National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for activity level stands

  1. Microfluidic sieve using intertwined, free-standing carbon nanotube mesh as active medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Noy, Aleksandr (Belmont, CA)

    2007-11-06

    A microfluidic sieve having a substrate with a microfluidic channel, and a carbon nanotube mesh. The carbon nanotube mesh is formed from a plurality of intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes which are fixedly attached within the channel for separating, concentrating, and/or filtering molecules flowed through the channel. In one embodiment, the microfluidic sieve is fabricated by providing a substrate having a microfluidic channel, and growing the intertwined free-standing carbon nanotubes from within the channel to produce the carbon nanotube mesh attached within the channel.

  2. Stand-Level Gas-Exchange Responses to Seasonal Drought in Very Young Versus Old Douglas-fir Forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Bible, K; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

    2009-02-23

    This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral stands (ES) (0-15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) ({approx} 450-500) forest in the Wind River Experiment Forest, Washington, USA. We use eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (F{sub NEE}), latent energy ({lambda}E) and sensible heat (H) to derive evapotranspiration rate (E{sub T}), bowen ratio ({beta}), water use efficiency (WUE), canopy conductance (G{sub c}), the Priestley-Taylor coefficient ({alpha}) and a canopy decoupling factor ({Omega}). The canopy and bulk parameters are examined to see how ecophysiological responses to water stress, including changes in available soil water ({theta}{sub r}) and vapor pressure deficit ({delta}e) differ among the two forest successional-stages. Despite very different rainfall patterns in 2006 and 2007, we observed distinct successional-stage relationships between E{sub T}, {alpha}, and G{sub c} to {delta}e and {theta}{sub r} during both years. The largest stand differences were (1) higher morning G{sub c} (> 10 mm s{sup -1}) at the OG forest coinciding with higher CO{sub 2} uptake (F{sub NEE} = -9 to -6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) but a strong negative response in G{sub c} to moderate {delta}e later in the day and a subsequent reduction in E{sub T}, and (2) higher E{sub T} at the ES stands because midday canopy conductance did not decrease until very low water availability levels (<30%) were reached at the end of the summer. Our results suggest that early seral stands are more likely than mature forests to experience declines in production if the summer drought becomes longer or intensifies because water conserving ecophysiological responses were only observed at the very end of the seasonal drought period in the youngest stands.

  3. High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities Breakout Session 1B-Integration of Supply Chains I: ...

  4. Memorandum, NNSA Activity Level Work Planning & Control Processes, January

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2006 | Department of Energy NNSA Activity Level Work Planning & Control Processes, January 2006 Memorandum, NNSA Activity Level Work Planning & Control Processes, January 2006 January 23, 2006 Memorandum from Thomas P. D'Agostino, Assistant Deputy Administrator for Program Integration: Action: Revitalizing Integrated Safety Management; Site Office Action Plans for Improving Activity Level Work Planning and Control Processes. PDF icon Memorandum, NNSA Activity Level Work Planning

  5. Subsea completion data show steady activity levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohr, H.O. )

    1993-02-01

    Review of subsea completion statistics indicates 45 installations during 1992 - one more than during 1991. The 45 installations are still considerably less than the all-time high of 66 installations in 1985. Petrobras continues to install three times as many subsea completions as Shell, the next most active user. However, as in the past three years, the overall-lower number of installations last year was due to reduced applications by Petrobras. During 1991, that company installed 10 subsea completions, whereas during 1988, for example, it completed 37 installations. It should be noted that reduced activity by petrobras reflects problems with financing and general activity, rather than a lack of confidence in subsea completions. The number of future subsea completions identified for installation during the next 10 years is 1,144 - some 10% more than the 1,014 identified at the end of 1991. The present planned installation figure is an all-time high; the next highest number of installations identified was 1,083 at the end of 1989. These and other statistics are presented in 10 tables. A brief analysis of each is included.

  6. Space Conditioning Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Space Conditioning Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan, v2011a Revised: January 2012 Committee Chair: 2011 Eric Martin Janet McIlvaine BA-PIRC Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan Overview Standing Technical Committees (STCs) focus on resolving key technical action items required to meet Building America performance goals. STC chairs lead each committees' activities in addressing specific research challenges, gaps in understanding, and new research opportunities. Committees

  7. Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Work Planning & Control | Department of Energy Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning & Control Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning & Control May 16, 2013 Presenter: Donna J. Governor, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Topics Covered: Work Control Review Board (WCRB) Functional Area Manager identified at the Institution level reporting directly to the Deputy Laboratory Director

  8. High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities Kevin Comer, Associate Principal, Antares Group Inc.

  9. Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Planning and Control, Final Report | Department of Energy Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and Control, Final Report Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and Control, Final Report May 15, 2013 Presenter: Stephen L. Domotor, Director, Office of Analysis, Office of Health, Safety and Security Topic: On August 28, 2012, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB or "Board") wrote to the Department of

  10. The sixth Standing Committee Meeting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    sixth Standing Committee Meeting between DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) was held on March 10, 2010, on the margins of the Waste Management 2010 Conference in Phoenix, Arizona. The Committee monitors collaboration activities between the two organizations and was pleased to hear of the progress being made by the respective expert groups in the current five topic areas: Fuel Drying, Glass Chemistry, Hot Isostatic Pressing, D&D,

  11. Implementation Standing Technical Committee Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementation Standing Technical Committee (I-STC) Meeting Deane Evans (NJIT) and Stacy Hunt (Confluence), co-chairs March 1, 2012 What is the I-STC? * Focused on identifying and documenting key barriers and opportunities in implementation of Building America (BA) research results How Does the I-STC Work? * Fosters discussion and prioritization of key research activities * Documents these for DOE/NREL planning purposes 2012 Focus * Clarify key priorities and ensure proper prioritization *

  12. Microsoft Word - FINAL news release EOC Level 1 activation - weather

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activated on Limited Basis CARLSBAD, N.M., 12/29/2015 1:26 PM (MT) - At approximately, 9 a.m. Mountain Time, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) announced a Level 1 activation to support coordination of resources needed to safely restore normal operations at WIPP due to the recent severe snow storm in southeast New Mexico. The icy and snow packed road conditions have made road conditions difficult for the workforce to commute to the WIPP site. Resources are

  13. Standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  14. Westinghouse Test Stand Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Westinghouse Non-Proprietary Class 3 © 2014 Westinghouse Electric Company LLC. All Rights Reserved MT-14-12 Westinghouse VERA Test Stand Zero Power Physics Test Simulations for the AP1000® PWR Fausto Franceschini, Westinghouse Electric Company LLC Andrew Godfrey, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Joel Kulesza, Westinghouse Electric Company LLC Robert Oelrich, Westinghouse Electric Company LLC L3.AMA.VDT.P8.01 Milestone Report CASL-U-2014-0012-000 March 6, 2014 MT-14-12 Westinghouse VERA Test Stand

  15. CASL Test Stand Experience

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry Test Stand Experience Stephen Hess, EPRI Heather Feldman, EPRI Brenden Mervin, EPRI Martin Pytel, EPRI Rose Montgomery, TVA Bill Bird, TVA Fausto Franceschini, Westinghouse Electric Company LLC Advanced Modeling Applications 28 March 2014 CASL-U-2014-0036-000 Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs ii CASL-U-2014-0036-000 REVISION LOG Revision Date Affected Pages Revision Description 0 3/28/2014 All Original Report Document pages that are: Export Controlled

  16. Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Presentation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Presentation Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Presentation This presentation outlines the goals of the Water Heating Standing...

  17. Implementation Standing Technical Committee Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation outlines the goals of the Implementation Standing Technical Committee, as presented at the Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder meeting on February 29, 2012, in Austin, Texas.

  18. Activity-Level Work Planning and Control Implementation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... chemical, explosive, pressure, temperature, confined ... parameters - Key tank or vessel levels - Status of safety ... is provided in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) ...

  19. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review of Activity Level Implementatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... was available to allow the worker to survey of his hands after the sweeping activity. ... In a related concern, radiological air sampling was not being performed during uranium ...

  20. DOE Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control at

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Facilities | Department of Energy Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control at Nuclear Facilities DOE Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control at Nuclear Facilities May 16, 2013 Presenter: James Winter, NA-00-10 Topics Covered: Project Justification Statement Improved Implementation of WP&C and Activity-level Work Effectively Meeting Requirements of ISM at the Activity Level Developing a Resource to Clarify DOE Requirements that

  1. Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standing Technical Committee Water Heating Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder's Meeting February 29, 2012 - Austin, Texas 2 STC Chairman Responsibilities * To maintain the Water Heating Strategic Plan (living document) * To work with stakeholders to identify research activities that resolve gaps & barriers towards achieving Water Heating Strategic Goals * To work with stakeholders to prioritize gaps leading to future BA research efforts * To serve as a collection point for BA research

  2. Impact Of Standing Bleed Water On Saltstone Placement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A. D.; Pickenheim, B. R.

    2012-09-28

    The amount of water present during placement and subsequent curing of saltstone has the potential to impact several properties important for grout quality. An active drain water system can remove residual standing water and expose the surface of the placed saltstone to air. Oxidation of the saltstone may result in an increase in the leachability of redox sensitive elements. A dry surface can lead to cracking, causing an increase in hydraulic conductivity. An inactive drain water system can allow standing water that generates unnecessary hydrostatic head on the vault walls. Standing water that cannot be removed via the drain system will be available for potential incorporation into subsequent grout placements. The objective of this work is to study the impact of standing water on grout quality pertaining to disposal units. A series of saltstone mixes were prepared, and cured at ambient temperature to evaluate the impact of standing water on saltstone placement. The samples were managed to control drying effects on leachability by either exposing or capping the samples. The water to premix ratio was varied to represent a range of processing conditions. Samples were analyzed for density, leachability, and hydraulic conductivity. A monolith of each composition was cut into four sections to analyze the homogeneity of the sample with respect to vertical position within the sample. The density of each section was measured by two methods, helium pycnometry and by ASTM 642-06. The results show a trend of increasing density with increasing depth in the samples. This effect is more pronounced with the inclusion of excess bleed water and indicative of increased settling. The leachability of the eight different samples was analyzed by ANS/ANSI 16.1 method. These results indicate that drying of the saltstone during curing leads to decreased Leachability Indices (indicative of more release) for potassium, sodium, rhenium, nitrite, and nitrate. This may be caused by shrinkage cracking in the samples creating additional pathways for contaminant release. There was no noticeable effect on leachability by changing the water to premix ratio or by including excess bleed water. There was no detectable chromium release in any of the samples. Chromium and rhenium were added in equal amounts to determine whether rhenium might be an acceptable surrogate for chromium, a hazardous material. This testing shows no correlation between the behavior of the two elements, as chromium is not released at detectable levels and rhenium is released at a comparable rate to nitrate, the most prevalent and mobile species in saltstone.

  3. Space Conditioning Standing Technical Commitee Presentation ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commitee Presentation Space Conditioning Standing Technical Commitee Presentation This presentation outlines the goals of the Space Conditioning Standing Technical ommittee, as...

  4. Stand by Europe | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Europe Jump to: navigation, search Name: Stand-by Europe Place: Czech Republic Product: Czech project development and distribution company References: Stand-by Europe1 This...

  5. Status Update on Action 2a: Implementation Handbook for Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by James Winter, NA-00-10. DOE Handbook: Implementing Activity-Level Work Planning & Control at Nuclear Facilities. Project Justification Statement submitted 1-29-13, with focus upon improved implementation of WP&C and activity-level work. Provides the background, project plan, and key elements of a new DOE handbook on implementing activity-level work planning and control at DOE nuclear facilities.

  6. Lesson Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Donna J. Governor, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-Level Work Planning & Control.

  7. Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Eneregy Nuclear Reactions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Eneregy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level: Annual Continuation And Progress Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of...

  8. Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Nuclear Reactions At The...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level: Annual Continuation And Progress Report Citation Details In-Document...

  9. Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level:Annual Continuation And Progress Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of...

  10. Mapping Battery Activity at the Level of a Billionth of a Meter - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Mapping Battery Activity at the Level of a Billionth of a Meter Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryAn ORNL method and apparatus offer a new approach to revealing battery behavior at the nanoscale. With this invention, researchers successfully mapped lithium diffusivity and electrochemical activity, showing how the battery works at the level of a billionth of a meter. Future energy technologies will rely heavily on

  11. Analysis of ISM Activity-level Work Planning and Control Within DOE |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Analysis of ISM Activity-level Work Planning and Control Within DOE Analysis of ISM Activity-level Work Planning and Control Within DOE May 15, 2013 Presenter: Stephen L. Domotor, Office of Analysis, Office of Health, Safety and Security Topics Covered: There are five main categories of deficiencies symptomatic of management system weaknesses in WP&C, as follows: Hazard Identification and Hazard Control Procedures and Documents Supervision and Management

  12. LED Efficacy: What America Stands to Gain | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficacy: What America Stands to Gain LED Efficacy: What America Stands to Gain PDF icon LED Efficacy-What America Stands to Gain November 2015.pdf

  13. Comparison of doubly labeled water with respirometry at low- and high-activity levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Brouns, F.; Saris, W.H.; ten Hoor, F.

    1988-07-01

    In previous studies the doubly labeled water method for measuring energy expenditure in free-living humans has been validated against respirometry under sedentary conditions. In the present investigation, energy expenditure is measured simultaneously with doubly labeled water and respirometry at low- and high-activity levels. Over 6 days, five subjects were measured doing mainly sedentary activities like desk work; their average daily metabolic rate was 1.40 +/- 0.09 (SD) times sleeping metabolic rate. Four subjects were measured twice over 3.5 days, including 2 days with heavy bicycle ergometer work, resulting in an average daily metabolic rate of 2.61 +/- 0.25 (SD) times sleeping metabolic rate. At the low-activity level, energy expenditures from the doubly labeled water method were on the average 1.4 +/- 3.9% (SD) larger than those from respirometry. At the high-activity level, the doubly labeled water method yielded values that were 1.0 +/- 7.0% (SD) lower than those from respirometry. Results demonstrate the utility of the doubly labeled water method for the determination of energy expenditure in the range of activity levels in daily life.

  14. Neighborhood level health risk assessment of lead paint removal activities from elevated steel bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, R.F.; Cohen, J.T.; Bowers, T.

    1999-07-01

    The New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) has adopted strict containment and monitoring procedures during paint removal activities on its bridges because of the increasing awareness about lead poisoning in children in urban environments and the potential risk of lead-based paint releases during those activities. NYCDOT owns nearly 800 bridges scattered throughout New York City. Before undertaking paint removal activities as part of its ongoing preventive maintenance and rehabilitation program, NYCDOT recently conducted an analysis to determine the public health risk posed to children living near them. The analysis the first of its kind to assess the actual public health risk potential during both routine operations and upset conditions, or accidental releases evaluated the total and incremental blood lead levels from paint removal activities on more than 5,000 children from 6 months to 6 years old. Increases in baseline blood lead levels were estimated using several models, including EPA's Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) Model. This model estimates steady-state blood lead levels in children, reflecting exposure to lead in multiple media over an extended period of time. Increases in lead exposure from paint removal activities in the area surrounding the bridges was estimated using EPA's Industrial Source Complex (ISC3) model to calculate ambient air and deposition levels. Potential releases from the containment and ancillary equipment used in the paint removal process were modeled based on different release scenarios ranging from routine operations to complete failure of containment. To estimate the paint removal activities' contribution to long-term exterior dust lead levels (and its related interior component), a stochastic simulation model was developed for each block in the study area.

  15. Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 8.4 Number of Establishments by Participation in Specific Energy-Management Activities, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes; Column: Participation; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Energy-Management Activity No Participation Participation(b) Don't Know Not Applicable Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Full-Time Energy Manager (c) 159,258 9,922 25,553 -- Set Goals for

  16. Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 8.4 Number of Establishments by Participation in Specific Energy-Management Activities, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes; Column: Participation; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Energy-Management Activity No Participation Participation(b) Don't Know No Steam Used Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Full-Time Energy Manager (c) 142,267 12,536 15,365 -- Set Goals for

  17. Activity-level Work Planning and Control in the Hanford Site Worker Evaluation Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Ted Giltz, Volpentest HAMMER Federal Training Center. Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool, Verifying Activity-Level Worker Medical Clearance and Training. The Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool (HSWET) provides line management an easy to use tool to determine if workers are medically cleared and trained to perform work safely.

  18. Building America Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Presentation Building America Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Presentation This presentation...

  19. Refrigeration system having standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (Glen Allen, VA)

    1992-01-01

    A compression-evaporation refrigeration system, wherein gaseous compression of the refrigerant is provided by a standing wave compressor. The standing wave compressor is modified so as to provide a separate subcooling system for the refrigerant, so that efficiency losses due to flashing are reduced. Subcooling occurs when heat exchange is provided between the refrigerant and a heat pumping surface, which is exposed to the standing acoustic wave within the standing wave compressor. A variable capacity and variable discharge pressure for the standing wave compressor is provided. A control circuit simultaneously varies the capacity and discharge pressure in response to changing operating conditions, thereby maintaining the minimum discharge pressure needed for condensation to occur at any time. Thus, the power consumption of the standing wave compressor is reduced and system efficiency is improved.

  20. Space Conditioning Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee Strategic Plan Space Conditioning Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan This strategic plan document outlines the gaps, barriers, and opportunities identified by...

  1. Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standing Technical Committee Water Heating Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder's Meeting February 29, 2012 - Austin, Texas 2 STC Chairman Responsibilities * To maintain the...

  2. Automated Home Energy Management Standing Technical Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. AHEM Standing Technical Committee Meeting Building America Stakeholder Meeting Lieko Earle and Bethany Sparn February 29, 2012 2 Role of ...

  3. Enclosures Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee Strategic Plan report Enclosures Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan report This report outlines the research path for increasing energy efficiency of building...

  4. Enclosures Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report outlines the research path for increasing energy efficiency of building enclosures, as identified by the Building America Standing Technical Committee; updated Feb. 2012.

  5. Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Nuclear Reactions At The Highest

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microscopic Level: Annual Continuation And Progress Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level: Annual Continuation And Progress Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level: Annual Continuation And Progress Report Authors: Quaglioni, S Publication Date: 2014-03-05 OSTI Identifier: 1124871 Report Number(s):

  6. Relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rates in teenagers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terblanche, A.P.S.; Ozkaynak, H.; Spengler, J.D.; Butler, D.A. )

    1991-08-01

    A study was designed to explore the relationship between self-reported activity levels and actual heart rate (HR) as measured by a portable heart rate monitor. Twenty-two teenagers (8 boys, 14 girls, median age of 16) from Watertown High School, Massachusetts participated in this pilot study which involved continuous monitoring of HR during normal daily activities and simultaneous completion of a time-activity diary. There were 31 successful monitoring sessions ranging from 1.9 to 17 hours with a median monitoring time of 12.6 hours. Four unsuccessful monitoring sessions were experienced due to equipment failure. Apart from participant cooperation, the single most important factor affecting the feasibility of continuous heart rate monitoring was found to be equipment design. Th overall average heart rate observed was 88.4 bpm (SD = 24.3). An individual's correlation coefficient for perceived activity level (documented in half-hour intervals) and heart rate (averaged over the half-hour intervals) varied from 0.24 to 0.89. More than half of the correlation coefficients were below 0.40. There was a significant difference between average heart rate for time spent indoors (90 bpm) versus outdoors (103 bpm) even after correcting for sleeping time. It is concluded that continuous HR monitoring with simultaneous completion of a time/activity dairy is feasible and is a promising source of information for studies on exposure to air pollutants.

  7. STANDING ORDER 1. Standing Order Number: EP-DIV-S0-20222, R.O

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    STANDING ORDER 1. Standing Order Number: EP-DIV-S0-20222, R.O 2. Standing Order Type: (check one) [8J Division D Facility 3. Applicable Facilities: All EWMO Facilities 4. Standing Order Title: EWMO Legacy TRU Waste Pause 5. Distribution List: (By Functional Title) TA-54 Timely Order Book, Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Timely Order Book, Radioassay and Nondestructive Testing (RANT) Facility Timely Order Book, and Environmental Programs (EP) Document Control

  8. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) will perform a feasibility study and associated tasks over the course of two years on sites within the exterior boundaries of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation to support the future development ranging from 50 to 150 megawatts (MW) of wind power.

  9. Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level:Annual Continuation And Progress ... Title: Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest ...

  10. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's (SRST) cultural identity demands that tribal development occur in a sustainable manner and in a manner protective of the tribe's natural resources to preserve them for following generations.

  11. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 1995 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary objective of this study is to provide the Standing Rock Sioux Nation with a strategic overview of the electric energy issues and opportunities they will be facing beginning in the year 2001.

  12. Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Test Methods Standing Technical Committee buildingamerica.gov Residential Building Technology Program Building America Test Methods STC BA Stakeholder Meeting Leap Day, 2012 Austin, TX 2 | Building America Test Methods Standing Technical Committee buildingamerica.gov Test Methods STC: Roles Update Field Test: Advanced Test / Audit Methods Key Role: Identify Needs for Field Test Methods & Sensors Targets: Field Performance Measurements: Accurate, Low-Cost & Simple Methods Safety &

  13. Corp and Stand-alone.PDF

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 AUDIT REPORT CORPORATE AND STAND-ALONE INFORMATION SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT SEPTEMBER 2000 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES September 28, 2000 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Corporate and Stand-Alone Information Systems Development" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) spends about $1.6 billion annually for the acquisition and maintenance of

  14. Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) Standing Technical Committee...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - February 2012 Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) Standing Technical Committee Strategic...

  15. Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - February...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategic Plan - February 2012 Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - ... identified by the Building America Standing Technical Committee on Test Methods. ...

  16. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for stand-off detection of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for stand-off detection of contraband Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for stand-off detection of...

  17. ASTATINE-211 RADIOCHEMISTRY: THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGIES FOR HIGH ACTIVITY LEVEL RADIOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MICHAEL R. ZALUTSKY

    2012-08-08

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as a viable approach for cancer treatment because of its potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to malignant cell populations while sparing normal tissues. Alpha particles such as those emitted by 211At are particularly attractive for this purpose because of their short path length in tissue and high energy, making them highly effective in killing cancer cells. The current impact of targeted radiotherapy in the clinical domain remains limited despite the fact that in many cases, potentially useful molecular targets and labeled compounds have already been identified. Unfortunately, putting these concepts into practice has been impeded by limitations in radiochemistry methodologies. A critical problem is that the synthesis of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals provides additional challenges in comparison to diagnostic reagents because of the need to perform radio-synthesis at high levels of radioactivity. This is particularly important for {alpha}-particle emitters such as 211At because they deposit large amounts of energy in a highly focal manner. The overall objective of this project is to develop convenient and reproducible radiochemical methodologies for the radiohalogenation of molecules with the {alpha}-particle emitter 211At at the radioactivity levels needed for clinical studies. Our goal is to address two problems in astatine radiochemistry: First, a well known characteristic of 211At chemistry is that yields for electrophilic astatination reactions decline as the time interval after radionuclide isolation from the cyclotron target increases. This is a critical problem that must be addressed if cyclotrons are to be able to efficiently supply 211At to remote users. And second, when the preparation of high levels of 211At-labeled compounds is attempted, the radiochemical yields can be considerably lower than those encountered at tracer dose. For these reasons, clinical evaluation of promising 211At-labeled targeted radiotherapeutics currently is a daunting task. Our central hypothesis is that improvements in 211At radiochemistry are critically dependent on gaining an understanding of and compensating for the effects of radiolysis induced by 211At {alpha}-particles. Because of the widespread interest in labeling antibodies, antibody fragments and peptides with 211At, our proposed work plan will initially focus on reagents that we have developed for this purpose. Part of our strategy is the use of synthetic precursors immobilized on polymeric resins or perfluorous and triarylphosphonium supports. Their use could eliminate the need for a purification step to separate unreacted tin precursor from labeled product and hopefully provide a simple kit technology that could be utilized at other institutions. The specific aims of this project are: (1) To optimze methods for 211At production and isolation of 211At from cyclotron targets; (2) To develop convenient and reproducible methodologies for high activity level and high specific activity radiohalogenation of biomolecules with 211At; (3) to develop a procedure for extending the shelf-life of 211At beyond a few hours so that this radionuclide can be utilized at centers remote from its site of production; and (4) to work out high activity level synthesis methods for utilizing support immobilized tin precursors for 211At labeling. If we are successful in achieving our goals, the radiochemical methodologies that are developed could greatly facilitate the use of 211At-labeled targeted cancer therapeutics in patients, even at institutions that are distant from the few sites currently available for 211At production.

  18. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallaher, B.M.; Benjamin, T.M.; Rokop, D.J.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-09-22

    For more than three decades Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. Be measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1000 fold along a 3000 ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicates off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  19. Survey of plutonium and uranium atom ratios and activity levels in Mortandad Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallaher, B.M.; Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Benjamin, T.M.; Stoker, A.K.

    1997-10-01

    For more than three decades, Mortandad Canyon has been the primary release area of treated liquid radioactive waste from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In this survey, six water samples and seven stream sediment samples collected in Mortandad Canyon were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry to determine the plutonium and uranium activity levels and atom ratios. By measuring the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios, the Laboratory plutonium component was evaluated relative to that from global fallout. Measurements of the relative abundance of {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U were also used to identify non-natural components. The survey results indicate that the Laboratory plutonium and uranium concentrations in waters and sediments decrease relatively rapidly with distance downstream from the major industrial sources. Plutonium concentrations in shallow alluvial groundwater decrease by approximately 1,000-fold along a 3,000-ft distance. At the Laboratory downstream boundary, total plutonium and uranium concentrations were generally within regional background ranges previously reported. Laboratory-derived plutonium is readily distinguished from global fallout in on-site waters and sediments. The isotopic ratio data indicate off-site migration of trace levels of Laboratory plutonium in stream sediments to distances approximately two miles downstream of the Laboratory boundary.

  20. Standing gravitational waves from domain walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Myrzakul, Shynaray; Singleton, Douglas

    2009-07-15

    We construct a plane symmetric, standing gravitational wave for a domain wall plus a massless scalar field. The scalar field can be associated with a fluid which has the properties of 'stiff' matter, i.e., matter in which the speed of sound equals the speed of light. Although domain walls are observationally ruled out in the present era, the solution has interesting features which might shed light on the character of exact nonlinear wave solutions to Einstein's equations. Additionally this solution may act as a template for higher dimensional 'brane-world' model standing waves.

  1. Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - February 2012 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Strategic Plan - February 2012 Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - February 2012 This document outlines gaps, needs, and opportunities identified by the Building America Standing Technical Committee on Test Methods. PDF icon strategic_plan_test_methods.pdf More Documents & Publications Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Presentation Standing Technical Committee Working Sessions Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee

  2. Space Conditioning Standing Technical Commitee Presentation | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Space Conditioning Standing Technical Commitee Presentation Space Conditioning Standing Technical Commitee Presentation This presentation outlines the goals of the Space Conditioning Standing Technical ommittee, as presented at the Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder meeting on February 29, 2012, in Austin, Texas. PDF icon space_conditioning_stc.pdf More Documents & Publications Standing Technical Committee Working Sessions Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical

  3. Stand-Alone Battery Thermal Management System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stand-Alone Battery Thermal Management System Stand-Alone Battery Thermal Management System 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon es135_brodie_2012_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Stand-Alone Battery Thermal Management System Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Stand-Alone Battery Thermal Management System Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Stand-Alone Battery Thermal

  4. R.E.A.C.T. - Renewable Energy Activities - Choices for Tomorrow - Teacher's Activity Guide for Middle Level Grades 6-8

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E.A.C.T. Renewable Energy Activities - Choices for Tomorrow Teacher's Activity Guide for Middle Level Grades 6-8 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Education Programs 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, Colorado 80401 Tel: (303) 275-3044 Home page: http://www.nrel.gov ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Education Office at NREL would like to thank Dr. James Schreck, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Northern Colorado, for his commitment and hard work in the development of this activity booklet. His

  5. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay; Ayers, Shannon Lee

    2012-10-09

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  6. Large optics inspection, tilting, and washing stand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ayers, Marion Jay (Brentwood, CA); Ayers, Shannon Lee (Brentwood, CA)

    2010-08-24

    A large optics stand provides a risk free means of safely tilting large optics with ease and a method of safely tilting large optics with ease. The optics are supported in the horizontal position by pads. In the vertical plane the optics are supported by saddles that evenly distribute the optics weight over a large area.

  7. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (SRST) will perform a feasibility study and associated tasks over the course of two years on sites within the exterior boundaries of the Standing Rock Sioux...

  8. Summary report. Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Volume 4, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    `Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  9. Summary report, low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Vol. 4. No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    `Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts` is a supplement to `LLW Notes` and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  10. Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Presentation | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Presentation Test Methods Standing Technical Committee Presentation This presentation outlines the goals of the Test Methods Standing Technical Committee, as presented at the Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder meeting on February 29, 2012, in Austin, Texas. PDF icon test_methods_stc.pdf More Documents & Publications Standing Technical Committee Working Sessions Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - February 2012 Space

  11. Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Presentation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Presentation Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Presentation This presentation outlines the goals of the Water Heating Standing Technical Committee, as presented at the Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder meeting on February 29, 2012, in Austin, Texas. PDF icon hot_water_stc.pdf More Documents & Publications Standing Technical Committee Working Sessions Building America Expert Meeting: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated

  12. Space Conditioning Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Committee Strategic Plan Space Conditioning Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan This strategic plan document outlines the gaps, barriers, and opportunities identified by the Building America Space Conditioning Standing Technical Committee. PDF icon strategic_plan_space_cond_2_12.pdf More Documents & Publications Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan -

  13. Enterprise Assessments Lessons Learned From Targeted Reviews of Activity-Level Work Planning and Control … March 2016

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lessons Learned From Targeted Reviews of Activity-Level Work Planning and Control March 2016 Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... ii Executive Summary

  14. Free-standing oxide superconducting articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-12-14

    A substrate-free, free-standing epitaxially oriented superconductive film including a layer of a template material and a layer of a ceramic superconducting material is provided together with a method of making such a substrate-free ceramic superconductive film by coating an etchable material with a template layer, coating the template layer with a layer of a ceramic superconductive material, coating the layer of ceramic superconductive material with a protective material, removing the etchable material by an appropriate means so that the etchable material is separated from a composite structure including the template layer.

  15. Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Eneregy Nuclear Reactions At The

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Highest Microscopic Level: Annual Continuation And Progress Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Eneregy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level: Annual Continuation And Progress Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Eneregy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level: Annual Continuation And Progress Report Authors: Quaglioni, S Publication Date: 2012-08-28 OSTI Identifier: 1057712 Report Number(s): LLNL-TR-578293

  16. Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions At The

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Highest Microscopic Level:Annual Continuation And Progress Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Energy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level:Annual Continuation And Progress Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level:Annual Continuation And Progress Report Authors: Quaglioni, S Publication Date: 2013-02-21 OSTI Identifier: 1069008 Report Number(s): LLNL-TR-622512 DOE

  17. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  18. Free-standing oxide superconducting articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Xin D. (Greenbelt, MD); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Espanola, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A substrate-free, free-standing epitaxially oriented superconductive film including a layer of a template material and a layer of a ceramic superconducting material is provided together with a method of making such a substrate-free ceramic superconductive film by coating an etchable material with a template layer, coating the template layer with a layer of a ceramic superconductive material, coating the layer of ceramic superconductive material with a protective material, removing the etchable material by an appropriate means so that the etchable material is separated from a composite structure including the template lay This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  19. U.S. NRC CONFIRMATORY LEVEL 1 PRA SUCCESS CRITERIA ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Helton; Hossein Esmaili; Robert Buell

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions standardized plant analysis risk (SPAR) models are used to support a number of risk-informed initiatives. The fidelity and realism of these models are ensured through a number of processes including cross-comparison with industry models, review and use by a wide range of technical experts, and confirmatory analysis. This paper will describe a key activity in the latter arena. Specifically, this paper will describe MELCOR analyses performed to augment the technical basis for confirming or modifying specific success criteria of interest. The analyses that will be summarized provide the basis for confirming or changing success criteria in a specific 3-loop pressurized-water reactor and a Mark-I boiling-water reactor. Initiators that have been analyzed include loss-of-coolant accidents, loss of main feedwater, spontaneous steam generator tube rupture, inadvertent opening of a relief valve at power, and station blackout. For each initiator, specific aspects of the accident evolution are investigated via a targeted set of calculations (3 to 22 distinct accident analyses per initiator). Further evaluation is ongoing to extend the analyses conclusions to similar plants (where appropriate), with consideration of design and modeling differences on a scenario-by-scenario basis. This paper will also describe future plans.

  20. Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) Standing Technical Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategic Plan - February 2012 | Department of Energy Home Energy Management (AHEM) Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - February 2012 Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan - February 2012 This report outlines the gaps, barriers, and opportunities in automated home energy management tools, as outlined by the Building America Standing Technical Committee. PDF icon strategic_plan_ahem_2_12.pdf More Documents & Publications Automated

  1. Westinghouse Completes its AP1000® Test Stand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Completes its AP1000® Test Stand Last June, CASL launched its first Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA) Test Stand on the Westinghouse engineering computer cluster. Westinghouse selected the AP1000® pressurized water reactor (PWR) first core for the Test Stand simulation because its advanced design and operational features, and imminent deployment in units under construction, make it a particularly relevant and engaging application of CASL technology. The Westinghouse Test

  2. Building America Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation | Department of Energy Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Presentation Building America Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Presentation This presentation outlines the goals of the Building America program's Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee, as presented at the Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder meeting on February 29, 2012, in Austin, Texas. PDF icon analysis_methods_tools_stc.pdf More Documents &

  3. Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan This report outlines the gaps, barriers, and opportunities for residential building analysis tools and methods, as identified by the Building America Standing Technical Committee and updated in February 2012. PDF icon strategic_plan_analysis_methods_tools_2_12.pdf More Documents & Publications Analysis: Targeting Zero Net

  4. Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map References: Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies1 Resources PV for Rural Electrification...

  5. Compositions comprising free-standing two-dimensional nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barsoum, Michel W.; Gogotsi, Yury; Abdelmalak, Michael Naguib; Mashtalir, Olha

    2015-11-24

    The present invention is directed to compositions comprising free standing and stacked assemblies of two dimensional crystalline solids, and methods of making the same.

  6. Implementation Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan- February 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report outlines the gaps, barriers, and opportunities for implementing energy efficiency measures and practices in homes, as identified by the Building America Implementation Standing Technical Committee.

  7. Charge stands (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Charge stands Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392, 9.501785 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type...

  8. When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomolecules must be properly oriented to perform their biological function. In other words, the DNA literally must stand up to be counted. Understanding both the attachment...

  9. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for stand-off detection of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for stand-off detection of contraband Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) for ...

  10. Stand Alone Renewable Energy Systems Case Studies | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alone Renewable Energy Systems Case Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Stand Alone Renewable Energy Systems Case Studies AgencyCompany...

  11. Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Financing Mechanisms | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Stand-alone Renewable Energy-Financing Mechanisms AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus...

  12. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing Wave Structures Citation ... Research Org: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of ...

  13. Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Strategic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This report outlines the gaps, barriers, and opportunities for residential building analysis tools and methods, as identified by the Building America Standing Technical Committee...

  14. Status Update on Action 2b: Revision of DOE G 226.1-2 with new Guidance for Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Roger Claycomb, Work Control Program Manager, DOE Idaho Operations Office. Strengthen guidance and formality associated with contractor implementation and Federal monitoring of activity-level WP&C. Develop a DOE Guide on Federal oversight and evaluation of the effectiveness of Activity-Level WP&C.

  15. Forest stand development patterns in the southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copenheaver, C.A.; Matthews, J.M.; Showalter, J.M.; Auch, W.E.

    2006-07-01

    Composition of southern Appalachian forests are influenced by disturbance and topography. This study examined six stands in southwestern Virginia. Within each stand, a 0.3-ha plot was established, and all trees and saplings were measured and aged. Burned stands had lower densities of saplings and small trees, but appeared to have greater Quercus regeneration. Ice damage from the 1994 ice storm was most evident in Pinus strobus saplings. A stand on old coal-mine slag appeared to be experiencing a slower rate of succession than other sites. A variety of stand development patterns were observed, but one common pattern was that oak-hickory overstories had different species in their understory, which may indicate future changes in species composition.

  16. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW.

  17. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  18. When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stand up to be counted. Understanding both the attachment and orientation of DNA on gold surfaces was the goal of recent experiments performed at ALS Beamline 8.0.1 by an...

  19. Project Reports for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's (SRST) cultural identity demands that tribal development occur in a sustainable manner and in a manner protective of the tribe's natural resources to preserve them for following generations.

  20. Automated Home Energy Management Standing Technical Committee Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation outlines the goals of the Automated Home Energy Management Standing Technical Committee, as presented at the Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder meeting on February 29, 2012, in Austin, Texas.

  1. Status Update on Action 2c: Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) for Performing Assessments of Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Bradley K. Davy, Director, Office of Worker Safety and Health Assistance, HS. Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) for Performing Assessments of Activity- Level Work Planning and Control. DOE CRAD Development Approach.

  2. Standing Technical Committee Working Sessions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standing Technical Committee Working Sessions Standing Technical Committee Working Sessions The strategic planning process charts the course for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program's efforts to widely deploy new integrated packages of energy-saving measures in new and existing homes. Following are presentations from the program's 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting. PDF icon space_conditioning_stc.pdf PDF icon ahem_stc.pdf PDF icon hot_water_stc.pdf

  3. Standing by Ohio: Cleaning Up our Environmental Legacy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Standing by Ohio: Cleaning Up our Environmental Legacy Standing by Ohio: Cleaning Up our Environmental Legacy September 14, 2010 - 12:46pm Addthis Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman observes instrumentation in the X-333 Process Building Control Room during his visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. | DOE photo Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman observes instrumentation in the X-333 Process Building Control Room during his visit to the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. | DOE

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Stand-Off Experiment Range draft environmental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assessment available for public review and comment News Media Contact: Tim Jackson (208) 526-8484 For Immediate Release December 22, 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Stand-Off Experiment Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment Idaho Falls, ID � The U.S. Department of Energy today published a draft environmental assessment for a proposed Stand-Off Experiment Range at Idaho National Laboratory. �This range would represent an expansion of capability and

  5. Numerical modeling of a 2K J-T heat exchanger used in Fermilab Vertical Test Stand VTS-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Prabhat Kumar; Rabehl, Roger

    2014-07-01

    Fermilab Vertical Test Stand-1 (VTS-1) is in operation since 2007 for testing the superconducting RF cavities at 2 K. This test stand has single layer coiled finned tubes heat exchanger before J-T valve. A finite difference based thermal model has been developed in Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to study its thermal performance during filling and refilling to maintain the constant liquid level of test stand. The model is also useful to predict its performance under other various operating conditions and will be useful to design the similar kind of heat exchanger for future needs. Present paper discusses the different operational modes of this heat exchanger and its thermal characteristics under these operational modes. Results of this model have also been compared with the experimental data gathered from the VTS-1 heat exchanger and they are in good agreement with the present model.

  6.  Westinghouse Completes its AP1000 Test Stand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

     Westinghouse Completes its AP1000 Test Stand  VERA-CS Coupled Multi-physics Capability demonstrated in a Full-core Simulation  TVA provides Watts Bar Operating Data to Support Validation of CASL Tools  University of Michigan adds Depletion Capability to MPACT for VERA-CS  VERA Data Transfer Processes Provided by DTK  Alternate Coupling Algorithm Investigations Completed  Role of HPC in the Nuclear Power Industry  TVA Test Stand Launched November 2013 Volume 1, Issue 4

  7. When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print Wednesday, 31 May 2006 00:00 DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA chips" are revolutionizing biotechnology, allowing scientists to identify and count many DNA sequences simultaneously. They are the enabling technology for genomic-based medicine and are a critical component of advanced diagnostic systems for

  8. Audience/Panel Discussion: Sites Lesson Learned about Activity-level Work Planning and Control Using EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guideline

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Donna J. Governor, Deputy Dept Mgr for Planning & Integration, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory work planning and control lessons learned and audience/panel discussion on site's lessons learned about Activity-level Work Planning and Control using EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guideline Document.

  9. Independent Oversight Review of the Los Alamos Field Office Processes for Laboratory Oversight of Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, March 2014

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review of the Los Alamos Field Office Processes for Laboratory Oversight of Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation May 2011 March 2014 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope

  10. A stochastic method for stand-alone photovoltaic system sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, Claudia Valeria Tavora; Filho, Delly Oliveira; Martins, Jose Helvecio; Toledo, Olga Moraes

    2010-09-15

    Photovoltaic systems utilize solar energy to generate electrical energy to meet load demands. Optimal sizing of these systems includes the characterization of solar radiation. Solar radiation at the Earth's surface has random characteristics and has been the focus of various academic studies. The objective of this study was to stochastically analyze parameters involved in the sizing of photovoltaic generators and develop a methodology for sizing of stand-alone photovoltaic systems. Energy storage for isolated systems and solar radiation were analyzed stochastically due to their random behavior. For the development of the methodology proposed stochastic analysis were studied including the Markov chain and beta probability density function. The obtained results were compared with those for sizing of stand-alone using from the Sandia method (deterministic), in which the stochastic model presented more reliable values. Both models present advantages and disadvantages; however, the stochastic one is more complex and provides more reliable and realistic results. (author)

  11. When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA chips" are revolutionizing biotechnology, allowing scientists to identify and count many DNA sequences simultaneously. They are the enabling technology for genomic-based medicine and are a critical component of advanced diagnostic systems for medical and homeland security applications. Like digital chips, DNA

  12. When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA chips" are revolutionizing biotechnology, allowing scientists to identify and count many DNA sequences simultaneously. They are the enabling technology for genomic-based medicine and are a critical component of advanced diagnostic systems for medical and homeland security applications. Like digital chips, DNA

  13. When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When DNA Needs to Stand Up and Be Counted Print DNA microarrays are small metal, glass, or silicon chips covered with patterns of short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). These "DNA chips" are revolutionizing biotechnology, allowing scientists to identify and count many DNA sequences simultaneously. They are the enabling technology for genomic-based medicine and are a critical component of advanced diagnostic systems for medical and homeland security applications. Like digital chips, DNA

  14. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Standing-wave excited soft x-ray...

  15. The Cold Dark Matter Search test stand warm electronics card

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, Bruce; Hansen, Sten; Huber, Martin; Kiper, Terry; Rau, Wolfgang; Saab, Tarek; Seitz, Dennis; Sundqvist, Kyle; Mandic, Vuk; /Minnesota U.

    2010-11-01

    A card which does the signal processing for four SQUID amplifiers and two charge sensitive channels is described. The card performs the same functions as is presently done with two custom 9U x 280mm Eurocard modules, a commercial multi-channel VME digitizer, a PCI to GPIB interface, a PCI to VME interface and a custom built linear power supply. By integrating these functions onto a single card and using the power over Ethernet standard, the infrastructure requirements for instrumenting a Cold Dark Matter Search (CDMS) detector test stand are significantly reduced.

  16. Building America Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis Methods and Tools Standing Technical Committee Meeting February 29, 2012 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, Texas Housekeeping *E-mail Ben Polly, ben.polly@nrel.gov to be added to committee E-mail list *Open committee: Invite others! *Next call: Tuesday, April 17, 1:00 - 2:00 PM (ET) Today's Agenda 1. Committee Purpose and Goals (10 min) 2. Brainstorming Session (30 min) 3. Strategic Plan (20 min) 1. Overview 2. Progress Update 4. Next Steps and

  17. High Catalytic Activity of Au/CeOx/TiO2(110) Controlled by the Nature of the Mixed Metal Oxide at the Nanometer Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.; Graciani, J; Evans, J; Stacchiola, D; Ma, S; Liu, P; Nambu, A; Sanz, J; Hrbek, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Mixed-metal oxides play a very important role in many areas of chemistry, physics, materials science, and geochemistry. Recently, there has been a strong interest in understanding phenomena associated with the deposition of oxide nanoparticles on the surface of a second (host) oxide. Here, scanning tunneling microscopy, photoemission, and density-functional calculations are used to study the behavior of ceria nanoparticles deposited on a TiO2(110) surface. The titania substrate imposes nontypical coordination modes on the ceria nanoparticles. In the CeOx/TiO2(110) systems, the Ce cations adopt an structural geometry and an oxidation state (+3) that are quite different from those seen in bulk ceria or for ceria nanoparticles deposited on metal substrates. The increase in the stability of the Ce3+ oxidation state leads to an enhancement in the chemical and catalytic activity of the ceria nanoparticles. The codeposition of ceria and gold nanoparticles on a TiO2(110) substrate generates catalysts with an extremely high activity for the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (H2O + CO ? H2 + CO2) or for the oxidation of carbon monoxide (2CO + O2 ? 2CO2). The enhanced stability of the Ce3+ state is an example of structural promotion in catalysis described here on the atomic level. The exploration of mixed-metal oxides at the nanometer level may open avenues for optimizing catalysts through stabilization of unconventional surface structures with special chemical activity.

  18. Activation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response Services Activated At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CARLSBAD, N.M., 2/5/2014, 11:43 a.m. (MDT) - Emergency response services have been activated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The activation occurred as a result of an emergency incident at the site. More information will be provided as soon as the extent of the emergency is determined. The Joint Information Center (JIC), located at 4021 National Parks Highway, has been

  19. National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls In Construction | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls In Construction National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls In Construction June 2, 2014 - 1:54pm Addthis National Safety Stand-Down To Prevent Falls In Construction Falls are the number one cause of workplace fatalities in the construction industry, accounting for more than a third of all deaths in the construction industry. To address this important safety issue, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has scheduled a National Safety

  20. INL Stand-Off Experiment Range will support critical national security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    missions INL Stand-Off Experiment Range will support critical national security missions Idaho Falls, ID - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact stemming from an environmental assessment it performed to examine the potential environmental impacts of operating a Stand-Off Experiment Range at Idaho National Laboratory. "The Stand-Off Experiment Range will enable important research and development on linear accelerator-based systems for the detection

  1. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation: Establishment of Renewable Energy & Energy Development Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8540 fwasinzi@standingrock.org Establishment of Renewable Energy & Energy Development Office Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation OVERVIEW: BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO) STANDING ROCK ONE OF SEVEN RESERVATIONS OF THE GREAT SIOUX NATION LOCATED IN

  2. A high voltage test stand for electron gun qualification for LINACs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanmode, Yashwant D.; Mulchandani, J.; Acharya, M.; Bhisikar, A.; Singh, H.G.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2011-07-01

    An electron gun lest stand has been developed at RRCAT. The test stand consists of a high voltage pulsed power supply, electron gun filament supply, grid supply, UHV system and electron gun current measurement system. Several electron guns developed indigenously were evaluated on this test stand. The shielding is provided for the electron gun set up. Electron gun tests can be tested upto 55 kV with pulse width of 15 microsecs and pulse repetition rates up to 200 Hz. The technical details of the subsystems are furnished and results of performance of the test stand have been reported in this paper. (author)

  3. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will improve the capability of engineers to design heat pump systems that utilize surface water or standing column wells (SCW) as their heat sources and sinks.

  4. Off-Grid or Stand-Alone Renewable Energy Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Off-Grid or Stand-Alone Renewable Energy Systems Off-Grid or Stand-Alone Renewable Energy Systems Off-grid, or stand-alone, systems can be more cost-effective than connecting to the grid in remote locations. | Photo courtesy of Dave Parsons. Off-grid, or stand-alone, systems can be more cost-effective than connecting to the grid in remote locations. | Photo courtesy of Dave Parsons. For many people, powering their homes or small businesses using a small renewable energy system that is not

  5. A Test Stand for Ion Sources of Ultimate Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enparantza, R.; Uriarte, L.; Romano, P.; Alonso, J.; Ariz, I.; Egiraun, M.; Bermejo, F. J.; Etxebarria, V.; Lucas, J.; Del Rio, J. M.; Letchford, A.; Faircloth, D.; Stockli, M.

    2009-03-12

    The rationale behind the ITUR project is to perform a comparison between different kinds of H{sup -} ion sources using the same beam diagnostics setup. In particular, a direct comparison will be made in terms of the emittance characteristics of Penning Type sources such as those currently in use in the injector for the ISIS (UK) Pulsed Neutron Source and those of volumetric type such as that driving the injector for the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (TN, U.S.A.). The endeavour here pursued is thus to build an Ion Source Test Stand where virtually any type of source can be tested and its features measured and, thus compared to the results of other sources under the same gauge. It would be possible then to establish a common ground for effectively comparing different ion sources. The long term objectives are thus to contribute towards building compact sources of minimum emittance, maximum performance, high reliability-availability, high percentage of desired particle production, stability and high brightness. The project consortium is lead by Tekniker-IK4 research centre and partners are companies Elytt Energy and Jema Group. The technical viability is guaranteed by the collaboration between the project consortium and several scientific institutions, such the CSIC (Spain), the University of the Basque Country (Spain), ISIS (STFC-UK), SNS (ORNL-USA) and CEA in Saclay (France)

  6. System integration and performance of the EUV engineering test stand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.; Replogle, William C.; Stulen, Richard H.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Rockett, Paul D.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Jefferson, Karen L.; Leung, Alvin H.; Wronosky, John B.; Hale, Layton C.; Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.; Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude; Soufli, Regina; Spiller, Eberhard; Blaedel, Kenneth; Sommargren, Gary E.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Bokor, Jeffrey; Batson, Phillip J.; Attwood, David T.; Jackson, Keith H.; Hector, Scott D.; Gwyn, Charles W.; Yan, Pei-Yang; Yan, P.

    2001-03-01

    The Engineering Test Stand (ETS) is a developmental lithography tool designed to demonstrate full-field EUV imaging and provide data for commercial-tool development. In the first phase of integration, currently in progress, the ETS is configured using a developmental projection system, while fabrication of an improved projection system proceeds in parallel. The optics in the second projection system have been fabricated to tighter specifications for improved resolution and reduced flare. The projection system is a 4-mirror, 4x-reduction, ring-field design having a numeral aperture of 0.1, which supports 70 nm resolution at a k{sub 1} of 0.52. The illuminator produces 13.4 nm radiation from a laser-produced plasma, directs the radiation onto an arc-shaped field of view, and provides an effective fill factor at the pupil plane of 0.7. The ETS is designed for full-field images in step-and-scan mode using vacuum-compatible, magnetically levitated, scanning stages. This paper describes system performance observed during the first phase of integration, including static resist images of 100 nm isolated and dense features.

  7. Low-level radioactive waste form qualification testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohal, M.S.; Akers, D.W.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes activities that have already been completed as well as yet to be performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to develop a plan to quantify the behavior of radioactive low-level waste forms. It briefly describes the status of various tasks, including DOE approval of the proposed work, several regulatory and environmental related documents, tests to qualify the waste form, preliminary schedule, and approximate cost. It is anticipated that INEEL and Brookhaven National Laboratory will perform the majority of the tests. For some tests, services of other testing organizations may be used. It should take approximately nine months to provide the final report on the results of tests on a waste form prepared for qualification. It is anticipated that the overall cost of the waste quantifying service is approximately $150,000. The following tests are planned: compression, thermal cycling, irradiation, biodegradation, leaching, immersion, free-standing liquid tests, and full-scale testing.

  8. Demolition Begins at K-25's Last Section Standing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Begins at K-25's Last Section Standing Demolition Begins at K-25's Last Section Standing September 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Demolition work began today at the last section standing of the K-25 building at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Workers began tearing down the final six units of the mile-long Manhattan Project-era gaseous diffusion building that once was the largest building under one roof in the world. The original building was in the shape of a U. The

  9. Development of a Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction in Marine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engines | Department of Energy a Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction in Marine Diesel Engines Development of a Stand-Alone Urea-SCR System for NOx Reduction in Marine Diesel Engines Stand-alone urea SCR system was developed for marine diesel engines and showed a 50-percent reduction in NOx. PDF icon deer08_bedick.pdf More Documents & Publications Difficulty of Measuring Emissions from Heavy-Duty Engines Equipped with SCR and DPF Evaluation of 2010 Urea-SCR Technology for

  10. Stand characteristics and productivity potential of Indiana surface mines reclaimed under SMCRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groninger, J.W.; Fillmore, S.D.; Rathfon, R.A.

    2006-06-15

    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) addresses a wide range of environmental concerns. However, its impacts on forest stand development and productive potential have only recently been investigated. We surveyed the vegetation and forest productivity on 22 surface mine sites throughout the coal-bearing region of Indiana that were reclaimed to forest cover under the provisions of SMCRA 7-14 years prior to sampling. Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) and green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) were the most widely occurring tree species. Tall fescue and goldenrod were the most widely occurring nonarborescent species. Median site index (base age 50 for black oak) was 30 ft. Although satisfying forest cover stocking requirements for bond release, these reclaimed surface mines almost always displayed a level of productivity far below those of native forests typical of this region. Reclamation techniques differing from those used on these study sites are needed to restore forest productivity to surface-mined lands while still complying with SMCRA.

  11. Optimizing Inspection Parameters for Long Stand-Off Detection of SNM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Erik; Blackburn, Brandon; Hynes, Michael; Hausladen, Paul

    2011-12-13

    Detection of special nuclear material (SNM) at extended ranges (>100 m) through the utilization of high energy (>20 MeV) bremsstrahlung photons requires optimizing the structure and interrelation of irradiation (beam-on) and detection (counting) periods. Conventional inspection schemes at lower energies and smaller distances primarily operate by pulsing an accelerator at frequencies of 0.1-1 kHz while collecting emitted radiation from the target under inspection for the few milliseconds in between pulses. Simulation and experimental results for long stand-off scenarios with source photons >20 MeV, however, indicate that two primary phenomena--(1) induced photoneutrons in proximity to the accelerator and (2) beam induced activation of air and soil--preclude the use of conventional inspection schemes. By considering the time structure and magnitude of the beam-induced photon and neutron backgrounds, signals of interest from the target, and natural backgrounds, inspection schemes have been developed to maximize signal to noise ratios (SNR). Analysis of the data indicates that the highest SNR values are found with short (2-5 s) irradiations followed by a 1-2 s period of collecting emitted neutron and photon signatures.

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Stand-Alone Battery Thermal Management System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by DENSO International America at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about stand-alone...

  13. Experimental observation of standing wave effect in low-pressure very-high-frequency capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Jia; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-07-28

    Radial uniformity measurements of plasma density were carried out by using a floating double probe in a cylindrical (21?cm in electrode diameter) capacitive discharge reactor driven over a wide range of frequencies (27220 MHz). At low rf power, a multiple-node structure of standing wave effect was observed at 130?MHz. The secondary density peak caused by the standing wave effect became pronounced and shifts toward the axis as the driving frequency further to increase, indicative of a much more shortened standing-wave wavelength. With increasing rf power, the secondary density peak shift toward the radial edge, namely, the standing-wave wavelength was increased, in good qualitative agreement with the previous theory and simulation results. At higher pressures and high frequencies, the rf power was primarily deposited at the periphery of the electrode, due to the fact that the waves were strongly damped as they propagated from the discharge edge into the center.

  14. SEP Success Story: "Idle Free Systems" Does Not Stand Idly by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEP Success Story: "Idle Free Systems" Does Not Stand Idly by March 12, 2012 - 2:12pm ... loan. | Courtesy of Helios USA, LLC. SEP Success Story: Not a Long Time Ago in an Energy ...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Stand-Alone Battery Thermal Management System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by DENSO International America, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about stand-alone...

  16. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Marine Corps Beaufort Air Station's energy and water savings accomplishments. PDF icon usmc_energysavings.pdf More Documents & Publications Ameresco ESCO Qualification Sheet Energy Savings Performance Contract Success Stories Food and Drug Administration White Oak Campus Environmental Stewardship

  17. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Stand-off

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Furring in Deep Energy Retrofits | Department of Energy Stand-off Furring in Deep Energy Retrofits Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Stand-off Furring in Deep Energy Retrofits This research project, conducted by IBACOS and GreenHomes America, investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and

  18. Free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film and method for production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baughman, R.J.; Ginley, D.S.

    1982-09-09

    A process for producing a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film comprises growing a film of boron phosphide in a vertical growth apparatus on a metal substrate. The metal substrate has a coefficient of thermal expansion sufficiently different from that of boron phosphide that the film separates cleanly from the substrate upon cooling thereof, and the substrate is preferably titanium. The invention also comprises a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film for use in electronic device fabrication.

  19. Method for production of free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baughman, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Ginley, David S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A process for producing a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film comprises growing a film of boron phosphide in a vertical growth apparatus on a metal substrate. The metal substrate has a coefficient of thermal expansion sufficiently different from that of boron phosphide that the film separates cleanly from the substrate upon cooling thereof, and the substrate is preferably titanium. The invention also comprises a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film for use in electronic device fabrication.

  20. ADR Lunchtime Program: WHERE DO YOU STAND IN THE FEEDBACK LOOP? MAKE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEEDBACK WORK FOR YOU | Department of Energy WHERE DO YOU STAND IN THE FEEDBACK LOOP? MAKE FEEDBACK WORK FOR YOU ADR Lunchtime Program: WHERE DO YOU STAND IN THE FEEDBACK LOOP? MAKE FEEDBACK WORK FOR YOU This interactive session during Conflict Resolution Month will delve into the complex topic of giving and receiving feedback. The presenter - a preeminent trainer and coach - will discuss how to use our skills and knowledge to help people in organizations work together effectively on

  1. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, A.P.

    1984-02-21

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which vapor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  2. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grasso, Albert P.

    1986-01-01

    A liquid level detector for low pressure boilers. A boiler tank, from which apor, such as steam, normally exits via a main vent, is provided with a vertical side tube connected to the tank at the desired low liquid level. When the liquid level falls to the level of the side tube vapor escapes therethrough causing heating of a temperature sensitive device located in the side tube, which, for example, may activate a liquid supply means for adding liquid to the boiler tank. High liquid level in the boiler tank blocks entry of vapor into the side tube, allowing the temperature sensitive device to cool, for example, to ambient temperature.

  3. Stand Up of Uranium Capability for Swipe Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Watrous; Anthony Appelhans; Robert Hague; Tracy Houghton; John Olson

    2013-11-01

    The INL has established the capability to process and analyze swipe samples to determine if the amount of U and Pu present on equipment and facilities are at the level typical for natural background, to quantify their isotopic composition and to determine if any off-normal isotopic ratio present in the sample is statistically relevant. A previous report detailed this capability for Pu and preliminarily for U; this report describes the measurements and analysis that were performed to demonstrate the INL capability for U. To establish that a piece of equipment is not contaminated with the element to be sampled, a fabric swipe is used to collect a sample of the materials present on the surface. The swipes are then processed and analyzed to determine if Pu and U are present on the sample at levels above what is accepted as natural background and, for the case of U, whether the isotope ratios deviate from the accepted natural background levels. Both the method applied for chemical processing of the swipes to remove and isolate the U and Pu and the method used to analyze the extracts influences the sensitivity and specificity. Over the years various methods have been developed for processing and analyzing these types of samples; the gold standard for these measurements involves a lengthy and complex separation process followed by analysis using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). However, this method is expensive and time consuming, thus driving a need for a less complicated and more efficient method that provides the necessary level of sensitivity and specificity. Advances in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS) over the last decade have enabled analyses of U and Pu that rival that of TIMS. This, coupled with the potential for simplifying the extraction and separation process required for an ICPMS analysis, prompted the INLs development of methods that provide the analysis of swipes in a timely and efficient manner. U is present in the blank swipe material at nanogram (~2 x 10-9 g) levels for a typical sample, a level easily detected with ICPMS. The abundance of the isotopes ranges over 4 orders of magnitude for the naturally occurring 234U, 235U and 238U and a goal was set to be able to detect the presence of 236U at 6 orders of magnitude lower than the 238U. The 236U measurement is particularly important because the presence of 236U is a strong indicator that the uranium as been in a nuclear reactor. To demonstrate these capabilities the following sample types were used: blank swipe material, blank process reagents, swipe material spiked with a natural abundance U isotope standard, swipe material spiked with an environmental standard (Columbia River sediment), and swipes taken at various locations within the processing laboratories and the INL environment. This report summarizes the method used to extract the U from the swipe material, the ICPMS analyses that demonstrate the limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) for the U isotopes of interest, the precision of the measured isotope ratios and the dependence of precision on the quantity of U present, and the method proposed to determine if an off-normal ratio is statistically relevant.

  4. Independent Oversight Follow-up Review of Activity Level Implementation of Radiation Controls and Radiological Work Planning at the Materials and Fuels Complex of the Idaho Site, January 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Independent Oversight Follow-Up Review of Activity Level Implementation of Radiation Controls and Radiological Work Planning at the Materials and Fuels Complex of the Idaho Site January 2014 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0

  5. Method and device for stand-off laser drilling and cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Copley, John A. (Rte. 11, Box 1022, Fredericksburg, VA 22405); Kwok, Hoi S. (214 Bonner Hall, SUNY-Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260); Domankevitz, Yacov (214 Bonner Hall, SUNY-Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260)

    1989-09-26

    A device for perforating material and a method of stand-off drilling using a laser. In its basic form a free-running laser beam creates a melt on the target and then a Q-switched short duration pulse is used to remove the material through the creation of a laser detonation wave. The advantage is a drilling/cutting method capable of working a target at lengthy stand-off distance. The device may employ 2 lasers or a single one operated in a free-running/Q-switched dual mode.

  6. Secretary Moniz's Remarks to the Energy Standing Committee of the U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference of Mayors -- As Delivered | Department of Energy to the Energy Standing Committee of the U.S. Conference of Mayors -- As Delivered Secretary Moniz's Remarks to the Energy Standing Committee of the U.S. Conference of Mayors -- As Delivered January 21, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy It's good to be back here again this year, just as we were last year. And I hope and look forward to maybe doing this again as we continue to try to find

  7. L1:PAC.P6.04 Westinghouse Test Stand Technical Readiness Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L1:PAC.P6.04 Westinghouse Test Stand Technical Readiness Review Andrew Godfrey ORNL Completed: June 25, 2013 CASL-8-2013-01 -000 D Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Bldg. 5700, Room E309, MS 6003 P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6003 Email: casl-info@ornl.gov Date: 6/25/2013 To: Jess Gehin c: Erik Walker, Mark Baird, From: Andrew Godfrey Subject: Westinghouse Test Stand Technical Readiness Review Jess, I have completed a

  8. Immelt: GE Stands at Intersection of Physical, Digital | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Immelt: GE stands at the intersection of the physical, digital Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Immelt: GE stands at the intersection of the physical, digital GE's 2015 Annual Meeting of Shareowners was held Wednesday, April 22, in Oklahoma City, the location of GE's newest Global Research facility.

  9. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing Wave

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structures (Conference) | SciTech Connect Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing Wave Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing Wave Structures Authors: Dolgashev, V.A. ; Tantawi, S.G. ; Yeremian, A.D. ; Li, Z. ; /SLAC ; Higashi, Y. ; /KEK, Tsukuba ; Spataro, B. ; /LNF, Dafne Light Publication Date: 2014-08-05 OSTI Identifier: 1149343 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-16060 DOE Contract Number:

  10. Influence of CO sub 2 -HCO sub 3 sup minus levels and pH on growth, succinate production, and enzyme activities of Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuelov, N.S.; Lamed, R.; Lowe, S. ); Zeikus, J.G. Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing )

    1991-10-01

    Growth and succinate versus lactate production from glucose by Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens was regulated by the level of available carbon dioxide and culture pH. At pH 7.2, the generation time was almost doubled and extensive amounts of lactate were formed in comparison with growth at pH 6.2. The succinate yield and the yield of ATP per mole of glucose were significantly enhanced under excess-CO{sub 2}-HOC{sub 3}{sup {minus}} growth conditions and suggest that there exists a threshold level of Co{sub 2} for enhanced succinate production in A. succiniciproducens. Glucose was metabolized via the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas route, and phosphoenopyruvate carboxykinase levels increased while lactate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase levels decreased under excess-CO{sub 2}-HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} growth conditions. Kinetic analysis of succinate and lactate formation in continuous culture indicated that the growth rate-linked production rate coefficient (K) cells was much higher for succinate (7.2 versus 1.0 g/g of cells per h) while the non-growth-rate-related formation rate coefficient (K{prime}) was higher for lactate (1.1 versus 0.3 g/g of cells per h). The data indicate that A. succiniciproducens, unlike other succinate-producing anaerobes which also form propionate, can grow rapidly and form high final yields of succinate at pH 6.2 and with excess CO{sub 2}-HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} as a consequence of regulating electron sink metabolism.

  11. Design of RF Feed System for Standing-Wave Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2012-05-25

    We are investigating a standing wave accelerator structure that uses a rf feed to each individual cell. This approach minimizes rf power flow and electromagnetic energy absorbed by an rf breakdown. The objective of this work is a robust high-gradient (above 100 MV/m) X-band accelerator structure.

  12. Filament-strung stand-off elements for maintaining pane separation in vacuum insulating glazing units

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bettger, Kenneth J; Stark, David H

    2013-08-20

    A vacuum insulating glazing unit (VIGU) comprises first and second panes of transparent material, first and second anchors, a plurality of filaments, a plurality of stand-off elements, and seals. The first and second panes of transparent material have edges and inner and outer faces, are disposed with their inner faces substantially opposing one another, and are separated by a gap having a predetermined height. The first and second anchors are disposed at opposite edges of one pane of the VIGU. Each filament is attached at one end to the first anchor and at the other end to the second anchor, and the filaments are collectively disposed between the panes substantially parallel to one another. The stand-off elements are affixed to each filament at predetermined positions along the filament, and have a height substantially equal to the predetermined height of the gap such that the each stand-off element touches the inner surfaces of both panes. The seals are disposed about the edges of the panes, enclosing the stand-off elements within a volume between the panes from which the atmosphere may be evacuated to form a partial vacuum.

  13. Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    storage challenge | National Nuclear Security Administration national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library

  14. Design, installation, commissioning and operation of a beamlet monitor in the negative ion beam test stand at NIFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoni, V.; Agostinetti, P.; Brombin, M.; Cervaro, V.; Delogu, R.; Fasolo, D.; Franchin, L.; Ghiraldelli, R.; Molon, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G. Tollin, M.; Veltri, P.; De Muri, M.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Muraro, A.

    2015-04-08

    In the framework of the accompanying activity for the development of the two neutral beam injectors for the ITER fusion experiment, an instrumented beam calorimeter is being designed at Consorzio RFX, to be used in the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A), with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The main components of the instrumented calorimeter are one-directional carbon-fibre-carbon composite tiles. Some prototype tiles have been used as a small-scale version of the entire calorimeter in the test stand of the neutral beam injectors of the LHD experiment, with the aim of characterising the beam features in various operating conditions. The extraction system of the NIFS test stand source was modified, by applying a mask to the first gridded electrode, in order to isolate only a subset of the beamlets, arranged in two 35 matrices, resembling the beamlet groups of the ITER beam sources. The present contribution gives a description of the design of the diagnostic system, including the numerical simulations of the expected thermal pattern. Moreover the dedicated thermocouple measurement system is presented. The beamlet monitor was successfully used for a full experimental campaign, during which the main parameters of the source, mainly the arc power and the grid voltages, were varied. This contribution describes the methods of fitting and data analysis applied to the infrared images of the camera to recover the beamlet optics characteristics, in order to quantify the response of the system to different operational conditions. Some results concerning the beamlet features are presented as a function of the source parameters.

  15. Bay-Area National Labs Team to Tackle Long-Standing Automotive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen-Storage Challenge Bay-Area National Labs Team to Tackle Long-Standing Automotive Hydrogen-Storage Challenge - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering

  16. NREL: Technology Deployment - NREL's Long-Term Relationship with GSA Stands

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Test of Time NREL's Long-Term Relationship with GSA Stands the Test of Time News NREL Helps Federal Agencies Reach New Efficiency Targets Publications Plug-Load Control and Behavioral Change Research in GSA Office Buildings Sponsors U.S. General Services Administration Related Stories Strengthening Homeland Security through Sustainable Energy Alaska Native Village Benefits from Strategic Energy Planning Assistance U.S. Navy Yielding Valuable Results in Hawaii and Guam Fossil Fuel

  17. Consequences of stand age and species functional trait changes on ecosystem water use of forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewers, Brent; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mackay, D. Scott

    2011-07-22

    We tested whether using stomatal conductance could capture the dynamic in transpiration with forest age. To do this we by answered the question If we chose a reference stomatal conductance from one stand age of the entire chronosequence to put into a model, would modeled transpiration be biased from the other ages? with a resounding yes. We found that obtaining the right stomatal conductance was crucial for accurate models in two different chronosequences. This strongly suggests that stomatal conductance is the appropriate integrator of inter- and intra-species change in tree transpiration with forest age. If we had tried to use a single reference canopy stomatal conductance, it would not have been able to capture the variability in transpiration with stand age despite the suggestion that hydraulic limitation was consistently acting on the trees; the situation is even more complex in many boreal systems, where a transition to nonstomatal bryophytes may occur over the course of succession. Because we used a biophysical approach, even if our and other researchers chronosequences do not fit the assumptions, the results are still useful. Further, our synthesis of sap flux based estimates of tree transpiration showing a large dynamic suggest that our approach to modeling is crucial in the face of anthropogenic changes to forest age structure. We have now provided the framework for a mechanistically rigorous yet simple approach based on simple tree hydraulics to measuring and modeling stand transpiration with changing forest age and/or species composition.

  18. Step-edge-induced resistance anisotropy in quasi-free-standing bilayer chemical vapor deposition graphene on SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciuk, Tymoteusz [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Cakmakyapan, Semih; Ozbay, Ekmel [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Department of Physics, Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Bilkent, Ankara (Turkey); Caban, Piotr; Grodecki, Kacper; Pasternak, Iwona; Strupinski, Wlodek, E-mail: wlodek.strupinski@itme.edu.pl [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Krajewska, Aleksandra [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Szmidt, Jan [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-09-28

    The transport properties of quasi-free-standing (QFS) bilayer graphene on SiC depend on a range of scattering mechanisms. Most of them are isotropic in nature. However, the SiC substrate morphology marked by a distinctive pattern of the terraces gives rise to an anisotropy in graphene's sheet resistance, which may be considered an additional scattering mechanism. At a technological level, the growth-preceding in situ etching of the SiC surface promotes step bunching which results in macro steps ~10 nm in height. In this report, we study the qualitative and quantitative effects of SiC steps edges on the resistance of epitaxial graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. We experimentally determine the value of step edge resistivity in hydrogen-intercalated QFS-bilayer graphene to be ~190 ??m for step height hS = 10 nm and provide proof that it cannot originate from mechanical deformation of graphene but is likely to arise from lowered carrier concentration in the step area. Our results are confronted with the previously reported values of the step edge resistivity in monolayer graphene over SiC atomic steps. In our analysis, we focus on large-scale, statistical properties to foster the scalable technology of industrial graphene for electronics and sensor applications.

  19. Preparation and electrical transport properties of quasi free standing bilayer graphene on SiC (0001) substrate by H intercalation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Cui; Liu, Qingbin; Li, Jia; Lu, Weili; He, Zezhao; Cai, Shujun; Feng, Zhihong

    2014-11-03

    We investigate the temperature dependent electrical transport properties of quasi-free standing bilayer graphene on 4H-SiC (0001) substrate. Three groups of monolayer epitaxial graphene and corresponding quasi-free standing bilayer graphene with different crystal quality and layer number homogeneity are prepared. Raman spectroscopy and atomic-force microscopy are used to obtain their morphologies and layer number, and verify the complete translation of buffer layer into graphene. The highest room temperature mobility reaches 3700 cm{sup 2}/V·s for the quasi-free standing graphene. The scattering mechanism analysis shows that poor crystal quality and layer number inhomogeneity introduce stronger interacting of SiC substrate to the graphene layer and more impurities, which limit the carrier mobility of the quasi-free standing bilayer graphene samples.

  20. Impact of TRU waste storage on a stand-alone MRS facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, R.E.; Ganley, J.T.

    1983-11-01

    A study was made of the impact of transuranic (TRU) waste storage on the conceptual design of a stand-alone Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The amount of TRU waste requiring storage is related to the startup dates of the reprocessing plant and the final repository. Current technology is available to store TRU waste from lightwater reactor (LWR) fuel reprocessing and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel refabrication safely and economically. Unit capital costs for TRU waste storage are in the range 7 to 10 $/kg of heavy metal. 7 references, 13 figures, 16 tables.

  1. Simulation studies on the standing and traveling wave thermoacoustic prime movers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skaria, Mathew; Rasheed, K. K. Abdul; Shafi, K. A.; Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, Upendra

    2014-01-29

    Thermoacoustic systems have been a focus of recent research due to its structural simplicity, high reliability due to absence of moving parts, and can be driven by low grade energy such as fuel, gas, solar energy, waste heat etc. There has been extensive research on both standing wave and traveling wave systems. Towards the development of such systems, simulations can be carried out by several methods such as (a) solving the energy equation, (b) enthalpy flow model, (c) DeltaEC, a free software available from LANL, USA (d) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) etc. We present here the simulation studies of standing wave and traveling wave thermoacoustic prime movers using CFD and DeltaEC. The CFD analysis is carried out using Fluent 6.3.26, incorporating the necessary boundary conditions with different working fluids at different operating pressures. The results obtained by CFD are compared with those obtained using DeltaEC. Also, the CFD simulation of the thermoacoustically driven refrigerator is presented.

  2. Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

  3. Fabrication of layered self-standing diamond film by dc arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G. C.; Dai, F. W.; Li, B.; Lan, H.; Askari, J.; Tang, W. Z.; Lu, F. X.

    2007-01-15

    Layered self-standing diamond films, consisting of an upper layer, buffer layer, and a lower layer, were fabricated by fluctuating the ratio of methane to hydrogen in high power dc arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition. There were micrometer-sized columnar diamond crystalline grains in both upper layer and lower layer. The size of the columnar diamond crystalline grains was bigger in the upper layer than that in the lower layer. The orientation of the upper layer was (110), while it was (111) for the lower layer. Raman results showed that no sp{sup 3} peak shift was found in the upper layer, but it was found and blueshifted in the lower layer. This indicated that the internal stress within the film body could be tailored by this layered structure. The buffer layer with nanometer-sized diamond grains formed by secondary nucleation was necessary in order to form the layered film. Growth rate was over 10 {mu}m/h in layered self-standing diamond film fabrication.

  4. Standing electromagnetic solitons in hot ultra-relativistic electron-positron plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidari, E.; Aslaninejad, M.; Eshraghi, H.; Rajaee, L.

    2014-03-15

    Using a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model, we investigate standing relativistic bright solitons in hot electron-positron plasmas. The positron dynamics is taken into account. A set of nonlinear coupled differential equations describing the evolution of electromagnetic waves in fully relativistic two-fluid plasma is derived analytically and solved numerically. As a necessary condition for the existence of standing solitons the system should be relativistic. For the case of ultra-relativistic plasma, we investigate non-drifting bright solitary waves. Detailed discussions of the acceptable solutions are presented. New single hump non-trivial symmetric solutions for the scalar potential were found, and single and multi-nodal symmetric and anti-symmetric solutions for the vector potential are presented. It is shown that for a fixed value of the fluid velocity excited modes with more zeros in the profile of the vector potential show a higher magnitude for the scalar potential. An increase in the plasma fluid velocity also increases the magnitude of the scalar potential. Furthermore, the Hamiltonian and the first integral of the system are given.

  5. Jet engine test stand and soil stockpile. 107th fighter-interceptor group Niagara Falls Air Force Reserve Station, New York Air National Guard, Niagara Falls, New York. Final site assessment addendum report, 9-12 February 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    THis report outlines additional site assessment activities which were conducted at the Jet Engine Test Stand (JETS), Building No. 852 located at the 197th Fighter-Interceptor Group, Niagara Falls Air National Guard Station (NFANGS), Air Force Reserve Facility (AFRF) approximately 6 miles northeast of Niagara Falls, New York (Figure 1.1). The additional site assessment activities were performed in response to requests, dated February 9 and 12, 1993, by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) to further investigate contaminated soil and groundwater conditions at the JETS and at an existing soil stockpile (Appendix A).

  6. Axial and transverse acoustic radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in Bessel beam standing wave tweezers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitri, F.G.

    2014-03-15

    The axial and transverse radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in the acoustical field of Bessel beams of standing waves are evaluated. The three-dimensional components of the time-averaged force are expressed in terms of the beam-shape coefficients of the incident field and the scattering coefficients of the fluid sphere using a partial-wave expansion (PWE) method. Examples are chosen for which the standing wave field is composed of either a zero-order (non-vortex) Bessel beam, or a first-order Bessel vortex beam. It is shown here, that both transverse and axial forces can push or pull the fluid sphere to an equilibrium position depending on the chosen size parameter ka (where k is the wave-number and a the spheres radius). The corresponding results are of particular importance in biophysical applications for the design of lab-on-chip devices operating with Bessel beams standing wave tweezers. Moreover, potential investigations in acoustic levitation and related applications in particle rotation in a vortex beam may benefit from the results of this study. -- Highlights: The axial and transverse forces on a fluid sphere in acoustical Bessel beams tweezers are evaluated. The attraction or repulsion to an equilibrium position in the standing wave field is examined. Potential applications are in particle manipulation using standing waves.

  7. Method for tracking the location of mobile agents using stand-off detection technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Bender, Susan Fae Ann (Tijeras, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, Mark S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-12-26

    A method for tracking the movement and position of mobile agents using light detection and ranging (LIDAR) as a stand-off optical detection technique. The positions of the agents are tracked by analyzing the time-history of a series of optical measurements made over the field of view of the optical system. This provides a (time+3-D) or (time+2-D) mapping of the location of the mobile agents. Repeated pulses of a laser beam impinge on a mobile agent, such as a bee, and are backscattered from the agent into a LIDAR detection system. Alternatively, the incident laser pulses excite fluorescence or phosphorescence from the agent, which is detected using a LIDAR system. Analysis of the spatial location of signals from the agents produced by repeated pulses generates a multidimensional map of agent location.

  8. Wave forces on an array of oscillating water column type free standing wave energy caissons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neelamani, S.; Thiruvenkatasamy, K.

    1995-12-31

    The wave induced in-line forces on a 1:50 scale model of an array of Multi resonant Oscillating Water Column (MOWC) type free standing wave energy caisson were experimentally investigated. A range of hydrodynamic parameters with different damping of oscillating water column (OWC) chamber and various center to center spacings between the caissons were used. In general, the force on the MOWC caisson array is two times that of a vertical wall, for maximum damping of OWC chamber. Reduction of damping of the OWC air chamber reduces the force on the array of caissons. With reduced damping, forces on OWC array can even be smaller than that the ones on a vertical wall. For smaller center to center (C/C) spacing between the caissons with respect to its harbor width, OWC array acts like a perforated breakwater, attracting smaller wave forces and for higher C/C spacing, it behaves like a vertical wall.

  9. Level Diagram Format Choice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Which format should I use? There is no clear-cut answer to this question -- different solutions work better in different situations. In an effort to help you decide which will work best for you, we provide a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the three available formats. GIF: GIF stands for Graphic Interchange Format. It was developed by CompuServe as a device-independent way to store pictures. The files are well-compressed, so download time is relatively short. Most web browsers

  10. TCP Final Report: Measuring the Effects of Stand Age and Soil Drainage on Boreal Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Goulden

    2007-05-02

    This was a 6-year research project in the Canadian boreal forest that focused on using field observations to understand how boreal forest carbon balance changes during recovery from catastrophic forest fire. The project began with two overarching goals: (1) to develop techniques that would all the year round operation of 7 eddy covariance sites in a harsh environment at a much lower cost than had previously been possible, and (2) to use these measurements to determine how carbon balance changes during secondary succession. The project ended in 2006, having accomplished its primary objectives. Key contributions to DOE during the study were: (1) Design, test, and demonstrate a lightweight, fully portable eddy flux system that exploits several economies of scale to allow AmeriFlux-quality measurements of CO{sub 2} exchange at many sites for a large reduction in cost (Goulden et al. 2006). (2) Added seven year-round sites to AmeriFlux, at a relatively low per site cost using the Eddy Covariance Mesonet approach (Goulden et al. 2006). These data are freely available on the AmeriFlux web site. (3) Tested and rejected the conventional wisdom that forests lose large amounts of carbon during the first decade after disturbance, then accumulate large amounts of carbon for {approx}several decades, and then return to steady state in old age. Rather, we found that boreal forests recovers quickly from fire and begins to accumulate carbon within {approx}5 years after disturbance. Additionally, we found no evidence that carbon accumulation declines in old stands (Goulden et al. 2006, Goulden et al. in prep). (4) Tested and rejected claims based on remote sensing observations (for example, Myneni et al 1996 using AVHRR) that regions of boreal forest have changed markedly in the last 20 years. Rather, we assembled a much richer data set than had been used in the past (eddy covariance observations, tree rings, biomass, NPP, AVHRR, and LandSat), which we used to establish that the forests in our study region have remained largely constant over the last 20 years after accounting for the effects of stand age and succession (McMillen et al. in review).

  11. Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well Heat Pump Systems (DE-EE0002961)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitler, J.D.; Culling, J.R.; Conjeevaram, K.; Ramesh, M.; Selvakumar, M.

    2012-11-30

    Ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems are perhaps the most widely used sustainable heating and cooling systems, with an estimated 1.7 million installed units with total installed heating capacity on the order of 18 GW. They are widely used in residential, commercial, and institutional buildings. Standing column wells (SCW) are one form of ground heat exchanger that, under the right geological conditions, can provide excellent energy efficiency at a relatively low capital cost. Closed-loop surface water heat pump (SWHP) systems utilize surface water heat exchangers (SWHE) to reject or extract heat from nearby surface water bodies. For building near surface water bodies, these systems also offer a high degree of energy efficiency at a low capital cost. However, there have been few design tools available for properly sizing standing column wells or surface water heat exchangers. Nor have tools for analyzing the energy consumption and supporting economics-based design decisions been available. The main contributions of this project lie in providing new tools that support design and energy analysis. These include a design tool for sizing surface water heat exchangers, a design tool for sizing standing column wells, a new model of surface water heat pump systems implemented in EnergyPlus and a new model of standing column wells implemented in EnergyPlus. These tools will better help engineers design these systems and determine the economic and technical feasibility.

  12. Parametric study of flow patterns behind the standing accretion shock wave for core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamada, Shoichi, E-mail: wakana@heap.phys.waseda.ac.jp [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-05-10

    In this study, we conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations systematically to investigate the flow patterns behind the accretion shock waves that are commonly formed in the post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. Adding small perturbations to spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows, we compute the subsequent evolutions to find what flow pattern emerges as a consequence of hydrodynamical instabilities such as convection and standing accretion shock instability for different neutrino luminosities and mass accretion rates. Depending on these two controlling parameters, various flow patterns are indeed realized. We classify them into three basic patterns and two intermediate ones; the former includes sloshing motion (SL), spiral motion (SP), and multiple buoyant bubble formation (BB); the latter consists of spiral motion with buoyant-bubble formation (SPB) and spiral motion with pulsationally changing rotational velocities (SPP). Although the post-shock flow is highly chaotic, there is a clear trend in the pattern realization. The sloshing and spiral motions tend to be dominant for high accretion rates and low neutrino luminosities, and multiple buoyant bubbles prevail for low accretion rates and high neutrino luminosities. It is interesting that the dominant pattern is not always identical between the semi-nonlinear and nonlinear phases near the critical luminosity; the intermediate cases are realized in the latter case. Running several simulations with different random perturbations, we confirm that the realization of flow pattern is robust in most cases.

  13. Solar photovoltaic applications seminar: design, installation and operation of small, stand-alone photovoltaic power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    This seminar material was developed primarily to provide solar photovoltaic (PV) applied engineering technology to the Federal community. An introduction to photoconductivity, semiconductors, and solar photovoltaic cells is included along with a demonstration of specific applications and application identification. The seminar details general systems design and incorporates most known information from industry, academia, and Government concerning small solar cell power system design engineering, presented in a practical and applied manner. Solar PV power system applications involve classical direct electrical energy conversion and electric power system analysis and synthesis. Presentations and examples involve a variety of disciplines including structural analysis, electric power and load analysis, reliability, sizing and optimization; and, installation, operation and maintenance. Four specific system designs are demonstrated: water pumping, domestic uses, navigational and aircraft aids, and telecommunications. All of the applications discussed are for small power requirement (under 2 kilowatts), stand-alone systems to be used in remote locations. Also presented are practical lessons gained from currently installed and operating systems, problems at sites and their resolution, a logical progression through each major phase of system acquisition, as well as thorough design reviews for each application.

  14. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO₃) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO₄) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO₄ the film exhibits thermal instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO₄ increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO₄. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO₄ concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO₄ promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO₄ adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.

  15. Description of the stand-damage model: Part of the gypsy moth life system model. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colbert, J.J.; Sheehan, K.A.

    1995-08-16

    This document describes the structure, organization, and mathematical formulations for the Stand-Damage Model and the Biological basis for these formulations. Growth, mortality, and regeneration are modeled along with the effects of user-prescribed defoliation and stand-management actions. The appendices provide a full description of the logic and mathematics in the form of code listings, structure charts, and files.

  16. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO₃) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO₄) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO₄ the film exhibits thermalmore » instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO₄ increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO₄. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO₄ concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO₄ promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO₄ adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.« less

  17. Solving The Long-Standing Problem Of Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions At The Highest Microscopic Level. Annual Continuation And Progress Report, August 15, 2014 -- August 14, 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaglioni, Sofia

    2015-03-19

    The aim of this project is to develop a comprehensive framework that will lead to a fundamental description of both structural properties and reactions of light nuclei in terms of constituent protons and neutrons interacting through nucleon-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) forces. This project will provide the research community with the theoretical and computational tools what will enable: an accurate prediction for fusion reactions that power stars and Earth-based fusion facilities; an improved description of the spectroscopy of exotic nuclei, including light Borromean systems; and, a fundamental understanding of the three-nucleon force in nuclear reaction and nuclei at the drip line.

  18. Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

  19. Level III Mentoring Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Level III applicants must be mentored (minimum of six months) by a Level III or IV FPD or demonstrate equivalency (see below Competency 3.12.2 in the PMCDP's CEG). A formal mentoring agreement must...

  20. Company Level Imports Archives

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Company Level Imports Company Level Imports Archives 2015 Imports by Month January XLS February XLS March XLS April XLS May XLS June XLS July XLS August XLS September XLS October...

  1. Tables of Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy Levels The Image Map below will direct you to the table of energy levels PDF format only for that particular nuclide from the most recent publication found within...

  2. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation Feasibility Study Supporting Wind Development and Establishment of Renewable Energy and Energy Development Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (Washee Zee) 701-854-3437 fwasinzi@standingrock.org Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation  BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION  SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE  EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE  WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY  ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO)  WIND FEASIBILITY STUDY  OCETI SAKOWIN POWER PROJECT  ONE OF SEVEN RESERVATIONS OF THE GREAT SIOUX NATION

  3. Basis to demonstrate compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for the Stand-off Experiments Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Sandvig

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis and the documentation to demonstrate general compliance with the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) 40 CFR 61 Subpart H, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, (the Standard) for outdoor linear accelerator operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-off Experiments Range (SOX). The intent of this report is to inform and gain acceptance of this methodology from the governmental bodies regulating the INL.

  4. One-step fabrication of free-standing flexible membranes reinforced with self-assembled arrays of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grilli, S.; Coppola, S.; Vespini, V.; Pagliarulo, V.; Ferraro, P.; Nasti, G.; Carfagna, C.

    2014-10-13

    Here, we report on a single step approach for fabricating free-standing polymer membranes reinforced with arrayed self-assembled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs are self-assembled spontaneously by electrode-free DC dielectrophoresis based on surface charge templates. The electrical charge template is generated through the pyroelectric effect onto periodically poled lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals. A thermal stimulus enables simultaneously the self-assembly of the CNTs and the cross-linking of the host polymer. Examples of thin polydimethylsiloxane membranes reinforced with CNT patterns are shown.

  5. Tiltmeter leveling mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA); Boro, Carl O. (Milpitas, CA); Farris, Alvis (late of Byron, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A tiltmeter device having a pair of orthogonally disposed tilt sensors that are levelable within an inner housing containing the sensors. An outer housing can be rotated to level at least one of the sensor pair while the inner housing can be rotated to level the other sensor of the pair. The sensors are typically rotated up to about plus or minus 100 degrees. The device is effective for measuring tilts in a wide range of angles of inclination of wells and can be employed to level a platform containing a third sensor.

  6. ARM - Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Past Sea Level Data Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data Objective The objective of this activity is to feel the changes of sea level in the past. Materials Each student or group of students will need the following: Graph paper Ruler Pen and

  7. Interaction of cesium adatoms with free-standing graphene and graphene-veiled SiO2 surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2015-04-21

    The interaction of Cs adatoms with mono- or bi-layered graphene (MLG and BLG), either free-standing or on a SiO2 substrate, was investigated using density functional theory. The most stable adsorption sites for Cs are found to be hollow sites on both graphene sheets and graphene-veiled SiO2(0001). In addition, larger dipole moments are created when a MLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate is used for adsorption of Cs atoms compared to the adsorption on free-standing MLG, due to charge transfer occurring between the MLG and the SiO2 substrate. For the adsorption of Cs on BLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate, these differences are smoothed out and themore » binding energies corresponding to different sites are nearly degenerate; smaller dipole moments created by the Cs adatoms on BLG compared to MLG are also predicted.« less

  8. Interaction of cesium adatoms with free-standing graphene and graphene-veiled SiO2 surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Biedermann, Grant W.

    2015-04-21

    The interaction of Cs adatoms with mono- or bi-layered graphene (MLG and BLG), either free-standing or on a SiO2 substrate, was investigated using density functional theory. The most stable adsorption sites for Cs are found to be hollow sites on both graphene sheets and graphene-veiled SiO2(0001). In addition, larger dipole moments are created when a MLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate is used for adsorption of Cs atoms compared to the adsorption on free-standing MLG, due to charge transfer occurring between the MLG and the SiO2 substrate. For the adsorption of Cs on BLG-veiled SiO2(0001) substrate, these differences are smoothed out and the binding energies corresponding to different sites are nearly degenerate; smaller dipole moments created by the Cs adatoms on BLG compared to MLG are also predicted.

  9. AVTA Voltec AC Level 1 and Level 2 Charging Systems Testing Results |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy AVTA Voltec AC Level 1 and Level 2 Charging Systems Testing Results AVTA Voltec AC Level 1 and Level 2 Charging Systems Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The

  10. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, M.E.; Sullivan, W.H.

    1985-01-29

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge. 2 figs.

  11. Precision liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Field, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, William H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A precision liquid level sensor utilizes a balanced R. F. bridge, each arm including an air dielectric line. Changes in liquid level along one air dielectric line imbalance the bridge and create a voltage which is directly measurable across the bridge.

  12. Geometry of a naked singularity created by standing waves near a Schwarzschild horizon, and its application to the binary black hole problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandel, Ilya

    2005-10-15

    The most promising way to compute the gravitational waves emitted by binary black holes (BBHs) in their last dozen orbits, where post-Newtonian techniques fail, is a quasistationary approximation introduced by Detweiler and being pursued by Price and others. In this approximation the outgoing gravitational waves at infinity and downgoing gravitational waves at the holes' horizons are replaced by standing waves so as to guarantee that the spacetime has a helical Killing vector field. Because the horizon generators will not, in general, be tidally locked to the holes' orbital motion, the standing waves will destroy the horizons, converting the black holes into naked singularities that resemble black holes down to near the horizon radius. This paper uses a spherically symmetric, scalar-field model problem to explore in detail the following BBH issues: (i) The destruction of a horizon by the standing waves. (ii) The accuracy with which the resulting naked singularity resembles a black hole. (iii) The conversion of the standing-wave spacetime (with a destroyed horizon) into a spacetime with downgoing waves by the addition of a 'radiation-reaction field'. (iv) The accuracy with which the resulting downgoing waves agree with the downgoing waves of a true black-hole spacetime (with horizon). The model problem used to study these issues consists of a Schwarzschild black hole endowed with spherical standing waves of a scalar field, whose wave frequency and near-horizon energy density are chosen to match those of the standing gravitational waves of the BBH quasistationary approximation. It is found that the spacetime metric of the singular, standing-wave spacetime, and its radiation-reaction-field-constructed downgoing waves are quite close to those for a Schwarzschild black hole with downgoing waves--sufficiently close to make the BBH quasistationary approximation look promising for non-tidally-locked black holes.

  13. Effect of coarse woody debris manipulation on soricid and herpetofaunal communities in upland pine stands of the southeastern coastal plain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Justin, Charles

    2009-04-01

    Abstract -The majority of studies investigating the importance of coarse woody debris (CWD) to forest- floor vertebrates have taken place in the Pacific Northwest and southern Appalachian Mountains, while comparative studies in the southeastern Coastal Plain are lacking. My study was a continuation of a long-term project investigating the importance of CWD as a habitat component for shrew and herpetofaunal communities within managed pine stands in the southeastern Coastal Plain. Results suggest that addition of CWD can increase abundance of southeastern and southern short-tailed shrews. However, downed wood does not appear to be a critical habitat component for amphibians and reptiles. Rising petroleum costs and advances in wood utilization technology have resulted in an emerging biofuels market with potential to decrease CWD volumes left in forests following timber harvests. Therefore, forest managers must understand the value of CWD as an ecosystem component to maintain economically productive forests while conserving biological diversity.

  14. Creating an EPICS Based Test Stand Development System for a BPM Digitizer of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is required to deliver a high quality electron beam for producing coherent X-rays. As a result, high resolution beam position monitoring is required. The Beam Position Monitor (BPM) digitizer acquires analog signals from the beam line and digitizes them to obtain beam position data. Although Matlab is currently being used to test the BPM digitizer?s functions and capability, the Controls Department at SLAC prefers to use Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems (EPICS). This paper discusses the transition of providing similar as well as enhanced functionalities, than those offered by Matlab, to test the digitizer. Altogether, the improved test stand development system can perform mathematical and statistical calculations with the waveform signals acquired from the digitizer and compute the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the signals. Finally, logging of meaningful data into files has been added.

  15. Coherent cooling of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave: Wave function and stochastic trajectory approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argonov, V. Yu.

    2014-11-15

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field can suppress packet splitting for some atoms whose specific velocities are in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We demonstrate and explain this effect numerically and analytically. We also demonstrate that the modulated field can not only trap but also cool the atoms. We perform a numerical experiment with a large atomic ensemble having wide initial velocity and energy distributions. During the experiment, most of atoms leave the wave while the trapped atoms have a narrow energy distribution.

  16. Pseudopotential study of electron-hole excitations in colloidal free-standing InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, A. J.; Zunger, Alex

    2000-01-15

    Excitonic spectra are calculated for free-standing, surface passivated, InAs quantum dots using atomic pseudopotentials for the single-particle states and screened Coulomb interactions for the two-body terms. We present an analysis of the single particle states involved in each excitation in terms of their angular momenta and Bloch-wave parentage. We find that (i) in agreement with other pseudopotential studies of CdSe and InP quantum dots, but in contrast to k{center_dot}p calculations, the dot wave functions exhibit strong odd-even angular momentum envelope function mixing (e.g., s with p) and large valence-conduction coupling. (ii) While the pseudopotential approach produced very good agreement with experiment for free-standing, colloidal CdSe and InP dots, and for self-assembled (GaAs-embedded) InAs dots, here the predicted spectrum does not agree well with the measured (ensemble average over dot sizes) spectra. (1) Our calculated excitonic gap is larger than the photoluminescence measured one, and (2) while the spacing between the lowest excitons is reproduced, the spacings between higher excitons is not fit well. Discrepancy (1) could result from surface state emission. As for (2), agreement is improved when account is taken of the finite-size distribution in the experimental data. (iii) We find that the single-particle gap scales as R{sup -1.01} (not R{sup -2}), that the screened (unscreened) electron-hole Coulomb interaction scales as R{sup -1.79} (R{sup -0.7}), and that the excitonic gap scales as R{sup -0.9}. These scaling laws are different from those expected from simple models. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning & Control Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work...

  18. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotz, Dennis M. (North Augusta, SC); Hinz, William R. (Augusta, GA)

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  19. Liquid-level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    Aliquid level sensor is described which has a pair of upright conductors spaced by an insulator defining a first high resistance path between the conductors. An electrically conductive path is interposed between the upright conductors at a discrete location at which liquid level is to be measured. It includes a liquid accessible gap of a dimension such that the electrical resistance across the conductor when the gap is filled with the liquid is detectably less than when the gap is emptied. The conductor might also be physically altered by temperature changes to serve also as an indicator of elevated temperature.

  20. Active-R filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  1. Level: National Data;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources; Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Total Energy Source First Use Total United States Coal 1,433 Natural Gas 5,911 Net Electricity 2,851 Purchases 2,894 Transfers In 20 Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy 4 Sales and Transfers Offsite 67 Coke and Breeze 272

  2. Company Level Imports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    All Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports Company Level Imports With Data for December 2015 | Release Date: February 29, 2016 | Next Release Date: March 31, 2016 | XLS Previous Issues Month: December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 June 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 February 2015 January 2015 prior issues Go December 2015 Import Highlights Monthly data on the origins of crude oil imports in December 2015 show that two countries, Canada and Saudi Arabia,

  3. Memorandum, NNSA Activity Level Work Planning & Control Processes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 23, 2006 Memorandum from Thomas P. D'Agostino, Assistant Deputy Administrator for ... More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1211-2014 Order Module--DOE G 450.4-1B, INTEGRATED ...

  4. Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    by the DNFSB to determine common trends, causal factors, or systematic weaknesses ... to determine if there are any common trends or areas of weaknesses with WP&C. Based ...

  5. High Level Overview of DOE Biomass Logistics II Project Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologies that will reduce biomass supply chain costs while meeting quality ... Monitoring & Improvement * Task G. Performance Evaluation & Baseline Development * ...

  6. DOE Handbook: Implementing Activity-level Work Planning & Control...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Work Planning & Control at Nuclear Facilities May 16, 2013 Presenter: James Winter, NA-00-10 Topics Covered: Project Justification Statement Improved Implementation of...

  7. Level: National Data; Row: General Energy-Management Activities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 8.1 Number of ... 10,646 709 3,132 165 Electricity Load Control 154,406 ... 496 1,748 297 Technical Information (k) 152,416 17,751 8,431 ...

  8. Independent Oversight Targeted Review of Activity-Level Implementation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ......... 2 4.0 Methodology ......B-1 i Acronyms ACRR Annular Core Research Reactor AHCF Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility ALARA ...

  9. Liquid level detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tshishiku, Eugene M. (Augusta, GA)

    2011-08-09

    A liquid level detector for conductive liquids for vertical installation in a tank, the detector having a probe positioned within a sheath and insulated therefrom by a seal so that the tip of the probe extends proximate to but not below the lower end of the sheath, the lower end terminating in a rim that is provided with notches, said lower end being tapered, the taper and notches preventing debris collection and bubble formation, said lower end when contacting liquid as it rises will form an airtight cavity defined by the liquid, the interior sheath wall, and the seal, the compression of air in the cavity preventing liquid from further entry into the sheath and contact with the seal. As a result, the liquid cannot deposit a film to form an electrical bridge across the seal.

  10. Switch wear leveling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  11. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities- High and Intermediate Level...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    necessary for the safe examination, analysis and testing of highly radioactive materials. Skilled operators stand safely outside of each cell and use manipulator arms to...

  12. Standing spin-wave mode structure and linewidth in partially disordered hexagonal arrays of perpendicularly magnetized sub-micron Permalloy discs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, N. Kostylev, M.; Stamps, R. L.

    2014-09-21

    Standing spin wave mode frequencies and linewidths in partially disordered perpendicular magnetized arrays of sub-micron Permalloy discs are measured using broadband ferromagnetic resonance and compared to analytical results from a single, isolated disc. The measured mode structure qualitatively reproduces the structure expected from the theory. Fitted demagnetizing parameters decrease with increasing array disorder. The frequency difference between the first and second radial modes is found to be higher in the measured array systems than predicted by theory for an isolated disc. The relative frequencies between successive spin wave modes are unaffected by reduction of the long-range ordering of discs in the array. An increase in standing spin wave resonance linewidth at low applied magnetic fields is observed and grows more severe with increased array disorder.

  13. Network Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statistics Network Activity Network Activity PDSF Network Uplinks to NERSC (dual 10 Gbps) NERSC Uplink to ESnet Last edited: 2011-03-31 22:20:59...

  14. Stand-Off Furring in Deep Energy Retrofits, Syracuse, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stand-Off Furring in Deep Energy Retrofits Syracuse, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Deep Energy Retrofit Location: Syracuse, NY Project Partners: GreenHomes America, www.greenhomesamerica.com/ IBACOS, www.ibacos.com Building Component: Building envelope Application: Single-family retrofit Year Tested: 2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of energy efficiency measure (including labor): $23,518 Projected energy savings: Approximately 50% overall savings Exterior

  15. Fault-tolerant three-level inverter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, John; Xu, Longya; Bhargava, Brij B.

    2006-12-05

    A method for driving a neutral point clamped three-level inverter is provided. In one exemplary embodiment, DC current is received at a neutral point-clamped three-level inverter. The inverter has a plurality of nodes including first, second and third output nodes. The inverter also has a plurality of switches. Faults are checked for in the inverter and predetermined switches are automatically activated responsive to a detected fault such that three-phase electrical power is provided at the output nodes.

  16. Activation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the reeptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

  17. Filter Replacement Activities Complete

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2014 Filter Replacement Activities Complete This week, filter replacements were safely and successfully completed. The high efficiency filters on the second filter unit were replaced on June 20, and employees replaced the moderate filters on June 23. Decontamination and cleanup of the work areas in the filter building will complete all activities currently scheduled for WIPP's ventilation system. Employees are also restoring higher airflow levels now that both filter units are operational.

  18. Low-level waste feed staging plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Certa, P.J.; Grams, W.H.; McConville, C.M.; L. W. Shelton, L.W.; Slaathaug, E.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12

    The `Preliminary Low-Level Waste Feed Staging Plan` was updated to reflect the latest requirement in the Tank Waste Remediation Privatization Request for Proposals (RFP) and amendments. The updated plan develops the sequence and transfer schedule for retrieval of DST supernate by the management and integration contractor and delivery of the staged supernate to the private low-activity waste contractors for treatment. Two DSTs are allocated as intermediate staging tanks. A transfer system conflict analysis provides part of the basis for determining transfer system upgrade requirements to support both low-activity and high-level waste feed delivery. The intermediate staging tank architecture and retrieval system equipment are provided as a planning basis until design requirements documents are prepared. The actions needed to successfully implement the plan are identified. These include resolution of safety issues and changes to the feed envelope limits, minimum order quantities, and desired batch sizes.

  19. Radiation Levels in Real Time?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels in Real Time? There's an App for That Gamma radiation levels in the southern Nevada area will soon be accessible around the world at the touch of a finger. Makers of the ...

  20. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  1. Seventh annual DOE LLWMP participants' information meeting. DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The following sessions were held: International Low-Level Waste Management Activities; Low-Level Waste Disposal; Characteristics and Treatment of Low-Level Waste; Environmental Monitoring and Performance; Greater Confinement and Alternative Disposal Methods; Low-Level Waste Management; Corrective Measures; Performance Prediction and Assessment; and Siting New Defense and Commercial Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities.

  2. Utility-Scale Wind & Solar Power in the U.S.: Where it stands in 2013 and its future going forward

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility-Scale Wind & Solar Power in the U.S.: Where it stands in 2014 and its future going forward; and will Storage enter the picture soon? Mike O'Sullivan Senior Vice President November 5, 2014 2 Goals for Today's Discussion * Inform and educate * Be interesting and provide value to each of you professionally without getting into too much technical or engineering jargon * Not be an infomercial for NextEra Energy * Get to Q&A quickly as that is always more interesting than powerpoint

  3. Radiation Levels in Real Time?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels in Real Time? There's an App for That! Gamma radiation levels in the southern Nevada area will soon be accessible around the world at the touch of a finger. Makers of the cell phone application EcoData: Radiation are expanding their global network of radiation monitoring stations to include up-to-date readings from the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) based out of southern Nevada. The CEMP was established in 1981 to monitor manmade and natural radiation levels surrounding

  4. Effect of Sea Level Rise

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan Areas September 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Pilot Study on the Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan Areas August 2014 Effect of Sea Level Rise on Energy Infrastructure in Four Major Metropolitan Areas Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy September 2014 i Table of Contents 1.

  5. Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Transport Refrigeration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transport Refrigeration Units Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Transport Refrigeration Units This project discusses a CARB Level 2+ verified active regeneration ...

  6. Disposal of low-level and low-level mixed waste: audit report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-03

    The Department of Energy (Department) is faced with the legacy of thousands of contaminated areas and buildings and large volumes of `backlog` waste requiring disposal. Waste management and environmental restoration activities have become central to the Department`s mission. One of the Department`s priorities is to clean up former nuclear weapons sites and find more effective and timely methods for disposing of nuclear waste. This audit focused on determining if the Department was disposing of low-level and low-level mixed waste in the most cost-effective manner.

  7. Highly c-axis oriented GaN films grown on free-standing diamond substrates for high-power devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bian, J.M., E-mail: jmbian@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Qin, F.W.; Wang, J.; Pan, L. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, J.M. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Y.; Bai, Y.Z. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Du, G.T. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} GaN films are deposited on diamond substrates by ECR-PEMOCVD. {yields} Influence of deposition temperature on the properties of samples is investigated. {yields} Properties of GaN films are dependent on the deposition temperature. -- Abstract: GaN films with highly c-axis preferred orientation are deposited on free-standing thick diamond films by low temperature electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition (ECR-PEMOCVD). The TMGa and N{sub 2} are applied as precursors of Ga and N, respectively. The quality of as-grown GaN films are systematically investigated as a function of deposition temperature by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Hall Effect measurement (HL), room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the dense and uniformed GaN films with highly c-axis preferred orientation are successfully achieved on free-standing diamond substrates under optimized deposition temperature of 400 {sup o}C, and the room temperature PL spectra of the optimized GaN film show a intense ultraviolet near band edge emission and a weak yellow luminescence. The obtained GaN/diamond structure has great potential for the development of high-power semiconductor devices due to its excellent heat dissipation nature.

  8. Catalyst activator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdon, Mark H. (Midland, MI); Nickias, Peter N. (Midland, MI); Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Schwartz, David J. (Lake Jackson, TX)

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  9. Low-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as low-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter IV.

  10. High-Level Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

  11. BETO Active Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETO Active Project Management Bioenergy Technologies Office - Program Management Review 6/25/15 Liz Moore Technology Manager eere.energy.gov Program Managers * Manages portfolio within their technology area * Establishes technical and cost goals * Strategic planning for technology area * Budget preparation/justification for technology portfolio * Identifies needs for workshops and FOAs * Oversees portfolio reviews including high-level project status Technology Managers * Plans/conducts

  12. Development of the front end test stand and vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses negative hydrogen ion sources at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Perkins, M.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Gabor, C.; Back, J.

    2014-02-15

    The ISIS pulsed spallation neutron and muon facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK uses a Penning surface plasma negative hydrogen ion source. Upgrade options for the ISIS accelerator system demand a higher current, lower emittance beam with longer pulse lengths from the injector. The Front End Test Stand is being constructed at RAL to meet the upgrade requirements using a modified ISIS ion source. A new 10% duty cycle 25 kV pulsed extraction power supply has been commissioned and the first meter of 3 MeV radio frequency quadrupole has been delivered. Simultaneously, a Vessel for Extraction and Source Plasma Analyses is under construction in a new laboratory at RAL. The detailed measurements of the plasma and extracted beam characteristics will allow a radical overhaul of the transport optics, potentially yielding a simpler source configuration with greater output and lifetime.

  13. Mini-lidar sensor for the remote stand-off sensing of chemical/biological substances and method for sensing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Mark D.; Sedlacek, Arthur J.

    2003-08-19

    A method and apparatus for remote, stand-off, and high efficiency spectroscopic detection of biological and chemical substances. The apparatus including an optical beam transmitter which transmits a beam having an axis of transmission to a target, the beam comprising at least a laser emission. An optical detector having an optical detection path to the target is provided for gathering optical information. The optical detection path has an axis of optical detection. A beam alignment device fixes the transmitter proximal to the detector and directs the beam to the target along the optical detection path such that the axis of transmission is within the optical detection path. Optical information gathered by the optical detector is analyzed by an analyzer which is operatively connected to the detector.

  14. High pressure liquid level monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

    1984-01-01

    A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  15. Level indicator for pressure vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-04-28

    A liquid-level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic-field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal-processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

  16. Energy Level Diagrams A=12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Available in the following years: (1990), (1985), (1980), (1975), (1968), (1959) A=12 Energy Level Diagrams from (1990AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 12Be (48 KB) 12B (93 KB) 12C (129 KB) 12N (63 KB) Isobar diagram (91 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 12Be (30 KB) 12B (52 KB) 12C (72 KB) 12N (40 KB) Isobar diagram (57 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 12Be (1.39 MB) 12B (1.80 MB) 12C (1.89 MB) 12N (1.66 MB) Isobar diagram (1.75 MB) A=12 Energy Level Diagrams from (1985AJ01) GIF

  17. Energy Level Diagrams A=13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Available in the following years: (1991), (1986), (1981), (1976), (1970), (1959) A=13 Energy Level Diagrams from (1991AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 13B (53 KB) 13C (115 KB) 13N (107 KB) Isobar diagram (94 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 13B (35 KB) 13C (63 KB) 13N (56 KB) Isobar diagram (56 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 13B (1.5 MB) 13C (1.7 MB) 13N (1.4 MB) Isobar diagram (1.5 MB) A=13 Energy Level Diagrams from (1986AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 13B (72 KB) 13C

  18. Energy Level Diagrams A=15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Available in the following years: (1991), (1986), (1981), (1976), (1970), (1959) A=15 Energy Level Diagrams from (1991AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 15C (67 KB) 15N (114 KB) 15O (106 KB) Isobar diagram (100 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 15C (43 KB) 15N (69 KB) 15O (59 KB) Isobar diagram (58 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 15C (1.82 MB) 15N (1.98 MB) 15O (1.67 MB) Isobar diagram (1.83 MB) A=15 Energy Level Diagrams from (1986AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 15C (52 KB)

  19. Energy Level Diagrams A=16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Available in the following years: (1993), (1986), (1982), (1977), (1971), (1959) A=16 Energy Level Diagrams from (1993TI07) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 16C (223 KB) 16N (274 KB) 16O (176 KB) 16F (106 KB) Isobar diagram (190 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 16C (154 KB) 16N (71 KB) 16O (178 KB) 16F (108 KB) Isobar diagram (266 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 16C (542 KB) 16N (430 KB) 16O (178 KB) 16F (357 KB) Isobar diagram (190 KB) A=16 Energy Level Diagrams from (1986AJ04) GIF

  20. Energy Level Diagrams A=17

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Available in the following years: (1993), (1986), (1982), (1977), (1971), (1959) A=17 Energy Level Diagrams from (1993TI07) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 17N (104 KB) 17O (148 KB) 17F (155 KB) Isobar diagram (82 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 17N (107 KB) 17O (141 KB) 17F (147 KB) Isobar diagram (90 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 17N (107 KB) 17O (141 KB) 17F (147 KB) Isobar diagram (90 KB) A=17 Energy Level Diagrams from (1986AJ04) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 17N (76 KB)

  1. Energy Level Diagrams A=18

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Available in the following years: (1995), (1987), (1983), (1978), (1972), (1959) A=18 Energy Level Diagrams from (1995TI07) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 18N (34 KB) 18O (97 KB) 18F (89 KB) 18Ne (56 KB) Isobar diagram (87 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 18N (13 KB) 18O (56 KB) 18F (54 KB) 18Ne (36 KB) Isobar diagram (50 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 18N (13 KB) 18O (1.98 MB) 18F (1.40 MB) 18Ne (1.64 MB) Isobar diagram (1.79 MB) A=18 Energy Level Diagrams from (1987AJ02) GIF

  2. Energy Level Diagrams A=19

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 Available in the following years: (1995), (1987), (1983), (1978), (1972), (1959) A=19 Energy Level Diagrams from (1995TI07) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 19O (50 KB) 19F (99 KB) 19Ne (53 KB) Isobar diagram (65 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 19O (34 KB) 19F (63 KB) 19Ne (35 KB) Isobar diagram (43 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 19O (1.60 MB) 19F (1.82 MB) 19Ne (1.26 MB) Isobar diagram (1.55 MB) A=19 Energy Level Diagrams from (1987AJ02) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 19O (204

  3. Energy Level Diagrams A=20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 Available in the following years: (1998), (1987), (1983), (1978), (1972), (1959) A=20 Energy Level Diagrams from (1998TI06) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 20O (47 KB) 20F (61 KB) 20Ne (75 KB) 20Na (61 KB) Isobar diagram (73 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 20O (31 KB) 20F (40 KB) 20Ne (51 KB) 20Na (41 KB) Isobar diagram (47 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 20O (1.44 MB) 20F (1.45 MB) 20Ne (1.38 MB) 20Na (1.75 MB) Isobar diagram (1.73 MB) A=20 Energy Level Diagrams from (1987AJ02) GIF

  4. Energy Level Diagrams A=5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Available in the following years: (2002), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=5 Energy Level Diagrams from (2002TI10) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 5He (28 KB) 5Li (28 KB) Isobar diagram (20 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 5He (40 KB) 5Li (40 KB) Isobar diagram (36 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 5He (1.7 MB) 5Li (1.7 MB) Isobar diagram (1.6 MB) A=5 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 5He (67 KB) 5Li (70 KB) Isobar diagram (55 KB) PDF

  5. Energy Level Diagrams A=6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Available in the following years: (2002), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=6 Energy Level Diagrams from (2002TI10) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 6He (98 KB) 6Li (98 KB) 6Be (98 KB) Isobar Diagram (130 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 6He (65 KB) 6Li (65 KB) 6Be (33 KB) Isobar Diagram (65 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 6He (1.5 MB) 6Li (1.5 MB) 6Be (1.3 MB) Isobar Diagram (1.7 MB) A=6 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 6He (50 KB)

  6. Energy Level Diagrams A=7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Available in the following years: (2002), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=7 Energy Level Diagrams from (2002TI10) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 7He (65 KB) 7Li (130 KB) 7Be (65 KB) Isobar Diagram (65 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 7He (35 KB) 7Li (65 KB) 7Be (65 KB) Isobar Diagram (65 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 7He (1.7 MB) 7Li (1.8 MB) 7Be (1.6 MB) Isobar Diagram (1.6 MB) A=7 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 7Li (80 KB)

  7. Energy Level Diagrams A=8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Available in the following years: (2004), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=8 Energy Level Diagrams from (2004TI06) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 8He (20 KB) 8Li (194 KB) 8Be (44 KB) 8B (24 KB) Isobar diagram (36 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 8He (28 KB) 8Li (703 KB) 8Be (60 KB) 8B (32 KB) Isobar diagram (48 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 8He (1.7 MB) 8Li (1.1 MB) 8Be (1.5 MB) 8B (1.4 MB) Isobar diagram (1.5 MB) A=8 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF

  8. High temperature liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01

    A length of metal sheathed metal oxide cable is perforated to permit liquid access to the insulation about a pair of conductors spaced close to one another. Changes in resistance across the conductors will be a function of liquid level, since the wetted insulation will have greater electrical conductivity than that of the dry insulation above the liquid elevation.

  9. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  10. Report on Separate Disposal of Defense High- Level Radioactive Waste

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Separate Disposal of Defense High- Level Radioactive Waste March 2015 [This page left blank.] i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Purpose This report considers whether a separate repository for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from atomic energy defense activities ("Defense HLW Repository") is "required" within the meaning of Section 8(b)(2) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). In 1985, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and President Reagan considered this

  11. Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Next-Generation Data Management and Analysis Environment (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy Next-Generation Data Management and Analysis Environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy Next-Generation Data Management and Analysis Environment This summary report describes data management and visualization activities in the Advanced Simulation and

  12. AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Aerovironment AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes

  13. AVTA: PLUGLESS Level 2 Wireless Charging Testing Results | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy PLUGLESS Level 2 Wireless Charging Testing Results AVTA: PLUGLESS Level 2 Wireless Charging Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from testing

  14. Paleoclimatic significance of lake level fluctuations in the Lahontan Basin. [Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, L.V.

    1980-08-01

    An energy flux balance model has been developed which treats evaporation as a function of air temperature, surface water temperature, precipitable water aloft, the amount, height, and type of sky cover, and the optical air mass. The model has been used to estimate the mean historical evaporation rate for Pyramid Lake, Nevada, using as input climatic data from the Reno area averaged over the period 1950 to 1975. Estimated and measured values of the mean annual evaporation rate were found to be in good agreement. The model was used to simulate changes in the level, the surface area and the volume of paleo Lake Lahontan. In particular, possible climatic states responsible for past high stands (1270 and 1330 m) were investigated. A conservative range of discharge values was used in the calculations. Results of the simulations indicate the fundamental importance of sky cover in the creation and destruction of large lake systems.

  15. B Plant low level waste system integrity assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the report of the integrity assessment activities for the B Plant low level waste system. The assessment activities were in response to requirements of the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC), 173-303-640. This integrity assessment report supports compliance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order interim milestone target action M-32-07-T03.

  16. Home refinishing, lead paint, and infant blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinowitz, M.; Leviton, A.; Bellinger, D.

    1985-04-01

    The blood lead levels of 249 infants were measured semi-annually from birth to two years of age; the home paint was sampled and any recent home refinishing activity recorded. Mean blood lead from birth to age 2 years did not vary systematically with age but did correlate significantly with the amount of lead in the indoor paint. Refinishing activity in homes with high lead paint was associated with elevations of blood lead averaging 69 per cent.

  17. Levelized Power Generation Cost Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-04-30

    LPGC is a set of nine microcomputer programs for estimating power generation costs for large steam-electric power plants. These programs permit rapid evaluation using various sets of economic and technical ground rules. The levelized power generation costs calculated may be used to compare the relative economics of nuclear and coal-fired plants based on life-cycle costs. Cost calculations include capital investment cost, operation and maintenance cost, fuel cycle cost, decommissioning cost, and total levelized power generationmore » cost. These programs can be used for quick analyses of power generation costs using alternative economic parameters, such as interest rate, escalation rate, inflation rate, plant lead times, capacity factor, fuel prices, etc. The two major types of electric generating plants considered are pressurized water reactor (PWR) and pulverized coal-fired plants. Data are also provided for the Large Scale Prototype Breeder (LSPB) type liquid metal reactor.« less

  18. Energy Level Diagrams A=9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Available in the following years: (2004), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=9 Energy Level Diagrams from (2004TI06) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 9Li (24 KB) 9Be (44 KB) 9B (36 KB) 9C (20 KB) Isobar diagram (36 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 9Li (36 KB) 9Be (60 KB) 9B (48 KB) 9C (28 KB) Isobar diagram (56 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 9Li (1.7 MB) 9Be (1.7 MB) 9B (1.6 MB) 9C (1.7 MB) Isobar diagram (1.8 MB) A=9 Energy Level Diagrams from (1988AJ01) GIF (Graphic

  19. Energy Level Diagrams A=4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Available in the following year: (1992) A=4 Energy Level Diagrams from (1992TI02) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 4H (38 KB) 4He (90 KB) 4Li (36 KB) Isobar diagram (60 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 4H (26 KB) 4He (47 KB) 4Li (24 KB) Isobar diagram (36 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 4H (1.32 MB) 4He (1.79 MB) 4Li (1.13 MB) Isobar diagram (1.54 MB

  20. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program DOE, NREL, and ORNL Team Presented by Keith Knoll Work supported by DOE/EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation meeting May 19, 2009 Kevin Stork Vehicle Technologies Program Shab Fardanesh and Joan Glickman Office of the Biomass Program This presentation does not contain any proprietary or classified information Project ID: ft_05_knoll Collaborators Kevin Stork DOE OVT Shab Fardanesh DOE OBP Joan Glickman DOE OBP Wendy Clark

  1. Universal single point liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-27

    A liquid level detector comprises a thermistor and circuitry for determining electrically if the thermistor is wet or dry and additionally, and continuously, if the thermistor is open or shorted. The voltage across the thermistor is filtered to remove low frequency electrical noise, then compared with a reference low voltage to determine if shorted and to a transition voltage chosen to be between the thermistor's normal wet and dry voltages to determine if the thermistor is wet or dry. The voltage is also compared to the supply voltage using a CMOS gate circuit element to determine if the thermistor is open. The gate passes both faults on to an LED to signal that a fault condition exists or indicates by another LED the wet or dry condition of the thermistor. A pump may be activated through a relay if the thermistor tests wet or dry, as desired. 1 figure.

  2. Universal single point liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (353 Church Rd., Beech Island, SC 29842)

    1992-01-01

    A liquid level detector comprises a thermistor and circuitry for determining electrically if the thermistor is wet or dry and additionally, and continuously, if the thermistor is open or shorted. The voltage across the thermistor is filtered to remove low frequency electrical noise, then compared with a reference low voltage to determine if shorted and to a transition voltage chosen to be between the thermistor's normal wet and dry voltages to determine if the thermistor is wet or dry. The voltage is also compared to the supply voltage using a CMOS gate circuit element to determine if the thermistor is open. The gate passes both faults on to an LED to signal that a fault condition exists or indicates by another LED the wet or dry condition of the thermistor. A pump may be activated through a relay if the thermistor tests wet or dry, as desired.

  3. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  4. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.G.

    1993-11-16

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

  5. Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, James G. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

  6. Low level tank waste disposal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-09-29

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

  7. Load Leveling Battery System Costs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-10-12

    SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer's monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer's peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer's side of themore » meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer's load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.« less

  8. Energy Level Diagrams A=10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Available in the following years: (2004), (1988), (1984), (1979), (1974), (1966), (1959) A=10 Energy Level Diagrams from (2004TI06) GIF (Graphic Interchange Format): 10He (16 KB) 10Li (20 KB) 10Be (36 KB) 10B (44 KB) γ transitions for 10B (32 KB) 10C (20 KB) Isobar diagram (40 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 10He (16 KB) 10Li (24 KB) 10Be (48 KB) 10B (56 KB) γ transitions for 10B (44 KB) 10C (28 KB) Isobar diagram (56 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 10He (1.6 MB) 10Li (1.6 MB) 10Be

  9. Energy Level Diagrams A=11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Available in the following years: (2012), (1990), (1985), (1980), (1975), (1968), (1959) A=11 Energy Level Diagrams from (2012KE01) PNG (Graphic Interchange Format): 11Li (26 KB) 11Be (66 KB) 11Li decay scheme (95 KB) 11B (147 KB) 11C (109 KB) 11N (25 KB) Isobar diagram (74 KB) PDF (Portable Document Format): 11Li (28 KB) 11Be (126 KB) 11Li decay scheme (185 KB) 11B (287 KB) 11C (185 KB) 11N (28 KB) Isobar diagram (245 KB) EPS (Encapsulated Postscript): 11Li (1807 KB) 11Be (2213 KB) 11Li decay

  10. Transition Helmholtz free energy, entropy, and heat capacity of free-standing smectic films in water: A mean-field treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Śliwa, Izabela; Zakharov, A. V.

    2014-11-21

    Using the extended McMillan's mean field approach with anisotropic forces a study of both the structural and thermodynamic properties of free-standing smectic film (FSSF) in water on heating to the isotropic temperature is carried out numerically. By solving the self-consistent nonlinear equations for the order parameters, we obtained that the smectic-A-isotropic (AI) transition occurs through the series of layer-thinning transitions causing the films to thin in the stepwise manner as the temperature is increased above the bulk smectic-A-isotropic temperature T{sub AI}(bulk). With enhanced pair interactions in the bounding layers, the smectic-isotropic transition corresponds to smectic melting of the central layers. The effects of surface “enhanced” pair interactions in the bounding layers and of film thickness on the orientational and translational order parameters, the Helmholtz free energy and entropy, as well as the temperature dependence of the heat capacity of FSSFs, have also been investigated. Reasonable agreement between the theoretically predicted and the experimentally obtained – by means of optical microscopy and ellipsometry techniques – data of the temperature when the thin decylcyanobiphenyl smectic film immersing in water ruptures has been obtained.

  11. A survey of cavity-nesting bees and wasps in loblolly pine stands of the Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, S.; Hanula, J., L.

    2004-03-10

    Horn, Scott, and James L. Hanula. 2004. A survey of cavity-nesting bees and wasps in loblolly pine stands of the Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina. 39(3): 464-469. Abstract: In recent years concern over widespread losses in biodiversity has grown to include a possible decline of many native pollinators, primarily bees. Factors such as habitat fragmentation, agricultural practices, use of pesticides, the introduction of invasive species, or changes in land use may negatively impact these vital organisims. Most reported studies show that human impacts on pollinators are overwhelmingly negative. Reductions in pollinator populations may profoundly impact plant population dynamics and ecosystem function. Little baseline data exists on the diversity and relative abundance of bees and wasps in southern forests. The objective of this study was to develop a simple, effective method of surveying cavity-nesting bees and wasps and to determine species diversity in mature forests of loblolly pine, the most widely planted tree species in the southern United States.

  12. Radiation May Indirectly Impair Growth Resulting in Reduced Standing Height via Subclinical Inflammation in Atomic-Bomb Survivors Exposed at Young Ages

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nakashima, Eiji; Neriishi, Kazuo; Hsu, Wan-Ling

    2015-01-01

    For youngmore » atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivors, A-bomb radiation’s (total) effect on standing height is thought to comprise the sum of direct effect and indirect effect via inflammation. With the data of five inflammatory markers—white blood cell count, sialic acid, corrected erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), α 1 globulin, and α 2 globulin—obtained in adulthood during the period 1988 to 1992, a summary inflammatory index was constructed as a surrogate for the five subclinical inflammatory markers. For 3,327 A-bomb survivors exposed at ages of less than 25 years, a structural equation model was analyzed to measure direct radiation effects on adult height as well as mediating effect of radiation via inflammation on the height after adjustment for other risk factors, smoking, cancer, inflammatory disease, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. The mediation proportion of the radiation effect on height via inflammation was approximately 5% for both sexes for all ages, and indirect dose effects via inflammation were statistically significant for both sexes combined and for females exposed at ages 0 to 5 years. Indirect dose effects for all ages via sialic acid, corrected ESR, and α 2 globulin were marginally significant for both sexes combined and for females. These proportions are likely underestimated.« less

  13. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  14. Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD, RAP March 6, 2013 Presented by: John Morse DEEP VADOSE ZONE ACTIVITIES Page 2 Deep Vadose Zone Areas Page 3 Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities FY 2014 Fieldwork Began in 2011 Page 4 Deep Vadose Zone Field Activities, Continued Page 5 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 Cumulative Gallons Removed Weekly Gallons Removed Perched Water Removal Shut down to address increased contamination levels and replace submersible pump Page 6 0

  15. Program Secretarial Office Name Certification Level

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Secretarial Office Name Certification Level Original Date of Certification EE BUMBACA,PRISCILLA B Level I 1/25/2011 EE COLLETTE,GREGORY D Level II 3/13/2009 EE DINS,RANDALL S Level II 8/31/2011 EE GRAHAM,MATT E Level III 9/26/2012 EE SWEENEY,ROBIN L Level I 11/21/2008 EIA LOW,JAMES O Level I 10/14/2009 EIA SNOOK,JEFFREY G Level I 1/22/2010 EM ABDUL,WAHED NMN Level III 6/27/2008 EM ADAMS,KAREN M Level I 7/31/2009 EM ADAMS,VINCENT NMN Level III 12/8/2006 EM APPENZELLER-WING,JANET L Level III

  16. Report on Separate Disposal of Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Report on Separate Disposal of Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste Report on Separate Disposal of Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste This report considers whether a separate repository for high-level radioactive waste resulting from atomic energy defense activities is "required" within the meaning of Section 8(b)(2) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. PDF icon Report on Separate Disposal of Defense High-Level Radioactive Waste More Documents &

  17. Modeling and low-level waste management: an interagency workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, C.A.; Stratton, L.E.

    1980-01-01

    The interagency workshop on Modeling and Low-Level Waste Management was held on December 1-4, 1980 in Denver, Colorado. Twenty papers were presented at this meeting which consisted of three sessions. First, each agency presented its point of view concerning modeling and the need for models in low-level radioactive waste applications. Second, a larger group of more technical papers was presented by persons actively involved in model development or applications. Last of all, four workshops were held to attempt to reach a consensus among participants regarding numerous waste modeling topics. Abstracts are provided for the papers presented at this workshop.

  18. AVTA: Eaton AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from testing done on the Eaton AC Level 2 charging system for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  19. AVTA: Leviton AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from testing done on the Leviton Level 2 charging system for plug-in electric vehicles. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  20. High-level waste management technology program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document the integrated technology program plan for the Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) Management System. The mission of the SRS HLW System is to receive and store SRS high-level wastes in a see and environmentally sound, and to convert these wastes into forms suitable for final disposal. These final disposal forms are borosilicate glass to be sent to the Federal Repository, Saltstone grout to be disposed of on site, and treated waste water to be released to the environment via a permitted outfall. Thus, the technology development activities described herein are those activities required to enable successful accomplishment of this mission. The technology program is based on specific needs of the SRS HLW System and organized following the systems engineering level 3 functions. Technology needs for each level 3 function are listed as reference, enhancements, and alternatives. Finally, FY-95 funding, deliverables, and schedules are s in Chapter IV with details on the specific tasks that are funded in FY-95 provided in Appendix A. The information in this report represents the vision of activities as defined at the beginning of the fiscal year. Depending on emergent issues, funding changes, and other factors, programs and milestones may be adjusted during the fiscal year. The FY-95 SRS HLW technology program strongly emphasizes startup support for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and In-Tank Precipitation. Closure of technical issues associated with these operations has been given highest priority. Consequently, efforts on longer term enhancements and alternatives are receiving minimal funding. However, High-Level Waste Management is committed to participation in the national Radioactive Waste Tank Remediation Technology Focus Area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Intermediate Energy Infobook Activities (29 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Information about Intermediate Energy Infobook, 29 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8.

  2. RF low-level control for the Linac4 H{sup ?} source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterworth, A. Grudiev, A.; Lettry, J.; Paoluzzi, M.; Schmitzer, C.; Nishida, K.

    2015-04-08

    The H{sup ?} source for the Linac4 accelerator at CERN uses an RF driven plasma for the production of H{sup ?}. The RF is supplied by a 2?MHz RF tube amplifier with a maximum power output of 100 kW and a pulse duration of up to 2?ms. The low-level RF signal generation and measurement system has been developed using standard CERN controls electronics in the VME form factor. The RF frequency and amplitude reference signals are generated using separate arbitrary waveform generator channels. The frequency and amplitude are both freely programmable over the duration of the RF pulse, which allows fine-tuning of the excitation. Measurements of the forward and reverse RF power signals are performed via directional couplers using high-speed digitizers, and permit the estimation of the plasma impedance and deposited power via an equivalent circuit model. The low-level RF hardware and software implementations are described, and experimental results obtained with the Linac4 ion sources in the test stand are presented.

  3. A=4-20 Level Diagrams (EPS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A 4 - 20 Level Diagrams - EPS format The Image Map below will direct you to the most recent, updated Energy Level Diagram for that particular nuclide. To view previous Energy...

  4. High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.; Choi, A.S.; Paul, P.; Wise, F.E.

    1998-04-01

    Revision 9 of the High Level Waste System Plan documents the current operating strategy of the HLW System at SRS to receive, store, treat, and dispose of high-level waste.

  5. Ash bed level control system for a fixed-bed coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Rotunda, John R. (Fairmont, WV)

    1984-01-01

    An ash level control system is provided which incorporates an ash level meter to automatically control the ash bed level of a coal gasifier at a selected level. The ash level signal from the ash level meter is updated during each cycle that a bed stirrer travels up and down through the extent of the ash bed level. The ash level signal is derived from temperature measurements made by thermocouples carried by the stirrer as it passes through the ash bed and into the fire zone immediately above the ash bed. The level signal is compared with selected threshold level signal to determine if the ash level is above or below the selected level once each stirrer cycle. A first counter is either incremented or decremented accordingly. The registered count of the first counter is preset in a down counter once each cycle and the preset count is counted down at a selected clock rate. A grate drive is activated to rotate a grate assembly supporting the ash bed for a period equal to the count down period to maintain the selected ash bed level. In order to avoid grate binding, the controller provides a short base operating duration time each stirrer cycle. If the ash bed level drops below a selected low level or exceeds a selected high level, means are provided to notify the operator.

  6. DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trk, T.; Titov, V. S.; Miki?, Z.; Leake, J. E.; Archontis, V.; Linton, M. G.; Dalmasse, K.; Aulanier, G.; Kliem, B.

    2014-02-10

    There has been a long-standing debate on the question of whether or not electric currents in solar active regions are neutralized. That is, whether or not the main (or direct) coronal currents connecting the active region polarities are surrounded by shielding (or return) currents of equal total value and opposite direction. Both theory and observations are not yet fully conclusive regarding this question, and numerical simulations have, surprisingly, barely been used to address it. Here we quantify the evolution of electric currents during the formation of a bipolar active region by considering a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the emergence of a sub-photospheric, current-neutralized magnetic flux rope into the solar atmosphere. We find that a strong deviation from current neutralization develops simultaneously with the onset of significant flux emergence into the corona, accompanied by the development of substantial magnetic shear along the active region's polarity inversion line. After the region has formed and flux emergence has ceased, the strong magnetic fields in the region's center are connected solely by direct currents, and the total direct current is several times larger than the total return current. These results suggest that active regions, the main sources of coronal mass ejections and flares, are born with substantial net currents, in agreement with recent observations. Furthermore, they support eruption models that employ pre-eruption magnetic fields containing such currents.

  7. Wind Powering America FY07 Activities Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-02-01

    The Wind Powering America FY07 Activities Summary reflects the accomplishments of our state wind working groups, our programs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and our partner organizations. The national WPA team remains a leading force for moving wind energy forward in the United States. WPA continues to work with its national, regional, and state partners to communicate the opportunities and benefits of wind energy to a diverse set of stakeholders. WPA now has 30 state wind working groups (welcoming Georgia and Wisconsin in 2007) that form strategic alliances to communicate wind's benefits to the state stakeholders. More than 140 members of national and state public and private sector organizations from 39 U.S. states and Canada attended the 6th Annual WPA All-States Summit in Los Angeles in June. WPA's emphasis remains on the rural agricultural sector, which stands to reap the significant economic development benefits of wind energy development. Additionally, WPA continues its program of outreach, education, and technical assistance to Native American communities, public power entities, and regulatory and legislative bodies.

  8. Secondary Energy Infobook Activities (19 Activities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information about Secondary Energy Infobook, 19 student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8 and 9-12.

  9. Lab active in support of science activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    active in support of science activities Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Lab active in support of science activities Los Alamos High Schools wins regional event February 1, 2014 Left to Right: Katherine Wang; William Wang; Alexander Swart; Alexandr Wang; William Zhao, Team Captain; and Kathleen Boerigter, Coach Los Alamos High School wins the regional Science Bowl. Left to Right:

  10. Energy Level Diagrams A=4-20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Level Diagrams A = 4 - 20 Nuclei If your web browser supports imagemaps, try our "Chart of the Nuclides"-style interface for one of the following format options [available only for energy level diagrams from the most recent evaluation and/or preliminary evaluation]. Graphic Interchange Format (GIF) Portable Document Format (PDF) Encapsulated Postscript (EPS) To view all of the Energy Level Diagrams available for each mass chain, including the most recent versions as well as

  11. ARM - Lesson Plans: Estimating Local Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating Local Sea Level Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Estimating Local Sea Level Objective The objective is to train students' skills in observing the local environment based upon the sea level variations. Materials Each student or group of students will

  12. Materials Discovery across Technological Readiness Levels | Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science | NREL Materials Discovery across Technological Readiness Levels Materials discovery is important across technology readiness levels: basic science, applied research, and device development. Over the past several years, NREL has worked at each of these levels, demonstrating our competence in a broad range of materials discovery problems. Basic Science An image of a triangular diagram with tantalum-cobalt-tin at the top vertex, tantalum at the lower left vertex, and cobalt at the

  13. Low-level waste program technical strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bledsoe, K.W.

    1994-10-01

    The Low-Level Waste Technical Strategy document describes the mechanisms which the Low-Level Waste Program Office plans to implement to achieve its mission. The mission is to manage the receipt, immobilization, packaging, storage/disposal and RCRA closure (of the site) of the low-level Hanford waste (pretreated tank wastes) in an environmentally sound, safe and cost-effective manner. The primary objective of the TWRS Low-level waste Program office is to vitrify the LLW fraction of the tank waste and dispose of it onsite.

  14. Operating Experience Level 3: Radiologically Contaminated Respirators...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Experience Level 3 provides information on a safety concern related to radiological contamination of launderedreconditioned respirators and parts that have been certified as...

  15. Prioritizing Acquisition Pathways in the State Level Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Chantell L.; Budlong-Sylvester, Kory; Pilat, Joseph F.

    2012-06-27

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Department of Safeguards has launched a project to further develop the State-level concept for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of safeguards activities. In order to further evolve the safeguards system an emphasis is placed on integrating inspection-related activities and the State evaluation process to draw safeguards conclusions in the most efficient way. The credible implementation of acquisition pathway analysis is central to the success of the IAEA's State-level concept. NNSA's Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is sponsoring Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to produce a study that will examine the use of acquisition pathway analysis in: (1) Developing a State-specific, State-level approach (SLA) and Annual Implementation Plan (AIP); (2) Maximizing the utility of the physical model; and (3) Supporting resource allocation decisions through a pathway prioritization. To deal with the challenge of developing an effective and efficient SLA, this study looks at: (1) Prioritizing proliferation pathways based on an assessment of a State's capabilities and assumed proliferation strategies; and (2) Relevant State behavior (e.g., transparency, cooperation, etc.) while avoiding subjective judgments about States themselves. The study makes use of case studies and concrete examples in order to illustrate how new concepts and approaches will be implemented, and how they may differ from more traditional safeguards approaches.

  16. Low Level Radiation SEAB Ltr. to Moniz

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and citizens in the vicinity of commercial nuclear power plants and associated fuel cycle activities, especially with regard to the increased likelihood of cancer fatality. ...

  17. Activity Based Costing

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  18. Alternate approaches to verifying the structural adequacy of the Defense High Level Waste Shipping Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmer, A.; Koploy, M.

    1991-12-01

    In the early 1980s, the US Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) initiated a project to develop a safe and efficient transportation system for defense high level waste (DHLW). A long-standing objective of the DHLW transportation project is to develop a truck cask that represents the leading edge of cask technology as well as one that fully complies with all applicable DOE, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. General Atomics (GA) designed the DHLW Truck Shipping Cask using state-of-the-art analytical techniques verified by model testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The analytical techniques include two approaches, inelastic analysis and elastic analysis. This topical report presents the results of the two analytical approaches and the model testing results. The purpose of this work is to show that there are two viable analytical alternatives to verify the structural adequacy of a Type B package and to obtain an NRC license. It addition, this data will help to support the future acceptance by the NRC of inelastic analysis as a tool in packaging design and licensing.

  19. Retrieval Activities - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farms Retrieval Activities Office of River Protection Tank Farms Retrieval Activities PHOENIX - Tank Monitoring Waste Treatment & Immobilization Plant 222-S Laboratory 242-A...

  20. Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

  1. Lesson Learned by Environmental Management Complex-wide Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Roger Claycomb, Work Control Program Manager, DOE Idaho Operations Office. Office of Environmental Management Work Planning and Control Oversight. Contractor Good Practices and DOE EM Good Practices.

  2. Lesson Learned by Savannah River Site Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Bonnie Barnes, Savannah River Remediation. Work Planning and Control at Savannah River Remediation.

  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Facilities Division- Optimizing Activity-level Work Planning and Control Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Ken Fletcher, Deputy Division Director for Facilities, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  4. Tank farms compacted low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetzer, D.C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the process of Low-Level Waste (LLW) volume reduction by compaction. Also included is the data used for characterization of LLW destined for compaction. Scaling factors (ratios) are formed based on data contained in this report.

  5. Tank farms compacted low level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, M.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the process of Low Level Waste (LLW) volume reduction by compaction. Also included is the data used for characterization of LLW destined for compaction. Scaling factors (ratios) are formed based on data contained in this report.

  6. ARM - Sea Surface and Sea Level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... On the other hand, under the changes in the level of the ocean surface, melting glaciers and ice sheets, ocean currents, daily tides, expansion or contraction of water based upon ...

  7. Operating Experience Level 3, Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 OE-3 2015-02: Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter (xQ) for Calculation of Co-located Worker Dose This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document informs the complex of the...

  8. Level-2 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.U.; /Purdue U.

    2007-04-01

    The CDF Run II Level-2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on an algorithm used in Run I. This system insured good performance at low luminosity obtained during the Tevatron Run II. However, as the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitations of the current system due to the algorithm start to become clear. In this paper, we will present an upgrade of the Level-2 calorimeter trigger system at CDF. The upgrade is based on the Pulsar board, a general purpose VME board developed at CDF and used for upgrading both the Level-2 tracking and the Level-2 global decision crate. This paper will describe the design, hardware and software implementation, as well as the advantages of this approach over the existing system.

  9. Operating Experience Level 3, Electrical Safety: Shocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE-3: 2015-03 This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to electrical shocks workers have received while performing work at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities.

  10. Low-level-waste-form criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, R.E.; Davis, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Efforts in five areas are reported: technical considerations for a high-integrity container for resin wastes; permissible radionuclide loadings for organic ion exchange resin wastes; technical factors affecting low-level waste form acceptance requirements of the proposed 10 CFR 61 and draft BTP; modeling of groundwater transport; and analysis of soils from low-level waste disposal sites (Barnwell, Hanford, and Sheffield). (DLC)

  11. College-Level Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    College-Level Materials College-Level Materials Professor reviewing student's papers. The following material is provided to help college professors and students looking for technical information on the use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. Course Manual on Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines and Related Technologies - Hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle manual developed by SunLine and College of the Desert (among others) with funding from DOE. It covers hydrogen properties, use, and safety as well as fuel

  12. 1996 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress. Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This report is prepared in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act (the Act), Public Law 96-573, 1980, as amended by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes the activities during calendar year 1996 related to the establishment of new disposal facilities for commercially-generated low-level radioactive waste. The report emphasizes significant issues and events that have affected progress in developing new disposal facilities, and also includes an introduction that provides background information and perspective on US policy for low-level radioactive waste disposal.

  13. Meetings and Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meetings and Activities Meetings and Activities The engagement of worker representatives in DOE's strategic efforts to enhance operations and improve performance has been expanded over the past several years by open lines of communication between top level DOE and union leadership. The engagement between DOE and worker representatives takes place in the following forums: DOE/Labor Leadership Roundtable Meetings June 27, 2014 DOE/Labor Leadership Roundtable Meeting Meeting agenda Meeting Date:

  14. Levelized Cost and Levelized Avoided Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2015 Levelized Cost and Levelized Avoided Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2015 This paper presents average values of levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought online in 2020 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015) Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized

  15. Model year 2010 Ford Fusion Level-1 testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Energy Systems

    2010-11-23

    As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Ford Fusion was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles, and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database. The major results are shown in this report. Given the benchmark nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and sought to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current/voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Fusion and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

  16. Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.

    2011-03-22

    As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

  17. A=4-20 Level Diagrams (GIF)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GIF format The Image Map below will direct you to the most recent, updated Energy Level Diagram for that particular nuclide. To view previous Energy Level Diagrams from past reviews, please refer to the list at the bottom of the page. Click on the button corresponding to the nucleus (or mass chain) for which you would like to see a level diagram. 20Mg 18Na 19Na 20Na 16Ne 17Ne 18Ne 19Ne 20Ne 14F 15F 16F 17F 18F 19F 20F 12O 13O 14O 15O 16O 17O 18O 19O 20O 10N 11N 12N 13N 14N 15N 16N 17N 18N 19N

  18. A=4-20 Level Diagrams (PDF)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PDF format The Image Map below will direct you to the most recent, updated Energy Level Diagram for that particular nuclide. To view previous Energy Level Diagrams from past reviews, please refer to the list at the bottom of the page. Click on the button corresponding to the nucleus (or mass chain) for which you would like to see a level diagram. 20Mg 18Na 19Na 20Na 16Ne 17Ne 18Ne 19Ne 20Ne 14F 15F 16F 17F 18F 19F 20F 12O 13O 14O 15O 16O 17O 18O 19O 20O 10N 11N 12N 13N 14N 15N 16N 17N 18N 19N

  19. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David E.; Kisner, Roger A.

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  20. Statistical approach to nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2014-10-15

    We discuss the level density in a finite many-body system with strong interaction between the constituents. Our primary object of applications is the atomic nucleus but the same techniques can be applied to other mesoscopic systems. We calculate and compare nuclear level densities for given quantum numbers obtained by different methods, such as nuclear shell model (the most successful microscopic approach), our main instrument - moments method (statistical approach), and Fermi-gas model; the calculation with the moments method can use any shell-model Hamiltonian excluding the spurious states of the center-of-mass motion. Our goal is to investigate statistical properties of nuclear level density, define its phenomenological parameters, and offer an affordable and reliable way of calculation.

  1. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Los Alamos National Laboratory -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    February 12, 2014 | Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory - February 12, 2014 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Los Alamos National Laboratory - February 12, 2014 February 2014 Review of Corrective Actions for Findings from the Independent Oversight Review of Los Alamos National Laboratory Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation (Published November 2013) [HIAR LANL-2014-02-12] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the

  2. Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1998-03-03

    A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units. 12 figs.

  3. Hight-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement You are here: DOE-ID Home > Environmental Management > Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) Table of Contents Documents are in the Adobe� PDF format and require the Adobe� Reader to access them. If you do not currently have the Acrobat Reader, you can download the Free Adobe Reader at http://get.adobe.com/reader/ Icon link to Free Adobe Acrobat Reader software * Large chapters broken down into sections

  4. Technical safety requirements control level verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEWART, J.L.

    1999-05-21

    A Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) control level verification process was developed for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) TSRs at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA, at the direction of the US. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The objective of the effort was to develop a process to ensure that the TWRS TSR controls are designated and managed at the appropriate levels as Safety Limits (SLs), Limiting Control Settings (LCSs), Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs), Administrative Controls (ACs), or Design Features. The TSR control level verification process was developed and implemented by a team of contractor personnel with the participation of Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH), the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) integrating contractor, and RL representatives. The team was composed of individuals with the following experience base: nuclear safety analysis; licensing; nuclear industry and DOE-complex TSR preparation/review experience; tank farm operations; FDH policy and compliance; and RL-TWRS oversight. Each TSR control level designation was completed utilizing TSR control logic diagrams and TSR criteria checklists based on DOE Orders, Standards, Contractor TSR policy, and other guidance. The control logic diagrams and criteria checklists were reviewed and modified by team members during team meetings. The TSR control level verification process was used to systematically evaluate 12 LCOs, 22 AC programs, and approximately 100 program key elements identified in the TWRS TSR document. The verification of each TSR control required a team consensus. Based on the results of the process, refinements were identified and the TWRS TSRs were modified as appropriate. A final report documenting key assumptions and the control level designation for each TSR control was prepared and is maintained on file for future reference. The results of the process were used as a reference in the RL review of the final TWRS TSRs and control suite. RL concluded that the TSR control level verification process is clear and logically based upon DOE Order 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements, and other TSR control selection guidelines. The process provides a documented, traceable basis for TSR level decisions and is a valid reference for preparation of new TSRs.

  5. Closed-field capacitive liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A liquid level sensor based on a closed field circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plate units that creates a displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of a liquid to the plate units. The ring oscillator circuit produces an output signal with a frequency inversely proportional to the presence of a liquid. A continuous liquid level sensing device and a two point sensing device are both proposed sensing arrangements. A second set of plates may be located inside of the probe housing relative to the sensing plate units. The second set of plates prevent any interference between the sensing plate units.

  6. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Steyert, William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  7. VOLUNTEER ACTIVITY 5

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Energy Conservation: Did I remember to...? Activity Type: Craft and Game Supports Lesson Five: Global Warming Grades 4-6

  8. Interactive Activity Detection Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Detection Tools Interactive Activity Detection Tools Tools for detecting specified activities in video data provide a key intelligence capability. High numbers of false alarms, however, reduce tool effectiveness and analyst patience. User feedback reduces false alarms * This project will reduce the number of false alarms generated by activity detection tools (including single vehicle start / stop, multi-vehicle meetings and coordinated driving patterns) by exploiting user feedback in a

  9. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combinatorial nuclear level-density model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combinatorial nuclear level-density model A microscopic nuclear level-density model is ...

  10. West Valley Demonstration Project Low-Level Waste Shipment |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Low-Level Waste Shipment West Valley Demonstration Project Low-Level Waste Shipment PDF icon West Valley Demonstration Project Low-Level Waste Shipment More Documents &...

  11. Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Management Compliance Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) The Low-Level Waste...

  12. Fiber-optic liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

  13. Operating Experience Level 3, Explosives Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about the dangers inherent in material handling and the role hazard analysis, work planning, and walkdowns can play in preventing injuries during heavy equipment moves. More than 200 material handling events reported to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) from January 1, 2010, through August 31, 2014.

  14. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-02-22

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending.

  15. High-level radioactive wastes. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1984-09-01

    This bibliography contains information on high-level radioactive wastes included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from August 1982 through December 1983. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 1452 citations.

  16. Shallow ground-water flow, water levels, and quality of water, 1980-84, Cowles Unit, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, D.A.; Shedlock, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Cowles Unit of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in Porter County, northwest Indiana, contains a broad dune-beach complex along the southern shoreline of Lake Michigan and a large wetland, called the Great Marsh, that occupies the lowland between the shoreline dunes and an older dune-beach complex farther inland. Water levels and water quality in the surficial aquifer were monitored from 1977 to 1984 near settling ponds on adjacent industrial property at the western end of the Cowles Unit. Since 1980, when the settling pond bottoms were sealed, these intradunal lowlands contained standing water only during periods of high snowmelt or rainfall. Water level declines following the cessation of seepage ranged from 6 feet at the eastern-most settling pond to nearly 14 feet at the western-most pond. No general pattern of water table decline was observed in the Great Marsh or in the shoreline dune complex at distances > 3,000 ft east or north of the settling ponds. Since the settling ponds were sealed, the concentration of boron has decreased while concentrations of cadmium, arsenic, zinc, and molybdenum in shallow ground-water downgradient of the ponds show no definite trends in time. Arsenic, boron and molybdenum have remained at concentrations above those of shallow groundwater in areas unaffected by settling pond seepage. 11 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Percent of Establishments by Levels of Price Difference that Would Cause Fuel Switching from Coal to a Less Expensive Substitute, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference; Unit: Establishment Counts. Would Switch Would Not Estimate to More NAICS Establishments Switch Due 1 to 10 11 to 25 26 to 50 Over 50 Cannot Expensive Code(a) Subsector and Industry Able to Switch(b) to Price Percent Percent Percent Percent Be Provided Substitute Total United States

  18. Technology development activities supporting tank waste remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonner, W.F.; Beeman, G.H.

    1994-06-01

    This document summarizes work being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The specific work activities are organized by the following categories: safety, characterization, retrieval, barriers, pretreatment, low-level waste, and high-level waste. In most cases, the activities presented here were identified as supporting tank remediation by EM-50 integrated program or integrated demonstration lead staff and the selections were further refined by contractor staff. Data sheets were prepared from DOE-HQ guidance to the field issued in September 1993. Activities were included if a significant portion of the work described provides technology potentially needed by TWRS; consequently, not all parts of each description necessarily support tank remediation.

  19. AVTA: Blink AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Blink AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Blink AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from testing

  20. AVTA: ChargePoint AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy ChargePoint AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: ChargePoint AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results

  1. AVTA: Clipper Creek AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Clipper Creek AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Clipper Creek AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes

  2. AVTA: GE Energy WattStation AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Energy WattStation AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: GE Energy WattStation AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The

  3. AVTA: GE Smart Grid Capable AC Level 2 Testing Results | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy GE Smart Grid Capable AC Level 2 Testing Results AVTA: GE Smart Grid Capable AC Level 2 Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from testing

  4. AVTA: SPX AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SPX AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: SPX AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from testing done on the SPX

  5. AVTA: Schneider AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Schneider AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Schneider AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report describes results from

  6. AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results AVTA: Siemens-VersiCharge AC Level 2 Charging System Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following

  7. High-Level Waste Melter Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez Jr, Joseph M; Bickford, Dennis F; Day, Delbert E; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lambert, Steven L; Marra, Sharon L; Peeler, David K; Strachan, Denis M; Triplett, Mark B; Vienna, John D; Wittman, Richard S

    2001-07-13

    At the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the path to site cleanup involves vitrification of the majority of the wastes that currently reside in large underground tanks. A Joule-heated glass melter is the equipment of choice for vitrifying the high-level fraction of these wastes. Even though this technology has general national and international acceptance, opportunities may exist to improve or change the technology to reduce the enormous cost of accomplishing the mission of site cleanup. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy requested the staff of the Tanks Focus Area to review immobilization technologies, waste forms, and modifications to requirements for solidification of the high-level waste fraction at Hanford to determine what aspects could affect cost reductions with reasonable long-term risk. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

  8. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank.

  9. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank. 9 figs.

  10. State and Regional Policy Assistance - Program Activities | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    practices" to regional electric bodies such as PJM, ISO-New England, NYISO, and states. ... Recommendations are implemented at the wholesale level by ISO-New England and under active ...

  11. Risk Group and Biosafety Level Definitions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group and Biosafety Level Definitions European Economic Community (DIRECTIVE 93/88/EEC, Oct. 1993) (1) Group 1 biological agent means one that is unlikely to cause human disease; (2) Group 2 biological agent means one that can cause human disease and might be a hazard to workers; it is unlikely to spread to the community; there is usually effective prophylaxis or treatment available; (3) Group 3 biological agent means one that can cause severe human disease and present a serious hazard to

  12. PHOTOGRA'"' THIS SHEET LEVEL INVENTORY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    0 a PHOTOGRA'"' THIS SHEET LEVEL INVENTORY V/r- 760 DOCUMENT IDENTIFICATION A)« y ^ DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for public releosej Distribution Unlimited DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT ACCESSION FOR NTIS GRA&I DTIC TAB UNANNOUNCH) JUSTIFICATION W Ü BY DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY CODES DIST AVAIL AND/OR SPECIAL DISTRIBUTION STAMP UNANNOUNCED DATE ACCESSIONED * Per: telecon w/Betty Fox, Chief, DNA Tech Libr'y. Div.: the Classifed References contained herein may remadin. ♦"Verified

  13. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 1 2014 U.S. DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting Kevin Stutenberg - Principal Investigator Argonne National Laboratory June 17, 2014 Project ID # VSS030 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Overview  Timeline - Benchmarking at ANL started in 1998 - FY13 & FY14 Completed Testing: * 10 vehicles tested in FY13, 4 in FY14 * Thermal impact

  14. Future scientists advance to national level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future scientists advance to national level Future scientists advance to DOE national competition A team from Los Alamos bested 39 other teams from around New Mexico in the 10-hour New Mexico Regional Science Bowl. April 3, 2012 Members of the Los Alamos High School Science Bowl Team Members of the Los Alamos High School Science Bowl Team were in Washington DC after their regional win, representing New Mexico in the 22nd Annual Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl. Contact Kathy

  15. Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehner, J.R.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, W. T.

    2012-02-17

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E&C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal [Ref. 1]. The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E&C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report [Ref. 2] that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E&C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.

  16. Circuit level modeling of inductive elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muyshondt, G.P.; Portnoy, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Design and analysis of spacecraft power systems have been difficult to perform because of the lack of circuit level models for nonlinear inductive elements. This paper reviews some of the models which have been proposed, their limitations, and applications. An improved saturation dependent model will be described. The model has been implemented in SPICE and with a commercial circuit program and demonstrated to be satisfactory in both implementations. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Application of decontamination and melting of low-level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, D.W.; Hall, M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the range of plant, equipment, and techniques developed by British Nuclear Fuels plc at their Capenhurst site to minimize land burial, environmental impact, and recycling of metals. This large nuclear processing facility in the United Kingdom yielded more than 160000 t of suspect surface contaminated material. By the time the project is finally completed at the end of 1996, {approx}99.5% of the contaminated material will have been safely and cost-effectively treated so that it can be recycled for use in a nonnuclear environment. The remaining material as well as minimal quantities of secondary wastes arising from decontamination activities will have been size reduced and/or encapsulated to maximize the cost-effective use of the U.K. low-level-waste burial facility.

  18. DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal July 20, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it will evaluate disposal options for Greater Than Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated from the decommissioning of nuclear power plants, medical activities and nuclear research. DOE delivered to

  19. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign International Activities Implementation Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy International Activities Implementation Plan Used Fuel Disposition Campaign International Activities Implementation Plan The management of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste is required for any country using nuclear energy. This includes the storage, transportation, and disposal of low and intermediate level waste (LILW), used nuclear fuel (UNF), and high level waste (HLW). The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office

  20. Optimising the Performance of the Low Level Waste Repository - 12144

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntington, Amy; Baker, Andrew; Cummings, Richard; Shevelan, John; Sumerling, Trevor

    2012-07-01

    The Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) is the United Kingdom's principal facility for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW). The LLWR made a major submission to its environmental regulator (the Environment Agency) on 1 May 2011, the LLWR's 2011 Environmental Safety Case (ESC). One of the key regulatory requirements is that all aspects of the construction, operation and closure of the disposal facility should be optimised. An optimised Site Development Plan for the repository was developed and produced as part of the ESC. The Site Development Plan covers all aspects of the construction, operation and closure of the disposal facility. This includes the management of past and future disposals, emplacement strategies, design of the disposal vaults, and the closure engineering for the site. The Site Development Plan also covers the period of active institutional control, when disposals at the site have ceased, but it is still under active management, and plans for the long-term sustainable use of the site. We have a practical approach to optimisation based on recorded judgements and realistic assessments of practicable options framed within the demands of UK policy for LLW management and the characteristics the LLWR site and existing elements of the facility. The final performance assessments undertaken for the ESC were based on the Site Development Plan. The ESC will be used as a tool to inform future decision-making concerning the repository design, operation and the acceptance of wastes, as set out in the evolving Site Development Plan. Maintaining the ESC is thus essential to ensure that the Site Development Plan takes account of an up-to-date understanding and analysis of environmental performance, and that the Plan continues to be optimised. (authors)

  1. Activated carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanzawa, Y.; Kaneko, K. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)] [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Dresselhaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-25

    Activated carbon aerogels were obtained from the CO{sub 2} activation of the carbon aerogels. The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen on activated carbon aerogels at 77 K were measured and analyzed by the high-resolution {alpha}{sub s} plot to evaluate their porosities. The {alpha}{sub s} plot showed an upward deviation from linearity below {alpha}{sub s} = 0.5, suggesting that the presence of micropores becomes more predominant with the extent of the activation. Activation increased noticeably the pore volume and the surface area (the maximum value: 2600 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}) without change of the basic network structure of primary particles. Activated carbon aerogels had a bimodal pore size distribution of uniform micropores and mesopores. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report 2006

  3. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report 2006

  4. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Carl W. (Stony Brook, NY); Mangel, Walter F. (Shoreham, NY)

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  5. Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities Activities Activities and events provide Residential Network members the opportunity to discuss similar needs and challenges, and to collectively identify effective strategies and useful resources. Peer Exchange Call Summaries Voluntary Initiatives Events PEER EXCHANGE CALL Summaries Catch up on past Peer Exchange Calls by accessing more than 100 call summaries on the following topics: Market Position and Business Model Program Design and Customer Experience Evaluation and Data

  6. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the world's most powerful technology without consuming excessive energy or creating waste? January 30, 2014 Active stewardship: sustainable future What if you could power your life using pond scum? Los Alamos researchers are creating many innovations to support a sustainable future. Energy sustainability is a daunting task:

  7. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  8. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report

  9. ALS Activity Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Reports Print These hard-copy annual reports were produced from 1993-2006. They illustrated the depth and breadth of the ALS scientific program with a selection of research results. They also summarized operations and ongoing R&D, highlighted educational outreach efforts and special events, and provided yearly documentation of the beamlines and publications. The Activity Report was replaced in 2007 by ALS Spectrum. The reports for 1996-2006 are available here. Activity Report 2006

  10. Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities Report to Congress August 2015 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | August 2015 Energy Conservation Standards Activities | i Message from the Assistant Secretary I am pleased to provide you with the semi-annual Implementation Report on Energy Conservation Standards Activities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report meets the requirements of section 141 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) and sections 305 and 321 of the

  11. Activities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Activities Activities Activities and events provide Residential Network members the opportunity to discuss similar needs and challenges, and to collectively identify effective strategies and useful resources. Peer Exchange Call Summaries Voluntary Initiatives Events PEER EXCHANGE CALL Summaries Catch up on past Peer Exchange Calls by accessing more than 150 call summaries on the following topics: Market Position and Business Model Program Design and Customer Experience Evaluation and Data

  12. National Service Activation Checklist

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Service Activation Checklist You have just received information that you are being activated for national service. Covered or Not Covered If you have received notice to report for active duty - Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, National Guard, Public Health Service, or Coast Guard and you are a Federal employee, you have employment and reemployment rights under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Act of 1994 (USERRA). Basics - Telling People What is Happening 1. Have you told your

  13. Improving landscape-level environmental impact evaluations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walston, L.J.; LaGory, K.E.; Vinikour, W.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.L.; Cantwell, B.

    2012-04-01

    New spatial data and advancements in GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses of the large datasets required when making programmatic evaluations of the ecological effects of proposed activities that cover a large area or region. Understanding the environmental impacts of proposed human developments is critical to making appropriate siting decisions and designing mitigation strategies to reduce impacts on important resources. Impact analyses conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) or Environmental Assessments (EAs) are intended to determine the resource-specific impacts of proposed activities of federal agencies and their alternatives using the best available information. Impacts to ecological resources are often a primary focus of these analyses. Information used in NEPA analyses include some measure of the known or probable presence of plants and wildlife in the project area, with special emphasis placed on threatened, endangered, and other special-status species. Site-specific information pertaining to ecological resources is usually easier to obtain for small-scale activities such as a local facility, road, or transmission upgrade project, where the ability to conduct fieldwork is more often feasible. However, site-specific data is more difficult-and sometimes impossible-to obtain for proposed activities that could affect a large area or region. These types of analyses often are considered in programmatic NEPA documents, in which a federal agency evaluates the implementation of a broad program or plan. Under these programmatic evaluations, the exact location and size of developments are often not known. Because obtaining quantitative information for ecological resources at such large spatial scales is difficult, programmatic impact evaluations typically rely on sketchy or partial information such as recorded species occurrences, species ranges, and general habitat descriptions. However, new spatial data and improved GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses using large, readily available datasets. The availability of large-scale regional data such as GAP land-cover models or species habitat suitability models, combined with more robust spatial analysis procedures available through ArcGIS for Desktop software, allowed the analysis of multiple datasets at large spatial scales. This enabled researchers to surpass previous qualitative evaluations by developing a more accurate and quantitative approach for determining the environmental impacts of human activities at larger spatial scales. These approaches, combined with the utility of ModelBuilder and operability of Python scripts in ArcGIS, allow a more timely and cost-effective synthesis of available spatial data for programmatic evaluations and add a quantitative basis to environmental decision making.

  14. Bandwidth and Transfer Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    average. Graphs for the last 8 days. Historical yearly peak days. Daily Storage Concurrency Transfer Activity This graph shows the number of transfers to the storage systems...

  15. Exploring Hydroelectricity (9 activities)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated and inquiry-based activities that provide a comprehensive understanding of the scientific, economic, environmental, technological, and societal aspects of hydropower to secondary students

  16. Alabama Power- UESC Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingdiscusses Alabama Power and its utility energy service contract (UESC) projects and activities.

  17. Activation.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Information Center Activated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CARLSBAD, N.M., 2/15/2014 3:09 PM1:30 PM (MST) - The Joint Information Center (JIC) has been activated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) 26 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The activation occurred as a precautionary measure. More information will be provided as it becomes available. The Joint Information Center (JIC), located at 4021 National Parks Highway, has been activated to provide public information. For

  18. Residential Building Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building...

  19. Low Specific Activity (LSA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of Low Specific Activity (LSA) material.  This...

  20. Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by SSEB in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste Issues. In addition. this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  1. Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages sew be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  2. Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

  3. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 10.17 Percent of Establishments by Levels of Price Difference that Would Cause Fuel Switching from LPG to a Less Expensive Substitute, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference; Unit: Establishment Counts. Would Switch Would Not Estimate to More NAICS Establishments Switch Due 1 to 10 11 to 25 26 to 50 Over 50 Cannot Expensive Code(a) Subsector and Industry Able to Switch(b) to Price Percent Percent Percent Percent

  4. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, R.H.; Keener, W.E.

    1995-02-28

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame. 6 figs.

  5. Lid design for low level waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, Richard H.; Keener, Wendell E.

    1995-01-01

    A container for low level waste includes a shell and a lid. The lid has a frame to which a planar member is welded. The lid frame includes a rectangular outer portion made of square metal tubing, a longitudinal beam extending between axial ends of the rectangular outer portion, and a transverse beam extending between opposite lateral sides of the rectangular outer portion. Two pairs of diagonal braces extend between the longitudinal beam and the four corners of the rectangular outer portion of the frame.

  6. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 July 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights * EIA projects the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price to average about $88 per barrel over the second half of 2012 and the U.S. refiner acquisition cost (RAC) of crude oil to average $93 per barrel, both about $7 per barrel lower than last month's Outlook. EIA expects WTI and RAC crude oil prices to remain roughly at these second half levels in 2013. Beginning in this month's Outlook, EIA is also providing a forecast of Brent crude

  7. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil prices, which reached their highest point of the year in June, fell to their lowest levels of the year in early August. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $105.44/barrel on August 7, a decrease of $6.85/barrel from July 1 (Figure 1). The front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI) contract also fell, settling at $97.34/barrel on August 7, $8.00/barrel lower than on July 1. A further easing of

  8. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: Crude oil futures prices reached the lowest level in 12 years in December and early January. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $33.75 per barrel (b) on January 7, $10.69/b lower than the close on December 1 (Figure 1). The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) front month futures price settled at $33.27, a decrease of $8.58/b over the same period. Global crude oil prices declined after the December 4 Organization of Petroleum

  9. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil futures prices rebounded in April and approached the top of their recent trading range. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $107.76 per barrel (bbl) on May 1, an increase of $2.14/bbl from April 1 (Figure 1). West Texas Intermediate (WTI) prices at the start of May were near the same levels as the beginning of April. The front month WTI contract settled at $99.42/bbl on May 1, a slight decrease

  10. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Market Prices and Uncertainty Report Crude Oil Prices: International crude oil prices fell in August and remain near their lowest levels of 2014. The North Sea Brent front month futures price settled at $101.83/barrel on September 4, a decrease of $3.01/barrel from August 1 (Figure 1). The front month West Texas Intermediate (WTI) contract price fell by $3.43/barrel over the same period, settling at $94.45/barrel on September 4. Although the U.S. economy showed robust growth in the second

  11. Natural gas inventories at record levels

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural gas inventories at record levels U.S. natural gas inventories at the end of October tied the all-time record high and inventories could climb to 4 trillion cubic feet in November for the first time. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said weekly injections of natural gas into storage may continue into November, after inventories at the close of October matched the record high of just over 3.9 trillion cubic feet. High inventories, along with rising

  12. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix A-3: Basis for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste light water reactor projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, A.; Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; Woodberry, S.

    1994-09-01

    This study characterizes low-level radioactive waste types that may exceed Class C limits at light water reactors, estimates the amounts of waste generated, and estimates radionuclide content and distribution within the waste. Waste types that may exceed Class C limits include metal components that become activated during operations, process wastes such as cartridge filters and decontamination resins, and activated metals from decommissioning activities. Operating parameters and current management practices at operating plants are reviewed and used to estimate the amounts of low-level waste exceeding Class C limits that is generated per fuel cycle, including amounts of routinely generated activated metal components and process waste. Radionuclide content is calculated for specific activated metals components. Empirical data from actual low-level radioactive waste are used to estimate radionuclide content for process wastes. Volumes and activities are also estimated for decommissioning activated metals that exceed Class C limits. To estimate activation levels of decommissioning waste, six typical light water reactors are modeled and analyzed. This study does not consider concentration averaging.

  13. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

  14. High accuracy electronic material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11

    The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: (1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, (2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, (3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or ``ghost`` reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%. 4 figs.

  15. PUREX low-level waste radionuclide characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, M.W.; LeBaron, G.J.

    1995-01-16

    The PUREX low-level waste (LLW) radionuclide characterization document describes the methodology for the characterization of solid LLW and solid low-level mixed waste (MW) with the respect to radiological characteristics. This document only serves as an overview of the PUREX radionuclide characterization methodology and provides specific examples for how the radionuclide distribution is derived. It would be impractical to provide all background information in this document. If further clarification and background information is required, consult the PUREX Regulatory Compliance group files. This document applies to only that waste generated in or is the responsibility of the PUREX facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes the requirements for radioactive solid waste in DOE Order 5820.2A Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters 2 and 3 from DOE Order 5820.2A requires that generators of solid wastes in the LLW categories and the radioactive mixed waste subcategories: (1) identify the major radionuclides in each solid waste matrix and (2) determine the radionuclide concentrations and waste classes of their solid wastes. In addition, the Order also requires each generator to carry out a compliance program that ensures the proper certification of the solid waste generated.

  16. High accuracy electronic material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    The High Accuracy Electronic Material Level Sensor (electronic dipstick) is a sensor based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line or guide wire that is partially immersed in the material being measured; a launcher plate is positioned at the beginning of the guide wire. Reflected pulses are produced at the material interface due to the change in dielectric constant. The time difference of the reflections at the launcher plate and at the material interface are used to determine the material level. Improved performance is obtained by the incorporation of: 1) a high accuracy time base that is referenced to a quartz crystal, 2) an ultrawideband directional sampler to allow operation without an interconnect cable between the electronics module and the guide wire, 3) constant fraction discriminators (CFDs) that allow accurate measurements regardless of material dielectric constants, and reduce or eliminate errors induced by triple-transit or "ghost" reflections on the interconnect cable. These improvements make the dipstick accurate to better than 0.1%.

  17. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  18. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  19. Low-level waste certification plan for the WSCF Laboratory Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, J.A.

    1994-09-19

    The solid, low-level waste certification plan for the Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) describes the organization and methodology for the certification of the solid low-level waste (LLW) that is transferred to the Hanford Site 200 Areas Storage and Disposal Facilities. This plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, including up-front minimization, and end product treatment to reduce the volume or toxicity of the waste. The plan also includes segregation of different waste types. This low-level waste certification plan applies only to waste generated in, or is the responsibility of the WSCF Laboratory Complex. The WSCF Laboratory Complex supports technical activities performed at the Hanford Site. Wet Chemical and radiochemical analyses are performed to support site operations, including environmental and effluent monitoring, chemical processing, RCRA and CERCLA analysis, and waste management activities. Environmental and effluent samples include liquid effluents, ground and surface waters, soils, animals, vegetation, and air filters.

  20. Four-level entangled quantum heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Ting; Liu, W.-T.; Chen, P.-X.; Li, C.-Z.

    2007-06-15

    Based on a two-qubit one-dimensional isotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg spin chain in a constant external magnetic field, we construct a four-level entangled quantum heat engine (QHE) and investigate the influence of entanglement between two qubits on basic thermodynamic quantities, i.e., the heat transferred and the work done in a cycle, and the efficiency of the QHE. The validity of the second law of thermodynamics is confirmed in the entangled system. We also find several interesting features of the variation of the efficiency with the entanglement of two different thermal equilibrium states in a work cycle in zero and finite magnetic field. An abrupt transition of efficiency is found in zero field.

  1. Draft low level waste technical summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, W.J.; Benar, C.J.; Certa, P.J.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Kruger, A.A.; Norman, E.C.; Mitchell, D.E.; Penwell, D.E.; Reidel, S.P.; Shade, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an outline of the Hanford Site Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal program, what it has accomplished, what is being done, and where the program is headed. This document may be used to provide background information to personnel new to the LLW management/disposal field and to those individuals needing more information or background on an area in LLW for which they are not familiar. This document should be appropriate for outside groups that may want to learn about the program without immediately becoming immersed in the details. This document is not a program or systems engineering baseline report, and personnel should refer to more current baseline documentation for critical information.

  2. Detecting low levels of radionuclides in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting low levels of one or more radionuclides in a fluid sample uses a substrate that includes an ion exchange resin or other sorbent material to collect the radionuclides. A collecting apparatus includes a collecting chamber that exposes the substrate to a measured amount of the fluid sample such that radionuclides in the fluid sample are collected by the ion exchange resin. A drying apparatus, which can include a drying chamber, then dries the substrate. A measuring apparatus measures emissions from radionuclides collected on the substrate. The substrate is positioned in a measuring chamber proximate to a detector, which provides a signal in response to emissions from the radionuclides. Other analysis methods can be used to detect non-radioactive analytes, which can be collected with other types of sorbent materials.

  3. Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Transport Refrigeration Units

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Transport Refrigeration Units Active Diesel Emission Control Technology for Transport Refrigeration Units This project discusses a CARB Level 2+ verified active regeneration technology for smal diesel engines PDF icon deer09_guzman.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Particulate Filters and NO2 Emission Limits RYPOS - An Actively Regenerated DPF that Demonstrates Significant NO2 Reduction 2005_deer_dePetrillo.pdf

  4. Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    October 29, 2010 | Department of Energy Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010 Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010 Presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010, on Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status. The presentation provides a high-level overview of the Renewable Electricity Futures study, its current status, modeling approach, and key

  5. Active optical zoom system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  6. High Level Waste Corporate Board Charter | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High Level Waste Corporate Board Charter High Level Waste Corporate Board Charter PDF icon High Level Waste Corporate Board Charter More Documents & Publications Corporate Board By-Laws NNMCAB Bylaws ORSSAB Bylaws

  7. Acceptor levels in ZnMgO:N probed by deep level optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, A.; Hierro, A. Muoz, E.

    2014-02-24

    A combination of deep level optical spectroscopy and lighted capacitance voltage profiling has been used to analyze the effect of N into the energy levels close to the valence band of Zn{sub 0.9}Mg{sub 0.1}O. Three energy levels at E{sub V}?+?0.47?eV, E{sub V}?+?0.35?eV, and E{sub V}?+?0.16?eV are observed in all films with concentrations in the range of 10{sup 15}10{sup 18}?cm{sup ?3}. The two shallowest traps at E{sub V}?+?0.35?eV and E{sub V}?+?0.16?eV have very large concentrations that scale with the N exposure and are thus potential acceptor levels. In order to correctly quantify the deep level concentrations, a metal-insulator-semiconductor model has been invoked, explaining well the resulting capacitance-voltage curves.

  8. Study Guides and Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for considering fossil energy education in your classroom curriculum. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy is excited to present printable study guides and activities...

  9. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels You are...

  10. Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Authors:...

  11. Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid The National Renewable Energy...

  12. Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methane levels larger over Four Corners region Scientists detect methane levels three times larger than expected over Four Corners region Study is first to show space-based...

  13. Certification of Completion of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Level-2 Milestone 405: Deploy Next-Generation Data Management and Analysis Environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Certification of Completion of Level-2...

  14. LOW-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP EXECUTION...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LOW-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP EXECUTION PLAN Los Alamos National ... Safety and Security LFRG Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group LLW ...

  15. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge ... Title: The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space ...

  16. High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the ...

  17. Combinatorial nuclear level-density model (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combinatorial nuclear level-density model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combinatorial nuclear level-density model You are accessing a document from the Department ...

  18. Operating Experience Level 3, Update to Requalification Test...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Operating Experience Level 3, Update to Requalification Test Failure of Certain High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters Operating Experience Level 3, Update to...

  19. Development of Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sea Level Rise Scenarios for Climate Change Assessments of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Development of Sea Level Rise...

  20. Level-2 Milestone 4468: Lorenz Simulation Interface Beta Release...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Level-2 Milestone 4468: Lorenz Simulation Interface Beta Release Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Level-2 Milestone 4468: Lorenz Simulation Interface Beta Release You...

  1. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  2. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelles, David S. (West Richland, WA); Ghoniem, Nasr M. (Granada Hills, CA); Powell, Roger W. (Pasco, WA)

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  3. WINDExchange: Deployment Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Regional Resource Centers Economic Development Siting Deployment Activities Recent years have seen major growth in wind energy, and deployment projections indicate this trend will continue for all parts of the wind industry, from small distributed and community wind projects to massive land-based and offshore utility-scale facilities. Record numbers of Americans see wind energy as an important contributor to a secure and clean energy

  4. Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to Congress August 2014 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Conservation Standards Activities Report to Congress | Page i Message from the Assistant Secretary I am pleased to provide you with the semi-annual Implementation Report on Energy Conservation Standards Activities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report meets the requirements of Section 141 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) and Sections 305 and 321 of the Energy Independence and

  5. Federal Biomass Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Biomass Federal Biomass Activities Activities Dana Arnold Dana Arnold Office of the Federal Environmental Office of the Federal Environmental Executive Executive September 10, 2009 September 10, 2009 OFEE OFEE Established in the Clinton Administration Established in the Clinton Administration Part of the White House Council on Environmental Part of the White House Council on Environmental Quality Quality Works with Federal agencies to make the operations Works with Federal agencies to make the

  6. International low level waste disposal practices and facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, W.M.

    2011-12-19

    The safe management of nuclear waste arising from nuclear activities is an issue of great importance for the protection of human health and the environment now and in the future. The primary goal of this report is to identify the current situation and practices being utilized across the globe to manage and store low and intermediate level radioactive waste. The countries included in this report were selected based on their nuclear power capabilities and involvement in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report highlights the nuclear waste management laws and regulations, current disposal practices, and future plans for facilities of the selected international nuclear countries. For each country presented, background information and the history of nuclear facilities are also summarized to frame the country's nuclear activities and set stage for the management practices employed. The production of nuclear energy, including all the steps in the nuclear fuel cycle, results in the generation of radioactive waste. However, radioactive waste may also be generated by other activities such as medical, laboratory, research institution, or industrial use of radioisotopes and sealed radiation sources, defense and weapons programs, and processing (mostly large scale) of mineral ores or other materials containing naturally occurring radionuclides. Radioactive waste also arises from intervention activities, which are necessary after accidents or to remediate areas affected by past practices. The radioactive waste generated arises in a wide range of physical, chemical, and radiological forms. It may be solid, liquid, or gaseous. Levels of activity concentration can vary from extremely high, such as levels associated with spent fuel and residues from fuel reprocessing, to very low, for instance those associated with radioisotope applications. Equally broad is the spectrum of half-lives of the radionuclides contained in the waste. These differences result in an equally wide variety of options for the management of radioactive waste. There is a variety of alternatives for processing waste and for short term or long term storage prior to disposal. Likewise, there are various alternatives currently in use across the globe for the safe disposal of waste, ranging from near surface to geological disposal, depending on the specific classification of the waste. At present, there appears to be a clear and unequivocal understanding that each country is ethically and legally responsible for its own wastes, in accordance with the provisions of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Therefore the default position is that all nuclear wastes will be disposed of in each of the 40 or so countries concerned with nuclear power generation or part of the fuel cycle. To illustrate the global distribution of radioactive waste now and in the near future, Table 1 provides the regional breakdown, based on the UN classification of the world in regions illustrated in Figure 1, of nuclear power reactors in operation and under construction worldwide. In summary, 31 countries operate 433 plants, with a total capacity of more than 365 gigawatts of electrical energy (GW[e]). A further 65 units, totaling nearly 63 GW(e), are under construction across 15 of these nations. In addition, 65 countries are expressing new interest in, considering, or actively planning for nuclear power to help address growing energy demands to fuel economic growth and development, climate change concerns, and volatile fossil fuel prices. Of these 65 new countries, 21 are in Asia and the Pacific region, 21 are from the Africa region, 12 are in Europe (mostly Eastern Europe), and 11 in Central and South America. However, 31 of these 65 are not currently planning to build reactors, and 17 of those 31 have grids of less than 5 GW, which is said to be too small to accommodate most of the reactor designs available. For the remaining 34 countries actively planning reactors, as of September 2010: 14 indicate a strong intention to precede with introduction of nuclear power; 7 are preparing but haven't made a final decision, 10 have made a decision and are preparing infrastructure, 2 have ordered a new nuclear power plant, and 1 has a plant under construction. In all countries interested in pursuing nuclear power, it is necessary for the governments to create an environment for investment and advancement of nuclear power, including development of a professional and independent regulatory framework and regime, knowledge and refinement of skills in nuclear safety and control, definition of policies on nuclear waste management and decommissioning, and participation in international non-proliferation measures. Specifically related to radioactive waste management, nuclear facilities and industries that utilize radioactive material work to well-established safety standards for the management of their waste.

  7. GROUND LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF ANOMALOUS RADIATION LEVELS IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GROUND LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF ANOMALOUS RADIATION LEVELS IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK W. D. Cottrell, D. J. Christian, and F. F. Haywood ,d ;v ~ !;);;J;$ '9;) -i, - 'L." ; i--j -7,) ;3 i, Work performed by Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37630 O&J. 2,7 +, / 7&y' March 1979 \ operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATIOII for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites- Remedial Action Program

  8. Ohio State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The Ohio State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Ohio. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Ohio. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Ohio.

  9. Massachusetts State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-12

    The Massachusetts State Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist State and Federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Massachusetts. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Massachusetts. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Massachusetts.

  10. Vermont State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Vermont State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Vermont. The profile is the result of a survey of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees in Vermont. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Vermont.

  11. New Jersey State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The New Jersey state Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in New Jersey. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in New Jersey. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in New Jersey.

  12. Texas State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The Texas State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactivee waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Texas. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Texas. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Texas.

  13. Kentucky State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The Kentucky State Briefing Book is one of a series of State briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist State and Federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Kentucky. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Kentucky. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Kentucky.

  14. Determining the appropriate scope: Assessing at the ecosystem level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southerland, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    Traditional approaches to determining the scope of environmental impact assessment have been based on an ad hoc selection of issues by the project proponent and other interested parties. Resulting in an inadequate consideration of both cumulative effects and impacts on biodiversity. Although public involvement in scoping the assessment must by resource-oriented, rather than activity-oriented, the appropriate scope of environmental impact assessment is the ecosystem. Drawing from the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) guidance on the consideration of biodiversity under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the growing consensus on principles of ecosystem management, scoping should begin with the large-scale ecosystem focusing on essential components potentially affected by the project to determine the appropriate bounds for the study. Although the science of analyzing ecosystems has many limitation, progress in improving environmental impact assessment can be made at any of the three increasingly difficult steps in assessing at the ecosystem level: (1) The first step involves bounding the assessment within the regional context to address cumulative effects and biodiversity. The adoption of a landscape scale has proven to be the most effective solution to the problems of setting boundaries for study units in time and space that do not omit important sources, endpoints (indicators), or processes. (2) The second step involves the use of higher-level indicators to characterize biodiversity and ecosystem integrity. Useful measures include community indices of biological integrity and landscape parameters such as habitat composition and fragmentation. (3) The third step involves identifying ecosystem thresholds (i.e., carrying capacities) to analyze the significance of cumulative impacts. Trends analysis can help identify potential threshold effects when process models are not available.

  15. Court decision dropping toxic substance rules stands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    In a somewhat surprising move, the U.S. Department of Labor has decided not to appeal a court decision essentially dropping regulations established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for about 400 hazardous substances. The decision leaves unregulated or subject to reduced standards substances that range from carbon monoxide to perchloroethylene. The Labor Department had until March 22, 1993, to appeal the court decision. On July 8, 1992, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit overturned OSHA's final Air Contaminants Standard, which was promulgated in 1989. The standard established permissible exposure limits (PELs) for 428 toxic substances. In AFL-CIO vs. OSHA, the Court ruled that OSHA failed to make a separate scientific case for evaluating health risks of each chemical. Because of the decision not to appeal, PELs for more than half of the substances regulated by OSHA now are removed from the books or revert to the voluntary industry standards adopted by OSHA in 1970 and in force prior to the 1989 final rule.

  16. CASL Test Stands . . . Enabling the CASL mission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A comprehensive, science-based understanding of these complex challenges requires high fidelity modeling & simulation (modsim) technology. CASL brings together a...

  17. Stand Alone Battery Thermal Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodie, Brad

    2015-09-30

    The objective of this project is research, development and demonstration of innovative thermal management concepts that reduce the cell or battery weight, complexity (component count) and/or cost by at least 20%. The project addresses two issues that are common problems with current state of the art lithium ion battery packs used in vehicles; low power at cold temperatures and reduced battery life when exposed to high temperatures. Typically, battery packs are oversized to satisfy the two issues mentioned above. The first phase of the project was spent making a battery pack simulation model using AMEsim software. The battery pack used as a benchmark was from the Fiat 500EV. FCA and NREL provided vehicle data and cell data that allowed an accurate model to be created that matched the electrical and thermal characteristics of the actual battery pack. The second phase involved using the battery model from the first phase and evaluate different thermal management concepts. In the end, a gas injection heat pump system was chosen as the dedicated thermal system to both heat and cool the battery pack. Based on the simulation model. The heat pump system could use 50% less energy to heat the battery pack in -20C ambient conditions, and by keeping the battery cooler at hot climates, the battery pack size could be reduced by 5% and still meet the warranty requirements. During the final phase, the actual battery pack and heat pump system were installed in a test bench at DENSO to validate the simulation results. Also during this phase, the system was moved to NREL where testing was also done to validate the results. In conclusion, the heat pump system can improve fuel economy (for electric vehicle) by 12% average in cold climates. Also, the battery pack size, or capacity, could be reduced 5%, or if pack size is kept constant, the pack life could be increased by two years. Finally, the total battery pack and thermal system cost could be reduced 5% only if the system is integrated with the vehicle cabin air conditioning system. The reason why we were not able to achieve the 20% reduction target is because of the natural decay of the battery cell due to the number of cycles. Perhaps newer battery chemistries that are not so sensitive to cycling would have more potential for reducing the battery size due to thermal issues.

  18. New York building stands out, saves energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A new energy-efficient building in New York is raising eyebrows and inspiring creativity, but its unique design and innovative features are helping the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art save energy, help the environment and keep its students’ imaginations fresh.

  19. Stand-Alone Battery Thermal Management System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  20. Building America Standing Technical Committee- Water Heating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building America program is focused on delivering market acceptable energy efficiency solutions to homeowners, builders, and contractors. Near term goals of 30-50% source energy savings are currently targeted. This document examines water heating gaps and barriers, and is updated as of Feb. 2012.

  1. Enclosures Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Research Project Organization Calendar Year ... Heating Home Energy Management Advanced Heating & Cooling Fluids Cooling ... this Insight first appeared in the ASHRAE Journal. ...

  2. Space Conditioning Standing Technical Commitee Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Construction ba-pirc.org * Identifying and Prioritizing Gaps and Barriers * Brain storm gapsbarriers - Grouped into 4 categories - Committee voted on top priorities in ...

  3. Photovoltaic (PV) Module Level Remote Safety Disconnect - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Find More Like This Return to Search Photovoltaic (PV) Module Level Remote Safety Disconnect National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Figure 1: System configuration of emergency module-level disconnect using module-level &lsquo;Isolation Detection Units&rsquo; (IDU).<br /> Figure 1: System configuration of emergency module-level disconnect using module-level 'Isolation Detection Units' (IDU). Technology Marketing Summary The ability to

  4. THE IMPACT OF OZONE ON THE LOWER FLAMMABLE LIMIT OF HYDROGEN IN VESSELS CONTAINING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherburne, Carol; Osterberg, Paul; Johnson, Tom; Frawely, Thomas

    2013-01-23

    The Savannah River Site, in conjunction with AREVA Federal services, has designed a process to treat dissolved radioactive waste solids with ozone. It is known that in this radioactive waste process, radionuclides radiolytically break down water into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen, which presents a well defined flammability hazard. Flammability limits have been established for both ozone and hydrogen separately; however, there is little information on mixtures of hydrogen and ozone. Therefore, testing was designed to provide critical flammability information necessary to support safety related considerations for the development of ozone treatment and potential scale-up to the commercial level. Since information was lacking on flammability issues at low levels of hydrogen and ozone, a testing program was developed to focus on filling this portion of the information gap. A 2-L vessel was used to conduct flammability tests at atmospheric pressure and temperature using a fuse wire ignition source at 1 percent ozone intervals spanning from no ozone to the Lower Flammable Limit (LFL) of ozone in the vessel, determined as 8.4%(v/v) ozone. An ozone generator and ozone detector were used to generate and measure the ozone concentration within the vessel in situ, since ozone decomposes rapidly on standing. The lower flammability limit of hydrogen in an ozone-oxygen mixture was found to decrease from the LFL of hydrogen in air, determined as 4.2 % (v/v) in this vessel. From the results of this testing, Savannah River was able to develop safety procedures and operating parameters to effectively minimize the formation of a flammable atmosphere.

  5. Observed and modeled patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the structure of the trade-wind layer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nuijens, Louise; Medeiros, Brian; Sandu, Irina; Ahlgrimm, Maike

    2015-11-06

    We present patterns of covariability between low-level cloudiness and the trade-wind boundary layer structure using long-term measurements at a site representative of dynamical regimes with moderate subsidence or weak ascent. We compare these with ECMWF’s Integrated Forecast System and 10 CMIP5 models. By using single-time step output at a single location, we find that models can produce a fairly realistic trade-wind layer structure in long-term means, but with unrealistic variability at shorter-time scales. The unrealistic variability in modeled cloudiness near the lifting condensation level (LCL) is due to stronger than observed relationships with mixed-layer relative humidity (RH) and temperature stratificationmore » at the mixed-layer top. Those relationships are weak in observations, or even of opposite sign, which can be explained by a negative feedback of convection on cloudiness. Cloudiness near cumulus tops at the tradewind inversion instead varies more pronouncedly in observations on monthly time scales, whereby larger cloudiness relates to larger surface winds and stronger trade-wind inversions. However, these parameters appear to be a prerequisite, rather than strong controlling factors on cloudiness, because they do not explain submonthly variations in cloudiness. Models underestimate the strength of these relationships and diverge in particular in their responses to large-scale vertical motion. No model stands out by reproducing the observed behavior in all respects. As a result, these findings suggest that climate models do not realistically represent the physical processes that underlie the coupling between trade-wind clouds and their environments in present-day climate, which is relevant for how we interpret modeled cloud feedbacks.« less

  6. Work Force Restructuring Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Force Restructuring Activities December 10, 2008 Note: Current updates are in bold # Planned Site/Contractor HQ Approved Separations Status General * LM has finalized the compilation of contractor management team separation data for the end of FY07 actuals and end of FY08 and FY09 projections. LM has submitted to Congress the FY 2007 Annual Report on contractor work force restructuring activities. The report has been posted to the LM website. *LM conducted a DOE complex-wide data call to the

  7. Bandwidth and Transfer Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Bandwidth and Transfer Activity Data Rate vs. File Size The graph below shows the bandwidth for individual file transfers for one day. The graph also gives a quick overview of the traffic and maximum bandwidth and file size for a given day. Historical yearly peak days. Daily Rate vs. Size Aggregate Transfer Bandwidth This graph shows the aggregate transfer rate to the storage systems as a function of time of day. The red line is the peak bandwidth observed within each one minute

  8. On the mechanism of populating 3p levels of neon under pumping by a hard ioniser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khasenov, M U

    2011-03-31

    The effect of quenching additives on the luminescence properties of helium - neon mixtures under pumping by {alpha} particles emitted from {sup 210}Po atoms is considered. It is concluded that, under excitation by a heavy charged particle, the population of the 3p'[1/2]{sub 0} level of neon is not related to the dissociative recombination of molecular ions. It is suggested that the most likely channels for populating the 3p level are the excitation transfer from metastable helium atoms to neon atoms and direct excitation of neon by nuclear particles and secondary electrons. (lasers and active media)

  9. Tank waste remediation system phase I high-level waste feed processability assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, S.L.; Stegen, G.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This report evaluates the effects of feed composition on the Phase I high-level waste immobilization process and interim storage facility requirements for the high-level waste glass.Several different Phase I staging (retrieval, blending, and pretreatment) scenarios were used to generate example feed compositions for glass formulations, testing, and glass sensitivity analysis. Glass models and data form laboratory glass studies were used to estimate achievable waste loading and corresponding glass volumes for various Phase I feeds. Key issues related to feed process ability, feed composition, uncertainty, and immobilization process technology are identified for future consideration in other tank waste disposal program activities.

  10. Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Road Map for Development of Crystal-Tolerant High Level Waste Glasses This road map guides the research and development for formulation and processing of crystal-tolerant glasses, identifying near- and long-term activities that need to be completed over the period from 2014 to 2019. The primary objective is to maximize waste loading for Hanford

  11. Soil characterization methods for unsaturated low-level waste sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wierenga, P.J.; Young, M.H. . Dept. of Soil and Water Science); Gee, G.W.; Kincaid, C.T. ); Hills, R.G. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Nicholson, T.J.; Cady, R.E. )

    1993-01-01

    To support a license application for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), applicants must characterize the unsaturated zone and demonstrate that waste will not migrate from the facility boundary. This document provides a strategy for developing this characterization plan. It describes principles of contaminant flow and transport, site characterization and monitoring strategies, and data management. It also discusses methods and practices that are currently used to monitor properties and conditions in the soil profile, how these properties influence water and waste migration, and why they are important to the license application. The methods part of the document is divided into sections on laboratory and field-based properties, then further subdivided into the description of methods for determining 18 physical, flow, and transport properties. Because of the availability of detailed procedures in many texts and journal articles, the reader is often directed for details to the available literature. References are made to experiments performed at the Las Cruces Trench site, New Mexico, that support LLW site characterization activities. A major contribution from the Las Cruces study is the experience gained in handling data sets for site characterization and the subsequent use of these data sets in modeling studies.

  12. NSLS 2009 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasta K.; Mona R.

    2009-05-01

    2009 was an incredibly exciting year for light sources at Brookhaven. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) hosted more than 2,200 visiting researchers, who, along with the about 50 members of our scientific staff, produced a total of 957 publications - about 20 percent of which appeared in premier journals. Covering topics ranging from Alzheimer's disease detection to ethanol-powered fuel cells, a sampling of these findings can be found in this Activity Report. We've also seen the resurfacing of some of our long-time users hard work. I was very proud to hear that two of the three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry have ties to the NSLS. Venki Ramakrishnan, a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department and long-time user of the NSLS, now at Cambridge University, and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University, also a long-time NSLS user, shared the prize with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science for their work on the structure and function of the ribosome. In the late 1990s, Ramakrishnan and Steitz used protein crystallography at the NSLS to gather atomic-level images of two ribosome subunits: 30S (Ramakrishnan) and 50S (Steitz). Both laureates solved the high-resolution structures for these subunits based on this data. After struggling with a rough budget for several years, we received excellent funding, and then some, this year. In addition to NSLS operations funding, we received $3 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). We used that additional money for two exciting projects: construction of a full-field x-ray microscope and acquisition of several advanced x-ray detectors. The x-ray microscope will be able to image objects with a targeted spatial resolution of 30 nanometers. This capability will be particularly important for new initiatives in energy research and will prepare our users for the projected 1-nanometer resolution benchmark at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The detectors project is expected to increase the throughput of several high-demand beamlines by an order of magnitude as well as enable new classes of experiments. In addition, a huge chunk of ARRA money - $150 million - was put toward accelerating the construction of NSLS-II, which is now taking shape across the street. Now physically much more than just a pile of dirt, NSLS-II was granted Critical Decision 3 status by the Department of Energy (DOE) early last year, giving the official go-ahead for construction. In July, construction began, marked by a groundbreaking ceremony that attracted elected officials, media, and DOE, Battelle, and Stony Brook University representatives from across the state and the country. As progress on NSLS-II continues, we're working with Stony Brook University to identify ways to capitalize on the facility's unique capabilities through the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). Included in this effort is a series of workshops to encourage the development and application of the photon sciences with collaborative research between industries, universities, and national laboratories. We helped host three of these workshops this year, focusing on microelectronics, energy storage, and materials in next-generation energy systems. The conversation and ideas generated at these meetings has been fresh and valuable and we hope to use this model to organize research opportunities in other scientific fields. Also this year: Brookhaven was deemed the lead institution for one of DOE's 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, focused on understanding the underlying nature of superconductivity in complex materials by using techniques at the NSLS and CFN; DOE awarded a $100,000 supplemental grant to our detector program to continue the development of a new generation of x-ray detectors that use germanium sensors, which, at high energies, are much more efficient than equivalent ones based on silicon; and funding for one of our largest consortia, Case Western Reserve University's Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB), was renewed through the National Inst

  13. Taking Risk Assessment and Management to the Next Level: Program-Level Risk Analysis to Enable Solid Decision-Making on Priorities and Funding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J. G.; Morton, R. L.; Castillo, C.; Dyer, G.; Johnson, N.; McSwain, J. T.

    2011-02-01

    A multi-level (facility and programmatic) risk assessment was conducted for the facilities in the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities (RTBF) Program and results were included in a new Risk Management Plan (RMP), which was incorporated into the fiscal year (FY) 2010 Integrated Plans. Risks, risk events, probability, consequence(s), and mitigation strategies were identified and captured, for most scope areas (i.e., risk categories) during the facilitated risk workshops. Risk mitigations (i.e., efforts in addition to existing controls) were identified during the facilitated risk workshops when the risk event was identified. Risk mitigation strategies fell into two broad categories: threats or opportunities. Improvement projects were identified and linked to specific risks they mitigate, making the connection of risk reduction through investments for the annual Site Execution Plan. Due to the amount of that was collected, analysis to be performed, and reports to be generated, a Risk Assessment/ Management Tool (RAMtool) database was developed to analyze the risks in real-time, at multiple levels, which reinforced the site-level risk management process and procedures. The RAMtool database was developed and designed to assist in the capturing and analysis of the key elements of risk: probability, consequence, and impact. The RAMtool calculates the facility-level and programmatic-level risk factors to enable a side-by-side comparison to see where the facility manager and program manager should focus their risk reduction efforts and funding. This enables them to make solid decisions on priorities and funding to maximize the risk reduction. A more active risk management process was developed where risks and opportunities are actively managed, monitored, and controlled by each facility more aggressively and frequently. risk owners have the responsibility and accountability to manage their assigned risk in real-time, using the RAMtool database.

  14. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on March 24, 2016 Title: Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and...

  15. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  16. Activities and Accomplishments

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activities and Accomplishments Denver * May 11, 2011 Working Groups * Financial Guidance * PSR Improvements * Notification * Communications Webinars * RFID Demonstration and TRANSCOM Enhancements - November 17, 2010 - ARG-US RFID/TRANSCOM Real-time Tracking System - TRANSCOM Enhancements * Communications for Waste Movements - February 24, 2011 - Mixed/LLW Forecast: Baseline Disposition Data and Waste Information Management System (WIMS) - Prospective Shipment Report Improvements Wiki Site *

  17. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  18. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wessendorf, Kurt O. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  19. Molecular level control of nanoscale composition and morphology: Toward photocatalytic nanocomposites for solar-to-chemical energy conversion of biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruberu, Thanthrige P.

    2013-05-15

    Understanding the factors influencing nanocrystal formation is a challenge yet to be realized. In comparison to the large number of studies on nanocrystal synthesis and their applications, the number of studies on the effect of the precursor chemistry on nanocrystal composition and shape remains low. Although photochemical fabrication of metalsemiconductor nano-heterostructures is reported in literature, control over the free particle formation and the site of metal deposition have not been achieved. Moreover, utilization of metal- semiconductor nano-heterostructures in photocatalytic reactions other than water splitting is hardly explored. In this thesis, we studied the effect of chalcogenide precursor reactivity on the composition, morphology and the axial anisotropy of cadmiumchalcogenide nanocrystals. We also investigated the influence of the irradiation wavelength in synthesizing metal-semiconductor nano-heterostructures. Finally, we showed that metal semiconductor nano-heterostructures can be used as a photocatalyst for alcohol dehydrogenation reactions. We explored the pathways for the formation of Pt and Pd nanoparticles on CdS and CdS{sub 0.4}Se{sub 0.6} nanorods. This study revealed that the wavelength of irradiation is critical to control free-standing vs. bound metal (Pt and Pd) nanoparticles to semiconductor. Additionally, we observed that metal photodeposition occurs on specific segments of axially anisotropic, compositionally graded CdS0.4Se0.6 nanorods due to the band-gap differential between their nano-domains. We used semiconductor-metal heterostructures for sunlightdriven dehydrogenation and hydrogenolysis of benzyl alcohol. Heterostructure composition dictates activity (turnovers) and product distribution. A few metal (Pt, Pd) islands on the semiconductor surface significantly enhance activity and selectivity and also greatly stabilize the semiconductor against photoinduced etching and degradation.

  20. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referred to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.

  1. Ras-GTP dimers activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nan, Xiaolin; Tamgüney, Tanja M.; Collisson, Eric A.; Lin, Li -Jung; Pitt, Cameron; Galeas, Jacqueline; Lewis, Sophia; Gray, Joe W.; McCormick, Frank; Chu, Steven

    2015-06-16

    Rat sarcoma (Ras) GTPases regulate cell proliferation and survival through effector pathways including Raf-MAPK, and are the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. Although it is well established that Ras activity requires binding to both GTP and the membrane, details of how Ras operates on the cell membrane to activate its effectors remain elusive. Efforts to target mutant Ras in human cancers to therapeutic benefit have also been largely unsuccessful. Here we show that Ras-GTP forms dimers to activate MAPK. We used quantitative photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) to analyze the nanoscale spatial organization of PAmCherry1-tagged KRas 4B (hereafter referredmore » to KRas) on the cell membrane under various signaling conditions. We found that at endogenous expression levels KRas forms dimers, and KRasG12D, a mutant that constitutively binds GTP, activates MAPK. Overexpression of KRas leads to formation of higher order Ras nanoclusters. Conversely, at lower expression levels, KRasG12D is monomeric and activates MAPK only when artificially dimerized. Moreover, dimerization and signaling of KRas are both dependent on an intact CAAX (C, cysteine; A, aliphatic; X, any amino acid) motif that is also known to mediate membrane localization. These results reveal a new, dimerization-dependent signaling mechanism of Ras, and suggest Ras dimers as a potential therapeutic target in mutant Ras-driven tumors.« less

  2. Activation of Air and Utilities in the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khater, H; Pohl, B; Brererton, S

    2010-04-08

    Detailed 3-D modeling of the NIF facility is developed to accurately simulate the radiation environment within the NIF. Neutrons streaming outside the NIF Target Chamber will activate the air present inside the Target Bay and the Ar gas inside the laser tubes. Smaller levels of activity are also generated in the Switchyard air and in the Ar portion of the SY laser beam path. The impact of neutron activation of utilities located inside the Target Bay is analyzed for variety of shot types. The impact of activating TB utilities on dose received by maintenance personnel post-shot is analyzed. The current NIF facility model includes all important features of the Target Chamber, shielding system, and building configuration. Flow of activated air from the Target Bay is controlled by the HVAC system. The amount of activated Target Bay air released through the stack is very small and does not pose significant hazard to personnel or the environment. Activation of Switchyard air is negligible. Activation of Target Bay utilities result in a manageable dose rate environment post high yield (20 MJ) shots. The levels of activation generated in air and utilities during D-D and THD shots are small and do not impact work planning post shots.

  3. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  4. Principal Building Activities--1995 CBECS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Detailed Tables > Principal Building Activities Table Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities,...

  5. Activ Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activ Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Activ Solar Address: Vienna, Wipplingerstrasse 35 Place: Austria Zip: 1010 Sector: Solar Product: The company's main business areas...

  6. Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Federal Activities in the Bioeconomy Zia Haq, Senior Analyst, Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

  7. POSSIBLE CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN AD LEO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buccino, Andrea P.; Petrucci, Romina; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Jofr, Emiliano

    2014-01-20

    AD Leo (GJ388) is an active dM3 flare star that has been extensively observed both in the quiescent and flaring states. Since this active star is near the fully convective boundary, studying its long-term chromospheric activity in detail could be an appreciable contribution to dynamo theory. Here, using the Lomb-Scargle periodogram, we analyze the Ca IIK line-core fluxes derived from CASLEO spectra obtained between 2001 and 2013 and the V magnitude from the ASAS database between 2004 and 2010. From both of these totally independent time series, we obtain a possible activity cycle with a period of approximately seven years and a less significant shorter cycle of approximately two years. A tentative interpretation is that a dynamo operating near the surface could be generating the longer cycle, while a second dynamo operating in the deep convection zone could be responsible for the shorter one. Based on the long duration of our observing program at CASLEO and the fact that we observe different spectral features simultaneously, we also analyze the relation between simultaneous measurements of the Na I index (R{sub D}{sup ?}), H?, and Ca IIK fluxes at different activity levels of AD Leo, including flares.

  8. Preliminary Safety Design Report for Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Solack; Carol Mason

    2012-03-01

    A new onsite, remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled low-level waste disposal for remote-handled low-level waste from the Idaho National Laboratory and for nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled low-level waste in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This preliminary safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by discussing site characteristics that impact accident analysis, by providing the facility and process information necessary to support the hazard analysis, by identifying and evaluating potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled low-level waste, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  9. Src regulates the activity of SIRT2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, You Hee; Kim, Hangun; Lee, Sung Ho; Jin, Yun-Hye; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: Src decreases the protein levels of Sirt2. Src inhibitor and knockdown of Src increase the protein levels of Sirt2. Src interacts with and phosphorylates Sirt2. Src regulate the activity of Sirt2. - Abstract: SIRT2 is a mammalian member of the Sirtuin family of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylases. The tyrosine kinase Src is involved in a variety of cellular signaling pathways, leading to the induction of DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal reorganization. The function of SIRT2 is modulated by post-translational modifications; however, the precise molecular signaling mechanism of SIRT2 through interactions with c-Src has not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the potential regulation of SIRT2 function by c-Src. We found that the protein levels of SIRT2 were decreased by c-Src, and subsequently rescued by the addition of a Src specific inhibitor, SU6656, or by siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Src. The c-Src interacts with and phosphorylates SIRT2 at Tyr104. c-Src also showed the ability to regulate the deacetylation activity of SIRT2. Investigation on the phosphorylation of SIRT2 suggested that this was the method of c-Src-mediated SIRT2 regulation.

  10. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA) [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  11. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  12. Geothermal Energy (5 Activities)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Energy (Five Activities) Grades: 5-8 Topic: Geothermal Authors: Laura J. W. Butterfield, Ph.D., Brandon A. Gillette, and Richard Shin Owner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Geothermal Energy Laura J. W. Butterfield, Ph.D. Brandon A. Gillette Richard Shin Middle School For the Teacher Deep inside the Earth, at depths near 150 kilometers, the temperature

  13. NREL: International Activities - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webmaster Please enter your name and email address in the boxes provided, then type your message below. When you are finished, click "Send Message." NOTE: If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version International Activities Home Bilateral Partnerships Multilateral Partnerships Assessments & Tools Working with Us Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your

  14. Better Buildings Workforce Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETTER BUILDINGS WORKFORCE ACTIVITIES  Benjamin Goldstein, Better Buildings Workforce Project Manager, U.S. Department of Energy April 24, 2014 Housekeeping and Overview 1) Restroom location 2) Cell phones-silent please 3) Presentation format  15 min presentation; 15 minute Q&A (reviewers first, then audience) 4) Presenters  Phil Coleman, LBNL: Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines (Energy Manager and Federal Facility Manager)  Marta Milan, Waypoint Building: Commercial Buildings

  15. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. Weekday and Weekend Air Pollutant Levels in Ozone Problem Areas in the U.S. 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  16. Levelized Cost of Energy in US | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Levelized Cost of Energy in US Home I'd like to pull a cost comparison for the levelized cost of energy in the US. How do I do this on this site? Does the LCOE interactive table...

  17. levelized cost of energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    levelized cost of energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of...

  18. State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy AgencyCompany Organization: Oak Ridge...

  19. Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design of megawatt power level heat pipe reactors An important niche for nuclear energy...

  20. CRAD, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015 (EA CRAD 31-11, Rev. 0) CRAD, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management - April 30, 2015 (EA CRAD 31-11, Rev. 0) April 2015...

  1. Evaluation of noise associated with geothermal development activities. Draft report, 31 July 1979-30 April 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, M.; Stern, R.

    1982-01-01

    This volume contains 93 data sheets for noise associated with geothermal development activities and geothermal well drilling noise levels from the long term noise monitoring program.

  2. Proceedings of the Third Annual Information Meeting DOE Low-Level Waste-Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Large, D.E.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stratton, L.E.; Jacobs, D.G.

    1981-12-01

    The Third Annual Participants Information Meeting of the Low-Level Waste Management Program was held in New Orleans, Louisiana, November 4-6, 1981 The specific purpose was to bring together appropriate representatives of industry, USNRC, program management, participating field offices, and contractors to: (1) exchange information and analyze program needs, and (2) involve participants in planning, developing and implementing technology for low-level waste management. One hundred seven registrants participated in the meeting. Presentation and workshop findings are included in these proceedings under the following headings: low-level waste activities; waste treatment; shallow land burial; remedial action; greater confinement; ORNL reports; panel workshops; and summary. Forty-six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the data base.

  3. Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will present a process for developing community-based sea level rise projections and facilitating their use.

  4. Operating Experience Level 3, OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Publications Hazard Communication Training - Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard Operating Experience Level 3, Safe Management of Mercury...

  5. Track 1: Safety Culture- Taking ISMS to the Next Level

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 1: Safety Culture - Taking ISMS to the Next Level

  6. Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives PDF icon Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives More Documents & Publications Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Focus

  7. High-Level Waste Corporate Board Presentation Archive | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy High-Level Waste Corporate Board Presentation Archive High-Level Waste Corporate Board Presentation Archive Archived Documents PDF icon High-Level Waste Corporate Board, Dr. Inés Triay PDF icon High-Level Waste Corporate Board, Mark Gilbertson PDF icon EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap and Major Technology Demonstrations PDF icon Office of River Protection PDF icon Idaho National Laboratory Description, Chellenges, Technology, Issues, and Needs PDF icon West Valley

  8. Letter on Low-Level Radiation Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Letter on Low-Level Radiation Research Letter on Low-Level Radiation Research The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) transmitted a letter to the Department regarding its perspective on how DOE should pursue research on low-level radiation. SEAB recommends DOE continue to sponsor a small, sustained, high quality research program primarily in DOE laboratories as well as centers of excellence within universities, medical schools, and hospitals. PDF icon SEAB Letter on Low-Level Radiation

  9. Level Alignment of a Prototypical Photocatalytic System: Methanol on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Migani, Annapaola; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Iacomino, Amilcare; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2013-08-07

    Photocatalytic activity depends on the optimal alignment of electronic levels at the molecule? semiconductor interface. Establishing the level alignment experimentally is complicated by the uncertain chemical identity of the surface species. We address the assignment of the occupied and empty electronic levels for the prototypical photocatalytic system consisting of methanol on a rutile TiO2(110) surface. Using many-body quasiparticle (QP) techniques, we show that the frontier levels measured in UV photoelectron and two-photon photoemission spectroscopy experiments can be assigned to molecularly chemisorbed methanol rather than its dissociated product, the methoxy species. We find that the highest occupied molecular orbital of the methoxy species is much closer to the valence band maximum, suggesting why it is more photocatalytically active than the methanol molecule. We develop a general semiquantitative model for predicting many-body QP energies based on the electronic screening within the bulk, molecular, or vacuum regions of the wave functions at molecule?semiconductor interfaces.

  10. Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda PDF icon Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Agenda More Documents & Publications NTSF Spring 2013 Save The Date NTSF 2013 Agenda NTSF Spring 2010 Final Agenda

  11. Energy Conservation Contract (4 activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students learn about saving energy and encourage their families to conserve by completing the following activities

  12. New York State low-level radioactive waste status report for 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes data on low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) generated in New York State. It is based on reports from generators that must be filed annually with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and on data from the US Department of Energy (US DOE). The data are summarized in a series of tables and figures. There are four sections in this report. Section 1 covers volume, activity, and other characteristics of waste shipped for disposal in 1997. (Activity is the measure of a material`s radioactivity, or the number of radiation-emitting events occurring each second.) Section 2 summarizes volume, activity, and other characteristics of waste held for storage as of December 31, 1997. Section 3 shows historical LLRW generation and includes generators` projections for the next five years. Section 4 provides a list, by county, of all facilities from which 1997 LLRW reports were received.

  13. Disposal of low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste during 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Isotopic inventories and other data are presented for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed LLW disposed (and occasionally stored) during calendar year 1990 at commercial disposal facilities and Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Detailed isotopic information is presented for the three commercial disposal facilities located near Barnwell, SC, Richland, WA, and Beatty, NV. Less information is presented for the Envirocare disposal facility located near Clive, UT, and for LLW stored during 1990 at the West Valley site. DOE disposal information is included for the Savannah River Site (including the saltstone facility), Nevada Test Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, Y-12 Site, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Summary information is presented about stored DOE LLW. Suggestions are made about improving LLW disposal data.

  14. Reuse of activated alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobensack, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Activated alumina is used as a trapping media to remove trace quantities of UF{sub 6} from process vent streams. The current uranium recovery method employs concentrated nitric acid which destroys the alumina pellets and forms a sludge which is a storage and disposal problem. A recently developed technique using a distilled water rinse followed by three dilute acid rinses removes on average 97% of the uranium, and leaves the pellets intact with crush strength and surface area values comparable with new material. Trapping tests confirm the effectiveness of the recycled alumina as UF{sub 6} trapping media.

  15. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  16. FY 1996 activity summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety provides nuclear safety policy, independent technical evaluation, and technical support. A summary of these activities is provided in this report. These include: (1) changing the mission of the former production facilities to storage and waste management; (2) stabilizing nuclear materials not recycled due to production cessation or interruptions; (3) reformulating the authorization basis for existing facilities to convert to a standards based approach for operations consistent with modern expectations; and (4) implementing a modern regulatory framework for nuclear facilities. Enforcement of the Price-Anderson Amendments Act is also reported.

  17. Mechanism for Clastogenic Activity of Naphthalene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchholz, Bruce A.

    2015-09-29

    Naphthalene incubations form DNA adducts in vitro in a dose dependent manner in both mouse and rat tissues. Rodent tissue incubations with naphthalene indicate that naphthalene forms as many DNA adducts as Benzo(a)pyrene, a known DNA binding carcinogen. The mouse airway has the greatest number of DNA adducts, corresponding to the higher metabolic activation of naphthalene in this location. Both rat tissues, the rat olfactory (tumor target) and the airways (non-tumor target), have similar levels of NA-DNA adducts, indicating that short term measures of initial adduct formation do not directly correlate with sites of tumor formation in the NTP bioassays.

  18. Activation of erbium films for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Snow, Clark S.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2011-06-01

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  19. NREL Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL Climate Activities (Redirected from Climate Activities at NREL) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Climate Activities at NREL Name Climate Activities at NREL AgencyCompany...

  20. Financial and Activity Reports | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Financial and Activity Reports Financial and Activity Reports June 30, 2013 Financial and Activity Report - June 30, 2013 May 31, 2013 Financial and Activity Report - May 31, 2013 ...