetical Gravity Control and Implications for Spacecraft Propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A scientific analysis of the conditions under which gravity could be controlled and the implications that an hypothetical manipulation of gravity would have for known schemes of space propulsion have been the scope of a recent study carried out for the European Space Agency. The underlying fundamental physical principles of known theories of gravity were analysed and shown that even if gravity could be modified it would bring somewhat modest gains in terms of launching of spacecraft and no breakthrough for space propulsion.

O. Bertolami; M. Tajmar

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Water Resource Trends and Implications for the Electric Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water resources, both surface and groundwater, are subject to significant variation and change with respect to volume, flow, and quality. This report evaluates observed water resource trends within the United States and their implications for electric power generation. The report also addresses how individual companies have responded to these changes. The report will be of value to environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies, government agencies, and water resource stakeholders ...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

Executive Potential Program (EPP) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Executive Potential Program (EPP) Executive Potential Program (EPP) Executive Potential Program (EPP) January 10, 2014 (All day) Application Procedure: Nomination packages for EPP-2015-1 and EPP 2015-DC, must be received by deadline dates of January 10, 2014 and April 8, 2014 respectively, and must include the following: -The completed Executive Potential Program Application that includes information about the applicant, the applicant's immediate supervisor, and the DOE program coordinator, Johnny McChriston. - A statement from the applicant indicating the purpose for applying and how participation in the Executive Potential Program will support the applicant's career goals. -The applicant's current resume, signed and dated by the applicant - Payment must accompany the application before it will be processed.

353

Property:PotentialCSPGeneration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialCSPGeneration PotentialCSPGeneration Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialCSPGeneration Property Type Quantity Description The estimated potential energy generation from CSP for a particular place. Use this type to express a quantity of energy. The default unit for energy on OpenEI is the Kilowatt hour (kWh), which is 3,600,000 Joules. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_of_energy It's possible types are Watt hours - 1000 Wh, Watt hour, Watthour Kilowatt hours - 1 kWh, Kilowatt hour, Kilowatthour Megawatt hours - 0.001 MWh, Megawatt hour, Megawatthour Gigawatt hours - 0.000001 GWh, Gigawatt hour, Gigawatthour Joules - 3600000 J, Joules, joules Pages using the property "PotentialCSPGeneration" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25)

354

Property:PotentialCSPCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialCSPCapacity PotentialCSPCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialCSPCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from CSP for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

355

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Studies of the geology, geochemistry of thermal waters, and of one exploratory geothermal well show that two related hot spring systems discharge in Canon de San Diego at Soda Dam (48°C) and Jemez Springs (72°C). The hot springs discharge from separate strands of the Jemez fault zone which trends northeastward towards the center of Valles Caldera. Exploration drilling to Precambrian basement beneath Jemez Springs

356

Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada'S Geothermal Resource Potential | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada'S Geothermal Resource Potential Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada'S Geothermal Resource Potential Details Activities (16) Areas (9) Regions (0) Abstract: The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBCGE) is conducting site-specific and regional geothermal research both in direct collaboration with industry (typically site-specific) and independently (typically regional exploration), communicating findings with public and industrial partners. These studies are research-oriented and are developing

357

Mutagenic potential of sediments from the Grand Calumet River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Grand Calumet River/Indiana Harbor Canal is one of the International Joint Commission's Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC). Like many other AOCs, the Grand Calumet River is in a heavily industrialized area and has a history of chemical contamination. Many of the chemicals found in the industrial and municipal wastes that enter the waterway end up in sediment where they are concentrated to high levels. In order to assess the potential genotoxicity of sediments from the Grand Calumet River, the authors determined the mutagenic potential of organic extracts of sediments. The sediment extracts were assayed in the Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity test. In the Ames test, all ten sediment samples assayed were found to be mutagenic. In general, chemicals found in the sediments required metabolic activation before a positive mutagenic response was observed.

Maccubbin, A.E.; Ersing, N. (Roswell Park Cancer Inst., Buffalo, NY (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Title Energy and air emission implications of a decentralized wastewater system Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Shehabi, Arman, Jennifer R. Stokes, and Arpad Horvath Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 7 Issue 2 Abstract Both centralized and decentralized wastewater systems have distinct engineering, financial and societal benefits. This paper presents a framework for analyzing the environmental effects of decentralized wastewater systems and an evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with two currently operating systems in California, one centralized and one decentralized. A comparison of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air pollutants from the systems shows that the scale economies of the centralized plant help lower the environmental burden to less than a fifth of that of the decentralized utility for the same volume treated. The energy and emission burdens of the decentralized plant are reduced when accounting for high-yield wastewater reuse if it supplants an energy-intensive water supply like a desalination one. The centralized facility also reduces greenhouse gases by flaring methane generated during the treatment process, while methane is directly emitted from the decentralized system. The results are compelling enough to indicate that the life-cycle environmental impacts of decentralized designs should be carefully evaluated as part of the design process.

359

Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to conduct laboratory and field experiments to determine the sensitivity of low frequency electrical measurements (resistivity and induced polarization) to the processes of corrosion and precipitation that are believed to limit permeable reactive barrier (PRB) performance. The research was divided into four sets of experiments that were each written up and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal: [1] A laboratory experiment to define the controls of aqueous chemistry (electrolyte activity; pH; valence) and total zero valent iron (Fe0) available surface area on the electrical properties of Fe0 columns. [2] A laboratory experiment to determine the impact of corrosion and precipitation on the electrical response of synthetic Fe0 columns as a result of geochemical reactions with NaSO4 and NaCO3 electrolytes. [3] Laboratory experiments on a sequence of cores retrieved from the Kansas City PRB to determine the magnitude of electrical and geochemical changes within a field active PRB after eight years of operation [4] Field-scale cross borehole resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of the Kansas City PRB to evaluate the potential of electrical imaging as a technology for non-invasive, long-term monitoring of indicators of reduced PRB performance This report first summarizes the findings of the four major experiments conducted under this research. The reader is referred to the four papers in Appendices 1-4 for a full description of each experiment, including motivation and significance, technical details, findings and implications. The deliverables of the project, including the publications, conference papers and new collaborative arrangements that have resulted are then described. Appendices 5-6 contain two technical reports written by co-PI Korte describing (1) supporting geochemical measurements, and (2) the coring procedure, conducted at the Kansas City PRB as part of this project.

Slater, Lee D.; Korte, N.; Baker, J.

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Oxy-Combustion Activities Worldwide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews oxy-combustion development activities throughout the world. The report opens by reviewing carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technologies and their relative advantages and disadvantages before focusing on oxy-combustion concepts and giving details on potential designs. It then delves into each sub-system (air separation, oxy boiler, gas quality control, and CO2 purification) giving the latest updates on technologies and associated development issues, pulling from work reported at the Second...

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Monitoring Potential Transport of Radioactive Contaminants in Shallow Ephemeral Channels  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550, Area 8 Smoky Contamination Area (CA), during precipitation runoff events. CAU 550 includes Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 08-23-03, 08-23-04, 08-23-06, and 08-23-07; these CASs are associated with tests designated Ceres, Smoky, Oberon, and Titania, respectively.

Miller Julianne J.,Mizell Steve A.,Nikolich George,Campbell Scott A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Gravity as BF theory plus potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spin foam models of quantum gravity are based on Plebanski's formulation of general relativity as a constrained BF theory. We give an alternative formulation of gravity as BF theory plus a certain potential term for the B-field. When the potential is taken to be infinitely steep one recovers general relativity. For a generic potential the theory still describes gravity in that it propagates just two graviton polarizations. The arising class of theories is of the type amenable to spin foam quantization methods, and, we argue, may allow one to come to terms with renormalization in the spin foam context.

Kirill Krasnov

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

363

Shale oil: potential for electric power fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the status of the oil shale industry and the impact it will have on the electric power industry in the years 1990 to 2000. The nontechnical problems are not addressed in detail as they have been suitably dealt with elsewhere. The available technologies for producing shale oil are reviewed. The major problem most processes face today is scale-up to commercial size. An industry of nearly 400,000 BPD is anticipated for 1990. The industry could grow to 1,000,000 BPD by the year 2000 with the introduction of second generation processes in the 1990s. The availability of shale oil may have a direct impact on the electric power industry initially. As the refineries improve their ability to handle shale oil, the availability of this fuel to the electric power industry for direct firing will decrease. The offgas from the oil shale industry could be of major importance to the electric power industry. One-quarter to one-third of the energy produced by the oil shale industry will be in the form of offgas (the gas produced in the retorting process). This will usually be a low Btu gas and therefore likely to be utilized on site to make electricity. The high yield of distillate fuels from shale oil could be important to the utility industry's demand for distillate fuels in peak shaving power generation. In addition to the potential supply implications, a shale oil industry and the people to support it will represent a substantial increase in power generation required in the shale oil region.

Gragg, M.; Lumpkin, R.E.; Guthrie, H.D.; Woinsky, S.G.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Aromatic nitrogen compounds in fossil fuels: a potential hazard  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To achieve energy independence in the United States, converting coal to oil or extracting oil from shale will be required. Before commercial scale fossil fuel conversion facilities become a reality, chemical and biological studies of currently available synfuel samples derived from coal or shale are urgently needed in order to determine what the potential health problems, such as from occupational exposure, might be. Aromatic nitrogen compounds such as basic aza-arenes, neutral aza-arenes, and aromatic amines are considered environmentally important and several members of these classes of compounds possess biological activity. For example, dibenz(a,h)acridine, 7 H-dibenzo(c,g)carbazole, and 2-naphthylamine, are well known as carcinogens. The methods used to isolate the basic aromatic nitrogen compounds and neutral aza-arenes from one shale oil and one coal-derived oil are discussed. The mutagenic activities of these fractions, based on the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test, are compared.

Ho, C H; Clark, B R; Guerin, M R; Ma, C Y; Rao, T K

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Solar Power Potential in SE New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Potential in Southeast New Mexico Solar Power Potential in Southeast New Mexico Solar Power Project Opportunities Abound in the Region The WIPP site is receives abundant solar energy with 6-7 kWh/sq meter power production potential As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the WIPP site enjoys abundant year-round sunshine. With an average solar power production potential of 6-7 kWh/sq meter per day, one exciting project being studied for location at WIPP is a 30-50 MW Solar Power Tower: The American Solar Energy Society (ASES) is is a national trade association promoting solar energy as a clean source of electricity, and provides a comprehensive resource for additional information. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is also a comprehensive resource for more information on renewable energy.

366

United States Wind Resource Potential Chart  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

18,000 18,000 Rated Capacity Above Indicated CF (GW) United States - Wind Resource Potential Cumulative Rated Capacity vs. Gross Capacity Factor (CF) 80 m The estimates show the potential gigawatts of rated capacity that could be installed on land above a given gross capacity factor (without losses) at 80-m and 100-m heights above ground. Areas greater than 30% at 80 m are generally considered to have suitable wind resource for potential wind development with today's advanced wind turbine technology. AWS Truewind, LLC developed the wind resource data for windNavigator® (http://navigator.awstruewind.com) with a spatial resolution of 200 m. NREL filtered the wind potential estimates to

367

Unearthing Geothermal's Potential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unearthing Geothermal's Potential Unearthing Geothermal's Potential Unearthing Geothermal's Potential September 16, 2010 - 12:33pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Our latest geothermal technologies awards are for those who think outside of the box (and below the surface). Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced $20 million towards the research and development of non-conventional geothermal energy technologies in three areas: low temperatures fluids, geothermal fluids recovered from oil and gas wells and highly pressurized geothermal fluids. As the Secretary said, these innovative projects have the potential to expand the use of geothermal energy to more areas around the country. Low temperature resources are widely available across the country and offer

368

Executive Potential Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential Program Potential Program Executive Potential Program Program Overview: This is a one year training program designed to help senior leaders understand and meet the challenges facing today's federal workforce. Through personal and professional development, The Executive Potential Program builds leadership capacity through strengthening the competencies needed to help today's leaders create a work environment prepared to meet changing agency initiatives. Nomination Due Date: Nomination Due Date: The nomination package must be received by the nomination deadline, which are as follows. (For EEP 2015-1 January 10, 2014 or until filled). (For EPP 2015-DC, April 8, 2014 or until filled) Please be advised that for the 2015-DC session only, there is a limit of 30 participants on a first come basis. Applicants are advised

369

Your home's solar potential  

SciTech Connect

This survey book offers a professional method of assessing your property's solar potential. Chapter I reviews the suitability of solar energy and the world energy crisis. Chapter II poses the ten most frequently asked questions about free solar energy and provides the answers. Chapter III surveys the fringe benefits about solar energy. Chapter IV lists the seven major factors concerning the evaluation of the home's solar potential, its existing heating system; its heat loss; its orientation and available sunlight; its roof slope; its exposure to sunlight; its indoor installation restrictions; and its outdoor installation restrictions. The following chapter will tell you why each of these factors is so important; how it affects your home's solar potential. Tally sheets are provided on which to score each solar potential factor. The book also includes lists of information sources, books, authors, government publications, consultants, design engineers, architects, manufacturers, installers, etc. (MCW)

Spetgang, I.; Wells, M.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Surprising attractive potential barriers and repulsive wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental fact is revealed that in the old good quantum mechanics there is possible such unexpected inversion: potential barriers can drag in wave-particles and wells can push them off.

B. N. Zakhariev

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

Gulf Coast Residents Underestimate Hurricane Destructive Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most people do not realize that hurricane destructiveness increases nonlinearly with increases in storm intensity. Three studies were conducted to examine people’s perceptions of hurricane destructive potential and their likelihood of evacuation. ...

Alan E. Stewart

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Renewable Energy Technical Potential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technical Potential Technical Potential Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released July 03rd, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated July 03rd, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords biopower csp geothermal hydropower hydrothermal Renewable Energy Technical Potential rooftop United States utility-scale wind Data text/csv icon United States Renewable Energy Technical Potential (csv, 7.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating

373

Supramolecular nano-stamping : analyzing market potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis was carried out on the process of Supramolecular Nano-Stamping (SuNS) in order to determine whether or not the science involved has market potential in the DNA microarray industry. This industry is rapidly ...

DePalma, Christina Maria

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Distributed Light Sensing with Convex Potential Fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a photoconductive fiber that supports decaying and convex electrical potential profiles capable of localizing a point of illumination, and propose a scheme to perform distributed optical sensing.

Sorin, Fabien

375

Gate potential control of nanofluidic devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of an external gate potential control on the nanofluidic nanochannels was experimentally investigated in this work. Like in the field effect transistors (FET) in microelectronics, molecular transport in ...

Le Coguic, Arnaud

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

On Formulas for Equivalent Potential Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several new formulas for pseudoadiabatic equivalent potential temperature (EPT) are devised and compared to previous ones. The maximum errors of all the formulas are determined from calculations on a dense grid of points in the region of a ...

Robert Davies-Jones

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Maximum Potential Intensity of Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermodynamic approach to estimating maximum potential intensity (MPI) of tropical cyclones is described and compared with observations and previous studies. The approach requires an atmospheric temperature sounding, SST, and surface pressure; ...

Greg J. Holland

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Lagrangian Potential Vorticity Balance during POLYMODE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terms in the Lagrangian potential vorticity equation are estimated by three different methods using clusters of SOFAR floats in the main (700 m) and lower (1300 m) thermocline of the POLYMODE region. The Lagrangian stretching term, which is ...

Arthur J. Mariano; T. Rossby

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Ertel's Potential Vorticity in Unstratified Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of Ertel's potential vorticity (PV) is examined in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of decaying turbulence advecting passive scalars and in a generalized Taylor-Green vortex (TGV). It is noted that although PV itself is advected ...

J. R. Herring; R. M. Kerr; R. Rotunno

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Potential Economic Value of Seasonal Hurricane Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the potential utility of seasonal Atlantic hurricane forecasts to a hypothetical property insurance firm whose insured properties are broadly distributed along the U.S. Gulf and East Coasts. Using a recently developed hurricane ...

Kerry Emanuel; Fabian Fondriest; James Kossin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Scaling Potential Evapotranspiration with Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is a supply-independent measure of the evaporative demand of a terrestrial climate, of basic importance in climatology, hydrology, and agriculture. Future increases in PET from greenhouse warming are often cited ...

Jacob Scheff; Dargan M. W. Frierson

382

Exploring the potential of layered BRDF models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key advantage of using layered BRDFs over traditional, more general shading-language constructs is that the automatic result is highly plausible. This course is a survey of the considerable potential of layered surface models. On a simple layered ...

Andrea Weidlich; Alexander Wilkie

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Energy saving potential of various roof technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional roof technologies such as cool roofs and green roofs have been shown to reduce building heating and cooling load. Although previous studies suggest potential for energy savings through such technologies, ...

Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Potential Vorticity Inversion on a Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several different kinds of accurate potential vorticity (PV) inversion operators, and the associated balanced models, are tested for the shallow water equations on a hemisphere in an attempt to approach the ultimate limitations of the balance, ...

Michael E. McIntyre; Warwick A. Norton

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Computation of Equivalent Potential Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified procedure is described for computation of equivalent potential temperature which remains valid in situations such as in the tropics where a term which is omitted in the derivation of the conventional formula can lead to an error of ...

David Bolton

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Conservation of Potential Vorticity on Lorenz Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quasigeostrophic equations formulated using the Charney–Phillips vertical staggering of variables are well known to possess an analog of the form of conservation of potential vorticity. It is shown that a similar analog is enjoyed by the ...

Michael J. Bell

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Potential of geothermal energy in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis provides an overview of geothermal power generation and the potential for geothermal energy utilization in China. Geothermal energy is thermal energy stored in the earth's crust and currently the only ubiquitously ...

Sung, Peter On

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Spirals in Potential Vorticity. Part II: Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the linear stability of spiral-shaped potential vorticity (PV) filaments is constructed by using the Kolmogorov capacity as a time-independent characterization of their structure, assuming that the dynamics is essentially barotropic. ...

John Methven

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breeding program for cassava. Crop Sci 1998; 38: 325-332. [opportunities for an ancient crop. seventh regional cassavaCassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Jansson

Jansson, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

United States Renewable Energy Technical Potential
 

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States Renewable Energy Technical Potential
2012-07-03T20:56:33Z 2012-07-19T22:42:54Z I am submitting data from researchers within my organization. To complete the...

391

Map Data: Solar Energy Potential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Energy Potential Map Data: Solar Energy Potential nrel-solar-pv-tilt-potential.zip More Documents & Publications Map Data: Recovery Act Funding...

392

Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A  

SciTech Connect

The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Parish (France)] [and others] [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Parish (France); and others

1995-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

On the Chemical Potential of Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is widely assumed that the observed universe is accelerating due to the existence of a new fluid component called dark energy. In this article, the thermodynamics consequences of a nonzero chemical potential on the dark energy component is discussed with special emphasis to the phantom fluid case. It is found that if the dark energy fluid is endowed with a negative chemical potential, the phantom field hypothesis becomes thermodynamically consistent with no need of negative temperatures as recently assumed in the literature.

S. H. Pereira

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

Category:Tech Potential Properties | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Properties Properties Jump to: navigation, search This is the Tech Potential Properties category. Pages in category "Tech Potential Properties" The following 30 pages are in this category, out of 30 total. P Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousGeneration Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousMass Property:PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity Property:PotentialBiopowerSolidGeneration Property:PotentialBiopowerSolidMass Property:PotentialCSPArea Property:PotentialCSPCapacity Property:PotentialCSPGeneration Property:PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity P cont. Property:PotentialEGSGeothermalGeneration Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration Property:PotentialHydropowerCapacity Property:PotentialHydropowerGeneration

395

Gridded state maps of wind electric potential  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimates of wind electric potential and available windy land area in the contiguous United States, calculated in 1991, have been revised by incorporating actual data on the distribution of environmental exclusion areas where wind energy development would be prohibited or severely restricted. The new gridded data base with actual environmental exclusion areas, in combination with a 'moderate' land-use scenario, is the basis for developing the first gridded maps of available windy land and wind electric potential. Gridded maps for the 48 contiguous states show the estimated windy land area and electric potential for each grid cell (1/40 latitude by 1/30 longitude). These new maps show the distribution of the estimated wind electric potential and available windy land within an individual state, unlike previous national maps that only show estimates of the total wind electric potential for the state as a whole. While changes for some individual states are fairly large (in percentage), on a national basis, the estimated windy land area and wind electric potential are only about 1% to 2% higher than estimated in 1991.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.; Gower, G.L.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Adsorption potential of alkanes on graphite  

SciTech Connect

In the framework of the extended Hueckel theory, the short-range repulsive interaction of alkanes with graphite is determined with band structure calculations from the difference between the total energy of the system (adsorbate + graphite) and the energy of the separated species. This theoretical approach enables one to determine the coefficients of the repulsive exponential term in the atom-atom potential simplified expression. The adsorption potential of alkanes on graphite is obtained when the dispersion atom-atom potential, which takes into account the high anisotropic polarizability of graphite, is added to the repulsive term. The equilibrium distance of methane on graphite and its vibrational frequency perpendicular to the surface are in good agreement with the experimental ones measured at low temperatures by neutron scattering techniques. The van der Waals radii of carbon and hydrogen atoms are obtained from the equilibrium distance of the atom-atom potential simplified expression. They are compared with those used in the literature to establish the semiempirical potential expressions. The molecular statistical theory of adsorption based on the atom-atom potential function enables one to predict the second adsorbate/surface virial coefficient and the thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption, measured for methane, ethane, and propane on graphitized carbon black at zero surface coverage by static and gas chromatographic methods.

Vidal-Madjar, C.; Minot, C.

1987-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

Low Specific Activity (LSA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Specific Activity (LSA) Low Specific Activity (LSA) Low Specific Activity (LSA) This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of Low Specific Activity (LSA) material. This exercise manual is one in a series of five scenarios developed by the Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program. Responding agencies may include several or more of the following: local municipal and county fire, police, sheriff, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel; state, local, and federal emergency response teams; emergency response contractors; and other emergency response resources that could potentially be provided by the carrier and the originating facility (shipper).

398

Greenhouse effect: Implications for economic development. Discussion paper  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents a scientific perspective on the global climate change issue and establishes a comprehensive framework for efficient response to the implications for natural resource conservation and economic development. It has benefitted from extensive comment and review within the international scientific community, as well as within the World Bank. It comprises an extensive summary and critique, from a development viewpoint, of the sometimes conflicting scientific literature and opinion on the greenhouse effect, the related theoretical and empirical evidence, and prospects for global climate change. Finally, it presents a set of conclusions which are worthy of serious consideration by everyone concerned with the enlightened stewardship of the global environment.

Arrhenius, E.; Waltz, T.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Predicting stimulus-locked single unit spiking from cortical local field potentials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapidly increasing use of the local field potential (LFP) has motivated research to better understand its relation to the gold standard of neural activity, single unit (SU) spiking. We addressed this in an in vivo, awake, restrained mouse ... Keywords: A1, Auditory cortex, Bayesian algorithm, Beta band, Despiking, EEG, Electroencephalography, Evoked potentials, Gamma band, Hilbert transform, LFP, Oscillation, Phase, Single cortical cells, Spike prediction, Theta band

Edgar E. Galindo-Leon; Robert C. Liu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fluid Flow In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera- Implications From Thermal Data And Deep Electrical Sounding Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

From CVaR to Uncertainty Set: Implications in Joint Chance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 12, 2007 ... From CVaR to Uncertainty Set: Implications in Joint Chance Constrained Optimization. Melvyn Sim (dscsimm ***at*** nus.edu.sg) Chung Piaw ...

402

Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for Personal Computer Monitors: Implications for Market Transformation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EU-ENERGY STAR (2007). ENERGY STAR Market http://www.eu-2010). ENERGY STAR Unit Shipment and Market Penetrationtwo implications for energy efficiency market transformation

Park, Won Young

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Economic implications for the generation of electricity from biomass fuel sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the economic theory, geographical implications, and relevant legislative history impacting the use of biomass fuel sources within the electric utility industry. Research… (more)

Curtis, Thomas Wayne

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Residential heating and cooling energy cost implications associated with window type: Revision  

SciTech Connect

We present a comparative study in which residential heating and cooling energy costs are analyzed as a function of window glazing type, with a particular emphasis on the performance of windows having low-emittance coatings. The DOE-2.1B energy analysis simulation program was used to generate a data base of the heating and cooling energy requirements of a prototypical single-family ranch-style house. Algebraic expressions derived by multiple regression techniques permitted a direct comparison of those parameters that characterize window performance: orientation, size, conductance, and solar transmission properties. We use these equations to discuss the energy implications of conventional double- and triple-pane window designs and newer designs in which number and type of substrate, low-emittance coating type and location and gas fill are varied. Results are presented for the heating-dominated climate of Madison, WI, and cooling-dominated locations of Lake Charles, LA, and Phoenix, AZ. The analysis shows the potential for substantial savings but suggests that both heating and cooling energy should be examined when evaluating the performance of different fenestration systems. Coating and substrate properties and the location of the coating in the glazing system are shown to have moderate effects as a function of orientation and climate. In addition, with the low-conductance glazing units, the window frame becomes a contributor to overall residential energy efficiency. 4 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Residential heating and cooling energy cost implications associated with window type  

SciTech Connect

A comparative study is presented in which residential heating and cooling energy costs are analyzed as a function of window glazing type, with a particular emphasis on the performance of windows having low-emittance coatings. The DOE-2.1B energy analysis simulation program was used to generate a data base of the heating and cooling energy requirements of a prototypical single-family ranch-style house. Algebraic expressions derived by multiple regression techniques permitted a direct comparison of those parameters that characterize window performance: orientation, size, conductance, and solar transmission properties. These equations are used to discuss the energy implications of conventional double- and triple-pane window designs and newer designs in which number and type of substrate, low-emittance coating type and location and gas fill are varied. Results are presented for the heating-dominated climate of Madison, WI, and cooling-dominated locations of Lake Charles, LA, and Phoenix, AZ. The analysis shows the potential for substantial savings but suggests that both heating and cooling energy should be examined when evaluating the performance of different fenestration systems. Coating and substrate properties and the location of the coating in the glazing system are shown to have moderate effects as a function of orientation and climate. In addition, with the low-conductance glazing units, the window frame becomes a contributor to overall residential energy efficiency.

Sullivan, R.; Selkowitz, S.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Implications of the Public Utility Regulatory Act for Energy Efficiency in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Act (PURA) as amended in 1982 and the Substantive Rules of the Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT) establish a comprehensive regulatory system for electric, telephone, and water utilities. The rules which cover electric utilities contain provisions requiring certain electric utilities to prepare energy efficiency plans. In their plans, utilities must consider the potential for economically producing capacity through supply-side and demand-side alternatives to new power plant construction. These alternatives are identified in the definition of energy efficiency included in the Rules. Supply-side alternatives are: optimizing existing and planned generation, transmission, and distribution facilities; purchasing power from cogenerators and small power producers; utilizing direct conversion of renewable resources; and improving power plant productivity and efficiency. Demand-side options are conservation and load management programs that can be implemented to improve customer utilization of energy. The initial plan submissions were made in December 1984, so the energy efficiency plan, and its implications are emerging. This paper describes and discusses the energy efficiency plan as it pertains to conservation and load management programs and its likely effects on the allowable cost of service expenditures for conservation and load management programs, policies for new power plant construction and cogeneration.

Biedrzycki, C. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

GAS METHANE HYDRATES-RESEARCH STATUS, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, AND ENERGY IMPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task as originally conceived was to compile an assessment of methane hydrate deposits in Alaska from available sources and to make a very preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of producing methane from these deposits for remote power generation. Gas hydrates have recently become a target of increased scientific investigation both from the standpoint of their resource potential to the natural gas and oil industries and of their positive and negative implications for the global environment After we performed an extensive literature review and consulted with representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Canadian Geological Survey, and several oil companies, it became evident that, at the current stage of gas hydrate research, the available information on methane hydrates in Alaska does not provide sufficient grounds for reaching conclusions concerning their use for energy production. Hence, the original goals of this task could not be met, and the focus was changed to the compilation and review of published documents to serve as a baseline for possible future research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). An extensive annotated bibliography of gas hydrate publications has been completed. The EERC will reassess its future research opportunities on methane hydrates to determine where significant initial contributions could be made within the scope of limited available resources.

James Sorensen; Jaroslav Solc; Bethany Bolles

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Rationally Tuning the Reduction Potential of a Single Cupredoxin Beyond the Natural Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redox processes are at the heart of numerous functions in chemistry and biology, from long-range electron transfer in photosynthesis and respiration to catalysis in industrial and fuel cell research. These functions are accomplished in nature by only a limited number of redox-active agents. A long-standing issue in these fields is how redox potentials are fine-tuned over a broad range with little change to the redox-active site or electron-transfer properties. Resolving this issue will not only advance our fundamental understanding of the roles of long-range, non-covalent interactions in redox processes, but also allow for design of redox-active proteins having tailor-made redox potentials for applications such as artificial photosynthetic centres or fuel cell catalysts for energy conversion. Here we show that two important secondary coordination sphere interactions, hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bonding, are capable of tuning the reduction potential of the cupredoxin azurin over a 700 mV range, surpassing the highest and lowest reduction potentials reported for any mononuclear cupredoxin, without perturbing the metal binding site beyond what is typical for the cupredoxin family of proteins. We also demonstrate that the effects of individual structural features are additive and that redox potential tuning of azurin is now predictable across the full range of cupredoxin potentials.

Marshall, N.; Garner, D; Wilson, T; Gao, Y; Robinson, H; Nilges, M; Lu, Y

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

renewable energy potential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142258919 Varnish cache server renewable energy potential Dataset Summary Description Global Wind Potential Supply Curves by Country, Class, and Depth (quantities in GW) Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released July 12th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated July 12th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords offshore resource offshore wind renewable energy potential Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon offshore_resource_100_vs2.xlsx (xlsx, 41.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

410

Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet - Potential Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE has prepared a draft Environmental Assessment for Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site. It examines the potential environmental consequences from conducting particular types of scientific experiments in an area of the WIPP underground called the experiment gallery. The environmental assessment also looks at the potential cumulative impacts of conducting experiments and operating the WIPP as a transuranic waste repository. This fact sheet presents questions and answers about potential impacts to human health and the environment and proposed protections and mitigations, based on the draft environmental assessment. The deep geologic repository at the WIPP could be the most favorable U.S. environment currently available for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astro-

411

Students, Professors Demonstrating Virginia's Potential | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Students, Professors Demonstrating Virginia's Potential Students, Professors Demonstrating Virginia's Potential Students, Professors Demonstrating Virginia's Potential April 23, 2010 - 10:37am Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this project do? James Madison University is spearheading an effort to make at least 25 percent of the energy used in the Shenandoah Valley come from renewable sources as soon as possible. Peter Denbigh's real interest is in finding ways to help Americans save energy - especially in terms of the transportation industry - so it's appropriate that he says "the key is to address the situation effectively so that we don't just spin our wheels and get nowhere." Peter enjoys solving complex problems, including one thing he sees as an urgent situation that is vastly important - energy creation. He earned a

412

Renewables in India : Status and Future Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewables in India : Status and Future Potential Renewables in India : Status and Future Potential Speaker(s): Luis Fernandes Date: July 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Galen Barbose We analyse the status and the trends in the growth of renewables in India. We propose a methodology linking micro-simulation to macro-modelling to obtain technical and economic potential estimates for solar water heaters in residential and commercial and biomass gasifiers for thermal applications in industry. We assess the sustainability of renewables based on the criteria of life cycle cost, net energy ratio, resource constraint and greenhouse gas emissions. The renewable based technologies seem to be sustainable based on all criteria, except the high life cycle cost. In some cases e.g. in wind and biomass based systems land availability may

413

Pion optical potential with. delta. dynamics  

SciTech Connect

A pion optical potential is constructed which incorporates the ..delta.. dynamics found to be important in ..delta..-hole analyses of pion scattering from light nuclei. These dynamics include ..delta.. propagation, binding and Pauli blocking, and a ..delta.. spreading potential. We employ a local density approximation for the medium-modified ..delta.. propagator, resulting in a computationally flexible tool for the analysis of pion-nucleus data. We reproduce the ..delta..-hole results for ..pi..-/sup 16/O scattering satisfactorily. Elastic ..pi../sup + -/-/sup 208/Pb scattering is described very well with the same strongly damping spreading potential found for light nuclei. The pion wave functions in the medium are substantially modified by the ..delta.. dynamics.

Karaoglu, B.; Moniz, E.J.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Boiling water reactor uranium utilization improvement potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of design and operational simulation studies to assess the potential for reduction of BWR uranium requirements. The impact of the improvements on separative work requirements and other fuel cycle requirements also were evaluated. The emphasis was on analysis of the improvement potential for once-through cycles, although plutonium recycle also was evaluated. The improvement potential was analyzed for several design alternatives including axial and radial natural uranium blankets, low-leakage refueling patterns, initial core enrichment distribution optimization, reinsert of initial core discharge fuel, preplanned end-of-cycle power coastdown and feedwater temperature reduction, increased discharge burnup, high enrichment discharge fuel rod reassembly and reinsert, lattice and fuel bundle design optimization, coolant density spectral shift with flow control, reduced burnable absorber residual, boric acid for cold shutdown, six-month subcycle refueling, and applications of a once-through thorium cycle design and plutonium recycle.

Wei, P.; Crowther, R.L.; Fennern, L.E.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Tilley, R.M.; Townsend, D.B.; Wolters, R.A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Boson stars: Chemical potential and quark condensates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of a star made of self-gravitating bosons gas in a mean-field approximation. A generalized set of Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov(TOV) equations is derived to incorporate the effect of chemical-potential in the general relativistic frame work. The metric-dependence of the chemical-potential gives a new class of solutions for the boson stars. It is demonstrated that the maximum mass and radius of the star change in a significant way when the effect of finite chemical-potential is considered. We also discuss the case of a boson star made of quark-condensates. It is found that when the self-interaction between the condensates is small as compared to their mass, the typical density is too high to form a diquark-boson star. Our results indicate that the star of quark-condensate may be formed in a low-density and high-pressure regime.

Jitesh R. Bhatt; V. Sreekanth

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

Wind energy potential in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of the electricity that could potentially be generated by wind power and of the land area available for wind energy development have been calculated for the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and exclude windy lands that are not suitable for development as a result of environmental and land-use considerations. Despite these exclusions, the potential electric power from wind energy is surprisingly large. Good wind areas, which cover 6% of the contiguous US land area, have the potential to supply more than one and a half times the current electricity consumption of the United States. Technology under development today will be capable of producing electricity economically from good wind sites in many regions of the country.

Elliott, D.L.; Schwartz, M.N.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA 2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued 2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued July 31, 2013 - 5:02pm Addthis 2013 Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA Issued The Stakeholder Directory, now in its 30th edition, identifies contacts in federal agencies; states, territories, and state government associations; and nongovernmental organizations for reviewing environmental impact statements and environmental assessments, and for other NEPA public involvement and consultation activities. The Directory is primarily intended to supplement lists that Departmental Offices compile for individual projects or facilities. Addthis Related Articles Obama Officials Announce Steps to Promote the Clean Energy Potential of the

418

A Snapshot Of Geothermal Energy Potential And Utilization In Turkey | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snapshot Of Geothermal Energy Potential And Utilization In Turkey Snapshot Of Geothermal Energy Potential And Utilization In Turkey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Snapshot Of Geothermal Energy Potential And Utilization In Turkey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Turkey is one of the countries with significant potential in geothermal energy. It is estimated that if Turkey utilizes all of her geothermal potential, she can meet 14% of her total energy need (heat and electricity) from geothermal sources. Therefore, today geothermal energy is an attractive option in Turkey to replace fossil fuels. Besides, increase in negative effects of fossil fuels on the environment has forced many countries, including Turkey, to use renewable energy sources. Also, Turkey

419

Nuclear spirals: gas in asymmetric galactic potential with a massive black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear spirals can provide a wealth of information about the nuclear potential in disc galaxies. They form naturally as a gas response to non-axisymmetry in the gravitational potential, even if the degree of this asymmetry is very small. Linear wave theory well describes weak nuclear spirals, but stronger asymmetries in the potential induce waves beyond the linear regime, which appear as spiral shocks. If a central massive black hole (MBH) is present, spiral shocks can extend all the way to its immediate vicinity, and generate gas inflow up to 0.03 Msun/yr. This coincides with the accretion rates needed to power local Active Galactic Nuclei.

Maciejewski, W

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nuclear spirals: gas in asymmetric galactic potential with a massive black hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear spirals can provide a wealth of information about the nuclear potential in disc galaxies. They form naturally as a gas response to non-axisymmetry in the gravitational potential, even if the degree of this asymmetry is very small. Linear wave theory well describes weak nuclear spirals, but stronger asymmetries in the potential induce waves beyond the linear regime, which appear as spiral shocks. If a central massive black hole (MBH) is present, spiral shocks can extend all the way to its immediate vicinity, and generate gas inflow up to 0.03 Msun/yr. This coincides with the accretion rates needed to power local Active Galactic Nuclei.

Witold Maciejewski

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

2000-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

422

Identifying Potential Areas for Siting Interim Nuclear Waste Facilities Using Map Algebra and Optimization Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The renewed interest in siting new nuclear power plants in the United States has brought to the center stage, the need to site interim facilities for long-term management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). In this paper, a two-stage approach for identifying potential areas for siting interim SNF facilities is presented. In the first stage, the land area is discretized into grids of uniform size (e.g., 100m x 100m grids). For the continental United States, this process resulted in a data matrix of about 700 million cells. Each cell of the matrix is then characterized as a binary decision variable to indicate whether an exclusion criterion is satisfied or not. A binary data matrix is created for each of the 25 siting criteria considered in this study. Using map algebra approach, cells that satisfy all criteria are clustered and regarded as potential siting areas. In the second stage, an optimization problem is formulated as a p-median problem on a rail network such that the sum of the shortest distance between nuclear power plants with SNF and the potential storage sites from the first stage is minimized. The implications of obtained results for energy policies are presented and discussed.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Active NEPA Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active NEPA Projects Active NEPA Projects Active NEPA Projects List of Active NEPA Projects EIS-0497: CE FLNG Project, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, and approximately 37 miles of 42-inch diameter natural gas transmission pipeline to connect the terminal to natural gas infrastructure facilities. Last Update: January 8, 2014 EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated

424

Property:PotentialCSPArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialCSPArea PotentialCSPArea Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialCSPArea Property Type Quantity Description An area of potential CSP generation. Use this type to express a quantity of two-dimensional space. The default unit is the square meter (m²). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Square Meters - 1 m²,m2,m^2,square meter,square meters,Square Meter,Square Meters,Sq. Meters,SQUARE METERS Square Kilometers - 0.000001 km²,km2,km^2,square kilometer,square kilometers,square km,square Kilometers,SQUARE KILOMETERS Square Miles - 0.000000386 mi²,mi2,mi^2,mile²,square mile,square miles,square mi,Square Miles,SQUARE MILES Square Feet - 10.7639 ft²,ft2,ft^2,square feet,square foot,FT²,FT2,FT^2,Square Feet, Square Foot

425

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Small HVAC Problems and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Small HVAC Problems and Potential Savings Reports Summary of Problems of the Integrated Design of Small Commercial HVAC Systems research project. The reports are a result of funding: Productivity and Interior Environments Integrated Design of Large Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated Design

426

Isospin dependence of the. delta. -spreading potential  

SciTech Connect

The ratio of near-resonance inclusive ..pi../sup + -/ scattering cross sections from the isotopic pair /sup 16,18/O is shown to be consistent with an isospin dependence of the ..delta..-spreading potential determined by intermediate coupling to the pion absorption channel.

Karaoglu, B.; Karapiperis, T.; Moniz, E.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Pacific Northwest Regional Assessment of the Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, demand response and energy efficiency demand-side reductions. The fact that natural gas is the regionPacific Northwest Regional Assessment of the Potential Benefits of the Direct Use of Natural Gas) .........................42 Figure 1 Service Area Map of PNW Participating Natural Gas Utilities

428

Exploring the Similarities between Potential Smoothing and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring the Similarities between Potential Smoothing and Simulated Annealing REECE K. HART,1 between spatially distant regions will require large-scale conformational rearrangements, whereas small in spa- tially "distant" and distinct conformational states may, in fact, be similar, but the energy

Ponder, Jay

429

Potential formal models for autonomic computing applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the potential formalism, used in the hierarchical system theory is performed, addressing the autonomic computing system design. In that manner, self management of the overall autonomic system can be achieved by influencing the local resources ... Keywords: autonomic computing systems, control theory, hierarchical system theory, optimization

Todor Stoilov; Krasimira Stoilova

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Select Economic Implications for the Biological Control of Arundo donax along the Rio Grande  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arundo donax, or giant reed, is a large, bamboo-like plant native to Spain that has invaded several thousand acres of the Rio Grande riparian in Texas. The plant grows to 18-24 feet, consuming large quantities of water per acre per year. With concern of increased water demands in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley region, the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA)ARS) is investigating four herbivorous insects as potential biological control agents for Arundo donax to facilitate increased water supply. This study examines select economic implications for agricultural water users in the United States of applying these biological control agents along the Rio Grande. The research includes (a) estimating the value of the water saved due to the reduction of Arundo donax, (b) a benefit-cost analysis, (c) regional economic impact analysis, and (d) an estimate of the per-unit cost of water saved over a 50-year planning horizon (2009 through 2058). The model ArundoEcon is used to perform a deterministic analyses using low- and high-marginal-composite acre values. Regional results indicate present values of farmlevel benefits ranging from $97.80 to $159.87 million. Benefit-cost ratios are calculated with normalized prices and range from 4.38 to 8.81. Sensitivity analyses provide a robust set of results for Arundo water use, replacement species water use, Arundo expansion rate after control, value of water, and the cost of the program. The pre-production processes and farm-gate economic impact analysis is estimated using multipliers from the IMPLAN model. Regional results reveal a range of $8.90 to $17.94 million annually in economic output and 197 to 351 new jobs for the year 2025. Further results show the cost per acre-foot of water saved is $44.08. This amount is comparable to other projects designed to conserve water in the region. The USDA)ARS, Weslaco, Texas Arundo donax biological control project realizes positive results for the benefit-cost ratios, economic impact analyses, and competitive results for the per-unit cost of saving water. These positive results indicate this project will have positive economic implications for the U.S. and the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley.

Seawright, Emily Kaye

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential By Bruce biofuel usage. Biofuel feedstocks are a source of raw material that can be transformed into petroleum for coal. In the USA, liquid fuel biofuel production has not proven to be broadly economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

432

Environmental WindowsEnvironmental Windows Real Problems and PotentialReal Problems and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental WindowsEnvironmental Windows Real Problems and PotentialReal Problems and Potential Window - a period during which dredging may occur Seasonal Restriction - a period during which dredging and effective management guidelines such as dredging windows..." #12;Schubel et al. 1979. A conceptual framework

US Army Corps of Engineers

433

Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate Pushker A. Kharecha1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate Pushker A. Kharecha1 and James E environments. If conventional oil production peaks within the next few decades, it may have a large effect., and J. E. Hansen (2008), Implications of ``peak oil'' for atmospheric CO2 and climate, Global Biogeochem

434

Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation Papers Contents Introduction Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation Alaska: a food-web perspective 1647 J. A. Estes, D. F. Doak, A. M. Springer and T. M. Williams Parasites

Pascual, Mercedes

435

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Implications of a Regime-Switching Model on Natural Gas Storage Valuation and Optimal Operation-switching model for the risk adjusted natural gas spot price and study the implications of the model on the valuation and optimal operation of natural gas storage facilities. We calibrate the model parameters to both

Forsyth, Peter A.

436

Mechano-Activated Electronic and Molecular Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For centuries, researchers have been trying to achieve precise control and tailor materials properties. Several approaches, i.e., thermo-activation, electro-activation, and photo-activation, have been widely utilized. As an alternate and fundamentally different approach, mechano-activation is still relatively less-known. In particular, understanding the roles of mechano-activated electronic and molecular structures is yet to be achieved. This research contributes the fundamental understanding in mechanisms of mechano-activation and its effects on materials properties. Experimental investigation and theoretical analysis were involved in the present research. A methodology was developed to introduce the mechnao-activation and to study its subsequent effects. There are three major areas of investigation involved. First, the means to introduce mechanoactivation, such as energetic particle collision or a bending deformation (tensile force); Second, in-situ and ex-situ characterization using AFM, FTIR, UV-Vis, and XPS etc. techniques; Third, theoretical analysis through modified Lennard-Jones potentials in order to explain the behavior of materials under mechano-activation. In the present research, experiments on a Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) film, a Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) film, and the Silver-Crown Ether nanochains (Ag-NCs) were carried out. For DLC, the collision-induced transformation between hybridization states of carbon was confirmed, which also dominated the friction behavior of the film. For PVDF, results show that the applied tensile force induced the transformation of [alpha], [beta], and [upsilon] crystalline phase. In addition, the transformation observed was time and direction dependent. For Ag-NCs, a new approach based on the mechanism of mechano-activation was developed for nanochain structure synthesis. Molecular dynamics simulation and experimental results revealed that the formation of Ag-NCs is a synergetic physicalchemical procedure. Experimental results from DLC and PVDF were further used to validate the proposed potential, which brought new insight into the activation process. The current research achieves a precise control on engineering materials properties. The force-activated materials have wide applications in many areas, such as functional coating, sensing, and catalysis. In this study selected experiments have demonstrated the effects of mechanoactivation in different material systems (ceramic, polymer, metallic nano structure) and at different length scales. For the first time, a modified potential was proposed to explain the observed mechano-activation phenomena from the energy point of view. It was validated by experimental results of DLC and PVDF. The current research brings new understanding in mechano-activation and opens potential for its applications in tailoring materials properties.

Wang, Ke

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

PHYSICS LAB: TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, "Technical Activities 1999" - NISTIR 6438. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1999. This report summarizes ...

438

PHYSICS LAB: TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most Recent Technical Activities, TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998 - NISTIR NISTIR 6268. TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998. ...

439

Potential Vorticity Accumulation Following Atmospheric Kelvin Waves in the Active Convective Region of the MJO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous works have shown that most of the rainfall embedded within the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) occurs in large eastward-moving envelopes of enhanced convection known as super cloud clusters. Many of these superclusters have been ...

Kyle MacRitchie; Paul E. Roundy

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

StructureActivity Analysis of the Potentiation by Aminothiols of the Chromosome-Damaging Effect of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, squamous cell car- cinomas, testicular cancer, and some lymphomas [Hay et al., 1991; Stubbe et al., 1996 to DNA by hydro- phobic and ionic interactions mediated by its bithiazole moiety and C-terminus [Kane et

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Motor Gasoline Market Spring 2007 and Implications for Spring 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Market Spring 2007 Motor Gasoline Market Spring 2007 and Implications for Spring 2008 April 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor. Preface and Contacts

442

Implications of high efficiency power cycles for fusion reactor design  

SciTech Connect

The implications of the High Efficiency Power Cycle for fusion reactors are examined. The proposed cycle converts most all of the high grade CTR heat input to electricity. A low grade thermal input (T approximately 100$sup 0$C) is also required, and this can be supplied at low cost geothermal energy at many locations in the U. S. Approximately 3 KW of low grade heat is required per KW of electrical output. The thermodynamics and process features of the proposed cycle are discussed. Its advantages for CTR's are that low Q machines (e.g. driven Tokamaks, mirrors) can operate with a high (approximately 80 percent) conversion of CTR fusion energy to electricity, where with conventional power cycles no plant output could be achieved with such low Q operation. (auth)

Powell, J.R.; Usher, J.; Salzano, F.J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Security Implications of Typical Grid Computing Usage Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

A Computational Grid is a collection of heterogeneous computers and resources spread across multiple administrative domains with the intent of providing users uniform access to these resources. There are many ways to access the resources of a Computational Grid, each with unique security requirements and implications for both the resource user and the resource provider. A comprehensive set of Grid usage scenarios are presented and analyzed with regard to security requirements such as authentication, authorization, integrity, and confidentiality. The main value of these scenarios and the associated security discussions are to provide a library of situations against which an application designer can match, thereby facilitating security-aware application use and development from the initial stages of the application design and invocation. A broader goal of these scenarios are to increase the awareness of security issues in Grid Computing.

Humphrey, Marty; Thompson, Mary R.

2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

444

Astrophysical implications of the Asymptotic Safety Scenario in Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years it has emerged that the high energy behavior of gravity could be governed by an ultraviolet non-Gaussian fixed point of the (dimensionless) Newton's constant, whose behavior at high energy is thus {\\it antiscreened}. This phenomenon has several astrophysical implications. In particular in this article recent works on renormalization group improved cosmologies based upon a renormalization group trajectory of Quantum Einstein Gravity with realistic parameter values will be reviewed. It will be argued that quantum effects can account for the entire entropy of the present Universe in the massless sector and give rise to a phase of inflationary expansion. Moreover the prediction for the final state of the black hole evaporation is a Planck size remnant which is formed in an infinite time.

Bonanno, Alfio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Photodissociation dynamics of tryptophan and the implication of asymmetric photolysis  

SciTech Connect

Photodissociation of amino acid tryptophan in a molecular beam at wavelengths of 212.8 and 193 nm, corresponding to excitation to the second and third absorption bands, was investigated using multimass ion imaging techniques. The respective wavelengths also represent excitation to the edge of a positive circular dichroism band and the center of a negative circular dichroism band of L-tryptophan. Only one dissociation channel was observed at both photolysis wavelengths: C{sub 8}NH{sub 6}CH{sub 2}CHNH{sub 2}COOH{yields}C{sub 8}NH{sub 6}CH{sub 2}+CHNH{sub 2}COOH. Dissociation rates were found to be 1.3x10{sup 6} and 5x10{sup 6} s{sup -1} at the respective wavelengths. Comparison to theoretical calculation indicates that dissociation occurs on the ground state after internal conversion. Implication of asymmetric photolysis is discussed.

Tseng, Chien-Ming; Dyakov, Yuri A.; Huang, Huai Ching; Huang, Kuan Yu; Lee, Yuan T.; Ni, Chi-Kung [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Su-Yu [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2010-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

Research and institutional dimensions of environmental justice: Implications for NEPA documentation  

SciTech Connect

Satisfying the environmental justice requirements imposed on the NEPA process is a challenging imperative. Among the challenges for NEPA documentation are: (1) adapting existing disciplinary methodologies that address distributional effects to the dictates of the executive order; (2) determining operational and, perhaps, threshold values for policy directives (e.g., disproportionately high and adverse effects); (3) identifying and involving representatives of minority, Native American, and low-income communities and populations in the NEPA process without jeopardizing their independence and integrity; (4) developing strategies, approaches, and methodologies that are more responsive to the consideration of multiple and cumulative exposures; and (5) developing professional standards for environmental justice assessment that are consistent with the letter and intent of the executive order, protective of the environments of minority, Native American, and low-income populations and communities, and useful to decision makers. This report will address current research and institutional activities associated with these issues, present alternative approaches available for their resolution, and identify the implications of those alternative approaches.

Carnes, S.A.; Wolfe, A.K.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Salt effects on isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Essential to the use of stable isotopes as natural tracers and geothermometers is the knowledge of equilibrium isotope partitioning between different phases and species, which is usually a function of temperature only. The one exception known to date is oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation between liquid water and other phases (steam, gases, minerals), which changes upon the addition of salts to water, i.e., the isotope salt salt effect. Our knowledge of this effect, the difference between activity and composition (a-X) of isotopic water molecules in salt solutions, is very limited and controversial, especially at elevated temperatures. For the last several years, we have been conducting a detailed, systematic experimental study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the isotope salt effects from room temperature to elevated temperatures (currently to 500{degree}C). From this effort, a simple, coherent picture of the isotope salt effect is emerging, that differs markedly from the complex results reported in the literature. In this communication, we present an overview on the isotope salt effect, obtained chiefly from our study. Observed isotope salt effects in salt solutions are significant even at elevated temperatures. The importance and implications of the isotope salt effect for isotopic studies of brine-dominated systems are also discussed in general terms.

Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Fortier, S.M. [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

POFGEC: growing neural network of classifying potential function generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose an architecture and learning algorithm for a growing neural network. Drawing inspiration from the idea of electrical potentials, we develop a classifier based on a set of synthesised potential fields over the domain of input ... Keywords: classification rules, electrical potentials, kernels, neural networks, potential function generators, potential functions

Natacha Gueorguieva; Iren Valova; Georgi Georgiev

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The potential for low petroleum gasoline  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to determine the feasibility of producing sufficient replacement fuels to replace at least 30 percent of the projected consumption of motor fuels by light duty vehicles in the year 2010. The Act also requires the Secretary to determine the greenhouse gas implications of the use of replacement fuels. A replacement fuel is a non-petroleum portion of gasoline, including certain alcohols, ethers, and other components. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model has been used to study the cost and refinery impacts for production of {open_quotes}low petroleum{close_quotes} gasolines, which contain replacement fuels. The analysis suggests that high oxygenation is the key to meeting the replacement fuel target, and a major contributor to cost increase is investment in processes to produce and etherify light olefins. High oxygenation can also increase the costs of control of vapor pressure, distillation properties, and pollutant emissions of gasolines. Year-round low petroleum gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components might be produced with cost increases of 23 to 37 cents per gallon of gasoline, and with greenhouse gas emissions changes between a 3 percent increase and a 16 percent decrease. Crude oil reduction, with decreased dependence on foreign sources, is a major objective of the low petroleum gasoline program. For year-round gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components, crude oil use is reduced by 10 to 12 percent, at a cost $48 to $89 per barrel. Depending upon resolution of uncertainties about extrapolation of the Environmental Protection Agency Complex Model for pollutant emissions, availability of raw materials and other issues, costs could be lower or higher.

Hadder, G.R.; Webb, G.M.; Clauson, M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Wind Energy Potential in SE New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

click to return to the Renewable Energy page click to return to the Renewable Energy page Return to Renewable Energy Page Wind Energy in Southeast New Mexico Several Ongoing and New Wind Power Projects are Contributing to Making Renewable Energy Sources an Important Economic and Environmental Mainstay of the Region As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe Mountains, about 50-60 miles southwest. The numeric grid values indicate wind potential, with a range from 1 (poor) to 7 (superb). Just inside Texas in the southern Guadalupe Mountains, the Delaware Mountain Wind Power Facility in Culbertson County, Texas currently generates over 30 MW, and could be expanded to a 250 MW station.

451

Self-potential modeling from primary flows  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new method for the calculation of self potentials (SP) based on induced current sources is presented. The induced current sources are due to divergences of the convective current which is driven, in turn, by a primary flow, either heat or fluid. Numerical modeling utilizing this method has been implemented using a two-dimensional transmission surface algorithm. When the primary flow is driven by the gradient of a potential, joint modeling of the primary flow and the resultant SP is possible with this algorithm. Examples of simple geometrical models in the presence of point sources for the primary flow are presented and discussed. Lastly, a field example of the joint modeling of temperature and SP data is illustrated with data from Red Hill Hot Spring, Utah.

Sill, W.R.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Potential Carriers and Approaches for Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carriers and Potential Carriers and Carriers and Potential Carriers and Approaches for Hydrogen Approaches for Hydrogen Delivery Delivery TIAX LLC 1601 S. D Anza Blvd. Cupertino CA, 95014 Tel. 408-517-1550 Reference: D0348 © 2007 TIAX LLC Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8-9, 2007 Columbia, Maryland Matthew Hooks Stefan Unnasch Stephen Lasher 1 Novel Hydrogen Carriers Project Overview Cost Density (wt. and vol.) Energy requirements Forecourt storage requirements Codes and standards H H 2 2 Plant, Liquefier, LH Plant, Liquefier, LH 2 2 storage storage H H 2 2 Tube Trailer Tube Trailer LH 2 2 Tank/ Fueling Station LH Tank/ Fueling Station The efficient delivery of hydrogen is necessary for the adoption of hydrogen as a transportation fuel, but numerous challenges must be met. 2 "Conventional" delivery options are limited by volumetric density,

453

Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clot Busting Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment September 24, 2013 | Tags: Biological and Environmental Research (BER), Franklin Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov Calvariasetup.jpg The array transducer in position above the calvaria (skull). Shown are the ends of the array elements above the computational model of the skull. Researchers are using computer simulations to investigate how ultrasound and tiny bubbles injected into the bloodstream might break up blood clots, limiting the damage caused by a stroke in its first hours. Strokes are the most common cause of long-term disability in the United States and the third most common cause of death. More than 795,000 Americans suffer a stroke every year, which happens when a clot blocks an

454

Chemical potential and the gap equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In general the kernel of QCD's gap equation possesses a domain of analyticity upon which the equation's solution at nonzero chemical potential is simply obtained from the in-vacuum result through analytic continuation. On this domain the single-quark number- and scalar-density distribution functions are mu-independent. This is illustrated via two models for the gap equation's kernel. The models are alike in concentrating support in the infrared. They differ in the form of the vertex but qualitatively the results are largely insensitive to the Ansatz. In vacuum both models realise chiral symmetry in the Nambu-Goldstone mode and in the chiral limit, with increasing chemical potential, exhibit a first-order chiral symmetry restoring transition at mu~M(0), where M(p^2) is the dressed-quark mass function. There is evidence to suggest that any associated deconfinement transition is coincident and also of first-order.

Huan Chen; Wei Yuan; Lei Chang; Yu-Xin Liu; Thomas Klahn; Craig D. Roberts

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

455

Doorway state approach to optical potential scattering  

SciTech Connect

We extend and apply the doorway state approach in the context of optical potential scattering. This entails construction of doorway basis states for resolving the transition operator. We focus on analytic solutions to comparatively simple problems in optical potential scattering. Both low and high energy limits are considered, and absorptive interactions are treated; both on- and off-shell partial wave amplitudes are constructed. Further, the full scattering amplitude in the high energy limit is calculated directly in the doorway expansion. With our analytic results it is possible to identify the physical parameters controlling convergence of the doorway expansion. The same parameters apply over the entire range of cases studied. These parameters are related simply to the target geometry and to the interaction strength. For interactions appropriate to hadron--nucleus scattering, convergence of both on- and off-shell amplitudes is very rapid.

Lenz, F.; Moniz, E.J.; Yazaki, K.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Engineering and economic implications of ice-classed containerships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Arctic is becoming increasingly attractive for shipping. With the potential savings in transit time and the untapped natural resources, both the shipping and offshore industries are pouring capital into research and ...

Dvorak, Robert E. (Robert Ernest)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 For a Federal agency, changes in the demand for business travel can be difficult to predict. Changes in the nature of the agency's work may have a substantial impact on the demand for business travel. It is therefore important to account for these changes when planning for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction. Conditions that may contribute to a significant increase or decrease in the agency's business travel, beyond specific efforts to reduce business travel demand, include: Significant changes in the agency's budget Addition or completion of major program activities that require

458

Potential of Evaporative Cooling Systems for Buildings in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaporative cooling potential for building in various climatic zones in India is investigated. Maintainable indoor conditions are obtained from the load - capacity analysis for the prevailing ambient conditions. For the assumed activity level, clothing and air velocity, the predicted mean vote (PMV), predicted percentage dissatisfied (PPD), and cumulative dissatisfaction levels for each month are estimated. Time - air condition contours of ambient, supply air and indoor air are plotted on a psychrometric chart for different cities in India like Ahmadabad, Jodhpur, Nagpur and New Delhi representing different climatic conditions of India. While satisfactorily comfort can be achieved at cool and dry weather conditions by evaporative cooling system throughout the year, some discomfort prevailed for few months around July at hot and dry/humid weather conditions. The results are also quantified in terms of PMV, PPD and their cumulative factors; PMV-hour and PPD-hour.

Maiya, M. P.; Vijay, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

NSLS Activity Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activity Report Activity Report 2009 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2009 Periodic Table Dust Jacket 2008 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008 2007 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2006 - September 30, 2007 Science Highlights PDF Publications PDF 2006 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006 2005 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2004 - September 30, 2005 2004 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004 2003 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2002 - September 30, 2003 2002 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2001 - September 30, 2002 2001 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2000 - September 30, 2001 2000 Activity Report Covering October 1, 1999 - September 30, 2000 1999 Activity Report Covering October 1, 1998 - September 30, 1999

460

Market potential for electrolytic hydrogen. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The economics of hydrogen production by the major users of hydrogen (petroleum refiners and manufacturers of ammonia and methanol) favor the continued use of fossil fuels for hydrogen generation. However, there are a large number of miscellaneous small users for whom hydrogen produced by advanced electrolyzers may become economically attractive. Many of these small users, with hydrogen demands of < 0.5 million SCF per day, purchase their hydrogen requirements from industrial gas suppliers. Forseeable improvements in current electrolyzer technology, which will reduce plant capital costs and improve plant performance and efficiency, may make electrolytic hydrogen competitive with purchased hydrogen for many specialty users. This study analyzed the small user hydrogen market. Telephone interviews were conducted with representative hydrogen users in the chemical, pharmaceutical, electronics, metals, fats and oils, and float glass industries to determine the decision factors governing the choice of their hydrogen supply. Cost projections to the year 2000 for production of hydrogen by advanced electrolyzers were made and compared with price projections for merchant hydrogen, and the estimates of the potential market for each of the industrial sub-sectors were determined. By the year 2000, the potential market for advanced technology electrolytic hydrogen among specialty users is projected to be about half of what the merchant hydrogen market would be in the absence of electrolytic hydrogen. This potential market, representing an annual demand of about 16 billion SCF of hydrogen, will develop from market penetrations of electrolyzers assumed to begin in the early 1980s.

Fein, E.; Mathey, C.J.; Arnstein, C.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity potential implications" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Predicting Atlantic Basin Seasonal Tropical Cyclone Activity by 1 June  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the third in a series of papers describing the potential for the seasonal forecasting of Atlantic basin tropical cyclone activity. Earlier papers by the authors describe seasonal prediction from 1 December of the previous year and from 1 ...

William M. Gray; Christopher W. Landsea; Paul W. Mielke Jr.; Kenneth J. Berry

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Improving Multiseason Forecasts of North Atlantic Hurricane Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricanes cause drastic social problems as well as generate huge economic losses. A reliable forecast of the level of hurricane activity covering the next several seasons has the potential to mitigate against such losses through improvements in ...

James B. Elsner; Thomas H. Jagger; Michael Dickinson; Dail Rowe

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Impacts of Atmospheric Temperature Trends on Tropical Cyclone Activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impacts of tropical temperature changes in the upper troposphere (UT) and the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) on tropical cyclone (TC) activity are explored. UT and lower TTL cooling both lead to an overall increase in potential intensity (PI), ...

Gabriel A. Vecchi; Stephan Fueglistaler; Isaac M. Held; Thomas R. Knutson; Ming Zhao

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M., E-mail: Pucheu-Haston.Cherie@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, CB 7270, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7270 (United States); Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W. [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 109 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

COE Reductions through Active Aerodynamic Control of Rotor Aerodynamics and Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates potential cost of energy reductions that might be achieved by designing active systems to mitigate loads throughout the wind turbine system.

Griffin, D. A.; McCoy, T. J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Self Potential At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, Self Potential At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

467

Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential Measurements Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential Measurements Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The distribution of hydrothermal circulation within active volcanoes is of importance in identifying regions of hydrothermal alteration which may in turn control explosivity, slope stability and sector collapse. Self-potential measurements, indicative of fluid circulation, were made within the crater of Mount St. Helens in 2000 and

468

Self Potential At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Self Potential At Northern Basin & Range Region Self Potential At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then

469

Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and short-lived neutron activation analysis (NAA) applied to the characterization of legacy materials  

SciTech Connect

Without quality historical records that provide the composition of legacy materials, the elemental and/or chemical characterization of such materials requires a manual analytical strategy that may expose the analyst to unknown toxicological hazards. In addition, much of the existing legacy inventory also incorporates radioactivity, and, although radiological composition may be determined by various nuclear-analytical methods, most importantly, gamma-spectroscopy, current methods of chemical characterization still require direct sample manipulation, thereby presenting special problems with broad implications for both the analyst and the environment. Alternately, prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) provides a'single-shot' in-situ, non-destructive method that provides a complete assay of all major entrained elemental constituents.1-3. Additionally, neutron activation analysis (NAA) using short-lived activation products complements PGAA and is especially useful when NAA activation surpasses the PGAA in elemental sensitivity.

Firestone, Richard B; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Perry, D.L.; Reijonen, J.P.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Garabedian, G.F.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

470

Sensory information in local field potentials and spikes from visual and auditory cortices: time scales and frequency bands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies analyzing sensory cortical processing or trying to decode brain activity often rely on a combination of different electrophysiological signals, such as local field potentials (LFPs) and spiking activity. Understanding the relation between these ... Keywords: Audition, Firing rates, Information theory, Oscillations, Population coding, Vision

Andrei Belitski; Stefano Panzeri; Cesare Magri; Nikos K. Logothetis; Christoph Kayser

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Regional comparisons of on-site solar potential in the residential and industrial sectors  

SciTech Connect

Regional and sub-regional differences in the potential development of decentralized solar technologies are studied. Two sectors of the economy were selected for intensive analysis: the residential and industrial sectors. In both investigations, the sequence of analysis follows the same general steps: (1) selection of appropriate prototypes within each land-use sector disaggregated by census region; (2) characterization of the end-use energy demand of each prototype in order to match an appropriate decentralized solar technology to the energy demand; (3) assessment of the energy conservation potential within each prototype limited by land use patterns, technology efficiency, and variation in solar insolation; and (4) evaluation of the regional and sub-regional differences in the land use implications of decentralized energy supply technologies that result from the combination of energy demand, energy supply potential, and the subsequent addition of increasingly more restrictive policies to increase the percent contribution of on-site solar energy. Results are presented and discussed. It is concluded that determining regional variations in solar energy contribution for both the residential and industrial sectors appears to be more dependent upon a characterization of existing demand and conservation potential than regional variations in solar insolation. Local governmental decisions influencing developing land use patterns can significantly promote solar energy use and reduce reliance on non-renewable energy sources. These decisions include such measures as solar access protection through controls on vegetation and on building height and density in the residential sector, and district heating systems and industrial co-location in the manufacturing sector. (WHK)

Gatzke, A.E.; Skewes-Cox, A.O.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Dynamical Potential Energy: A New Approach to Ocean Energetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of available potential energy is supposed to indicate which part of the potential energy is available to transform into kinetic energy. Yet it is impossible to obtain a unique definition of available potential energy for the real ocean ...

Fabien Roquet

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil EnergyA Potential Path...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy The National Energy Technology Laboratory's chemical looping reactor, above, is the only one of its kind in the Western...

474

Heat Flow And Geothermal Potential In The South-Central United States |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Geothermal Potential In The South-Central United States And Geothermal Potential In The South-Central United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow And Geothermal Potential In The South-Central United States Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal exploration is typically limited to high-grade hydrothermal reservoirs that are usually found in the western United States, yet large areas with subsurface temperatures above 150 deg. C at economic drilling depths can be found east of the Rocky Mountains. The object of this paper is to present new heat flow data and to evaluate the geothermal potential of Texas and adjacent areas. The new data show that, west of the Ouachita Thrust Belt, the heat flow values are lower than east of the fault zone. Basement heat flow values for the Palo Duro and Fort