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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Wind Tunnel and Flight Testing of Active Flow Control on a UAV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active flow control has been extensively explored in wind tunnel studies but successful in-flight implementation of an active flow control technology still remains a challenge. This thesis presents implementation of active flow control technology...

Babbar, Yogesh

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

2

Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful...

3

Data Flow Testing Neelam Gupta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Flow Testing Neelam Gupta The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona and Rajiv Gupta The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona Software testing techniques are designed to execute a program on a set of test cases that provide suĂ?cient coverage under some speci#12;c well-de#12;ned test coverage criterion

Gupta, Rajiv

4

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing, 2013 Mousavi: Path Testing #12;Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Outline Structural

Mousavi, Mohammad

5

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing, 2012 Mousavi: Path Testing #12;Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Outline Structural

Mousavi, Mohammad

6

Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor for Quantification of Phosphorylated Cholinesterase: Biomarker of Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor...

7

Active combustion flow modulation valve  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flow modulation valve has a slidably translating hollow armature with at least one energizable coil wound around and fixably attached to the hollow armature. The energizable coil or coils are influenced by at least one permanent magnet surrounding the hollow armature and supported by an outer casing. Lorentz forces on the energizable coils which are translated to the hollow armature, increase or decrease the flow area to provide flow throttling action. The extent of hollow armature translation depends on the value of current supplied and the direction of translation depends on the direction of current flow. The compact nature of the flow modulation valve combined with the high forces afforded by the actuator design provide a flow modulation valve which is highly responsive to high-rate input control signals.

Hensel, John Peter; Black, Nathaniel; Thorton, Jimmy Dean; Vipperman, Jeffrey Stuart; Lambeth, David N; Clark, William W

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

8

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? PHEV Evaluations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities AVTA PHEV Demonstrations and Testing Argonne...

9

Review of flow battery testing at Sandia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating prototype zinc/bromine, Redox, and zinc/ferricyanide flowing electrolyte batteries and cells. This paper will update previous reports of test results of two Exxon zinc/bromine batteries and one NASA Redox iron/chromium battery. Two 60-sq. cm. zinc/ferricyanide cells from Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. are also being evaluated. Performance, life, and operating data will be described for these batteries and cells.

Butler, P.C.; Miller, D.W.; Robinson, C.E.; Rodriguez, G.P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

J. Francfort; D. Karner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Final report for the flow excursion follow-on testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Mark 22 Flow Excursion Follow-On testing was to investigate the theory that approximately 15% of the flow bypassed the primary flow channels in previous testing, whereas the design called for only a 3% bypass. The results of the follow-on tests clearly confirmed this theory. The testing was performed in two phases. During the first phase, characterization tests performed during the earlier test program were repeated.

Nash, C.A.; Walters, T.W.

1992-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

12

Category:Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind FarmAdd a new Federal Oil andFlow Test

13

Summary of Construction Equipment Tests and Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Construction Equipment Tests and Activities Bruce Glagola - Sept 2013 Construction Equipment Tests A series of tests were conducted by the APS Construction Vibration...

14

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Non-PHEV Evaluations and Data Collection AVTA HEV, NEV, BEV and HICEV Demonstrations and Testing Benchmarking of Advanced HEVs and...

15

Boron-10 ABUNCL Active Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from testing of the active mode of the General Electric Reuter-Stokes Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory using sources and fuel pins.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

HEV Fleet Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activities - 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Maintenance Sheet for 2010 Ford Fusion VIN 3FADP0L32AR194699 Date Mileage Description Cost 1012009 5915 Changed oil and filter 28.77...

17

Results of no-flow rotary drill bit comparison testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the results of testing of a newer rotary sampling bit and sampler insert called the No-Flow System. This No-Flow System was tested side by side against the currently used rotary bit and sampler insert, called the Standard System. The two systems were tested using several ''hard to sample'' granular non-hazardous simulants to determine which could provide greater sample recovery. The No-Flow System measurably outperformed the Standard System in each of the tested simulants.

WITWER, K.S.

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Flight test measurements and theoretical lift prediction for flow energizers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering FLIGHT TEST MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL LIFT PREDICTION FOR FLOW ENERGIZERS A Thesis by AHIT ARAVIND PRADHAN Approved as to style and content by: Donald T. Mard (Chairman of Committee...) Howard L. Chevalier (Member) Garng H. Huang (Member) gg~j(EC( C, Clogs' Malter E. Haisler (Head of Department) Hay 1986 ABSTRACT Flight Test Measurements and Theoretical Lift prediction for Flow Energizers. (May 1986) Amit Aravind Pradhan, B...

Pradhan, Amit Aravind

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor pills'' directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Reversing Flow Test Facility. Technical report, March 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reversing Flow Test Facility (RFTF) is intended for the study of fluid flow and heat transfer under the reversing-flow conditions that occur in Stirling engines. the facility consists of four major parts: (1) Mechanical Drive - two cylinders with cam-driven pistons which generate the reversing gas flow, (2) Test Section - a U-shaped section containing instrumented test pieces, (3) Instruments -l high-speed transducers for measuring gas pressure and temperature, piston positions, and other system parameters, and (4) Data Acquisition System - a computer-based system able to acquire, store, display and analyze the data from the instruments. The RFTF can operate at pressures up to 8.0 MPa, hot-side temperatures to 800/sup 0/C, and flow-reversal frequencies to 50 Hz. Operation to data has used helium as the working gas at pressures of 3.0 and 6.0 MPa, at ambient temperature, and at frequencies from 1 to 50 Hz. The results show that both frictional and inertial parts of the pressure drop are significant in the heater, coolers and connecting tubes; the inertial part is negligible in the regenerators. In all cases, the frictional part of the pressure drop is nearly in phase with the mass flow. 18 refs., 22 figs., 13 tabs.

Roach, P.D.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Design verification and cold-flow modeling test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a compilation of the following three test reports prepared by TRW for Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) as part of the Healy Clean Coal Project, Phase 1 Design of the TRW Combustor and Auxiliary Systems, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Clean Coal Technology 3 Program: (1) Design Verification Test Report, dated April 1993, (2) Combustor Cold Flow Model Report, dated August 28, 1992, (3) Coal Feed System Cold Flow Model Report, October 28, 1992. In this compilation, these three reports are included in one volume consisting of three parts, and TRW proprietary information has been excluded.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Test experience with multiterminal HVDC load flow and stability programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A powerful new set of load flow and stability programs for the study of HVdc systems has recently been completed. During the development of the programs novel applications of multiterminal HVdc systems were investigated, firstly on a large test system and later on actual utility models. This paper describes the test systems used, the HVdc systems studied and some of the interesting system related aspects of the HVdc system performance.

Chapman, D.G.; Davies, J.B. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); McNichol, J.R. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); Gulachenski, E.M.; Doe, S. (New England Power Service Co., Westboro, MA (US)); Balu, N.J. (EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (US))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Analysis of Alcove 8/Niche 3 Flow and Transport Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document analyses of the Alcove 8/Niche 3 flow and transport tests, with a focus on the large-infiltration-plot tests and compare pre-test model predictions with the actual test observations. The tests involved infiltration that originated from the floor of Alcove 8 (located in the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift) and observations of seepage and tracer transport at Niche 3 (located in the Main Drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF)). The test results are relevant to drift seepage and solute transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. The main objective of this analysis was to evaluate the modeling approaches used and the importance of the matrix diffusion process by comparing simulation and actual test observations. The pre-test predictions for the large plot test were found to differ from the observations and the reasons for the differences were documented in this report to partly address CR 6783, which concerns unexpected test results. These unexpected results are discussed and assessed with respect to the current baseline unsaturated zone radionuclide transport model in Sections 6.2.4, 6.3.2, and 6.4.

H.H. Liu

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this test report is to document the testing performed under the guidance of HNF-SD-WM-TC-073, {ital Flammable Gas Interlock Spoolpiece Flow Response Test Plan and Procedure}. This testing was performed for Lockheed Martin Hanford Characterization Projects Operations (CPO) in support of Rotary Mode Core Sampling jointly by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation and Numatec Hanford Company. The testing was conducted in the 305 building Engineering Testing Laboratory (ETL). NHC provides the engineering and technical support for the 305 ETL. The key personnel identified for the performance of this task are as follows: Test responsible engineering manager, C. E. Hanson; Flammable Gas Interlock Design Authority, G. P. Janicek; 305 ETL responsible manager, N. J. Schliebe; Cognizant RMCS exhauster engineer, E. J. Waldo/J. D. Robinson; Cognizant 305 ETL engineer, K. S. Witwer; Test director, T. C. Schneider. Other support personnel were supplied, as necessary, from 305/306 ETL. The testing, on the flammable Gas Interlock (FGI) system spoolpiece required to support Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) of single shell flammable gas watch list tanks, took place between 2-13-97 and 2-25-97.

Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

26

A review of flow battery testing at Sandia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating prototype zinc/bromine, Redox, and zinc/ferricyanide flowing electrolyte batteries and cells. This paper updates previous reports of test results of two Exxon zinc/bromine batteries and one NASA Redox iron/chromium battery. Two 60sq. cm. zinc/ferricyanide cells from Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. are also being evaluated. Performance, life, and operating data are described for these batteries and cells.

Butler, P.C.; Miller, D.W.; Robinson, C.E.; Rodriguez, G.P.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique...

28

Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

29

Dixie Valley Six Well Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision has TypeGeothermal Area JumpSix Well Flow Test

30

Hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization and radial flow through permeability tests for cementitous materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressurization test is a potential solution for measuring concrete permeability. The hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization (HDP) test is compared with the radial flow through (RFT) test and the solid cylinder dynamic pressurization (SDP) test to assess...

Jones, Christopher Andrew

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

None

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 34.5 kPa, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.114 m{sup 3}/hr.

Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Research and Technology Applications Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Engine Tests of an Active PM Filter Regeneration System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HERE (tm) 10 Diesel Particulate Filter Flow Direction 10 Liter, Non-catalyzed, Silicon Carbide CLEAN AIR STARTS HERE (tm) 11 XFC(tm) Engine Testing: No DPF installed Device out...

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - active flow control Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Control of Resonant Flow Inside a Supersonic Cavity Using High Bandwidth Pulsed Micro-actuators Summary: , Tallahassee, FL 32310 Active control of high speed flows has...

36

A data flow-based structural testing technique for FBD programs Eunkyoung Jee a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Nuclear Regulatory Commission) [3] mandates that software unit testing for safety-critical systemsA data flow-based structural testing technique for FBD programs Eunkyoung Jee a , Junbeom Yoo b Available online 10 March 2009 Keywords: Software testing Structural testing Test coverage criteria

37

SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, J. M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Two-phase flow in a chemically active porous medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the problem of the transformation of a given reactant species into an immiscible product species, as they flow through a chemically active porous medium. We derive the equation governing the evolution of the volume fraction of the species -- in a one-dimensional macroscopic description --, identify the relevant dimensionless numbers, and provide simple models for capillary pressure and relative permeabilities, which are quantities of crucial importance when tackling multiphase flows in porous media. We set the domain of validity of our models and discuss the importance of viscous coupling terms in the extended Darcy's law. We investigate numerically the steady regime and demonstrate that the spatial transformation rate of the species along the reactor is non-monotonous, as testified by the existence of an inflection point in the volume fraction profiles. We obtain the scaling of the location of this inflection point with the dimensionless lengths of the problem. Eventually, we provide key elements for optimization of the reactor.

Alexandre Darmon; Michael Benzaquen; Thomas Salez; Olivier Dauchot

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? PHEV Evaluations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

kWh MPG per FWHET Test Cumulative MPG Cumulative AC kWh 15 FY07 EnergyCS Prius - Fuel Costs EnergyCS PHEV Prius UDDS & HWFET Fuel Cost per Mile 0.000 0.005 0.010 0.015...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Active Waste Materials Corrosion and Decontamination Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stainless steel alloys, 304L and 316L, were corrosion tested in representative radioactive samples of three actual Hanford tank waste solutions (Tanks AW-101, C-104, AN-107). Both the 304L and 316L exhibited good corrosion performance when immersed in boiling waste solutions. The maximum general corrosion rate was 0.015 mm/y (0.60 mils per year). Generally, the 304L had a slightly higher rate than the 316L. No localized attack was observed after 122 days of testing in the liquid phase, liquid/vapor phase, or vapor phase. Radioactive plate-out decontamination tests indicated that a 24-hour exposure to 1 {und M} HNO{sub 3} could remove about 99% of the radioactive components in the metal film when exposed to the C-104 and AN-107 solutions. The decontamination results are less certain for the AW-101 solution, since the initial contamination readings exceeded the capacity of the meter used for this test.

MJ Danielson; MR Elmore; SG Pitman

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Pre-test CFD Calculations for a Bypass Flow Standard Problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is the flow that occurs between adjacent graphite blocks. Gaps exist between blocks due to variances in their manufacture and installation and because of the expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. Although the temperature of fuel compacts and graphite is sensitive to the presence of bypass flow, there is great uncertainty in the level and effects of the bypass flow. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program at the Idaho National Laboratory has undertaken to produce experimental data of isothermal bypass flow between three adjacent graphite blocks. These data are intended to provide validation for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of the bypass flow. Such validation data sets are called Standard Problems in the nuclear safety analysis field. Details of the experimental apparatus as well as several pre-test calculations of the bypass flow are provided. Pre-test calculations are useful in examining the nature of the flow and to see if there are any problems associated with the flow and its measurement. The apparatus is designed to be able to provide three different gap widths in the vertical direction (the direction of the normal coolant flow) and two gap widths in the horizontal direction. It is expected that the vertical bypass flow will range from laminar to transitional to turbulent flow for the different gap widths that will be available.

Rich Johnson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Validation Process for the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Faultless Nuclear Test at Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many sites of groundwater contamination rely heavily on complex numerical models of flow and transport to develop closure plans. This has created a need for tools and approaches that can be used to build confidence in model predictions and make it apparent to regulators, policy makers, and the public that these models are sufficient for decision making. This confidence building is a long-term iterative process and it is this process that should be termed ''model validation.'' Model validation is a process not an end result. That is, the process of model validation cannot always assure acceptable prediction or quality of the model. Rather, it provides safeguard against faulty models or inadequately developed and tested models. Therefore, development of a systematic approach for evaluating and validating subsurface predictive models and guiding field activities for data collection and long-term monitoring is strongly needed. This report presents a review of model validation studies that pertain to groundwater flow and transport modeling. Definitions, literature debates, previously proposed validation strategies, and conferences and symposia that focused on subsurface model validation are reviewed and discussed. The review is general in nature, but the focus of the discussion is on site-specific, predictive groundwater models that are used for making decisions regarding remediation activities and site closure. An attempt is made to compile most of the published studies on groundwater model validation and assemble what has been proposed or used for validating subsurface models. The aim is to provide a reasonable starting point to aid the development of the validation plan for the groundwater flow and transport model of the Faultless nuclear test conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The review of previous studies on model validation shows that there does not exist a set of specific procedures and tests that can be easily adapted and applied to determine the validity of site-specific groundwater models. This is true for both deterministic and stochastic models, with the latter posing a more difficult and challenging problem when it comes to validation. This report then proposes a general validation approach for the CNTA model, which addresses some of the important issues recognized in previous validation studies, conferences, and symposia as crucial to the process. The proposed approach links model building, model calibration, model predictions, data collection, model evaluations, and model validation in an iterative loop. The approach focuses on use of collected validation data to reduce model uncertainty and narrow the range of possible outcomes of stochastic numerical models. It accounts for the stochastic nature of the numerical CNTA model, which used Monte Carlo simulation approach. The proposed methodology relies on the premise that absolute validity is not even a theoretical possibility and is not a regulatory requirement. Rather, it highlights the importance of testing as many aspects of the model as possible and using as many diverse statistical tools as possible for rigorous checking and confidence building in the model and its predictions. It is this confidence that will eventually allow for regulator and public acceptance of decisions based on the model predictions.

Ahmed Hassan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

LOW ACTIVITY WASTE FEED SOLIDS CARACTERIZATION AND FILTERABILITY TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for the WTP Pretreatment facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) feed and Low Activity Waste (LAW) feed. Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium in the WTP Pretreatment facility, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Options are being explored to immobilize the LAW portion of the tank waste, i.e., the LAW feed from the WTP Pretreatment facility. Removal of {sup 99}Tc from the LAW Feed, followed by off-site disposal of the {sup 99}Tc, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing {sup 99}Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. The conceptual flow sheet of the {sup 99}Tc removal process includes a filter to remove insoluble solids prior to processing the stream in an ion exchange column, but the characteristics and behavior of the liquid and solid phases has not previously been investigated. This report contains results of testing of a simulant that represents the projected composition of the feed to the Supplemental LAW process. This feed composition is not identical to the aqueous tank waste fed to the Waste Treatment Plant because it has been processed through WTP Pretreatment facility and therefore contains internal changes and recycle streams that will be generated within the WTP process. Although a Supplemental LAW feed simulant has previously been prepared, this feed composition differs from that simulant because those tests examined only the fully soluble aqueous solution at room temperature, not the composition formed after evaporation, including the insoluble solids that precipitate after it cools. The conceptual flow sheet for Supplemental LAW immobilization has an option for removal of {sup 99}Tc from the feed stream, if needed. Elutable ion exchange has been selected for that process. If implemented, the stream would need filtration to remove the insoluble solids prior to processing in an ion exchange column. The characteristics, chemical speciation, physical properties, and filterability of the solids are important to judge the feasibility of the concept, and to estimate the size and cost of a facility. The insoluble solids formed during these tests were primarily natrophosphate, natroxalate, and a sodium aluminosilicate compound. At the elevated temperature and 8 M [Na+], appreciable insoluble solids (1.39 wt%) were present. Cooling to room temperature and dilution of the slurry from 8 M to 5 M [Na+] resulted in a slurry containing 0.8 wt% insoluble solids. The solids (natrophosphate, natroxalate, sodium aluminum silicate, and a hydrated sodium phosphate) were relatively stable and settled quickly. Filtration rates were in the range of those observed with iron-based simulated Hanford tank sludge simulants, e.g., 6 M [Na+] Hanford tank 241-AN-102, even though their chemical speciation is considerably different. Chemical cleaning of the crossflow filter was readily accomplished with acid. As this simulant formulation was based on an average composition of a wide range of feeds using an integrated computer model, this exact composition may never be observed. But the test conditions were selected to enable comparison to the model to enable improving its chemical prediction capability.

McCabe, D.; Crawford, C.; Duignan, M.; Williams, M.; Burket, P.

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

45

An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535%C2%B0C. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535%C2%B0C and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice won't be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

ANALYSIS OF HIGH PRESSURE TESTS ON WET GAS FLOW METERING WITH A VENTURI METER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF HIGH PRESSURE TESTS ON WET GAS FLOW METERING WITH A VENTURI METER P. Gajan , Q, 64018 Pau cedex, France pierre.gajan@onera.fr Abstract This work deals with the flow metering of wet gas on the CEESI facilities are presented. They are performed at 75 bars with 0.6 beta ratio Venturi meter

47

ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: ICFT- An Initial...

48

Experimental investigation of an oscillating circular piston positive displacement flowmeter: II - Leakage flows and wear tests.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental data from an oscillating circular piston positive displacement flowmeter are described which focused on leakage flows and wear. This is the second part of a two part paper on the experimental tests, the first part concerned piston...

Morton, Charlotte E; Baker, Roger C; Hutchings, Ian M

49

Test report, air flow control device for 241-SY waste tankventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This documents the testing of a passively operated, constant air flow control device for in-duct applications on waste tank ventilation systems in the 50-1000 SCFM range.

Tuck, J.A.

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

50

Preliminary tests using magnetic resonance imaging of two-phase flow patterns and transitions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of preliminary tests used to establish the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine and quantitatively characterize two-phase flow patterns and flow transitions. These tests were performed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine MRI Center as a collaborative research effort with Oregon State University (OSU). Special scanning sequences designed by UCSF for flow imaging were implemented in the tests. UCSF operated the MRI facility, and OSU constructed and operated a cocurrent air-water flow loop consisting of a 1-in.-diam test section capable of producing air superficial velocities j[sub g] ranging from 0.3 to 14 m/s, and water superficial velocities j[sub l] ranging from 0.08 to 1.3 m/s.

Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Lafi, A.Y. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)); Saloner, D. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nevada National Security Site Underground Test Area (UGTA) Flow...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

December 12, 2014 To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 Technical Exchange Meeting videos click here. Video Presentation Nevada National Security Site Underground Test Area...

52

Instrumentation of a light twin aircraft for flow energizer flight tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSTRUMDITATION OF A LIGHT TWIN AIRCRAFT FOR FLOW ENERGIZER FLIGHT TESTS A Thesis by ROBERT SUSUMU BINFORD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of HASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1986 MaJor SubJect: Aerospace Engineering INSTRUMENTATION OF A LIGHT TWIN AIRCRAFT FOR FLOW ENERGIZER FLIGHT TESTS A Thesis by ROBERT SUSUMU BINFORD Approved as to style and content by: Donald T. Ward (Chairman of Committee) Cyrus...

Binford, Robert Susumu

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vs ActualInformationAlum Area (DOE GTP)Flow

54

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? Non-PHEV Evaluations...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Non-PHEV Evaluations and Data Collection Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Non-PHEV Evaluations and Data Collection Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

55

Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year 1990 applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities. Four MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for energy testing and program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities.

Parker, G.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Single Tube Test Program Demand Curve Data Tables. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of reports which document the flow instability testing conducted by Columbia University during 1989, through 1992. This testing was completed as part of AX1811457. Data files were transmitted to SRS in a DOS compatible format. This report volume provides a hardcopy version of the electronic media data files.

Coutts, D.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2009 Air Products-Entrained Particle Flow Test Rig  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2009 Air Products-Entrained Particle Flow Test are causing catalyst plugging. Objectives Air Products requested that a test rig be constructed to entrain the hydrogen reforming facilities and aid Air Products in understanding the plugging problem. Approach

Demirel, Melik C.

58

CFD Simulation and Experimental Testing of Multiphase Flow Inside the MVP Electrical Submersible Pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to test the pump at different operating conditions. The pump is modeled and tested at two speeds; 3300 and 3600 rpm, using air-water mixtures with GVFs of 0, 5, 10, 25, 32 and 35%. The flow loop is controlled to produce different suction pressures up...

Rasmy Marsis, Emanuel 1983-

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

59

Wind Turbine Blade Flow Fields and Prospects for Active Aerodynamic Control: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes wind turbine flow fields that can cause adverse aerodynamic loading and can impact active aerodynamic control methodologies currently contemplated for wind turbine applications.

Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper and presentation will discuss PHEV testing activities and results. INL/CON-08-14333

James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Effect of flow leakage on the benchmarking of FLOWTRAN with Mark-22 mockup flow excursion test data from Babcock and Wilcox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a revised analysis of the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) downflow flow excursion tests that accounts for leakage between flow channels in the test assembly. Leak rates were estimated by comparing results from the downflow tests with those for upflow tests conducted using an identical assembly with some minor modifications. The upflow test assembly did not contain leaks. This revised analyses shows that FLOWTRAN with the SRS working criterion conservatively predicts onset of flow instability without using a local peaking factor to model heat transfer variations near the ribs.

Chen, Kuo-Fu.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Results mixed from pulsating flow tests of orifice-plate meters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that laboratory tests on several commercially available orifice-plate meters for use in pulsating flow indicate that none yields acceptable accuracy. These tests suggested, however, that if the objective of monitoring pulsating flow is to indicate or quantify pulsation magnitudes for comparisons, then at least two instruments are acceptable. Use of such meters, particularly in low flow rate gathering systems, can be a viable alternative to attempting to reduce the intensity (amplitude and frequency) of pulsation by expensive installation and maintenance of chokes and bottles. Phillips Petroleum Co. set out to find a meter that would be sensitive enough to measure pulsating hydrocarbon flows with acceptable accuracy using the orifice plate. Several orifice measurement systems were simultaneously investigated at the Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio (SwRI).

Arasi, J.A. (Phillips Petroleum Co., Tananger (Norway))

1992-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

Autonomous Motility of Active Filaments due to Spontaneous Flow-Symmetry Breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We simulate the nonlocal Stokesian hydrodynamics of an elastic filament which is active due a permanent distribution of stresslets along its contour. A bending instability of an initially straight filament spontaneously breaks flow symmetry and leads to autonomous filament motion which, depending on conformational symmetry, can be translational or rotational. At high ratios of activity to elasticity, the linear instability develops into nonlinear fluctuating states with large amplitude deformations. The dynamics of these states can be qualitatively understood as a superposition of translational and rotational motion associated with filament conformational modes of opposite symmetry. Our results can be tested in molecular-motor filament mixtures, synthetic chains of autocatalytic particles, or other linearly connected systems where chemical energy is converted to mechanical energy in a fluid environment.

Gayathri Jayaraman; Sanoop Ramachandran; Somdeb Ghose; Abhrajit Laskar; M. Saad Bhamla; P. B. Sunil Kumar; R. Adhikari

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required.

Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Sampling Point Compliance Tests for 325 Building at Set-Back Flow Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stack sampling system at the 325 Building (Radiochemical Processing Laboratory [RPL]) was constructed to comply with the American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI’s) Guide to Sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear Facilities (ANSI N13.1-1969). This standard provided prescriptive criteria for the location of radionuclide air-sampling systems. In 1999, the standard was revised (Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances From the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities [ANSI/Health Physics Society [HPS] 13.1-1999]) to provide performance-based criteria for the location of sampling systems. Testing was conducted for the 325 Building stack to determine whether the sampling system would meet the updated criteria for uniform air velocity and contaminant concentration in the revised ANSI/HPS 13.1-1999 standard under normal operating conditions (Smith et al. 2010). Measurement results were within criteria for all tests. Additional testing and modeling was performed to determine whether the sampling system would meet criteria under set-back flow conditions. This included measurements taken from a scale model with one-third of the exhaust flow and computer modeling of the system with two-thirds of the exhaust flow. This report documents the results of the set-back flow condition measurements and modeling. Tests performed included flow angularity, uniformity of velocity, gas concentration, and particle concentration across the duct at the sampling location. Results are within ANSI/HPS 13.1-1999 criteria for all tests. These tests are applicable for the 325 Building stack under set-back exhaust flow operating conditions (980 - 45,400 cubic feet per minute [cfm]) with one fan running. The modeling results show that criteria are met for all tests using a two-fan configuration exhaust (flow modeled at 104,000 cfm). Combined with the results from the earlier normal operating conditions, the ANSI/HPS 13.1-1999 criteria for all tests are met for all configurations: one, two, or three fans (normal).

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Glissmeyer, John A.; Barnett, J. M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 10: Critical Heat Flux Test Program data tables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of reports which document the flow instability testing conducted by Columbia University during 1989 through 1992. This report volume provides a hardcopy version of the twenty-six electronic media data files: CO515(A-D).DAT, CO525(A-G). DAT, CO530(A-K).DAT, CO718(A-E).DAT.

Coutts, D.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix SolarBlack Warrior Area (DOE GTP)Flow Test AtFlow

69

Flow Test At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix SolarBlack Warrior Area (DOE GTP)Flow Test AtFlowHot

70

Two-dimensional modeling of sodium boiling in a simulated LMFBR loss-of-flow test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Loss-of-flow (LOF) accidents are of major importance in LMFBR safety. Tests have been performed to simulate the simultaneous failure of all primary pumps and reactor shutdown systems in a 37-pin electrically heated test bundle installed in the KNS sodium boiling loop at the Institute of Reactor Development, Karlsruhe. The tests simulated LOF conditions of the German prototype LMFBR, the SNR 300. The main objectives of these tests were to characterize the transient boiling development to cladding dryout and to provide data for validation of sodium boiling codes. One particular LOF test, designated L22, at full power was selected as a benchmark exercise for comparison of several codes at the Eleventh Meeting of the Liquid Metal Boiling Working Group (LMBWG) held in Grenoble, France, in October 1984. In this paper, the results of the calculations performed at ORNL with the two-dimensional (2-D) boiling code THORAX are presented.

Rose, S.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal MHK Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) tidal turbine extracts energy from tidal currents, providing clean, sustainable electricity generation. In general, all MHK conversion technologies are confronted with significant operational hurdles, resulting in both increased capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. To counter these high costs while maintaining reliability, MHK turbine designs can be simplified. Prior study found that a tidal turbine could be cost-effectively simplified by removing blade pitch and rotor/nacelle yaw. Its rotor would run in one direction during ebb and then reverse direction when the current switched to flood. We dubbed such a turbine a bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT). The bidirectional hydrofoils of a BRTT are less efficient than conventional hydrofoils and capture less energy, but the elimination of the pitch and yaw systems were estimated to reduce levelized cost of energy by 7.8%-9.6%. In this study, we investigated two mechanisms for recapturing some of the performance shortfall of the BRTT. First, we developed a novel set of hydrofoils, designated the yy series, for BRTT application. Second, we investigated the use of active flow control via microtabs. Microtabs are small deployable/retractable tabs, typically located near the leading or trailing edge of an air/hydrofoil with height on the order of the boundary layer thickness (1% - 2% of chord). They deploy approximately perpendicularly to the foil surface and, like gurney flaps and plain flaps, globally affect the aerodynamics of the airfoil. By strategically placing microtabs and selectively deploying them based on the direction of the inflow, performance of a BRTT rotor can be improved while retaining bidirectional operation. The yy foils were computationally designed and analyzed. They exhibited better performance than the baseline bidirectional foil, the ellipse. For example, the yyb07cn-180 had 14.7% higher (l/d)max than an ellipse of equal thickness. The yyb07cn family also had higher c{sub p,min} than equivalently thick ellipses, indicating less susceptibility to cavitation. Microtabs applied on yy foils demonstrated improved energy capture. A series of variable speed and constant speed rotors were developed with the yyb07cn family of hydrofoils. The constant speed yyb07cn rotor (yy-B02-Rcs,opt) captured 0.45% more energy than the equivalent rotor with ellipses (e-B02-Rcs,opt). With microtabs deployed (yy?t-B02-Rcs,opt), the energy capture increase over the rotor with ellipses was 1.05%. Note, however, that microtabs must be applied judiciously to bidirectional foils. On the 18% thick ellipse, performance decreased with the addition of microtabs. Details of hydrofoil performance, microtab sizing and positioning, rotor configurations, and revenue impacts are presented herein.

Shiu, Henry [Research Engineer; van Dam, Cornelis P. [Professor

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

72

Online Speed Scaling Based on Active Job Count to Minimize Flow plus Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Online Speed Scaling Based on Active Job Count to Minimize Flow plus Energy Tak-Wah Lam Lap-Kei Lee research on online job scheduling has gradually taken speed scaling and energy usage into consideration algorithms that aim at minimizing the total flow time plus energy usage. The results are divided into two

Wong, Prudence W.H.

73

Heat extracted from the long term flow test in the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term flow test was carried out in the Fenton Hill HDR Phase-2 reservoir for 14 months during 1992-1993 to examine the potential for supplying thermal energy at a sustained rate as a commercial demonstration of HDR technology. The test was accomplished in several segments with changes in mean flowrate due to pumping conditions. Re-test estimates of the extractable heat content above a minimum useful temperature were based on physical evidence of the size of the Fenton Hill reservoir. A numerical model was used to estimate the extent of heat extracted during the individual flow segments from the database of measured production data during the test. For a reservoir volume of 6.5x10{sup 6}m{sup 3}, the total heat content above a minimum temperature of 150{degree} C was 1.5x10{sup 15}J. For the total test period at the three sustained mean flowrates, the integrated heat extracted was 0.088x10{sup 15}J, with no discernable temperature decline of the produced fluid. The fraction of energy extracted above the abandonment temperature was 5.9%. On the basis of a constant thermal energy extraction rate, the lifetime of the reservoir (without reservoir growth) to the abandonment temperature would be 13.3 years, in good agreement with the pre-test estimate of 15.0 years for the given reservoir volume.

Kruger, Paul; Robinson, Bruce

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

74

Multi-phase flow well test analysis in multi-layer reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the performance of an oil well under multi-phase flow test conditions when the reservoir pressure falls below the bubble point pressure and is correspond with the performance of dissolved gas reservoirs. The model reservoir comprises two commingled layer, where a well test is conducted on a fully perforated interval. The water phase is assumed immobile. The main objective of this work is to interpret the flowing well pressure response and to predict reservoir characteristics based on its performance. The work presented is based on a constant terminal rate analysis, but it can also applied to constant bottomhole pressure and can be used to predict the Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR).

Jatmiko, W.; Archer, J.S. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Daltaban, T.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Design, testing and two-dimensional flow modeling of a multiple-disk fan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multiple-disk Tesla type fan has been designed, tested and analyzed two-dimensionally using the conservation of angular momentum principle. Experimental results showed that such multiple-disk fans exhibited exceptionally low performance characteristics, which could be attributed to the low viscosity, tangential nature of the flow, and large mechanical energy losses at both suction and discharge sections that are comparable to the total input power. By means of theoretical analysis, local and overall shearing stresses on the disk surfaces have been determined based on tangential and radial velocity distributions of the air flow of different volume flow rates at prescribed disk spaces and rotational speeds. Then the total power transmitted by rotating disks to air flow, and the power acquired by the air flow in the gap due to transfer of angular momentum have been obtained by numerically integrating shearing stresses over the disk surfaces. Using the measured shaft and hydraulic powers, these quantities were utilized to evaluate mechanical energy losses associated with the suction and discharge sections of the fan. (author)

Engin, Tahsin; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cesmeci, Sevki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Sakarya, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 ?g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

Boron-10 ABUNCL Prototype Models And Initial Active Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from MCNPX model simulations and initial testing of the active mode variation of the Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) design built by General Electric Reuter-Stokes. Initial experimental testing of the as-delivered passive ABUNCL was previously reported.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

Active flow separation control using synthetic jet actuators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of connecting rod, [m] e distance from the aerodynamic center to the hinge, [m] F force, [N] F' nondimensional frequency, f frequency of actuation, [Hz] k dimensionless average momentum parameter, k stiffness of the torsional spring at the hinge [N/rad] 1... length (spanwise) of the exit slot, [m] 1' flow acceleration length, [m] 1 length of the connecting rod, [m] L lift, [N] M?c moment about the aerodynamic center of the airfoil, [N m] M momentum, [kg m/s] /tM momentum deficit, [kg m/s] m mass...

Rao, Preetham P

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Grout long radius flow testing to support Saltstone disposal Unit 5 design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as “Saltstone”. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a “mega vault” and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference saltstone rheology and a saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0ș, 2.4ș, and 0.72ș. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7ș to 0.9ș. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch.

Stefanko, D. B.; Langton, C. A.; Serrato, M. G.; Brooks, T. E. II; Huff, T. H.

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

80

Grout Long Radius Flow Testing to Support Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 Design - 13352  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as 'Saltstone'. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a 'mega vault' and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; Saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (Saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference Saltstone rheology and a Saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0 deg., 2.4 deg., and 0.72 deg.. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7 deg. to 0.9 deg. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch. (authors)

Stefanko, D.B.; Langton, C.A.; Serrato, M.G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brooks, T.E. II; Huff, T.H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Status of Proof-Of-Concept testing at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proof-of-concept (POC) testing, and collection and evaluation of data continued at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility during the past year. Following four preliminary tests firing Rosebud coal in 1991 to establish base conditions for the Rosebud coal POC tests, three POC tests were run in 1992, and a fourth test early in 1993. Major equipment additions or modifications included installation of a wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP), which replaced a badly deteriorated venturi. This component also provides improved capability to meet Tennessee pollution regulations while operating the dry ESP and/or baghouse off design, or if one of these two control devices does not function properly. Improvements were also made to the dry ESP prior to the 1993 test, which appear to have improved the performance of this equipment. This paper will present an overview of the major results obtained during the Rosebud coal POC tests, including the performance of the dry and wet electrostatic precipitators. Differences between the Rosebud and Illinois coals will be described, but it is emphasized that these observations are based on incomplete results for the Rosebud coal.

Attig, R.C.; Chapman, J.N.; Johanson, N.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 ”g/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 șC, 27 șC, and 32 șC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Piping flow erosion in water retaining structures: inferring erosion rates from hole erosion tests and quantifying the failure time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Piping flow erosion in water retaining structures: inferring erosion rates from hole erosion tests-en-Provence Cedex 5, France E-mail: stephane.bonelli@cemagref.fr Abstract The piping flow erosion process, involving structures. Such a pipe can be imputed to roots or burrows. The coefficient of erosion must be known in order

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

85

Standard Test Method for Resin Flow of Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Prepreg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the determination of the amount of resin flow that will take place from prepreg tape or sheet under given conditions of temperature and pressure. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values in parentheses are for reference only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Flow Test At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix SolarBlack Warrior Area (DOE GTP)Flow Test At Fort

87

Flow Test At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix SolarBlack Warrior Area (DOE GTP)Flow Test At

88

Flow Test At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix SolarBlack Warrior Area (DOE GTP)Flow Test

89

Flow Test At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix SolarBlack Warrior Area (DOE GTP)Flow TestPilgrim

90

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP)OpenNewFlow Test

91

FLOWS AT THE EDGE OF AN ACTIVE REGION: OBSERVATION AND INTERPRETATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upflows observed at the edges of active regions have been proposed as the source of the slow solar wind. In the particular case of Active Region (AR) 10942, where such an upflow has been already observed, we want to evaluate the part of this upflow that actually remains confined in the magnetic loops that connect AR 10942 to AR 10943. Both active regions were visible simultaneously on the solar disk and were observed by STEREO/SECCHI EUVI. Using Hinode/EIS spectra, we determine the Doppler shifts and densities in AR 10943 and AR 10942 in order to evaluate the mass flows. We also perform magnetic field extrapolations to assess the connectivity between AR 10942 and AR 10943. AR 10943 displays a persistent downflow in Fe XII. Magnetic extrapolations including both ARs show that this downflow can be connected to the upflow in AR 10942. We estimate that the mass flow received by AR 10943 areas connected to AR 10942 represents about 18% of the mass flow from AR 10942. We conclude that the upflows observed on the edge of active regions represent either large-scale loops with mass flowing along them (accounting for about one-fifth of the total mass flow in this example) or open magnetic field structures where the slow solar wind originates.

Boutry, C.; Buchlin, E.; Vial, J.-C. [Universite Paris Sud, Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR8617, 91405 Orsay (France); Regnier, S., E-mail: eric.buchlin@ias.u-psud.fr [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

94

E-Print Network 3.0 - activation test locations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 45 Power-Aware Test Planning in the Early System-on-Chip Design Exploration Process Summary: test application leads to higher activity during the testing...

95

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Data and Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies through the Advanced Vehicle Testing...

96

Efficient Integration of Web Services with Distributed Data Flow and Active Mediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Integration of Web Services with Distributed Data Flow and Active Mediation David Liu Electrical Engineering Stanford University davidliu@stanford.edu Jun Peng Civil & Env. Engineering Stanford University junpeng@stanford.edu Kincho H. Law Civil & Env. Engineering Stanford University law

Stanford University

97

Mixing-Induced Global Modes in Open Active Flow Arthur V. Straube and Arkady Pikovsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field in an open flow into absolutely unstable. Presenting the mixing region as one with a locally a candle flame in a strong wind, in the opposite case a sustained activity can be observed [2]. This simple on a constant throughflow, due to, e.g., wakes behind islands in ocean currents or mixing enforced by revolving

Pikovsky, Arkady

98

ACTIVE CONTROL OF FLOW SEPARATION AND STRUCTURAL VIBRATIONS OF WIND TURBINE BLADES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACTIVE CONTROL OF FLOW SEPARATION AND STRUCTURAL VIBRATIONS OF WIND TURBINE BLADES Sponsor: Ney actuators embedded inside the wind turbine blade to provide an efficient, rapid and compact means to alter the ability to shed excess wind loads off the blade. 3. Reduce vibration in the turbine blades by selectively

Salama, Khaled

99

Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative to volcanic-rock units is exemplified by the large difference in their estimated maximum hydraulic conductivity; 4,000 and 400 feet per day, respectively. Simulated minimum estimates of hydraulic conductivity are inexact and represent the lower detection limit of the method. Minimum thicknesses of lithologic intervals also were defined for comparing AnalyzeHOLE results to hydraulic properties in regional ground-water flow models.

Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

100

Spontaneous Flows and Accumulation of Active Particles in Connected Micro-Chambers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We numerically study the dynamics of run-and-tumble particles in two confining vessels connected by thin channels. Two dominant dynamical behaviors emerge: (i) an oscillatory pumping state, in which particles alternatively fill the two vessels and (ii) a circulating flow state, dynamically maintaining a near constant population level in the containers when connected by two channels. The narrowness of channels and the out-of-equilibrium nature of the system give rise to accumulation phenomena and long-lived spontaneous flows of active particles.

M. Paoluzzi; R. Di Leonardo; L. Angelani

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? Non-PHEV Evaluations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

simulation and analysis technical team every other month * Testing results and life-cycle costs are used by vehicle modelers * Partnering with private sector testers provides...

102

Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Energy TechnicalFlow Room

103

Webinar: Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique, originally presented on March 12, 2013.

104

Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

105

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Benchmark Testing of the Chevrolet Volt Onboard Charger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report for public consumption, for the AVTA website, detailing the testing and analysis of the benchmark testing conducted on the Chevrolet Volt on-board charger.

Richard Carlson

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Comparison of the results of short-term static tests and single-pass flow-through tests with LRM glass.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Static dissolution tests were conducted to measure the forward dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 C and pH(RT) 11.7 {+-} 0.1 for comparison with the rate measured with single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests in an interlaboratory study (ILS). The static tests were conducted with monolithic specimens having known geometric surface areas, whereas the SPFT tests were conducted with crushed glass that had an uncertain specific surface area. The error in the specific surface area of the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests, which was calculated by modeling the particles as spheres, was assessed based on the difference in the forward dissolution rates measured with the two test methods. Three series of static tests were conducted at 70 C following ASTM standard test method C1220 using specimens with surfaces polished to 600, 800, and 1200 grit and a leachant solution having the same composition as that used in the ILS. Regression of the combined results of the static tests to the affinity-based glass dissolution model gives a forward rate of 1.67 g/(m{sup 2}d). The mean value of the forward rate from the SPFT tests was 1.64 g/(m{sup 2}d) with an extended uncertainty of 1.90 g/(m{sup 2}d). This indicates that the calculated surface area for the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests is less than 2% higher than the actual surface area, which is well within the experimental uncertainties of measuring the forward dissolution rate using each test method. These results indicate that the geometric surface area of crushed glass calculated based on the size of the sieves used to isolate the fraction used in a test is reliable. In addition, the C1220 test method provides a means for measuring the forward dissolution rate of borosilicate glasses that is faster, easier, and more economical than the SPFT test method.

Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 12. Single annulus transient test program data tables: Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The single annulus test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the fuel assemblies used in the Savannah River Site production reactors. Data files were transmitted from Columbia University to Savannah River Site in a DOS compatible format. This report provides a hardcopy version of the electronic media data files.

Coutts, D.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will load heavily onto activated carbon and should be removed from groundwater upstream of the activated carbon pre-treatment system. Unless removed upstream, the adsorbed loadings of these organic constituents could exceed the land disposal criteria for carbon.

BYRNES ME

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

109

Capillary test specimen, system, and methods for in-situ visualization of capillary flow and fillet formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A capillary test specimen, method, and system for visualizing and quantifying capillary flow of liquids under realistic conditions, including polymer underfilling, injection molding, soldering, brazing, and casting. The capillary test specimen simulates complex joint geometries and has an open cross-section to permit easy visual access from the side. A high-speed, high-magnification camera system records the location and shape of the moving liquid front in real-time, in-situ as it flows out of a source cavity, through an open capillary channel between two surfaces having a controlled capillary gap, and into an open fillet cavity, where it subsequently forms a fillet on free surfaces that have been configured to simulate realistic joint geometries. Electric resistance heating rapidly heats the test specimen, without using a furnace. Image-processing software analyzes the recorded images and calculates the velocity of the moving liquid front, fillet contact angles, and shape of the fillet's meniscus, among other parameters.

Hall, Aaron C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hosking, F. Michael (Albuquerque, NM),; Reece, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

110

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin Well. Volume III. Final report for the period October 1985--October 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial flow test of the Hulin well was done to obtain brine and gas samples and to get a first measure of the reservoir properties. The 20,602 to 20,690-foot interval was perforated and tested in two short-term draw-down and buildup tests. This zone had an initial pressure of 17,308 psia and temperature of 339 F. The total dissolved solids of 207,000 mg/L (mostly sodium chloride) is higher than for previously tested Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal wells. The gas content in the brine of 31 to 32 SCF/STB indicates that the brine is at or near saturation with natural gas. The permeability, as deduced from the draw-down and buildup tests, is 13 md for the lower 80-foot-thick sand member. The duration of the tests was too short to determine the lateral extent of the reservoir; but declining measured values for static bottomhole pressure prior to each flow test suggests a relatively small reservoir. When the uppermost interval in the zone of interest (20,220 to 20,260 feet) was perforated such that flow from this zone would commingle with flow from the lower zone, little to no free gas was observed. It had been speculated before the test that there might be free gas in this upper zone. These speculations were generally deduced from logs after assuming the formation contained brine that had a salinity between 70,000 and 100,000 mg/L. The actual salinity was more than twice that number. it is now apparent that the amount of free gas, if any, is too small to make a significant contribution to production in a short-term test. This does not preclude the possibility of mobilization of gas by higher drawdown or coning down from an offsetting gas cap in one or more of the sand members. However, there was no evidence that this was occurring in this test. No measurements of the reservoir parameters, such as permeability, were made for the shallowest interval tested. But substantially lower drawdown for the commingled zones suggests either higher permeability or lower skin for the shallower perforated interval. Hydrate formation in the upper part of the wellbore was a problem. To circumvent this problem, about 10 barrels of diesel were pumped into the top of the well after each flow to displace the brine down to a level in the well where the temperature was too high for hydrates to form. Calculations of saturation index indicated that calcium carbonate scale would also form in the well if the pressure was drawn down too far. Thus all the flow tests were performed at low flow rates to preclude formation of scale in the wellbore. Scale inhibitor was injected into the surface flow lines to control possible scale formation in the surface equipment. Corrosion inhibitor was also injected, and coupon monitoring indicated a corrosion rate of less than 5 mils per year.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.

Abramowitz, Howard [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Brandys, Marek [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Cecil, Richard [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; D'Angelo, Nicholas [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Matlack, Keith S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Muller, Isabelle S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Pegg, Ian L. [Energy Solutions, Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Callow, Richard A. [Energy Solutions, Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Joseph, Innocent

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

112

Experimental investigation of a flow monitoring instrument in an upper plenum of an air-water reflood test facility. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Instrumentation was developed for measuring fluid phenomena in the upper plenum of pressurized water reactor reflood facilities. In particular, the instrumentation measured two-phase flow velocity and void fraction. The principle of operation of the instrumentation scheme was based on the measurement of electrical impedance. The technique of analysis of random signals from two spatially separated impedance sensors was employed to measure two-phase flow velocity. A relative admittance technique was used to determine void fraction. The performance of the instrumentaton was studied in an air-water test facility.

Combs, S.K.; Hardy, J.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Test and evaluation of constant-flow devices for use in SSN AFFF proportioning systems. Interim report, January-May 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constant flow devices, which deliver a constant flow of liquid over a range of upstream and downstream pressures, have been suggested as an alternative to orifice plates for proportioning AFFF in SSN 21 fire-suppression systems. Operational and performance characteristics of two lightweight, inexpensive, commercially available constant-flow devices have significant advantages over orifice plates. Both models tested, however, showed performance degradation when subjected to simulated service conditions. A constant flow device with improved resistance to wear and to AFFF exposure is desirable. Since the constant-flow control devices tested improves proportioning efficiency but do not have optimum characteristics, investigation of improved devices or methods is recommended.

Williams, F.W.; Back, G.G.; Burns, R.E.; Quellette, R.J.; Scheffey, J.L.

1986-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

114

Summary Report on FY12 Small-Scale Test Activities High Temperature Electrolysis Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a description of the apparatus and the single cell testing results performed at Idaho National Laboratory during January–August 2012. It is an addendum to the Small-Scale Test Report issued in January 2012. The primary program objectives during this time period were associated with design, assembly, and operation of two large experiments: a pressurized test, and a 4 kW test. Consequently, the activities described in this report represent a much smaller effort.

James O'Brien

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

CURRENT TESTING ACTIVITIES AT THE ACRELAB RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS TEST FACILITY , E S Spooner2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, AUSTRALIA 2 University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW, AUSTRALIA 3 Australian CRC for Renewable Energy in a minimum of time. ACRELab was originally conceived as a laboratory for testing remote area power supply and RAPS system components such as inverters. With the growing interest in Grid-connected inverters

116

The fabrication of a vanadium-stainless steel test section for MHD testing of insulator coatings in flowing lithium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To test the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop reduction performance of candidate insulator coatings for the ITER Vanadium/Lithium Breeding Blanket, a test section comprised of a V- 4Cr-4Ti liner inside a stainless steel pipe was designed and fabricated. Theoretically, the MHD pressure drop reduction benefit resulting, from an electrically insulating coating on a vanadium- lined pipe is identical to the benefit derived from an insulated pipe fabricated of vanadium alone. A duplex test section design consisting of a V alloy liner encased in a SS pressure boundary provided protection for vanadium from atmospheric contamination during operation at high temperature and obviated any potential problems with vanadium welding while also minimizing the amount of V alloy material required. From the MHD and insulator coating- point of view, the test section outer SS wall and inner V alloy liner can be modeled simply as a wall having a sandwich construction. Two 52.3 mm OD x 2.9 m long V-alloy tubes were fabricated by Century Tubes from 64 mm x 200 mm x 1245 mm extrusions produced by Teledyne Wah Chang. The test section`s duplex structure was subsequently fabricated at Century Tubes by drawing down a SS pipe (2 inch schedule 10) over one of the 53.2 mm diameter V tubes.

Reed, C.B.; Mattas, R.F.; Smith, D.L.; Chung, H.; Tsai, H.-C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Morgan, G.D.; Wille, G.W. [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, St. Louis, MO (United States). High Energy Systems; Johnson, W.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Young, C. [Century Tubes, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for data frac'' stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) testing in order to provide benchmark data for technology modeling and research and development programs, and to be an independent source of test data for fleet managers and other early adaptors of advanced-technology vehicles. To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on 12 HEV models and accumulated 2.7 million fleet testing miles on 35 HEVs. The HEV baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed-track testing to document HEV performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model accumulate 160,000 test miles within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events and fuel use were recorded. Three models of PHEVs, from vehicle converters Energy CS and Hymotion and the original equipment manufacturer Renault, are currently in testing. The PHEV baseline performance testing includes 5 days of dynamometer testing with a minimum of 26 test drive cycles, including the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, the Highway Fuel Economy Driving Schedule, and the US06 test cycle, in charge-depleting and charge-sustaining modes. The PHEV accelerated testing is conducted with dedicated drivers for 4,240 miles, over a series of 132 driving loops that range from 10 to 200 miles over various combinations of defined 10-mile urban and 10-mile highway loops, with 984 hours of vehicle charging. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Applications, with dynamometer testing conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

Donald Karner

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Recent National Solar Thermal Test Facility activities, in partnership with industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA conducts testing of solar thermal components and systems, funded primarily by the US Department of Energy. Activities are conducted in support of Central Receiver Technology, Distributed Receiver Technology and Design Assistance projects. All activities are performed in support of various cost-shared government/industry joint ventures and, on a design assistance basis, in support of a number of other industry partners.

Ghanbari, C.; Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E.; Pacheco, J.E.; Rawlinson, K.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport at the Climax Mine sub-CAU, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU) on the Nevada Test Site comprises 747 underground nuclear detonations, all but three of which were conducted in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate rocks in Yucca Flat. The remaining three tests were conducted in the very different hydrogeologic setting of the Climax Mine granite stock located in Area 15 at the northern end of Yucca Flat. As part of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU, models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will be developed for Yucca Flat. However, two aspects of these CAU-scale models require focused modeling at the northern end of Yucca Flat beyond the capability of these large models. First, boundary conditions and boundary flows along the northern reaches of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU require evaluation to a higher level of detail than the CAU-scale Yucca Flat model can efficiently provide. Second, radionuclide fluxes from the Climax tests require analysis of flow and transport in fractured granite, a unique hydrologic environment as compared to Yucca Flat proper. This report describes the Climax Mine sub-CAU modeling studies conducted to address these issues, with the results providing a direct feed into the CAI for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU. Three underground nuclear detonations were conducted for weapons effects testing in the Climax stock between 1962 and 1966: Hard Hat, Pile Driver, and Tiny Tot. Though there is uncertainty regarding the position of the water table in the stock, it is likely that all three tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone. In the early 1980s, the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercial nuclear reactor wastes. Detailed mapping of fractures and faults carried out for the SFT-C studies greatly expanded earlier data sets collected in association with the nuclear tests and provided invaluable information for subsequent modeling studies at Climax. The objectives of the Climax Mine sub-CAU work are to (1) provide simulated heads and groundwater flows for the northern boundaries of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model, while incorporating alternative conceptualizations of the hydrogeologic system with their associated uncertainty, and (2) provide radionuclide fluxes from the three tests in the Climax stock using modeling techniques that account for groundwater flow in fractured granite. Meeting these two objectives required two different model scales. The northern boundary groundwater fluxes were addressed using the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model (Belcher, 2004) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey as a modeling framework, with refined hydrostratigraphy in a zone north of Yucca Flat and including Climax stock. Radionuclide transport was simulated using a separate model confined to the granite stock itself, but linked to regional groundwater flow through boundary conditions and calibration targets.

K. Pohlmann; M. Ye; D. Reeves; M. Zavarin; D. Decker; J. Chapman

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

122

TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa; Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; ,; Guy Roemer

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Active Vorticity Control in a Shear Flow Using a Flapping Foil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown experimentally that free shear flows can be substantially altered through direct control of the large coherent vortices present in the flow.

Gopalkrishnan, R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Implementation and Testing of Fault-Tolerant Photodiode-based Active Pixel Sensor (APS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementation and Testing of Fault-Tolerant Photodiode-based Active Pixel Sensor (APS) Sunjaya the photodiode and readout transistors into two parallel operating devices, while keeping a common row select-tolerant photodiode APS was designed and fabricated using a CMOS 0.18”m process. Testing included both fully

Chapman, Glenn H.

125

Interlaboratory study of the reproducibility of the single-pass flow-through test method : measuring the dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 {sup {degree}}C and pH 10.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An international interlaboratory study (ILS) was conducted to evaluate the precision with which single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests can be conducted by following a method to be standardized by the American Society for Testing and Materials - International. Tests for the ILS were conducted with the low-activity reference material (LRM) glass developed previously for use as a glass test standard. Tests were conducted at 70 {+-} 2 C using a LiCl/LiOH solution as the leachant to impose an initial pH of about 10 (at 70 C). Participants were provided with LRM glass that had been crushed and sieved to isolate the -100 +200 mesh size fraction, and then washed to remove fines. Participants were asked to conduct a series of tests using different solution flow rate-to-sample mass ratios to generate a range of steady-state Si concentrations. The glass dissolution rate under each test condition was calculated using the steady-state Si concentration and solution flow rate that were measured in the test. The glass surface area was estimated from the mass of glass used in the test and the Si content of LRM glass was known. A linear relationship between the rate and the steady-state Si concentration (at Si concentrations less than 10 mg/L) was used to estimate the forward dissolution rate, which is the rate in the absence of dissolved Si. Participants were asked to sample the effluent solution at least five times after reaction times of between 3 and 14 days to measure the Si concentration and flow rate, and to verify that steady-state was achieved. Results were provided by seven participants and the data sets provided by five participants were sufficient to determine the forward rates independently.

Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

A groundwater flow and transport model of long-term radionuclide migration in central Frenchman flat, Nevada test site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of groundwater flow and transport models were created for the Central Testing Area of Frenchman Flat at the former Nevada Test Site to investigate the long-term consequences of a radionuclide migration experiment that was done between 1975 and 1990. In this experiment, radionuclide migration was induced from a small nuclear test conducted below the water table by pumping a well 91 m away. After radionuclides arrived at the pumping well, the contaminated effluent was discharged to an unlined ditch leading to a playa where it was expected to evaporate. However, recent data from a well near the ditch and results from detailed models of the experiment by LLNL personnel have convincingly demonstrated that radionuclides from the ditch eventually reached the water table some 220 m below land surface. The models presented in this paper combine aspects of these detailed models with concepts of basin-scale flow to estimate the likely extent of contamination resulting from this experiment over the next 1,000 years. The models demonstrate that because regulatory limits for radionuclide concentrations are exceeded only by tritium and the half-life of tritium is relatively short (12.3 years), the maximum extent of contaminated groundwater has or will soon be reached, after which time the contaminated plume will begin to shrink because of radioactive decay. The models also show that past and future groundwater pumping from water supply wells within Frenchman Flat basin will have negligible effects on the extent of the plume.

Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Becker, Naomi M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruskauff, Gregory [NAVARRO-INTERA, LLC.; De Novio, Nicole [GOLDER AND ASSOC.; Wilborn, Bill [US DOE NNSA NSO

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

127

Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Wastewater and other Freshwater Disasters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater flooding can seriously affect soil fertility and the physical and chemical properties of soil. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded soil. Having the soil tested for microbes, pesticides, hydrocarbons and other contaminants...

Provin, Tony; Feagley, Sam E.; Pitt, John L.; McFarland, Mark L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

128

Design, build and test of an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine with fatigue analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OpenProp is an open source propeller and turbine design and analysis code that has been in development since 2007 by MIT graduate students under the supervision of Professor Richard Kimball. In order to test the performance ...

Ketcham, Jerod W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - active power flow Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 8 IEEE INFOCOM 2000 1 Effortlimited Fair (ELF) Scheduling for Wireless Summary: on each flow using a per-flow power factor setting. The...

130

Final Report: Pilot-scale Cross-flow Filtration Test - Envelope A + Entrained Solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company.This filter technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. This plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

Duignan, M.R.

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix SolarBlack Warrior Area (DOE GTP)Flow

132

Flow Test At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix SolarBlack Warrior Area (DOE GTP)FlowArea (DOE GTP)

133

Flow Test At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Musgrave, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix SolarBlack Warrior Area (DOE GTP)FlowArea (DOE

134

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP)OpenNewFlow

135

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP)OpenNewFlow6

136

Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Experimental neutronics tests for a neutron activation system for the European ITER TBM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are investigating methods for neutron flux measurement in the ITER TBM. In particular we have tested sets of activation materials leading to induced gamma activities with short half-lives of the order of tens of seconds up to minutes and standard activation materials. Packages of activation foils have been irradiated with the intense neutron generator of Technical University of Dresden in a pure DT neutron field as well as in a neutronics mock-up of the European ITER HCLL TBM. An important aim was to check whether the gamma activity induced in the activation foils in these packages could be measured simultaneously. It was indeed possible to identify gamma lines of interest in gamma-ray measurements immediately after extraction from the irradiation.

Klix, A.; Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gehre, D. [Technical University of Dresden, IKTP, Zellescher Weg 19, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Kleizer, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany and Budapest University of Technology and Economics, M?egyetem rkp. 3-9. H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Raj, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany and Université Paris-Sud, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, F-91405 Paris (France); Rovni, I. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, M?egyetem rkp. 3-9. H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Ruecker, Tom [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany and University of Applied Sciences Zittau-Goerlitz, Theodor-Körner-Allee 16, D-02754 Zittau (Germany)

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

A study of pumps for the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy extraction experiment (LTFT (Long Term Flow Test))  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of specifications for the hot dry rock (HDR) Phase II circulation pumping system is developed from a review of basic fluid pumping mechanics, a technical history of the HDR Phase I and Phase II pumping systems, a presentation of the results from experiment 2067 (the Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test or ICFT), and consideration of available on-site electrical power limitations at the experiment site. For the Phase II energy extraction experiment (the Long Term Flow Test or LTFT) it is necessary to provide a continuous, low maintenance, and highly efficient pumping capability for a period of twelve months at variable flowrates up to 420 gpm and at surface injection pressures up to 5000 psi. The pumping system must successfully withstand attacks by corrosive and embrittling gases, erosive chemicals and suspended solids, and fluid pressure and temperature fluctuations. In light of presently available pumping hardware and electric power supply limitations, it is recommended that positive displacement multiplex plunger pumps, driven by variable speed control electric motors, be used to provide the necessary continuous surface injection pressures and flowrates for LTFT. The decision of whether to purchase the required circulation pumping hardware or to obtain contractor provided pumping services has not been made.

Tatro, C.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Modeling Groundwater Flow and Transport of Radionuclides at Amchitka Island's Underground Nuclear Tests: Milrow, Long Shot, and Cannikin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1963, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive material in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site (NTS), but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these locations, Amchitka Island, Alaska is the subject of this report. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. Long Shot was an 80-kiloton-yield test conducted at a depth of 700 meters (m) on October 29, 1965 (DOE, 2000). Milrow had an announced yield of about 1,000 kilotons, and was detonated at a depth of 1,220 m on October 2, 1969. Cannikin had an announced yield less than 5,000 kilotons, and was conducted at a depth of 1,790 m on November 6, 1971. The purpose of this work is to provide a portion of the information needed to conduct a human-health risk assessment of the potential hazard posed by the three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka Island. Specifically, the focus of this work is the subsurface transport portion, including the release of radionuclides from the underground cavities and their movement through the groundwater system to the point where they seep out of the ocean floor and into the marine environment. This requires a conceptual model of groundwater flow on the island using geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information, a numerical model for groundwater flow, a conceptual model of contaminant release and transport properties from the nuclear test cavities, and a numerical model for contaminant transport. Needed for the risk assessment are estimates of the quantity of radionuclides (in terms of mass flux) from the underground tests on Amchitka that could discharge to the ocean, the time of possible discharge, and the location in terms of distance from shoreline. The radionuclide data presented here are all reported in terms of normalized masses to avoid presenting classified information. As only linear processes are modeled, the results can be readily scaled by the true classified masses for use in the risk assessment. The modeling timeframe for the risk assessment was set at 1,000 years, though some calculations are extended to 2,000 years. This first section of the report endeavors to orient the reader with the environment of Amchitka and the specifics of the underground nuclear tests. Of prime importance are the geologic and hydrologic conditions of the subsurface. A conceptual model for groundwater flow beneath the island is then developed and paired with an appropriate numerical modeling approach in section 2. The parameters needed for the model, supporting data for them, and data uncertainties are discussed at length. The calibration of the three flow models (one for each test) is then presented. At this point the conceptual radionuclide transport model is introduced and its numerical approach described in section 3. Again, the transport parameters and their supporting data and uncertainties are the focus. With all of the processes and parameters in place, the first major modeling phase can be discussed in section 4. In this phase, a parametric uncertainty analysis is performed to determine the sensitivity of the transport modeling results to the uncertainties present in the parameters. This analysis is motivated by the recognition of substantial uncertainty in the subsurface conditions on the island and the need to incorporate that uncertainty into the modeling. The conclusion of the first phase determines the parameters to hold as uncertain through the main flow and transport modeling. This second, main phase of modeling is presented in section 5, with the contaminant breakthrough behavior of each test site addressed. This is followed by a sensitivity analysis in section 6, regarding the importance of additional processes that could not be supported in the main modeling effort due to lack of data. Finally, the results for the individual sites are compared, the sensitivities discussed,

Ahmed Hassan; Karl Pohlmann; Jenny Chapman

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

140

RAFT: A simulator for ReActive Flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the use of the simulator RAFT for the ReActive flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants. RAFT can be used as a predictive tool in the design and analysis of laboratory and field experiments or it can be used for the estimation of model/process parameters from experiments. RAFT simulates the reactive transport of groundwater contaminants in one, two-, or three-dimensions and it can model user specified source/link configurations and arbitrary injection strategies. A suite of solvers for transport, reactions and regression are employed so that a combination of numerical methods best suited for a problem can be chosen. User specified coupled equilibrium and kinetic reaction systems can be incorporated into RAFT. RAFT is integrated with a symbolic computational language MAPLE, to automate code generation for arbitrary reaction systems. RAFT is expected to be used as a simulator for engineering design for field experiments in groundwater remediation including bioremediation, reactive barriers and redox manipulation. As an integrated tool with both the predictive ability and the ability to analyze experimental data, RAFT can help in the development of remediation technologies, from laboratory to field.

Chilakapati, A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Testing Geometrical Discrimination within an Enzyme Active Site: Constrained Hydrogen Bonding in the Ketosteroid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing Geometrical Discrimination within an Enzyme Active Site: Constrained Hydrogen Bonding, Stanford UniVersity, Stanford, California 94305, and Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry-chain reorientation and prevent hydrogen bond shortening by 0.1 Ă? or less. Further, this constraint has substantial

Herschlag, Dan

142

Testing for fault activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using independent GPS results from the BARGEN network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing for fault activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using independent GPS results from the BARGEN June 2006; published 19 July 2006. [1] Data from BARGEN GPS stations around Yucca Mountain (YM) have at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using independent GPS results from the BARGEN network, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33

Blewitt, Geoffrey

143

Automatic Test Generation for Data-Flow Reactive Systems with time constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

instantaneously. We present a conformance relation for this model and we propose a test generation method using(V ) the set of variable assignments for V . Given G G(V ) and a valuation v Dom(V ), we write v |= G when G(v) true. Given a valuation v = (v1, · · · , vn) of V and A A(V ), we define the valuations v[A] as v

Boyer, Edmond

144

Large scale test rig for flow visualization and leakage measurement of labyrinth seals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensions of the two categories of seals considered showing:(a) seal without annular groove and (b) seal with annular groove. 38 4. 2 Schematic of test facility layout showing by-pass valve. 41 5. 1 Design dimension variables for: (a) seal without.... g Gravitational constant. Nondimensional leakage resistance coefficient. I Length of straight run of pipe. P? Bulk pressure at inlet of seal. Bulk presure at outlet of seal. Cavity leakage Reynolds number. Stator step size. V, ? Bulk velocity...

Broussard, Daniel Harold

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Expanding operation ranges using active flow control in Francis turbines; Lastomrćdesutvidgning med aktiv flödeskontroll i Francisturbiner.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This report contains an investigation of fluid injection techniques used in the purpose of reducing deleterious flow effects occurring in the draft tube of… (more)

Adolfsson, Sebastian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Current trends and innovations in porometry and porosimetry applicable to battery separator testing and development: Introducing the Micro-Flow Porometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pore structure of separators is a critical property for efficiency of batteries and fuel cells. As such, porosity characterization is of great interest to those developing, as well as those manufacturing, these materials. This paper discusses the two most frequently used techniques for porosity characterization: porosimetry and porometry. The strengths and limitations of both testing techniques is discussed with a focus on appropriate test selection to obtain optimal results. This paper also describes the new user-friendly instruments now available from Porous Materials Inc. (PMI) and the recent advances that have made these techniques more useful for those involved with product development, product improvement, and quality control in the battery separator industry. This paper introduces the new Micro-Flow Porometer, which is capable of testing flow rates as low as .0001 cc/min. The usefulness of the Micro-Flow Porometer for battery separator testing is discussed and additional advances in porosimetry is introduced.

Stillwell, C.R.; Gupta, K.M. [Porous Materials Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well. Appendix A, Gladys McCall Site (Cameron Parish, LA): Final report, October 1985--October 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor ``pills`` directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Prolonged effect of fluid flow stress on the proliferative activity of mesothelial cells after abrupt discontinuation of fluid streaming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Late-onset peritoneal fibrosis leading to EPS remains to be elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluid streaming is a potent factor for peritoneal fibrosis in PD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focused on the prolonged effect of fluid streaming on mesothelial cell kinetics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A history of fluid streaming exposure promoted mesothelial proliferative activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have thus identified a potent new factor for late-onset peritoneal fibrosis. -- Abstract: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) often develops after transfer to hemodialysis and transplantation. Both termination of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and transplantation-related factors are risks implicated in post-PD development of EPS, but the precise mechanism of this late-onset peritoneal fibrosis remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that fluid flow stress induced mesothelial proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Therefore, we speculated that the prolonged bioactive effect of fluid flow stress may affect mesothelial cell kinetics after cessation of fluid streaming. To investigate how long mesothelial cells stay under the bioactive effect brought on by fluid flow stress after removal of the stress, we initially cultured mesothelial cells under fluid flow stress and then cultured the cells under static conditions. Mesothelial cells exposed to fluid flow stress for a certain time showed significantly high proliferative activity compared with static conditions after stoppage of fluid streaming. The expression levels of protein phosphatase 2A, which dephosphorylates MAPK, in mesothelial cells changed with time and showed a biphasic pattern that was dependent on the duration of exposure to fluid flow stress. There were no differences in the fluid flow stress-related bioactive effects on mesothelial cells once a certain time had passed. The present findings show that fluid flow stress exerts a prolonged bioactive effect on mesothelial cells after termination of fluid streaming. These findings support the hypothesis that a history of PD for a certain period could serve as a trigger of EPS after stoppage of PD.

Aoki, Shigehisa, E-mail: aokis@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Ikeda, Satoshi [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Takezawa, Toshiaki [Transgenic Animal Research Center, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan)] [Transgenic Animal Research Center, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan); Kishi, Tomoya [Department of Internal Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Internal Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Makino, Junichi [Makino Clinic, Saga (Japan)] [Makino Clinic, Saga (Japan); Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Matsunobu, Aki [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Noguchi, Mitsuru [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Sugihara, Hajime [Department of Physical Therapy, International University of Health and Welfare, Fukuoka (Japan)] [Department of Physical Therapy, International University of Health and Welfare, Fukuoka (Japan); Toda, Shuji [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan)

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

150

Practical Experiences from the USE of a Method for Active Functional Tests and Optimization of Coil Energy Recovery Loop Systems in AHUs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCES FROM THE USE OF A METHOD FOR ACTIVE FUNCTIONAL TESTS AND OPTIMIZATION OF COIL ENERGY RECOVERY LOOP SYSTEMS IN AHUS. J?rgen Eriksson* * ?F-Installation AB, Box 1551 SE 401 51 G?teborg, Sweden. Summary A method...-commissioning, ventilation, energy, efficiency, EES INTRODUCTION The reason to study coil energy recovery loop systems is that they are very common in Sweden and mainly used in cases with high air flow rates such as in hospitals and pharmaceutical industries. The heat...

Eriksson, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from H? and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Ć) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of 'counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Ć). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s{sup –1}) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.

Alexander, Caroline E.; Walsh, Robert W.; Régnier, Stéphane [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)] [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)] [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kobayashi, Ken [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)] [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick [School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)] [School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA (United States)] [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA (United States); DeForest, Craig [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)] [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P.N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [P.N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Suppression of the phagocytic capabilities of coelomocytes from Lumbricus terrestris following an in-vitro exposure to heavy metals and evaluation of their metabolic activities by flow cytometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Immunotoxic effects of environmental exposure to chemical contaminants can be evaluated by monitoring cellular and functional parameters of the immune system of sentinel species. In this scope, the earthworm may represent a relevant sentinel species to determine the level of toxicity linked to soil contaminants or to test the efficacy of remediation protocols. In this work, coelomocytes were incubated in vitro for 18 hours with mercury, cadmium, zinc or lead at concentrations ranging from 10{sup {minus}9} to 10{sup {minus}4}M. The analysis of phagocytosis by flow cytometry revealed that this natural response was impaired at non cytotoxic concentrations of mercury, cadmium and zinc. Moreover, the analysis of cells obtained from coelomic fluid, based on the combination of low angle forward scatter (FSC) and side scatter (SSC) allowed to discriminate between two distinct populations of coelomocytes. With the use of fluorescent probes, such as carboxyfluorescin diacetate (CFDA), dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFDA) and chloromethyl fluorescin diacetate (CFDA), to study the esterase activity and Fluo-3 to measure free cytoplasmic calcium, the results showed that the first discrimination between the two populations of cells based on size and complexity could be further accentuated on the basis of their metabolic activities. In summary, the data make very attractive the use of flow cytometry to study cellular and functional parameters of the earthworm.

Brousseau, P.; Fugere, N.; Coderre, D.; Flipo, D.; Foumier, M. [Univ. du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Hampering Active Wellbore Kit (HAWK) for rapidly controlling a free flowing oil well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To mitigate the impact of a Blowout Preventer (BOP) failure, this work proposes a method and machine that can create a gradual flow reduction to zero in an offshore well by introducing a mechanical plug inside the BOP. The ...

Rojas, Folkers Eduardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Active hopper for promoting flow of bulk granular or powdered solids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus that promotes the flow of materials has a body having an inner shape for holding the materials, a wall having a shape that approximates a portion of the inner shape of the body, and a vibrator attached to the wall. The wall may be disposed vertically within the body close to the body's inner shape. The vibrator transfers vibrations to the wall to agitate the material and encourage material flow.

Saunders, Timothy; Brady, John D.

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

156

TRAC-PF1/MOD-1 analysis of Loss-Of-Flow Test L9-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. As part of our independent assessment of code version TRAC-PF1/MOD1, we analyzed Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) L9-4 and compared the test data to the calculated results. This was an anticipated-transient-without-scram test in which the pumps were tripped, the steam generator main feedwater discontinued, and the main steam-outlet valve closed. This data comparison is the first extensive test of TRAC's reactor-kinetics models. The comparisons show that TRAC can calculate the power generation within a nuclear reactor if the program is supplied with adequate reactor-kinetics input specifications. The data comparisons also indicate that TRAC calculated the thermal-hydraulic parameters within LOFT well with only minor discrepancies. A number of models within TRAC-PF1/MOD1 were verified for the first time. They include the reactor-kinetics models, the trip-activated time-step controls, and the LOFT pump-coastdown calculations. In general, the final input description is adequate to analyze the experiment. The calculations indicate the importance and difficulty of obtaining accurate and applicable reactor-kinetics input data. They also indicate the need to include the effects of xenon-poisoning buildup in the analysis.

Meier, J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets: Effect of gas flow, active species, and snake-like bullet propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jets have recently attracted enormous interest owing to numerous applications in plasma biology, health care, medicine, and nanotechnology. A dedicated study of the interaction between the upstream and downstream plasma plumes revealed that the active species (electrons, ions, excited OH, metastable Ar, and nitrogen-related species) generated by the upstream plasma plume enhance the propagation of the downstream plasma plume. At gas flows exceeding 2 l/min, the downstream plasma plume is longer than the upstream plasma plume. Detailed plasma diagnostics and discharge species analysis suggest that this effect is due to the electrons and ions that are generated by the upstream plasma and flow into the downstream plume. This in turn leads to the relatively higher electron density in the downstream plasma. Moreover, high-speed photography reveals a highly unusual behavior of the plasma bullets, which propagate in snake-like motions, very differently from the previous reports. This behavior is related to the hydrodynamic instability of the gas flow, which results in non-uniform distributions of long-lifetime active species in the discharge tube and of surface charges on the inner surface of the tube.

Wu, S.; Wang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Tan, X.; Lu, X. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Ostrikov, K. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

RMOTC - Testing - Flow Assurance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001Data

159

Development of a CouetteTaylor flow device with active minimization of secondary circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flexibility in developing flow profiles. The working fluids of the experiment are water, a water-glycerol mix of the experiment and some representative results obtained with laser Doppler velocimetry in water are discussed magnetorotational instability MRI experiment is de- signed to study are subcritical hydrodynamic instability3,4 SHI

Ji, Hantao

160

Charpy impact test results for low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 30 dpa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miniature specimens of six low activation ferritic alloys have been impact field tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 30 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens and specimens irradiated to 10 dpa indicates that degradation in the impact behavior appears to have saturated by {approx}10 dpa in at least four of these alloys. The 7.5Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X appears most promising for further consideration as a candidate structural material in fusion reactor applications, although the 9Cr-1V alloy may also warrant further investigation.

Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

John McCord

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Neuroimaging and neuroenergetics: Brain activations as information-driven reorganization of energy flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neuroimaging and neuroenergetics: Brain activations as information-driven reorganization of energy 25 January 2010 Keywords: Neuroimaging Neuroenergetics Brain activation Cortical response Deviance detection a b s t r a c t There is increasing focus on the neurophysiological underpinnings of brain

164

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Design and Analysis Activity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by the Department of Energy's Energy Storage area at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the battery testing, design, and analysis activity.

165

Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion adsorption chemicals, solid-liquid separation methods, and achievable decontamination factors. Results of the radionuclide removal testing indicate that the radionuclides, including Tc-99, can be removed with inorganic sorbents and precipitating agents. Evaporation test results indicate that the simulant can be evaporated to fairly high concentration prior to formation of appreciable solids, but corrosion has not yet been examined.

McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

166

Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that used for routine evaluation of feed compatibility studies for the 242-A evaporator. One of the

Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone takes place as preferential flow, faster than would be predicted by the coupled Richards' and advection-dispersion equations with hydraulic properties estimated by traditional means. At present the hydrologic community has not achieved consensus as to whether a modification of Richards' equation, or a fundamentally different formulation, would best quantify preferential flow. Where the fastest contaminant transport speed is what needs to be estimated, there is the possibility of simplification of the evaluation process. One way of doing so is by a two-step process in which the first step is to evaluate whether significant preferential flow and solute transport is possible for the media and conditions of concern. The second step is to carry out (a) a basic Richards' and advection-dispersion equation analysis if it is concluded that preferential flow is not possible or (b) an analysis that considers only the fastest possible preferential-flow processes, if preferential flow is possible. For the preferential-flow situation, a recently published model describable as a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow (SRPF) model is an easily applied option. This report documents the application of this two-step process to flow through the thick unsaturated zones of Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site. Application of the SRPF model involves distinguishing between continuous and intermittent water supply to preferential flow paths. At Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain this issue is complicated by the fact that contaminant travel begins at a location deep in the subsurface, where there may be perched water that may or may not act like a continuous supply, depending on such features as the connectedness of fractures and the nature of impeding layers. We have treated this situation by hypothesizing both continuous and intermittent scenarios for contaminant transport to the carbonate aquifer and reporting estimation of the fastest speed for both of these end members.

Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

168

Development of a Pulse Modulator for Active Flow Control in Turbomachinery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suppression system that will introduce oscillatory blowing into one of the rotor blade (stall suppression blade). This oscillatory blowing method has been tested on a wing section in a wind tunnel and has shown to increase the stall angle-of-attack by several...

Johnson, Shalom

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Design and Test of an Event Detector for the ReflectoActive Seals System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Design and Test of an Event Detector and Locator for the ReflectoActive Seals System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Two-photon microscopy to measure blood flow and concurrent brain cell activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fluorescent molecules occurs only at the laser focus. Past studies have made use of two-photon microscopy-27) and the olfactory bulb (6, 28-31), down to depths of 600 ”m, which is sufficient to resolve vessels and neurons and endogenous fluorescence-based functional reporters to observe cellular activity, such as changes

Kleinfeld, David

172

Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory - Semiannual Report: April 1, 1990, Through September 30, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1990. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. MELs are equipped for the on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. This report describes the testing, test results, and suggested courses of action.

Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A thermodynamical formulation for chemically active multi-phase turbulent flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A generalized thermodynamics for chemically active multiphase solid-fluid mixtures in turbulent state of motion is formulated. The global equations of balance for each phase are ensemble averaged and the local conservation laws for the mean motions are derived. The averaged and the local conservation laws for the mean motions are derived. The averaged form of the Clausius-Duhem inequality is used and the thermodynamics of the chemically active mixtures in turbulent motion is studied. Particular attention is given to the species concentration and chemical reaction effects, in addition to transport and interaction of the phasic fluctuation energies. Based on the averaged entropy inequality, constitutive equations for the stresses, energy, heat and mass fluxes of various species are developed. The explicit governing equations of motion are derived and discussed.

Ahmadi, G.; Cao, J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity. The framework for this evaluation is provided in Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Section 3.0 of Appendix VI ''Corrective Action Strategy'' of the FFACO describes the process that will be used to complete corrective actions specifically for the UGTA Project. The objective of the UGTA corrective action strategy is to define contaminant boundaries for each UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) where groundwater may have become contaminated from the underground nuclear weapons tests. The contaminant boundaries are determined based on modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. A summary of the FFACO corrective action process and the UGTA corrective action strategy is provided in Section 1.5. The FFACO (1996) corrective action process for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97 was initiated with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 2000a). The CAIP included a review of existing data on the CAU and proposed a set of data collection activities to collect additional characterization data. These recommendations were based on a value of information analysis (VOIA) (IT, 1999), which evaluated the value of different possible data collection activities, with respect to reduction in uncertainty of the contaminant boundary, through simplified transport modeling. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAIP identifies a three-step model development process to evaluate the impact of underground nuclear testing on groundwater to determine a contaminant boundary (DOE/NV, 2000a). The three steps are as follows: (1) Data compilation and analysis that provides the necessary modeling data that is completed in two parts: the first addressing the groundwater flow model, and the second the transport model. (2) Development of a groundwater flow model. (3) Development of a groundwater transport model. This report presents the results of the first part of the first step, documenting the data compilation, evaluation, and analysis for the groundwater flow model. The second part, documentation of transport model data will be the subject of a separate report. The purpose of this document is to present the compilation and evaluation of the available hydrologic data and information relevant to the development of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU groundwater flow model, which is a fundamental tool in the prediction of the extent of contaminant migration. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are summarized with reference to the complete documentation. The specific task objectives for hydrologic data documentation are as follows: (1) Identify and compile available hydrologic data and supporting information required to develop and validate the groundwater flow model for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. (2) Assess the quality of the data and associated documentation, and assign qualifiers to denote levels of quality. (3) Analyze the data to derive expected values or spatial distributions and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability.

John McCord

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Electro-hydrodynamics and kinetic modelling of polluted air flow activated by multi-tip-to-plane corona discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present paper is devoted to the 2D simulation of an Atmospheric Corona Discharge Reactor (ACDR) involving 10 pins powered by a DC high voltage and positioned 7 mm above a grounded metallic plane. The corona reactor is periodically crossed by thin mono filamentary streamers with a natural repetition frequency of some tens of kHz. The simulation involves the electro-dynamic, chemical kinetic, and neutral gas hydrodynamic phenomena that influence the kinetics of the chemical species transformation. Each discharge stage (including the primary and the secondary streamers development and the resulting thermal shock) lasts about one hundred nanoseconds while the post-discharge stages occurring between two successive discharge phases last one hundred microseconds. The ACDR is crossed by a lateral air flow including 400 ppm of NO. During the considered time scale of 10 ms, one hundred discharge/post-discharge cycles are simulated. The simulation involves the radical formation and thermal exchange between the discharges and the background gas. The results show how the successive discharges activate the flow gas and how the induced turbulence phenomena affect the redistribution of the thermal energy and the chemical kinetics inside the ACDR.

Meziane, M.; Eichwald, O.; Ducasse, O.; Marchal, F. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Toulouse Cedex 9 F-31062 (France); Sarrette, J. P.; Yousfi, M. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Toulouse Cedex 9 F-31062 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, Toulouse F-31062 (France)

2013-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

Design and Development of a Test Facility to Study Two-Phase Steam/Water Flow in Porous Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of relative permeability is the key concept in extending Darcy's law for single phase flow through porous media to the two-phase flow regime. Relative permeability functions are needed for simulation studies of two-phase geothermal reservoirs. These are poorly known inspite of considerable theoretical and experimental investigations during the last decade. Since no conclusive results exist, many investigators use ad hoc parametrization, or adopt results obtined from flow of oil and gas (Corey, 1954). It has been shown by Reda and Eaton (1980) that this can lead to serious deficiencies. Sensitivity of the relative permeability curves for prediction of mass flow rate and flowing enthalpy into geothermal wells has been studied by many investigators (e.g. Eaton and Reda (1980), Bodvarsson et al (1980), Sun and Ershagi (1979) etc.). It can be concluded from these studies that the beehavior of a two-phase steam/water reservoir depends greatly on the relative permeability curves used. Hence, there exists a need for obtaining reliable relative permeability functions.

Verma, Ashok K.; Pruess, Karsten; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Results of brine flow testing and disassembly of a crushed salt/bentonite block seal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small-Scale Seal Performance Tests, Series C, a set of in situ experiments conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, are designed to evaluate the performance of various seal materials emplaced in large (0.9-m-diameter) boreholes. This report documents the results of fluid (brine) flow testing and water and clay content analyses performed on one emplaced seal comprised of 100% salt blocks and 50%/50% crushed salt/bentonite blocks and disassembled after nearly three years of brine injection testing. Results from the water content analyses of 212 samples taken from within this seal show uniform water content throughout the 50%/50% salt/bentonite blocks with saturations about 100%. Clay content analyses from the 100% salt endcaps of the seal show a background clay content of about 1% by weight uniformly distributed, with the exception of samples taken at the base of the seal at the borehole wall interface. These samples show clay contents up to 3% by weight, which suggests some bentonite may have migrated under pressure to that interface. Results of the brine-flow testing show that the permeability to brine for this seal was about 2 to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} darcy (2 to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}16} m{sup 2}).

Finley, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

TESTING DIAGNOSTICS OF NUCLEAR ACTIVITY AND STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z > 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present some of the first science data with the new Keck/MOSFIRE instrument to test the effectiveness of different AGN/SF diagnostics at z {approx} 1.5. MOSFIRE spectra were obtained in three H-band multi-slit masks in the GOODS-S field, resulting in 2 hr exposures of 36 emission-line galaxies. We compare X-ray data with the traditional emission-line ratio diagnostics and the alternative mass-excitation and color-excitation diagrams, combining new MOSFIRE infrared data with previous HST/WFC3 infrared spectra (from the 3D-HST survey) and multiwavelength photometry. We demonstrate that a high [O III]/H{beta} ratio is insufficient as an active galactic nucleus (AGN) indicator at z > 1. For the four X-ray-detected galaxies, the classic diagnostics ([O III]/H{beta} versus [N II]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha}) remain consistent with X-ray AGN/SF classification. The X-ray data also suggest that 'composite' galaxies (with intermediate AGN/SF classification) host bona fide AGNs. Nearly {approx}2/3 of the z {approx} 1.5 emission-line galaxies have nuclear activity detected by either X-rays or the classic diagnostics. Compared to the X-ray and line ratio classifications, the mass-excitation method remains effective at z > 1, but we show that the color-excitation method requires a new calibration to successfully identify AGNs at these redshifts.

Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Konidaris, Nicholas P. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 105-24, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kocevski, Dale D.; Yan, Renbin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Juneau, Stephanie [Irfu/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); McLean, Ian S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Villar, Victor [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

Iodine Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins and Activated Carbons– Batch Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows: • The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. • The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 ”g/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 ”g/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. • The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 ”g/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. • In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine sorption.

Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - activities field test Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at North Temperate Lakes-LTER Activities serve approximately 350... elementary, middle, and high school students annually Professional development activities reach 60...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Passive Acoustic Detection of Wind Turbine In-Flow Conditions for Active Control and Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind is a significant source of energy; however, the human capability to produce electrical energy still has many hurdles to overcome. One of these is the unpredictability of the winds in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The ABL is highly turbulent in both stable and unstable conditions (based on the vertical temperature profile) and the resulting fluctuations can have a dramatic impact on wind turbine operation. Any method by which these fluctuations could be observed, estimated, or predicted could provide a benefit to the wind energy industry as a whole. Based on the fundamental coupling of velocity fluctuations to pressure fluctuations in the nearly incompressible flow in the ABL, This work hypothesizes that a ground-based array of infrasonic pressure transducers could be employed to estimate the vertical wind profile over a height relevant for wind turbines. To analyze this hypothesis, experiments and field deployments were conducted. Wind tunnel experiments were performed for a thick turbulent boundary layer over a neutral or heated surface. Surface pressure and velocity probe measurements were acquired simultaneously. Two field deployments yielded surface pressure data from a 49 element array. The second deployment at the Reese Technology Center in Lubbock, TX, also included data from a smaller aperture, 96-element array and a 200-meter tall meteorological tower. Analysis of the data successfully demonstrated the ability to estimate the vertical velocity profile using coherence data from the pressure array. Also, dynamical systems analysis methods were successful in identifying and tracking a gust type event. In addition to the passive acoustic profiling method, this program also investigated a rapid response Doppler SODAR system, the optimization of wind turbine blades for enhanced power with reduced aeroacoustic noise production, and the implementation of a wireless health monitoring system for the wind turbine blades. Each of these other objectives was met successfully. The use of phase unwrapping applied to SODAR data was found to yield reasonable results for per-pulse measurements. A health monitoring system design analysis was able to demonstrate the ability to use a very small number of sensors to monitor blade health based on the blade's overall structural modes. Most notable was the development of a multi-objective optimization methodology that successfully yielded an aerodynamic blade design that produces greater power output with reduced aerodynamic loading noise. This optimization method could be significant for future design work.

Murray, Nathan E.

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

A review of two recent occurrences at the Advanced Test Reactor involving subcontractor activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a brief, unofficial investigation into two incidents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility, reported on October 25 and 31, 1997. The first event was an unanticipated breach of confinement. The second involved reactor operation with an inoperable seismic scram subsystem, violating the reactor`s Technical Specifications. These two incidents have been found to be unrelated. A third event that occurred on December 16, 1996, is also discussed because of its similarities to the first event listed above. Both of these incidents were unanticipated breaches of confinement, and both involved the work of construction subcontractor personnel. The cause for the subcontractor related occurrences is a work control process that fails to effectively interface with LMITCO management. ATR Construction Project managers work sufficient close with construction subcontractor personnel to understand planned day-to-day activities. They also have sufficient training and understanding of reactor operations to ensure adherence to applicable administrative requirements. However, they may not be sufficiently involved in the work authorization and control process to bridge an apparent communications gap between subcontractor employees and Facility Operations/functional support personnel for work inside the reactor facility. The cause for the inoperable seismic scram switch (resulting from a disconnected lead) is still under investigation. It does not appear to be subcontractor related.

Dahlke, H.J.; Jensen, N.C.; Vail, J.A.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. The PA is needed to satisfy both Washington State IDF Permit and DOE Order requirements. Cast Stone has been selected for solidification of radioactive wastes including WTP aqueous secondary wastes treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. A similar waste form called Saltstone is used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to solidify its LAW tank wastes.

Westsik, Joseph H.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mercier, Theresa M.; Russell, Renee L.; Cozzi, Alex; Daniel, William E.; Eibling, Russell E.; Hansen, E. K.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Swanberg, David J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Pollen-Mediated Gene Flow in California Cotton Depends on Pollinator Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Mediated Gene Flow in California Cotton Depends on Pollinator Activity Allen E. Van Deynze,* Frederick J. In the 1950s comprehensive studies using vis-Many cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollination studies have ual). These studies reported 28% outcrossing in cotton in the California cotton growing region and in a region

Bradford, Kent

186

Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

None

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Final Report: Pilot-Scale X-Flow Filtration Test - Env C Plus Entrained Solids Plus Sr/TRU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This filtration technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. The plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

Duignan, M.R.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon testing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

190

Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities are outlined to introduce students to information on solar energy while performing ordinary classroom work. In this teaching manual solar energy is integrated with the humanities. The activities include such things as stories, newspapers, writing assignments, and art and musical presentations all filled with energy related terms. An energy glossary is provided. (BCS)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal regulation requires energy companies and government entities to utilize alternative fuels in their vehicle fleets. To meet this need, several automobile manufacturers are producing compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled vehicles. In addition, several converters are modifying gasoline-fueled vehicles to operate on both gasoline and CNG (Bifuel). Because of the availability of CNG vehicles, many energy company and government fleets have adopted CNG as their principle alternative fuel for transportation. Meanwhile, recent research has shown that blending hydrogen with CNG (HCNG) can reduce emissions from CNG vehicles. However, blending hydrogen with CNG (and performing no other vehicle modifications) reduces engine power output, due to the lower volumetric energy density of hydrogen in relation to CNG. Arizona Public Service (APS) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (DOE AVTA) identified the need to determine the magnitude of these effects and their impact on the viability of using HCNG in existing CNG vehicles. To quantify the effects of using various blended fuels, a work plan was designed to test the acceleration, range, and exhaust emissions of a Ford F-150 pickup truck operating on 100% CNG and blends of 15 and 30% HCNG. This report presents the results of this testing conducted during May and June 2003 by Electric Transportation Applications (Task 4.10, DOE AVTA Cooperative Agreement DEFC36- 00ID-13859).

James E. Francfort

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A Comprehensive Review of the Tests Completed on the Flow Loop at the Energy Systems Laboratory (Draft)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-calibration of the equipment is the best way to ensure field accuracy. The calibration laboratory was built to provide a close at hand facility where the majority of this work could be performed. The flowloop was built to provide a means of calibrating the thermal monitoring... the receiving tank.backto thesupply tank. An orifice plate assembly has been installed to provide a secondary standard. The orifice plate is located in the vertical rise between the test section and the receiving tank. A differential pressure transducer with a 0...

Robinson, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Activity testing of fine-particle size, iron catalysts for coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of fine-particle size (< 40 nm) unsupported catalysts in direct coal liquefaction may result in improved economics due to possible enhanced yields of desired products, the potential for decreasing reaction severity, and the possibility of using less catalyst. Sandia has developed a standard testing procedure for evaluating and comparing the fine-particle catalysts. The test procedure uses phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, the DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, and a statistical experimental design to enable evaluation of the catalysts over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt % on a dmmf coal basis). Product analyses include tetrahydrofuran (THF) conversion, heptane conversion, solvent recovery, and gas analyses. Phenanthrene as the solvent in the testing procedure yielded significant differences between thermal and catalytic reactions, whereas using a good hydrogen donor such as 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP) showed no catalytic effects.

Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Gugliotta, T.P.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development and results of experimental testing of electromembrane process for liquid active waste purification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the results of studies on electromembrane purification. The concentration of salts in active wastes arising from decontamination is more than 3--5 g/l. For these investigations a solution was chosen that had arisen from the decontamination of metallic items by a two-bath method using permanganate-alkali in the first stage and nitrogen oxalic acid in the second stage. The total salt content of mixed acid and alkaline solutions was 3.0 g/l, with a pH of 8.5 and total beta-activity of 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} Ci/l.

Martinov, B.V.; Smirnov, V.V.; Tugolukov, B.B.; Belyakov, Y.A. [A.A. Bochvar All Russian Scientific Research, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Inorganic Materials

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

MHD coal-fired flow facility. Annual technical progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) reports on significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Faclity (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF).

Alstatt, M.C.; Attig, R.C.; Brosnan, D.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar energy information is made available to students through classroom instruction by way of the Solar Energy Education teaching manuals. In this manual solar energy, as well as other energy sources like wind power, is introduced by performing school activities in the area of social studies. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOffice -TemplateDavid L.Testing2009

199

Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Enginesthewith RationalActivity| Department of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Stable Modality-Specific Activity Flows As Reflected by the Neuroenergetic Approach to the fMRI Weighted Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the metabolic rate of glucose (PET with FDG) [5]. fMRI measures the consumption of energy by the brain through reflected by the increase of blood flow, blood oxygenation (PET with H2O15 and BOLD fMRI), the increase oxygen consumption, which is needed for the synthesis of the energy-carrying ATP molecules. This energy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

203

A Hydrostratigraphic System for Modeling Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration at the Corrective Action Unit Scale, Nevada Test Site and Surrounding Areas, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground Test Area (UGTA) corrective action unit (CAU) groundwater flow and contaminant transport models of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity are built upon hydrostratigraphic framework models (HFMs) that utilize the hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) as the fundamental modeling component. The delineation and three-dimensional (3-D) modeling of HSUs within the highly complex geologic terrain that is the NTS requires a hydrostratigraphic system that is internally consistent, yet flexible enough to account for overlapping model areas, varied geologic terrain, and the development of multiple alternative HFMs. The UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system builds on more than 50 years of geologic and hydrologic work in the NTS region. It includes 76 HSUs developed from nearly 300 stratigraphic units that span more than 570 million years of geologic time, and includes rock units as diverse as marine carbonate and siliciclastic rocks, granitic intrusives, rhyolitic lavas and ash-flow tuffs, and alluvial valley-fill deposits. The UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system uses a geology-based approach and two-level classification scheme. The first, or lowest, level of the hydrostratigraphic system is the hydrogeologic unit (HGU). Rocks in a model area are first classified as one of ten HGUs based on the rock’s ability to transmit groundwater (i.e., nature of their porosity and permeability), which at the NTS is mainly a function of the rock’s primary lithology, type and degree of postdepositional alteration, and propensity to fracture. The second, or highest, level within the UGTA CAU-scale hydrostratigraphic system is the HSU, which is the fundamental mapping/modeling unit within UGTA CAU-scale HFMs. HSUs are 3-D bodies that are represented in the finite element mesh for the UGTA groundwater modeling process. HSUs are defined systematically by stratigraphically organizing HGUs of similar character into larger HSUs designations. The careful integration of stratigraphic information in the development of HSUs is important to assure individual HSUs are internally consistent, correlatable, and mappable throughout all the model areas.

Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack Jr., Jennifer Mercadante

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Standard Test Method for Oxygen Content Using a 14-MeV Neutron Activation and Direct-Counting Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method covers the measurement of oxygen concentration in almost any matrix by using a 14-MeV neutron activation and direct-counting technique. Essentially, the same system may be used to determine oxygen concentrations ranging from over 50 % to about 10 g/g, or less, depending on the sample size and available 14-MeV neutron fluence rates. Note 1 - The range of analysis may be extended by using higher neutron fluence rates, larger samples, and higher counting efficiency detectors. 1.2 This test method may be used on either solid or liquid samples, provided that they can be made to conform in size, shape, and macroscopic density during irradiation and counting to a standard sample of known oxygen content. Several variants of this method have been described in the technical literature. A monograph is available which provides a comprehensive description of the principles of activation analysis using a neutron generator (1). 1.3 The values stated in either SI or inch-pound units are to be regarded...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for ``data frac`` stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Activities to support the liquefied gaseous fuels spill test facility program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately a hundred years ago the petrochemical industry was in its infancy, while the chemical industry was already well established. Today, both of these industries, which are almost indistinguishable, are a substantial part of the makeup of the U.S. economy and the lifestyle we enjoy. It is difficult to identify a single segment of our daily lives that isn`t affected by these industries and the products or services they make available for our use. Their survival and continued function in a competitive world market are necessary to maintain our current standard of living. The occurrence of accidents in these industries has two obvious effects: (1) the loss of product during the accident and future productivity because of loss of a portion of a facility or transport medium, and (2) the potential loss of life or injury to individuals, whether workers, emergency responders, or members of the general public. A great deal of work has been conducted at the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill test Facility (LGFSTF) on hazardous spills. WRI has conducted accident investigations as well as provided information on the research results via the internet and bibliographies.

Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.; Routh, T.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligence (SmartHome Kyoung's pictureFlint

208

Development and adaptation of conduction and radiation heat-transfer computer codes for the CFTL. [Core Flow Test Loop; RODCON; HOTTEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RODCON and HOTTEL are two computational methods used to calculate thermal and radiation heat transfer for the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) analysis efforts. RODCON was developed at ORNL to calculate the internal temperature distribution of the fuel rod simulator (FRS) for the CFTL. RODCON solves the time-dependent heat transfer equation in two-dimensional (R angle) cylindrical coordinates at an axial plane with user-specified radial material zones and time- and position-variant surface conditions at the FRS periphery. Symmetry of the FRS periphery boundary conditions is not necessary. The governing elliptic, partial differential heat equation is cast into a fully implicit, finite-difference form by approximating the derivatives with a forward-differencing scheme with variable mesh spacing. The heat conduction path is circumferentially complete, and the potential mathematical problem at the rod center can be effectively ignored. HOTTEL is a revision of an algorithm developed by C.B. Baxi at the General Atomic Company (GAC) to be used in calculating radiation heat transfer in a rod bundle enclosed in a hexagonal duct. HOTTEL uses geometric view factors, surface emissivities, and surface areas to calculate the gray-body or composite view factors in an enclosure having multiple reflections in a nonparticipating medium.

Conklin, J.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Single-Pass Flow-Through Test Elucidation of Weathering Behavior and Evaluation of Contaminant Release Models for Hanford Tank Residual Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminant release models are required to evaluate and predict long-term environmental impacts of even residual amounts of high-level radioactive waste after cleanup and closure of radioactively contaminated sites such as the DOE’s Hanford Site. More realistic and representative models have been developed for release of uranium, technetium, and chromium from Hanford Site tanks C-202, C-203, and C-103 residual wastes using data collected with a single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) method. These revised models indicate that contaminant release concentrations from these residual wastes will be considerably lower than previous estimates based on batch experiments. For uranium, a thermodynamic solubility model provides an effective description of uranium release, which can account for differences in pore fluid chemistry contacting the waste that could occur through time and as a result of different closure scenarios. Under certain circumstances in the SPFT experiments various calcium rich precipitates (calcium phosphates and calcite) form on the surfaces of the waste particles, inhibiting dissolution of the underlying uranium phases in the waste. This behavior was not observed in previous batch experiments. For both technetium and chromium, empirical release models were developed. In the case of technetium, release from all three wastes was modeled using an equilibrium Kd model. For chromium release, a constant concentration model was applied for all three wastes.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Buck, Edgar C.; Neiner, Doinita; Geiszler, Keith N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this quarterly technical Progress report, UTSI reports on continued technical progress in developing the technology for the steam bottoming plant for an MHD Steam combined cycle Power plant. No testing was conducted during the quarter. Major activities were in preparation for the beginning of the 2000 hour POC testing on wester, low sulfur coal scheduled to start in April 1992. The report contains analyses of data from the previous tests in this series that were designed to prepare for the POC test series. Modifications to the flow train that are reported include the rearrangement of the lower temperature heat exchangers in the superheater test module (SHTM) to move the air heater upstream to a higher gas temperature, installation of a gas by-pass to keep the ash seed hopper tap open and installation of the new tubes to be tested in the steam cooled test sections. The major facility modification discussed is the installation of the wet electrostatic precipitator, to replace the venturi scrubber that has been used in previous testing, to take any flow that is not desired through the dry electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. Plans for future testing that are summarized include improvements in test operations, the details of arrangement of high temperature air heater materials for testing and the plans for advanced instrumentation by both UTSI and Mississippi State University.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

In Situ Field Testing of Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

J. Wang

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

212

Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. • Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases “well portion of the objective function” and “head portion of the objective function” are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

John McCord

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in greatest abundance in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are low but are also expected to be in measurable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. These are present due to their partial volatility and some entrainment in the off-gas system. This report discusses results of optimized {sup 99}Tc decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc. Testing focused on minimizing the quantity of sorbents/reactants added, and minimizing mixing time to reach the decontamination targets in this simulant formulation. Stannous chloride and ferrous sulfate were tested as reducing agents to determine the minimum needed to convert soluble pertechnetate to the insoluble technetium dioxide. The reducing agents were tried with and without sorbents.

Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

214

Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

Peters, Dennis

215

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Solderability test system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time. 11 figs.

Yost, F.; Hosking, F.M.; Jellison, J.L.; Short, B.; Giversen, T.; Reed, J.R.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

Solderability test system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time.

Yost, Fred (Cedar Crest, NM); Hosking, Floyd M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Short, Bruce (Beverly, MA); Giversen, Terri (Beverly, MA); Reed, Jimmy R. (Austin, TX)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Selective large-eddy simulation of hypersonic flows. Procedure to activate the filtering in unresolved regions only  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method for the localization of the regions where the turbulent fluctuations are unresolved is applied to the large-eddy simulation (LES) of a compressible turbulent jet with an initial Mach number equal to 5. The localization method used is called selective LES and is based on the exploitation of a scalar probe function f which represents the magnitude of the stretching-tilting term of the vorticity equation normalized with the enstrophy (Tordella et al. 2007). For a fully developed turbulent field of fluctuations, statistical analysis shows that the probability that f is larger than 2 is almost zero, and, for any given threshold, it is larger if the flow is under-resolved. By computing the spatial field of f in each instantaneous realization of the simulation it is possible to locate the regions where the magnitude of the normalized vortical stretching-tilting is anomalously high. The sub-grid model is then introduced into the governing equations in such regions only. The results of the selective LES s...

Tordella, D; Massaglia, S; Mignone, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Moving Granular-Bed Filter Development Program, Option 1 - Component Test Facilities - Test Plan; topical report, September 8, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test plan has been devised for Option 1 Contract period that focuses on the remaining SMGBF technical issues for the purpose of optimizing the SMGBF performance and generating key process performance data needed to promote the continued development of the technology. These technical issues have been identified and ranked in the Task 8, Technical Tradeoffs and Issues Report, submitted to DOE in May, 1994. Three activities are defined in this test plan to address the key issues identified: the first activity performs engineering modeling and design evaluation to Support the test activities; the second activity is directed toward SMGBF cold flow model testing; and the third activity is directed toward high- temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) SMGBF testing. All of the activities are directed toward Recycle SMGBF, although much of it also applies to Once-Through SMGBF.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Cotton flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the conformally invariant Cotton tensor, we define a geometric flow, the "Cotton flow", which is exclusive to three dimensions. This flow tends to evolve the initial metrics into conformally flat ones, and is somewhat orthogonal to the Yamabe flow, the latter being a flow within a conformal class. We define an entropy functional, and study the flow of nine homogeneous spaces both numerically and analytically. In particular, we show that the arbitrarily deformed homogeneous 3-sphere flows into the round 3-sphere. Two of the nine homogeneous geometries, which are degenerated by the Ricci flow, are left intact by the Cotton flow.

Ali Ulas Ozgur Kisisel; Ozgur Sarioglu; Bayram Tekin

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Annual report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Resonating Arm Exerciser: design and pilot testing of a mechanically passive rehabilitation device that mimics robotic active assistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M: Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training forthat provides robot-like assistance for active arm trainingRobots allow a variety of forms of active Page 2 of 12 assistance to be provided for arm

Zondervan, Daniel K; Palafox, Lorena; Hernandez, Jorge; Reinkensmeyer, David J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. This report discusses results of preliminary radionuclide decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of Monosodium Titanate (MST) to remove {sup 90}Sr and actinides, inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc, and zeolites for {sup 137}Cs. Test results indicate that excellent removal of {sup 99}Tc was achieved using Sn(II)Cl{sub 2} as a reductant, coupled with sorption onto hydroxyapatite, even in the presence of air and at room temperature. This process was very effective at neutral pH, with a Decontamination Factor (DF) >577 in two hours. It was less effective at alkaline pH. Conversely, removal of the cesium was more effective at alka

Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

225

Estimation of steady-state and transcient power distributions for the RELAP analyses of the 1963 loss-of-flow and loss-of-pressure tests at BR2.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the safety analyses required for the conversion of the Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, the simulation of a number of loss-of-flow tests, with or without loss of pressure, has been undertaken. These tests were performed at BR2 in 1963 and used instrumented fuel assemblies (FAs) with thermocouples (TC) imbedded in the cladding as well as probes to measure the FAs power on the basis of their coolant temperature rise. The availability of experimental data for these tests offers an opportunity to better establish the credibility of the RELAP5-3D model and methodology used in the conversion analysis. In order to support the HEU to LEU conversion safety analyses of the BR2 reactor, RELAP simulations of a number of loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure tests have been undertaken. Preliminary analyses showed that the conservative power distributions used historically in the BR2 RELAP model resulted in a significant overestimation of the peak cladding temperature during the transient. Therefore, it was concluded that better estimates of the steady-state and decay power distributions were needed to accurately predict the cladding temperatures measured during the tests and establish the credibility of the RELAP model and methodology. The new approach ('best estimate' methodology) uses the MCNP5, ORIGEN-2 and BERYL codes to obtain steady-state and decay power distributions for the BR2 core during the tests A/400/1, C/600/3 and F/400/1. This methodology can be easily extended to simulate any BR2 core configuration. Comparisons with measured peak cladding temperatures showed a much better agreement when power distributions obtained with the new methodology are used.

Dionne, B.; Tzanos, C. P. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

Colorado stride (COSTRIDE): testing genetic and physiological moderators of response to an intervention to increase physical activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

details University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309,data and rationale for Colorado STRIDE. J Behav Med 2013,as: Bryan et al. : Colorado stride (COSTRIDE): testing

Bryan, Angela D; Magnan, Renee E; Hooper, Ann E; Ciccolo, Joseph T; Marcus, Bess; Hutchison, Kent E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground for flow models of Quaternary continental glaciers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground City came from the NNE (from the "Labrador center"). When ice blocked the N end of Hudson Bay and Lake This Abstract: Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground

Merguerian, Charles

228

Flow characteristics in an irregular spillway model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

River Authority. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS V1 LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF TABLES INTRODUCTION REVIEW OF LITERATURE Open Channel Flow Spillways Physical Modeling METHODS AND PROCEDURES 5 5 10 16 20 RESULTS... Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test Test 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ? PMF Test 27 27 29 29 32 35 38 43 43 49 49 52 56 63 63 65 65 DISCUSSION S...

Scott, Mary Charlene

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

230

Evaluation of flow hood measurements for residential register flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flow measurement at residential registers using flow hoods is becoming more common. These measurements are used to determine if the HVAC system is providing adequate comfort, appropriate flow over heat exchangers and in estimates of system energy losses. These HVAC system performance metrics are determined by using register measurements to find out if individual rooms are getting the correct airflow, and in estimates of total air handler flow and duct air leakage. The work discussed in this paper shows that commercially available flow hoods are poor at measuring flows in residential systems. There is also evidence in this and other studies that flow hoods can have significant errors even when used on the non-residential systems they were originally developed for. The measurement uncertainties arise from poor calibrations and the sensitivity of exiting flow hoods to non-uniformity of flows entering the device. The errors are usually large--on the order of 20% of measured flow, which is unacceptably high for most applications. Active flow hoods that have flow measurement devices that are insensitive to the entering airflow pattern were found to be clearly superior to commercially available flow hoods. In addition, it is clear that current calibration procedures for flow hoods may not take into account any field application problems and a new flow hood measurement standard should be developed to address this issue.

Walker, I.S.; Wray, C.P.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Sherman, M.H.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

En beskrivning av manuellt test.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Test is an area in system development. Test can be performed manually or automated. Test activities can be supported by Word documents and Excel… (more)

Artursson Wissa, Ulrika

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

HARD X-RAY LAGS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: TESTING THE DISTANT REVERBERATION HYPOTHESIS WITH NGC 6814  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an X-ray spectral and temporal analysis of the variable active galaxy NGC 6814, observed with Suzaku during 2011 November. Remarkably, the X-ray spectrum shows no evidence for the soft excess commonly observed amongst other active galaxies, despite its relatively low level of obscuration, and is dominated across the whole Suzaku bandpass by the intrinsic powerlaw-like continuum. Despite this, we clearly detect the presence of a low-frequency hard lag of ?1600 s between the 0.5-2.0 and 2.0-5.0 keV energy bands at greater than 6? significance, similar to those reported in the literature for a variety of other active galactic nuclei (AGNs). At these energies, any additional emission from, e.g., a very weak, undetected soft excess, or from distant reflection must contribute less than 3% of the observed countrates (at 90% confidence). Given the lack of any significant continuum emission component other than the powerlaw, we can rule out models that invoke distant reprocessing for the observed lag behavior, which must instead be associated with this continuum emission. These results are fully consistent with a propagating fluctuation origin for the low-frequency hard lags, and with the interpretation of the high-frequency soft lags—a common feature seen in the highest quality AGN data with strong soft excesses—as reverberation from the inner accretion disk.

Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Cahill Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Cackett, E. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Uttley, P. [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

233

Activity testing of alveolar macrophages and changes in surfactant phospholipids after irradiation in bronchoalveolar lavage: Experimental and clinical data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after irradiation to the lungs in mice as well as clinical data. The number of BAL cells, mainly macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulocytes, changed in a time-dependent manner. The phagocytic activity of the macrophages measured as the phagocytosis of microbeads and measured as the esterase activity also showed a strong time-dependent increase during the acute phase up to 21 days after irradiation. The contents of surfactant phospholipids (SF) and sphingomyelin (SPH; as a parameter for cell death) were quantified by HPLC. Both were significantly changed between day 2 and 21 after irradiation. Three BALs of a patient with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, who had received an allogenic bone marrow graft after total body irradiation with 10 Gy, showed similar effects in the cellular and surfactant parameters. These data indicate that there are positive interactions between the number of different BAL cells, macrophage activity, and SF and SPH content in the preclinical model of the mouse as well as in the clinical situation after lung irradiation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Steinberg, F.; Rehn, B.; Kraus, R.; Quabeck, K.; Bruch, J.; Beelen, D.W.; Schaefer, U.W.; Streffer, C. (Univ. Clinics, Essen (Germany))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Summary of Construction Activities and Results from Six Initial Accelerated Pavement Tests Conducted on Asphalt Concrete Pavement Section for Modified-Binder Overlay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing on the Asphalt Concrete FWD testing was conducted onin asphalt concrete modulus after HVS testing for Sectionsconcrete pavements under accelerated pavement testing. This

Bejarano, Manuel O.; Morton, Bruce S.; Scheffy, Clark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Vertical flow chemical detection portal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portal apparatus is described for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow. 3 figs.

Linker, K.L.; Hannum, D.W.; Conrad, F.J.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Flow chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Geological flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

Yu. N. Bratkov

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Flow visualization and leakage measurements of labyrinth seals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large scale test rig is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance properties and flow characteristics of labyrinth seals. A novel test facility with multiple cavities that provides 2D, planar flow at a scale...

Johnson, James Wayne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Field Test and Performance Verification: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Installed in a School - Final Report: Phase 4A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a field verification pilot site investigation that involved the installation of a hybrid integrated active desiccant/vapor-compression rooftop heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) unit at an elementary school in the Atlanta Georgia area. For years, the school had experienced serious humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) problems that had resulted in occupant complaints and microbial (mold) remediation. The outdoor air louvers of the original HVAC units had been closed in an attempt to improve humidity control within the space. The existing vapor compression variable air volume system was replaced by the integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) system that was described in detail in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report published in 2004 (Fischer and Sand 2004). The IADR system and all space conditions have been monitored remotely for more than a year. The hybrid system was able to maintain both the space temperature and humidity as desired while delivering the outdoor air ventilation rate required by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Standard 62. The performance level of the IADR unit and the overall system energy efficiency was measured and found to be very high. A comprehensive IAQ investigation was completed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute before and after the system retrofit. Before-and-after data resulting from this investigation confirmed a significant improvement in IAQ, humidity control, and occupant comfort. These observations were reported by building occupants and are echoed in a letter to ORNL from the school district energy manager. The IADR system was easily retrofitted in place of the original rooftop system using a custom curb adapter. All work was completed in-house by the school's maintenance staff over one weekend. A subsequent cost analysis completed for the school district by the design engineer of record concluded that the IADR system being investigated was actually less expensive to install than other less-efficient options, most of which were unable to deliver the required ventilation while maintaining the desired space humidity levels.

Fischer, J

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Review and selection of unsaturated flow models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1994-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Multiphase cooling flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss the multiphase nature of the intracluster medium whose neglect can lead to overestimates of the baryon fraction of clusters by up to a factor of two. The multiphase form of the cooling flow equations are derived and reduced to a simple form for a wide class of self-similar density distributions. It is shown that steady-state cooling flows are \\emph{not} consistent with all possible emissivity profiles which can therefore be used as a test of the theory. In combination, they provide strong constraints on the mass distribution within the cooling radius.

Peter A. Thomas

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

243

Siemens SOFC Test Article and Module Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary design studies of the 95 kWe-class SOFC test article continue resulting in a stack architecture of that is 1/3 of 250 kWe-class SOFC advanced module. The 95 kWeclass test article is envisioned to house 20 bundles (eight cells per bundle) of Delta8 cells with an active length of 100 cm. Significant progress was made in the conceptual design of the internal recirculation loop. Flow analyses were initiated in order to optimize the bundle row length for the 250 kWeclass advanced module. A preferred stack configuration based on acceptable flow and thermal distributions was identified. Potential module design and analysis issues associated with pressurized operation were identified.

None

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Cooling Flows or Heating Flows?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is now clear that AGN heat cooling flows, largely by driving winds. The winds may contain a relativistic component that generates powerful synchrotron radiation, but it is not clear that all winds do so. The spatial and temporal stability of the AGN/cooling flow interaction are discussed. Collimation of the winds probably provides spatial stability. Temporal stability may be possible only for black holes with masses above a critical value. Both the failure of cooling flows to have adiabatic cores and the existence of X-ray cavities confirm the importance of collimated outflows. I quantify the scale of the convective flow that the AGN Hydra would need to drive if it balanced radiative inward flow by outward flow parallel to the jets. At least in Virgo any such flow must be confined to r<~20 kpc. Hydrodynamical simulations suggest that AGN outbursts cannot last longer than ~25 Myr. Data for four clusters with well studied X-ray cavities suggests that heating associated with cavity formation approximately balances radiative cooling. The role of cosmic infall and the mechanism of filament formation are briefly touched on.

James Binney

2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

The magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on progress on a multi-task contract to develop the technology for the steam bottoming plant for an MHD Steam Combined Cycle power plant. Two proof-of-concept (POC) tests totaling 614 hours of coal fired operation were conducted during the quarter using low sulfur Montana Rosebud coal. The results of these tests are summarized. Operational aspects of the particulate control devices being evaluated, a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a reverse air baghouse, are discussed. A sootblowing control system for the convective heat transfer surfaces that senses the need to clean the tubes by temperatures is described. Environmental reporting includes measurement of levels of ground water wells over time and the remote air quality measurements of impact of the stack emissions from the two tests. Results of testing candidate ceramic tubes for a recuperative high temperature air heater are included. Analyses of the tube materials tested in the 2000 hour test series previously completed on high sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal are summarized. Facility maintenance and repair activities for the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility are summarized. The major facility modification discussed is the completion of the installation of a Wet ESP with rotary vacuum filter which is replacing the venturi scrubber as the primary facility particulate control device for any exhaust gases that are not routed through the dry ESP or baghouse.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

UZ Flow Models and Submodels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11.

Y. Wu

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

AVTA: Vehicle to Grid Power Flow Regulations and Building Codes Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report is a review of Vehicle-to-Grid power flow regulations and building codes, as informed by the AVTA's testing on plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

249

RERTR program activities related to the development and application of new LEU fuels. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor; low-enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The statue of the U.S. Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm/sup 3/ each year, from the current 1.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ to the 7.0 g U/cm/sup 3/ which will be reached in late 1988. The technical needs of research and test reactors for HEU exports are also forecasted to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years.

Travelli, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Workshop on hypersonic flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An overview is given of research activity on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CDF) for hypersonic propulsion systems. After the initial consideration of the highly integrated nature of air-breathing hypersonic engines and airframe, attention is directed toward computations carried out for the components of the engine. A generic inlet configuration is considered in order to demonstrate the highly three dimensional viscous flow behavior occurring within rectangular inlets. Reacting flow computations for simple jet injection as well as for more complex combustion chambers are then discussed in order to show the capability of viscous finite rate chemical reaction computer simulations. Finally, the nozzle flow fields are demonstrated, showing the existence of complex shear layers and shock structure in the exhaust plume. The general issues associated with code validation as well as the specific issue associated with the use of CFD for design are discussed. A prognosis for the success of CFD in the design of future propulsion systems is offered.

Povinelli, L.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

THE ROTATING TARGET FLOW TEST FACILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@idom.com) Fernando Sordo, ESS Bilbao Tom McManamy, ORNL/SNS #12;Status of the RTFT 4th HPTW of a RotaAng Target for ESS · In 2009 ESS Bilbao worked out a preliminary design for a rotaZng target for ESS. · Disc formed by un-clad tungsten bricks cooled

McDonald, Kirk

252

IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

J.S.Y. YANG

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

253

Flow cytometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Faraday cage is described which encloses the flow chamber of a cytometer. Ground planes associated with each field deflection plate inhibit electric fields from varying the charge on designated events/droplets and further concentrates. They also increase forces applied to a passing charged event for accurate focus while concomitantly inhibiting a potential shock hazard. 4 figs.

Van den Engh, G.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

The magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Technical progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this quarterly technical Progress report, UTSI reports on continued technical progress in developing the technology for the steam bottoming plant for an MHD Steam combined cycle Power plant. No testing was conducted during the quarter. Major activities were in preparation for the beginning of the 2000 hour POC testing on wester, low sulfur coal scheduled to start in April 1992. The report contains analyses of data from the previous tests in this series that were designed to prepare for the POC test series. Modifications to the flow train that are reported include the rearrangement of the lower temperature heat exchangers in the superheater test module (SHTM) to move the air heater upstream to a higher gas temperature, installation of a gas by-pass to keep the ash seed hopper tap open and installation of the new tubes to be tested in the steam cooled test sections. The major facility modification discussed is the installation of the wet electrostatic precipitator, to replace the venturi scrubber that has been used in previous testing, to take any flow that is not desired through the dry electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. Plans for future testing that are summarized include improvements in test operations, the details of arrangement of high temperature air heater materials for testing and the plans for advanced instrumentation by both UTSI and Mississippi State University.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

DOE Underground-Coal-Conversion-Program field-test activities for 1979 and 1980. [Pricetown 1, Hoe Creek 3, Hanna IV, and SDB 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the US Department of Energy's Underground-Coal-Conversion program, four field tests were completed in 1979 and preparations were begun in 1980 for two additional field tests to be operated in 1981. The Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) completed Hanna IV, an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) completed Pricetown 1, an air gasification test in West Virginia bituminous coal. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) completed Hoe Creek 3, a steam-oxygen gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. Gulf Research and Development Co. completed Steeply Dipping Beds (SDB) Test 1, primarily an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal and the first SDB test in the US. In 1980, Gulf R and D Co. began preparation of SDB Test 2, scheduled for operation in the fall of 1981. The DOE project teams at LETC, METC, LLNL, and SNL, in association with the Washington Irrigation and Development Co. (WIDCo), Washington Water Power (WWP), and the State of Washington, are preparing a field test site in the Centralia-Chehalis coal district of Washington. A series of large coal block tests will be completed prior to the field test, scheduled for operation in 1982 or 1983. This field test will utilize a directionally drilled link and steam-oxygen gasification system. This paper summarizes the results of the four recently completed field tests and the plans for additional tests.

Bartke, T.C.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Early Flight Fission -- Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Engineering Analysis, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

257

SFTEL: Flow Cell | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flow Cell EMSL's Subsurface Flow and Transport Experimental Laboratory offers several meter-scale flow cells and columns for research in saturated and unsaturated porous media....

258

Flow visualization and leakage measurements of worn labyrinth seals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large-scale flow visualization test facility is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance and flow characteristics of worn labyrinth seals. Wear in labyrinth seals is a consequence of contact between the rotating...

Allen, Brian Frank

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are assumed given the absence of groundwater withdrawal activities in the area. The conceptual and numerical models were developed based upon regional hydrogeologic investigations conducted in the 1960s, site characterization investigations (including ten wells and various geophysical and geologic studies) at Shoal itself prior to and immediately after the test, and two site characterization campaigns in the 1990s for environmental restoration purposes (including eight wells and a year-long tracer test). The new wells are denoted MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3, and are located to the northnortheast of the nuclear test. The groundwater model was generally lacking data in the north-northeastern area; only HC-1 and the abandoned PM-2 wells existed in this area. The wells provide data on fracture orientation and frequency, water levels, hydraulic conductivity, and water chemistry for comparison with the groundwater model. A total of 12 real-number validation targets were available for the validation analysis, including five values of hydraulic head, three hydraulic conductivity measurements, three hydraulic gradient values, and one angle value for the lateral gradient in radians. In addition, the fracture dip and orientation data provide comparisons to the distributions used in the model and radiochemistry is available for comparison to model output. Goodness-of-fit analysis indicates that some of the model realizations correspond well with the newly acquired conductivity, head, and gradient data, while others do not. Other tests indicated that additional model realizations may be needed to test if the model input distributions need refinement to improve model performance. This approach (generating additional realizations) was not followed because it was realized that there was a temporal component to the data disconnect: the new head measurements are on the high side of the model distributions, but the heads at the original calibration locations themselves have also increased over time. This indicates that the steady-state assumption of the groundwater model is in error. To test the robustness of the model d

A. Hassan; J. Chapman

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Scaling bounds on dissipation in turbulent flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new rigorous method for estimating statistical quantities in fluid dynamics such as the (average) energy dissipation rate directly from the equations of motion. The method is tested on shear flow, channel flow, Rayleigh--B\\'enard convection and porous medium convection.

Seis, Christian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sandia National Laboratories: PMTF Flow Loop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EBTS and EB-1200 vacuum chambers, and is used for infrared thermography in separate hotcold transient tests that assess the quality of brazed joints. The flow loop gives the...

263

Active dc filter for HVDC system--A test installation in the Konti-Skan DC link at Lindome converter station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of introducing active dc filters is to meet the more and more stringent requirement from power utilities on limiting telephone interference caused by harmonic currents from HVdc transmission lines, without unnecessarily increasing the cost of HVdc stations. An active dc filter installed in the Konti-Skan HVdc link is described. The active dc filter is connected at the bottom of an existing passive dc filter at the Lindome station. The active dc filter includes optic harmonic current measuring unit, control system, protection and supervision system, PWM power amplifier, high-frequency transformer, surge arrester, and coupling apparatuses. The active dc filter has small physical size and occupies small ground area. The performance of the active dc filter for eliminating the disturbing harmonics is excellent. To achieve comparable results by passive filters would require something like ten times more high voltage equipment.

Zhang, Wenyan; Asplund, G. (ABB Power Systems, Ludvika (Sweden). HVDC Division); Aberg, A. (ABB Corporate Research, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Man-Machine Communication); Jonsson, U. (Svenska Kraftnaet, Vaellingby (Sweden)); Loeoef, O. (Vattenfall AB, Trollhaettan (Sweden). Region Vaestsverige)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Improve image resolution for microseismicimaging and time-lapse active seismic imaging; Enhance the prediction of fluid flow and temperature distributions and stress changes by coupling fracture flow simulations with reservoir flow simulations; and integrating imaging into modeling.

265

Generalized one-dimensional, steady, compressible flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present development and testing of a generalized method for analytically examining 1D steady flow of perfect gases allows area change, heat transfer, friction, and mass injection. Generalized flow functions are developed, and sample tables are calculated and tested for both simple cases and combined changes. Normal shocks are noted to occur from the supersonic portion of these loci to the subsonic portion, in a manner analogous to simple-change behavior. 9 refs.

Young, F.M. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and test combined geophysical techniques to characterize fluid flow, in relation to fracture orientations and fault distributions in a geothermal system. Average Overall Score:...

267

Mach flow angularity probes for scramjet engine flow path diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mach-flow angularity (MFA) probes were developed for use in scramjet flow path probe rakes. Prototype probes were fabricated to demonstrate the assembly processes (numerical control machining, furnace brazing, and electron beam welding). Tests of prototype probes confirmed the thermal durability margins and life cycle. Selected probes were calibrated in air at Mach numbers from 1.75 to 6.0. Acceptance criteria for the production probes stressed thermal durability and pressure (and, consequently, Mach number) measurement quality. This new water-cooled MFA probe has 0.397-cm shaft diameter and is capable of withstanding heat fluxes of 2.724 kW/sq cm.

Jalbert, P.A.; Hiers, R.S. Jr. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Arnold AFS, TN (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Low volume flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The low flow monitor provides a means for determining if a fluid flow meets a minimum threshold level of flow. The low flow monitor operates with a minimum of intrusion by the flow detection device into the flow. The electrical portion of the monitor is externally located with respect to the fluid stream which allows for repairs to the monitor without disrupting the flow. The electronics provide for the adjustment of the threshold level to meet the required conditions. The apparatus can be modified to provide an upper limit to the flow monitor by providing for a parallel electronic circuit which provides for a bracketing of the desired flow rate.

Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Flow characteristics in underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the underground coal gasification field test at the Hoe Creek site No. 2, Wyoming, helium pulses were introduced to develop information to characterize the flow field, and to estimate the coefficients in dispersion models of the flow. Quantitative analysis of the tracer response curves shows an increasing departure from a plug flow regime with time because of the combined effects of the free and forced convection in addition to the complex non-uniformity of the flow field. The Peclet number was a function of temperature, pressure, gas recovery and characteristic velocity, as well as the split of the gas between the parallel streams in the model. 17 refs.

Chang, H.L.; Himmelblau, D.M.; Edgar, T.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a summary and framework of the available hydrologic data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater flow models. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

Nathan Bryant

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Federal Fleet Use of Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Per Executive Order 13031, “Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership,” the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity provided $998,300 in incremental funding to support the deployment of 220 electric vehicles in 36 Federal fleets. The 145 electric Ford Ranger pickups and 75 electric Chrysler EPIC (Electric Powered Interurban Commuter) minivans were operated in 14 states and the District of Columbia. The 220 vehicles were driven an estimated average of 700,000 miles annually. The annual estimated use of the 220 electric vehicles contributed to 39,000 fewer gallons of petroleum being used by Federal fleets and the reduction in emissions of 1,450 pounds of smog-forming pollution. Numerous attempts were made to obtain information from all 36 fleets. Information responses were received from 25 fleets (69% response rate), as some Federal fleet personnel that were originally involved with the Incremental Funding Project were transferred, retired, or simply could not be found. In addition, many of the Department of Defense fleets indicated that they were supporting operations in Iraq and unable to provide information for the foreseeable future. It should be noted that the opinions of the 25 fleets is based on operating 179 of the 220 electric vehicles (81% response rate). The data from the 25 fleets is summarized in this report. Twenty-two of the 25 fleets reported numerous problems with the vehicles, including mechanical, traction battery, and charging problems. Some of these problems, however, may have resulted from attempting to operate the vehicles beyond their capabilities. The majority of fleets reported that most of the vehicles were driven by numerous drivers each week, with most vehicles used for numerous trips per day. The vehicles were driven on average from 4 to 50 miles per day on a single charge. However, the majority of the fleets reported needing gasoline vehicles for missions beyond the capabilities of the electric vehicles, usually because of range limitations. Twelve fleets reported experiencing at least one charge depletion while driving, whereas nine fleets reported not having this problem. Twenty-four of the 25 fleets responded that the electric vehicles were easy to use and 22 fleets indicated that the payload was adequate. Thirteen fleets reported charging problems; eleven fleets reported no charging problems. Nine fleets reported the vehicles broke down while driving; 14 fleets reported no onroad breakdowns. Some of the breakdowns while driving, however, appear to include normal flat tires and idiot lights coming on. In spite of operation and charging problems, 59% of the fleets responded that they were satisfied, very satisfied, or extremely satisfied with the performance of the electric vehicles. As of September 2003, 74 of the electric vehicles were still being used and 107 had been returned to the manufacturers because the leases had concluded.

Mindy Kirpatrick; J. E. Francfort

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - Activity 1.13 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modifications were made to the inlet of the existing Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) thermal oxidizer to accommodate side-by-side coupon holders for exposure testing. Two 5-day tests with over 200 hours of total exposure time were completed. The first week of testing was conducted in enriched air-blown mode, with coupon temperatures ranging from 128° to 272°F. Carbonyl sampling was conducted, but it was discovered after the fact that the methodology used was producing very low recoveries of iron and nickel carbonyl. Therefore, the data generated during this week of testing were not considered accurate. The second week of testing was conducted in oxygen-blown mode, with coupon temperatures ranging from 220° to 265°F. Two improved methods were used to measure carbonyl concentration during this week of testing. These methods produced results closer to equilibrium calculations. Since both weeks of testing mostly produced a product gas with approximately 15%–18% carbon monoxide, it was felt that actual carbonyl concentrations for Week 1 should be very similar to those measured during Week 2. The revised carbonyl sampling methodology used during the second week of testing greatly improved the recovery of iron and nickel carbonyl in the sample. Even though the sampling results obtained from the first week were inaccurate, the results from the second week can be used as an estimate for the periods during which the gasifier was operating under similar conditions and producing similar product gas compositions. Specifically, Test Periods 2 and 3 from the first week were similar to the conditions run during the second week. For a product gas containing roughly 15%–18% CO and a coupon temperature of approximately 220°–270°F, the nickel carbonyl concentration should be about 0.05–0.1 ppm and the iron carbonyl concentration should be about 0.1–0.4 ppm. After each week of testing the coupons were recovered from the coupon holder, weighed, and shipped back to Siemens for analysis.

Swanson, Michael

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Interim Letter Report - Verification Survey Results for Activities Performed in March 2009 for the Vitrification Test Facility Warehouse at the West Valley Demonstration Project, Ashford, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the verification activities was to provide independent radiological surveys and data for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure that the building satisfies the requirements for release without radiological controls.

B.D. Estes

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Propeller Flow Meter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Propeller flow meters are commonly used to measure water flow rate. They can also be used to estimate irrigation water use. This publication explains how to select, install, read and maintain propeller flow meters....

Enciso, Juan; Santistevan, Dean; Hla, Aung K.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Dispersed flow film boiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dispersed flow consists of small liquid droplets entrained in a flowing vapor. This flow regime can occur in cryogenic equipment, in steam generators, and during nuclear reactor loss of coolant accidents. A theoretical ...

Yoder, Graydon L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Bacteria in shear flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacteria are ubiquitous and play a critical role in many contexts. Their environment is nearly always dynamic due to the prevalence of fluid flow: creeping flow in soil, highly sheared flow in bodily conduits, and turbulent ...

Marcos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

James Francfort

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

ash flow temperature: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

load has been... Hart, M. N.; Bond, S. K. 1980-01-01 120 Temperature-Gated Thermal Rectifier for Active Heat Flow Control Kedar Hippalgaonkar,, Renewable Energy...

279

4 kW Test of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new test stand has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for multi-kW testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. This test stand will initially be operated at the 4 KW scale. The 4 kW tests will include two 60-cell stacks operating in parallel in a single hot zone. The stacks are internally manifolded with an inverted-U flow pattern and an active area of 100 cm2 per cell. Process gases to and from the two stacks are distributed from common inlet/outlet tubing using a custom base manifold unit that also serves as the bottom current collector plate. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells and electrode gases. Sealing is accomplished with compliant mica-glass seals. A spring-loaded test fixture is used for mechanical stack compression. Due to the power level and the large number of cells in the hot zone, process gas flow rates are high and heat recuperation is required to preheat the cold inlet gases upstream of the furnace. Heat recuperation is achieved by means of two inconel tube-in-tube counter-flow heat exchangers. A current density of 0.3 A/cm2 will be used for these tests, resulting in a hydrogen production rate of 25 NL/min. Inlet steam flow rates will be set to achieve a steam utilization value of 50%. The 4 kW test will be performed for a minimum duration of 1000 hours in order to document the long-term durability of the stacks. Details of the test apparatus and initial results will be provided.

J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Multiphase flow calculation software  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CFD analysis of laminar oscillating flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a numerical simulations of oscillating flow in a constricted duct and compares the results with experimental and theoretical data. The numerical simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX4.2. The numerical model simulates an experimental oscillating flow facility that was designed to test the properties and characteristics of oscillating flow in tapered ducts, also known as jet pumps. Jet pumps are useful devices in thermoacoustic machinery because they produce a secondary pressure that can counteract an unwanted effect called streaming, and significantly enhance engine efficiency. The simulations revealed that CFX could accurately model velocity, shear stress and pressure variations in laminar oscillating flow. The numerical results were compared to experimental data and theoretical predictions with varying success. The least accurate numerical results were obtained when laminar flow approached transition to turbulent flow.

Booten, C. W. Charles W.); Konecni, S. (Snezana); Smith, B. L. (Barton L.); Martin, R. A. (Richard A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Flow characteristics in underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Hoe Creek No. 2 (Wyoming) underground-coal-gasification field test, researchers introduced helium pulses to characterize the flow field and to estimate the coefficients in dispersion models of the flow. Flow models such as the axial-dispersion and parallel tanks-in-series models allowed interpretation of the in situ combustion flow field from the residence time distribution of the tracer gas. A quantitative analysis of the Hoe Creek tracer response curves revealed an increasing departure from a plug-flow regime with time, which was due to the combined effects of the free and forced convection in addition to the complex nonuniformity of the flow field. The Peclet number was a function of temperature, pressure, gas recovery, and characteristic velocity, as well as the split of the gas between the parallel streams in the model.

Chang, H.L.; Himmelblau, D.M.; Edgar, T.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

An evaluation of heat flow transducers as a means of determining soil heat flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided to the Micrometeorology Section, Department of Oceanography and Meteorology, ARM College of Texas by the Signal Corps of the United States Army, under Contract No. DA 36-039 AMC-02195 (E). The heat flow plates used in this study were provided... surface soil heat flow. The results show that acceptable performance of the plates in the measurement of heat flow is possible although in general should not be expected without thorough testing, and even then there are restrictive considerations...

King, Barney L. D

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

Flow Distances on Open Flow Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Open flow network is a weighted directed graph with a source and a sink, depicting flux distributions on networks in the steady state of an open flow system. Energetic food webs, economic input-output networks, and international trade networks, are open flow network models of energy flows between species, money or value flows between industrial sectors, and goods flows between countries, respectively. Flow distances (first-passage or total) between any given two nodes $i$ and $j$ are defined as the average number of transition steps of a random walker along the network from $i$ to $j$ under some conditions. They apparently deviate from the conventional random walk distance on a closed directed graph because they consider the openness of the flow network. Flow distances are explicitly expressed by underlying Markov matrix of a flow system in this paper. With this novel theoretical conception, we can visualize open flow networks, calculating centrality of each node, and clustering nodes into groups. We apply fl...

Guo, Liangzhu; Shi, Peiteng; Wang, Jun; Huang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Jiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Microgravity Flow Regime Transition Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apparatus have been used in past flow regime mapping experiments such as Venturi, perforated pipe, annular, and t-junction mixers. The mixing apparatus used in a particular experiment determines the bubble size distribution at the inlet... pressure of 80 kPa was reported, however, the temperature was not. The orientation and location of the test section with respect to the aircraft are unknown. The mixing apparatus used in the experiment was a Venturi mixer. This data set does...

Shephard, Adam M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

287

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hydrologic testing methodology and results from deep basalt boreholes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the hydrologic field-testing program is to provide data for characterization of the groundwater systems wihin the Pasco Basin that are significant to understanding waste isolation. The effort is directed toward characterizing the areal and vertical distributions of hydraulic head, hydraulic properties, and hydrochemistry. Data obtained from these studies provide input for numerical modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. These models are then used for evaluating potential waste migration as a function of space and time. The groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site and surrounding area consists of a thick, accordantly layered sequence of basalt flows and associated sedimentary interbed that primarily occur in the upper part of the Columbia River basalt. Permeable horizons of the sequence are associated with the interbeds and the interflow zones within the basalt. The columnar interiors of a flow act as low-permeability aquitards, separating the more-permeable interflows or interbeds. This paper discusses the hydrologic field-gathering activities, specifically, field-testing methodology and test results from deep basalt boreholes.

Strait, S R; Spane, F A; Jackson, R L; Pidcoe, W W

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A constitutive law for dense granular flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A continuum description of granular flows would be of considerable help in predicting natural geophysical hazards or in designing industrial processes. However, the constitutive equations for dry granular flows, which govern how the material moves under shear, are still a matter of debate. One difficulty is that grains can behave like a solid (in a sand pile), a liquid (when poured from a silo) or a gas (when strongly agitated). For the two extreme regimes, constitutive equations have been proposed based on kinetic theory for collisional rapid flows, and soil mechanics for slow plastic flows. However, the intermediate dense regime, where the granular material flows like a liquid, still lacks a unified view and has motivated many studies over the past decade. The main characteristics of granular liquids are: a yield criterion (a critical shear stress below which flow is not possible) and a complex dependence on shear rate when flowing. In this sense, granular matter shares similarities with classical visco-plastic fluids such as Bingham fluids. Here we propose a new constitutive relation for dense granular flows, inspired by this analogy and recent numerical and experimental work. We then test our three-dimensional (3D) model through experiments on granular flows on a pile between rough sidewalls, in which a complex 3D flow pattern develops. We show that, without any fitting parameter, the model gives quantitative predictions for the flow shape and velocity profiles. Our results support the idea that a simple visco-plastic approach can quantitatively capture granular flow properties, and could serve as a basic tool for modelling more complex flows in geophysical or industrial applications.

Pierre Jop; Yoël Forterre; Olivier Pouliquen

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

Prematurely terminated slug tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solution of the well response to a prematurely terminated slug test (PTST) is presented. The advantages of a PTST over conventional slug tests are discussed. A systematized procedure of a PTST is proposed, where a slug test is terminated in the midpoint of the flow point, and the subsequent shut-in data is recorded and analyzed. This method requires a downhole shut-in device and a pressure transducer, which is no more than the conventional deep-well slug testing. As opposed to slug tests, which are ineffective when a skin is present, more accurate estimate of formation permeability can be made using a PTST. Premature termination also shortens the test duration considerably. Because in most cases no more information is gained by completing a slug test to the end, the author recommends that conventional slug tests be replaced by the premature termination technique. This study is part of an investigation of the feasibility of geologic isolation of nuclear wastes being carried out by the US Department of Energy and the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste of Switzerland.

Karasaki, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

Armstrong, William D. (Laramie, WY); Naughton, Jonathan (Laramie, WY); Lindberg, William R. (Laramie, WY)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

HALGREN DL

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

294

AVTA: 2010 Volkswagon Golf Diesel Start-Stop Testing Results...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Volkswagon Golf Diesel Start-Stop Testing Results AVTA: 2010 Volkswagon Golf Diesel Start-Stop Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...

295

Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Uncertainties about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal has limited the reactor operating power to 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these uncertainties is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW.

Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Specific test and evaluation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AX-B Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

297

Activity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

Yu, S W

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

High energy density redox flow device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

Thermal Analysis and Test Program to Evaluate Passenger Compartment Thermal Load Reduction and Improve: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-07-00231  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This activity supported a GM and NREL collaborative exploration of strategies to minimize and alleviate the temperature rise in the passenger compartment of an automobile during prolonged exposure to solar radiation in hot climates. It developed and exercised math-based models to simulate the air flow and thermal environment in the passenger compartment in order to compare the effectiveness of the strategies. This activity also assessed the strategies using vehicle tests.

Rugh, J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Test Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

302

Prediction of flow rates through an orifice at pressures corresponding to the transition between molecular and isentropic flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model of compressible flow through an orifice, in the region of transition from free molecular to isentropic expansion flow, has been developed and tested for accuracy. The transitional or slip regime is defined as the conditions where molecular interactions are too many for free molecular flow modeling, yet not great enough for isentropic expansion flow modeling. Due to a lack of literature establishing a well-accepted model for predicting transitional flow, it was felt such work would be beneficial. The model is nonlinear and cannot be satisfactorily linearized for a linear regression analysis. Consequently, a computer routine was developed which minimized the sum of the squares of the residual flow for the nonlinear model. The results indicate an average accuracy within 15% of the measured flow throughout the range of test conditions. Furthermore, the results of the regression analysis indicate that the transitional regime lies between Knudsen numbers of approximately 2 and 45. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

DeMuth, S.F.; Watson, J.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Ultrasonic flow metering system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mauseth, Jason A. (Pocatello, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Analysis and testing the performance...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Analysis and testing the performance of a centrifugal two phase flow separator Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

305

Redox Flow Batteries: An Engineering Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redox flow batteries are well suited to provide modular and scalable energy storage systems for a wide range of energy storage applications. In this paper, we review the development of redox flow battery technology including recent advances in new redox active materials and systems. We discuss cost, performance, and reliability metrics that are critical for deployment of large flow battery systems. The technology, while relatively young, has the potential for significant improvement through reduced materials costs, improved energy and power efficiency, and significant reduction in the overall system cost.

Chalamala, Babu R.; Soundappan, Thiagarajan; Fisher, Graham R.; Anstey, Mitchell A.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Perry, Mike L.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

CONTROL VALVE TESTING PROCEDURES AND EQUATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a coefficient that is independent of valve size and constant for geometrically similar valves. However in the publication "Control Valve Flow Coefficients" by Rahmeyer and Driskell and published in the Pipeline Journal of ASCE. Testing Procedures The flow coefficient is experimentally determined for different valve openings

Rahmeyer, William J.

308

Status of flow-battery research in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flow batteries are defined as electrochemical energy storage devices in which at least one of the active materials is stored external to the power converting cell-stack, and in which this soluble active material is circulated via the electrolyte, through the cell-stack during system charge or discharge. Although intensive development of some of these systems has been underway for some time, they were only classified as a distinct category in the United States recently. Of the projects on flow batteries which are still being conducted, the work on the zinc/chlorine system (EDA) has been in progress since 1968; programs on zinc/bromine (Exxon, Gould), on iron/chromium Redox (NASA-Lewis Research Center), and on the iron/ferric-ferrous chloride system (NRG/GEL) have all been underway about seven years; research on the zinc/ferro-ferricyanide battery (Lockheed) has been conducted since 1978. The present paper, which reviews the 1982 status of these battery programs, appears timely since, except for the Lockheed system, the developments have all reached the stage where multi-kilowatt-hour batteries are under test.

Clark, R.P.; Chamberlin, J.L.; Saxton, H.J.; Symons, P.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Diesel Engine Idling Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology Program Office goal to minimize diesel engine idling and reduce the consumption of millions of gallons of diesel fuel consumed during heavy vehicle idling periods, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted tests to characterize diesel engine wear rates caused by extended periods of idling. INL idled two fleet buses equipped with Detroit Diesel Series 50 engines, each for 1,000 hours. Engine wear metals were characterized from weekly oil analysis samples and destructive filter analyses. Full-flow and the bypass filter cartridges were removed at four stages of the testing and sent to an oil analysis laboratory for destructive analysis to ascertain the metals captured in the filters and to establish wear rate trends. Weekly samples were sent to two independent oil analysis laboratories. Concurrent with the filter analysis, a comprehensive array of other laboratory tests ascertained the condition of the oil, wear particle types, and ferrous particles. Extensive ferrogram testing physically showed the concentration of iron particles and associated debris in the oil. The tests results did not show the dramatic results anticipated but did show wear trends. New West Technologies, LLC, a DOE support company, supplied technical support and data analysis throughout the idle test.

Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordon Fielding

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A New Approach to Computing Max Flows using Electrical Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Approach to Computing Max Flows using Electrical Flows Yin Tat Lee (MIT) Satish Rao (UC-Kelner-Madry-Spielman-Teng'11]: approximate flow in time Uses electrical flows. 7 #12;Electrical Flows 3 1 S t 8 #12;Electrical Flows Identify Graph with Resistor Network R(e)=1/w(e) 1/3 S t 1 9 #12;Electrical Flows Electrical flow

Rajamani, Sriram K.

313

Low flow fume hood  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fume hood is provided having an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A displacement flow fume hood works on the principal of a displacement flow which displaces the volume currently present in the hood using a push-pull system. The displacement flow includes a plurality of air supplies which provide fresh air, preferably having laminar flow, to the fume hood. The displacement flow fume hood also includes an air exhaust which pulls air from the work chamber in a minimally turbulent manner. As the displacement flow produces a substantially consistent and minimally turbulent flow in the hood, inconsistent flow patterns associated with contaminant escape from the hood are minimized. The displacement flow fume hood largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 70% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance. The fume hood also includes a number of structural adaptations which facilitate consistent and minimally turbulent flow within a fume hood.

Bell, Geoffrey C. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Feustel, Helmut E. (Albany, CA); Dickerhoff, Darryl J. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

TESTING THE UNIFICATION MODEL FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE INFRARED: ARE THE OBSCURING TORI OF TYPE 1 AND 2 SEYFERTS DIFFERENT?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new mid-infrared imaging data for three Type-1 Seyfert galaxies obtained with T-ReCS on the Gemini-South Telescope at subarcsecond resolution. Our aim is to enlarge the sample studied in a previous work to compare the properties of Type-1 and Type-2 Seyfert tori using clumpy torus models and a Bayesian approach to fit the infrared (IR) nuclear spectral energy distributions. Thus, the sample considered here comprises 7 Type-1, 11 Type-2, and 3 intermediate-type Seyferts. The unresolved IR emission of the Seyfert 1 galaxies can be reproduced by a combination of dust heated by the central engine and direct active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission, while for the Seyfert 2 nuclei only dust emission is considered. These dusty tori have physical sizes smaller than 6 pc radius, as derived from our fits. Unification schemes of AGN account for a variety of observational differences in terms of viewing geometry. However, we find evidence that strong unification may not hold and that the immediate dusty surroundings of Type-1 and Type-2 Seyfert nuclei are intrinsically different. The Type-2 tori studied here are broader, have more clumps, and these clumps have lower optical depths than those of Type-1 tori. The larger the covering factor of the torus, the smaller the probability of having a direct view of the AGN, and vice versa. In our sample, Seyfert 2 tori have larger covering factors (C{sub T} = 0.95 {+-} 0.02) and smaller escape probabilities (P{sub esc} = 0.05% {+-} {sup 0.08}{sub 0.03}%) than those of Seyfert 1 (C{sub T} = 0.5 {+-} 0.1; P{sub esc} = 18% {+-} 3%). All the previous differences are significant according to the Kullback-Leibler divergence. Thus, on the basis of the results presented here, the classification of a Seyfert galaxy as a Type-1 or Type-2 depends more on the intrinsic properties of the torus rather than on its mere inclination toward us, in contradiction with the simplest unification model.

Ramos Almeida, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Levenson, N. A.; Radomski, J. T. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Alonso-Herrero, A. [Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA-CSIC, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Asensio Ramos, A.; Rodriguez Espinosa, J. M.; Perez Garcia, A. M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), C/VIa Lactea, s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Packham, C. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Mason, R. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); DIaz-Santos, T., E-mail: C.Ramos@sheffield.ac.es [Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece)

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

315

Evaluation of flow capture techniques for measuring HVAC grilleairflows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the accuracy of commercially available flow hoods for residential applications. Results of laboratory and field tests indicate these hoods can be inadequate to measure airflows in residential systems, and there can be large measurement discrepancies between different flow hoods. The errors are due to poor calibrations, sensitivity of the hoods to grille airflow non-uniformities, and flow changes from added flow resistance. It is possible to obtain reasonable results using some flow hoods if the field tests are carefully done, the grilles are appropriate, and grille location does not restrict flow hood placement. We also evaluated several simple flow capture techniques for measuring grille airflows that could be adopted by the HVAC industry and homeowners as simple diagnostics. These simple techniques can be as accurate as commercially available devices. Our test results also show that current calibration procedures for flow hoods do not account for field application problems. As a result, agencies such as ASHRAE or ASTM need to develop a new standard for flow hood calibration, along with a new measurement standard to address field use of flow capture techniques.

Walker, Iain S.; Wray, Craig P.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca Mountain using FEHM V 2.20 are being carried out in the model report, ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The velocity fields are calculated by the flow model, described herein, independent of the transport processes, and are then used as inputs to the transport model. Justification for this abstraction is presented in the model report, ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021 (BSC 2003 [164870]).

G. Zyvoloski

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

317

Airbus Toulouse Flight test data centre. Diagnosis and treatment of noisy vibration flight test data.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Airbus Toulouse ­ Flight test data centre. Diagnosis and treatment of noisy vibration flight test data. The trainee will work within flight test vibration analysis team.The main missions and activities on flight test vibration data; - Implement and test in LMS Test.Lab (vibration data processing software

Dobigeon, Nicolas

318

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- cont'd * University of California Davis, with 13 Hymotion Prius being used by 70 public drives * Oregon State Government fleets, 3 Hymotion PHEVs * National Rural Electric...

319

Fleet Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activities - 2010 Honda...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Changed oil and filter 28.25 8192009 10,414 Changed oil and filter and checked all fluids, belts, battery, etc. 42.77 9182009 17,488 Changed oil and filter and replaced air...

320

HEV Fleet Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activities - 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DU5A0006063 Date Mileage Description Cost 8192009 5,090 Changed oil and filter and rotated tires 39.28 9162009 14,484 Changed oil and filter and replaced flat tire 152.58 10...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2| DepartmentEnergy 2Waste|0 DOE2

322

Pressure grouting of fractured basalt flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a field trial of pressure grouting in basalt and the results of subsequent coring and permeability measurement activities. The objective was to show that the hydraulic conductivity of fractured basalt bedrock can be significantly reduced by pressure injection of cementitious materials. The effectiveness of the pressure grout procedure was evaluated by measuring the change in the hydraulic conductivity of the bedrock. The extent of grout penetration was established by analyzing postgrout injection drilling chips for the presence of a tracer in the grout and also by examining cores of the treated basalt. Downhole radar mapping was used to establish major lava flow patterns and follow water movement during a surface infiltration test. A site called Box Canyon, which is located northwest of the INEL, was chosen for this study due to the similarity of this surface outcrop geology to that of the underlying bedrock fracture system found at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. This study showed that hydraulic conductivity of basalt can be reduced through pressure grouting of cementitious material.

Shaw, P.; Weidner, J.; Phillips, S.; Alexander, J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Experimental Investigation of Two-Phase Flow in Rock Salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Test Plan describes procedures for conducting laboratory scale flow tests on intact, damaged, crushed, and consolidated crushed salt to measure the capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. The primary focus of the tests will be on samples of bedded geologic salt from the WIPP underground. However, the tests described herein are directly applicable to domal salt. Samples being tested will be confined by a range of triaxial stress states ranging from atmospheric pressure up to those approximating lithostatic. Initially these tests will be conducted at room temperature, but testing procedures and equipment will be evaluated to determine adaptability to conducting similar tests under elevated temperatures.

Malama, Bwalya; Howard, Clifford L.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

This is a 1D model of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) that was developed in MATLAB. The model uses cycle inputs such as the fluid mass flow and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the fluid-mechanical-magnetic processes associated with the cycle implementation. The interface between in MATLAB. The model uses cycle inputs such as the fluid mass flow and magnetic field profiles, fluid temperature profile of the fluid and regenerator. Using the temperature profiles, the cooling load produced

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

325

Analysis of pressure drops under reversing flow conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines pressure-drop data from the Reversing Flow Test Facility (RFTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The data comprise part of an initial series of measurements conducted with pressurized helium gas under reversing flow conditions. The characteristics of fluid pressure drops in compressible, reversing flows are discussed in the paper and compared with pressure-drop measurements for steady, incompressible flows. The methodology used to calculate instantaneous mass flows in the test section of the RFTF is summarized. The measured pressure drops are analyzed in terms of their frictional and inertial components. Pressure-drop data are presented for both tubes and wire mesh regenerators over a range of flow reversal frequencies. The results are discussed with reference to other experimental data and analytical models available in the literature. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Krazinski, J.L.; Holtz, R.E.; Uherka, K.L.; Lottes, P.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

In-service filter testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the observations, test results, and conclusions of three separate in-service tests beginning in November 1979 and concluding in September 1983. The in-service tests described in this report produced encouraging results on filters constructed with fiberglass medium containing 5% Nomex and separators of aluminum foil coated with a thin film of vinyl-epoxy polymer. Filters containing medium with Kevlar fiber additives demonstrated they merited further evaluation. Other types of filters tested include separatorless filters (Flanders SuperFlow) and one filter with fiberglass separators. Asbestos-containing filters were used for comparison until their supply was exhausted. All filters tested were judged to have performed satisfactorily under the test conditions.

Terada, K.; Woodard, R.W.; Jensen, R.T.

1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

Two-phase flow in horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flow in horizontal wells and two-phase flow interaction with the reservoir were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Two-phase flow behavior has been recognized as one of the most important problems in production engineering. The authors designed and constructed a new test facility suitable for acquiring data on the relationship between pressure drop and liquid holdup along the well and fluid influx from the reservoir. For the theoretical work, an initial model was proposed to describe the flow behavior in a horizontal well configuration. The model uses the inflow-performance-relationship (IPR) approach and empirical correlations or mechanistic models for wellbore hydraulics. Although good agreement was found between the model and experimental data, a new IPR apart from the extension of Darcy`s law must be investigated extensively to aid in the proper design of horizontal wells.

Ihara, Masaru [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan); Yanai, Koji [Nippon Kokan Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Yanai, Koji

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Bypass flow computations on the LOFA transient in a VHTR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bypass flow in the prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is not intentionally designed to occur, but is present in the gaps between graphite blocks. Previous studies of the bypass flow in the core indicated that the cooling provided by flow in the bypass gaps had a significant effect on temperature and flow distributions for normal operating conditions. However, the flow and heat transports in the core are changed significantly after a Loss of Flow Accident (LOFA). This study aims to study the effect and role of the bypass flow after a LOFA in terms of the temperature and flow distributions and for the heat transport out of the core by natural convection of the coolant for a 1/12 symmetric section of the active core which is composed of images and mirror images of two sub-region models. The two sub-region models, 9 x 1/12 and 15 x 1/12 symmetric sectors of the active core, are employed as the CFD flow models using computational grid systems of 70.2 million and 117 million nodes, respectively. It is concluded that the effect of bypass flow is significant for the initial conditions and the beginning of LOFA, but the bypass flow has little effect after a long period of time in the transient computation of natural circulation.

Yu-Hsin Tung [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science; Richard W. Johnson [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yuh-Ming Ferng [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science; Ching-Chang Chieng [City Univ. of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Dept. of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

CHARACTERISTICS OF SOLAR MERIDIONAL FLOWS DURING SOLAR CYCLE 23  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have analyzed available full-disk data from the Michelson Doppler Imager on board SOHO using the 'ring diagram' technique to determine the behavior of solar meridional flows over solar cycle 23 in the outer 2% of the solar radius. We find that the dominant component of meridional flows during solar maximum was much lower than that during the minima at the beginning of cycles 23 and 24. There were differences in the flow velocities even between the two minima. The meridional flows show a migrating pattern with higher-velocity flows migrating toward the equator as activity increases. Additionally, we find that the migrating pattern of the meridional flow matches those of sunspot butterfly diagram and the zonal flows in the shallow layers. A high-latitude band in meridional flow appears around 2004, well before the current activity minimum. A Legendre polynomial decomposition of the meridional flows shows that the latitudinal pattern of the flow was also different during the maximum as compared to that during the two minima. The different components of the flow have different time dependences, and the dependence is different at different depths.

Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Antia, H. M., E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed, E-mail: antia@tifr.res.i [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Reactivity initiated accident test series Test RIA 1-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test RIA 1-4, the first 9-rod fuel rod bundle RIA Test to be performed at BWR hot startup conditions, was completed on April 16, 1980. The test was performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). Objective for Test RIA 1-4 was to provide information regarding loss-of-coolable fuel rod geometry following a RIA event for a peak fuel enthalpy equivalent to the present licensing criteria of 280 cal/g. The most severe RIA is the postulated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) control rod drop during reactor startup. Therefore the test was conducted at BWR hot startup coolant conditions (538 K, 6.45 MPa, 0.8 1/sec). The test sequence began with steady power operation to condition the fuel, establish a short-lived fission product inventory, and calibrate the calorimetric measurements and core power chambers, neutron flux and gamma flux detectors. The test train was removed from the in-pile tube (IPT) to replace one of the fuel rods with a nominally identical irradiated rod and twelve flux wire monitors. A 2.8 ms period power burst was then performed. Coolant flow measurements were made before and after the power burst to characterize the flow blockage that occurred as a result of fuel rod failure.

Martinson, Z.R.; El-Genk, M.S.; Fukuda, S.K.; LaPointe, R.E.; Osetek, D.J.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Turbulent flow in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

2010-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

OpenFlow Switching: Data Plane Performance Andrea Bianco, Robert Birke, Luca Giraudo, Manuel Palacin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

business activities. Therefore, network administrators are struggling to ensure high network availability or network availability. The OpenFlow technology allows network administrators to segment telecommunication- work to avoid interferences among different flows. Further- more, the network administrator can

333

Patch-clamp array with on-chip electronics, optics, flow control and mechanical actuation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast and quantitative analysis of cellular activity, signaling and responses to external stimuli is a crucial capability and it has been the goal of several projects focusing on patch clamp measurements. To provide the maximum functionality and measurement options, we have developed a patch clamp array device that incorporates on-chip electronics, mechanical, optical and microfluidic coupling as well as cell localization through fluid flow. The preliminary design, which integrated microfluidics, electrodes and optical access, was fabricated and tested. In addition, new designs which further combine mechanical actuation, on-chip electronics and various electrode materials with the previous designs are currently being fabricated.

James, Conrad D.; Okandan, Murat; Draper, Bruce Leroy; Mani, Seethambal S.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

LM-MHD free-surface flow experiments in MTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LM-MHD free-surface flow experiments in MTOR Neil Morley for the APEX Participants VLT Conference concentrators · Free jet · Recirculating cell · Soaker Hose (not discussed here) Slide 5 #12;LM In LM Out #12;LM Jet test for NSTX module simulation · Jet flow is introduced into the high field region between

California at Los Angeles, University of

335

Energy Flow: A Multimodal `Ready' Indication For Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Flow: A Multimodal `Ready' Indication For Electric Vehicles Abstract The lack of sound and vibration while starting the drive system of an electric vehicle (EV) is one of the major differences the energy level to the driver. With Energy Flow (see Figure 1), we test if there will be a benefit in terms

336

Heat transfer and pressure drop in tape generated swirl flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water in tape generated swirl flow were investigated. The test sections were electrically heated small diameter nickel tubes with tight fitting full length Inconel ...

Lopina, Robert F.

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

Serrato, M. G.

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

Test Comparability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

initative. Together, these projects make up the largest ever deployment of all-electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and charging infrastructure in the...

340

Summary of Construction Equipment Tests and Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium OxideSumin Kim Sumin Kim Sumin KimSummary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

THE STATE OF THE ART OF NUMERICAL MODELING OF THERMOHYDROLOGIC FLOW IN FRACTURED ROCK MASSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At normal rates of geothermal wells, turbulent flow is fullyeffects in two- phase geothermal well tests were studied (of salt precipitation around geothermal wells and of methane

Wang, J.S.Y.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Productivity & Energy Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Productivity & Energy Flow Ecosystem approach, focuses: on flow of energy, water, and nutrients (capture) of energy by autotrophs Gross (total) Net (total ­ costs) Secondary productivity- capture of energy by herbivores http://sciencebitz.com/?page_id=204 What Controls the Primary Productivity

Mitchell, Randall J.

343

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

344

Microelectromechanical flow control apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microelectromechanical (MEM) flow control apparatus is disclosed which includes a fluid channel formed on a substrate from a first layer of a nonconducting material (e.g. silicon nitride). A first electrode is provided on the first layer of the nonconducting material outside the flow channel; and a second electrode is located on a second layer of the nonconducting material above the first layer. A voltage applied between the first and second electrodes deforms the fluid channel to increase its cross-sectional size and thereby increase a flow of a fluid through the channel. In certain embodiments of the present invention, the fluid flow can be decreased or stopped by applying a voltage between the first electrode and the substrate. A peristaltic pumping of the fluid through the channel is also possible when the voltage is applied in turn between a plurality of first electrodes and the substrate. A MEM flow control assembly can also be formed by providing one or more MEM flow control devices on a common substrate together with a submicron filter. The MEM flow control assembly can optionally include a plurality of pressure sensors for monitoring fluid pressure and determining flow rates through the assembly.

Okandan, Murat (NE Albuquerque, NM)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

Parametric testing and evaluation of a free-piston Stirling engine/linear compressor system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 3 Kw free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) driving a linear Rankine cycle vapor compressor has been under development by the Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute and General Electric Company as a heat activated heat pump (HAHP) for residential applications since 1976. This paper presents data obtained from recent testing on the FPSE/linear compressor unit. System performance and engine/compressor matching and control tests and analyses are presented and discussed. Engine component performance and loss test data are also presented. A description of the low-cost real-time digital data acquisition system is included. Engine/compressor test results show maximum engine power levels over 3 Kw, close to the design goal of 3.2 Kw. However, maximum efficiency is approximately 25 percent, 5 points below the design goal. The test results are used to construct maps of engine performance and compressor performance. These maps support the engine/compressor matching techniques. Confirmation of the control system features needed to provide matched engine/compressor operation is presented. Loss measurements under engine oscillating flow conditions show that quasi-steady models of oscillating flow substantially underestimate losses, and that various Stirling engine models predict significantly different component losses. Both performance and component loss test results are combined with simulation trends to identify design improvements to the current hardware and the projected performance increases.

Chiu, W.; Antoniak, Z.; Hogan, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing Introduction Test Selection Test Minimization Test Prioritization Summary Software Testing and Maintenance 2 What is it? Regression testing refers to the portion of the test cycle in which a program is tested to ensure that changes do not affect

Lei, Jeff Yu

347

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

Mousavi, Mohammad

348

PAPER B3: PHYSICS OF FLUID FLOWS Hilary Term 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,...) · Aerodynamics ­ important advances in fluid dynamics c. 1900 ­ still active today · Lubrication of mechanical systems · Industry ­ e.g. gases in pipes, polymer flows · Oil extraction ­ liquids flowing through eff n, where `effective diameter' deff 0.3 nm, say. 2 � 10-7 m = 200 nm. In FD, we consider scales

Read, Peter L.

349

Generating Test Data from SOFL Specifications \\Lambda A. Jefferson Offutt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generating Test Data from SOFL Specifications \\Lambda A. Jefferson Offutt ISSE Department, 4A4@cs.hiroshima­cu.ac.jp Abstract Software testing can only be formalized and quantified when a solid basis for test generation can be defined. Tests are commonly generated from the source code, control flow graphs, design representations

Offutt, Jeff

350

Elliptic flow phenomenon at ATLAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarize measurements of elliptic flow and higher order flow harmonics performed by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Results on event-averaged flow measurements and event-plane correlations in Pb+Pb collisions are discussed along with the event-by-event flow measurements. Further, we summarize results on flow in p+Pb collisions.

Martin Spousta

2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

351

Unit 14: Testing and Inspection To introduce software testing and to develop its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Unit 14: Testing and Inspection Objectives Ð To introduce software testing and to develop its and code as a means of reducing errors in software development. What is Testing? „ software testing is the process of seeking errors „ this process is active - if we find no errors after performing a test we

Finkelstein, Anthony

352

accretion flows effects: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

systems such as black hole binaries (BHB), active galactic nuclei (AGN), and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We find that for gamma > 43, the fast rotating flow forms a thick...

353

Water and Solute Flow in a Highly-Structured Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prevention of groundwater contamination by agricultural activities is a high priority in the United States. Water and contaminants often follow particular flow paths through the soil that lead to rapid movement of pesticides out of the rootzone...

Hallmark, C. Tom; Wilding, Larry P.; McInnes, Kevin J.; Heuvelman, Willem J.

354

Simulated Surface-Induced Thrombin Generation in a Flow Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A computational model of blood coagulation is presented with particular emphasis on the regulatory effects of blood flow, spatial distribution of tissue factor (TF), and the importance of the thrombomodulin-activated protein ...

Jordan, S.W.

355

Flow conditions of fresh mortar and concrete in different pipes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The variation in fresh concrete flow rate over the pipe cross section was investigated on differently coloured and highly flowable concrete mixes flowing through pipes of different materials (rubber, steel, acryl). First, uncoloured (gray) concrete was poured through the pipe and the pipe blocked. Similar but coloured (black) concrete was then poured into the pipe filled with gray concrete, flowing after the gray concrete for a while before being blocked and hardened. The advance of the colouring along the pipe wall (showing boundary flow rate) was observed on the moulded concrete surface appearing after removing the pipe from the hardened concrete. The shapes of the interfaces between uncoloured and coloured concrete (showing variation of flow rate over the pipe cross section) were observed on sawn surfaces of concrete half cylinders cut along the length axes of the concrete-filled pipe. Flow profiles over the pipe cross section were clearly seen with maximum flow rates near the centre of the pipe and low flow rate at the pipe wall (typically rubber pipe with reference concrete without silica fume and/or stabilizers). More plug-shaped profiles, with long slip layers and less variation of flow rate over the cross section, were also seen (typically in smooth acrylic pipes). Flow rate, amount of concrete sticking to the wall after flow and SEM-images of pipe surface roughness were observed, illustrating the problem of testing full scale pumping.

Jacobsen, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.jacobsen@ntnu.n [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dept of Structural Engineering, Trondheim (Norway); Haugan, Lars; Hammer, Tor Arne [SINTEF Byggforsk AS Building and Infrastructure, Trondheim (Norway); Kalogiannidis, Evangelos [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dept of Structural Engineering, Trondheim (Norway)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6974 Rev. e. ' A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTHFig. L r2 r2 Solar test collector flow chart. Type Slope (-2. ai ei ai/ei SOlar test collector in operation, side view.

Lampert, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K. (eds.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

SOA1: Geomaterial Behaviour and Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behaviour & Testing 17th ICSMGE, Alexandria, Egypt #12;10/21/2009 2 SOA1: Geomaterial Behaviour & Testing, Alexandria, Egypt #12;10/21/2009 3 SOA1: Geomaterial Behaviour & Testing Sarah M. Springman · Active (2009) SOA-1 Geomaterial Behaviour & Testing 17th ICSMGE, Alexandria, Egypt #12;10/21/2009 4 SOA1

Mayne, Paul W.

359

Can Clone Detection Support Test Comprehension?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can Clone Detection Support Test Comprehension? Benedikt Hauptmann, Maximilian Junker, Sebastianšunchen, Germany Rudolf Vaas Munich Re Group Mšunchen, Germany Abstract--Tests are central artifacts of software systems. Therefore, understanding tests is essential for activities such as maintenance, test automation

360

Shroud leakage flow discouragers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bailey, Jeremy Clyde (Middle Grove, NY); Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Bypass Flow Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measure the velocity fields that will populate the bypass flow study database.

Richard Schultz

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And...

363

Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

364

Failure Rates from Certification Testing to UL and IEC Standards...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Literature Review of the Effects of UV Exposure on PV Modules Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience US TG 4 Activities of...

365

Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

366

Spectral Content and Spatial Scales in Unsteady Rotationally Augmented Flow Fields: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes wind turbine flow fields that effect load predictions for design and analysis and the active aerodynamic control methodologies being considered for wind turbine applications.

Schreck, S. J.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - access blood flow Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada Summary: the activity of the heart is regulated, and what factors control the distribution of blood flow are best... ....

369

Solar cycle variations of large scale flows in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we study the large-scale velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone using the ring diagram technique. We use observations from four different times to study possible temporal variations in flow velocity. We find definite changes in both the zonal and meridional components of the flows. The amplitude of the zonal flow appears to increase with solar activity and the flow pattern also shifts towards lower latitude with time.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

2000-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

370

Final report for the ASC gas-powder two-phase flow modeling project AD2006-09.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents activities performed in FY2006 under the ''Gas-Powder Two-Phase Flow Modeling Project'', ASC project AD2006-09. Sandia has a need to understand phenomena related to the transport of powders in systems. This report documents a modeling strategy inspired by powder transport experiments conducted at Sandia in 2002. A baseline gas-powder two-phase flow model, developed under a companion PEM project and implemented into the Sierra code FUEGO, is presented and discussed here. This report also documents a number of computational tests that were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the new model. Although considerable progress was made in implementing the complex two-phase flow model, this project has identified two important areas that need further attention. These include the need to compute robust compressible flow solutions for Mach numbers exceeding 0.35 and the need to improve conservation of mass for the powder phase. Recommendations for future work in the area of gas-powder two-phase flow are provided.

Evans, Gregory Herbert; Winters, William S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Optical flow switching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Present-day networks are being challenged by dramatic increases in bandwidth demand of emerging applications. We will explore a new transport, ldquooptical flow switchingrdquo, that will enable significant growth and ...

Chan, Vincent W. S.

372

Olefin Autoxidation in Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handling hazardous multiphase reactions in flow brings not only safety advantages but also significantly improved performance, due to better mass transfer characteristics. In this paper, we present a continuous microreactor ...

Neuenschwander, Ulrich

373

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

375

Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity...

376

Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

377

Field Testing of the Advanced Worker Protection System  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

tasks which simulate actual decontamination activities. + to shake down the new IUOE test facilities. The activities began with a demonstration of filling the backpack with...

378

Light Duty Utility Arm system pre-operational (cold test) test plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Light Duty Utility (LDUA) Cold Test Facility, located in the Hanford 400 Area, will be used to support cold testing (pre- operational tests) of LDUA subsystems. Pre-operational testing is composed of subsystem development testing and rework activities, and integrated system qualification testing. Qualification testing will be conducted once development work is complete and documentation is under configuration control. Operational (hot) testing of the LDUA system will follow the testing covered in this plan and will be covered in a separate test plan

Bennett, K.L.

1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

379

The magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on progress on a multi-task contract to develop the technology for the steam bottoming plant for an MHD Steam Combined Cycle power plant. Two proof-of-concept (POC) tests totaling 614 hours of coal fired operation were conducted during the quarter using low sulfur Montana Rosebud coal. The results of these tests are summarized. Operational aspects of the particulate control devices being evaluated, a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a reverse air baghouse, are discussed. A sootblowing control system for the convective heat transfer surfaces that senses the need to clean the tubes by temperatures is described. Environmental reporting includes measurement of levels of ground water wells over time and the remote air quality measurements of impact of the stack emissions from the two tests. Results of testing candidate ceramic tubes for a recuperative high temperature air heater are included. Analyses of the tube materials tested in the 2000 hour test series previously completed on high sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal are summarized. Facility maintenance and repair activities for the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility are summarized. The major facility modification discussed is the completion of the installation of a Wet ESP with rotary vacuum filter which is replacing the venturi scrubber as the primary facility particulate control device for any exhaust gases that are not routed through the dry ESP or baghouse.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Microgrid Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

KJRR-FAI Hydraulic Flow Testing Input Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The INL, in cooperation with the KAERI via Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA), undertook an effort in the latter half of calendar year 2013 to produce a conceptual design for the KJRR-FAI campaign. The outcomes of this effort are documented in further detail elsewhere [5]. The KJRR-FAI was designed to be cooled by the ATR’s Primary Coolant System (PCS) with no provision for in-pile measurement or control of the hydraulic conditions in the irradiation assembly. The irradiation assembly was designed to achieve the target hydraulic conditions via engineered hydraulic losses in a throttling orifice at the outlet of the irradiation vehicle.

N.E. Woolstenhulme; R.B. Nielson; D.B. Chapman

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared Land Surface

383

Flow Test At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlix SolarBlack Warrior Area (DOE GTP) JumpColrado Area

384

Flow Test At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vs ActualInformationAlum Area (DOE GTP) Jump

385

Flow Test At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP)Open Energy

386

Flow Test At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlint Geothermal AreaWister Area (DOE GTP) Jump

387

Nevada National Security Site Underground Test Area (UGTA) Flow and  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010 PrintingNeed for An Integrated Risk Model NeedStreams

388

Underground Flow Measurement and Particle Release Test | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear Fuel Qualification Program |SankarDevelopment |

389

Slug Test Data Analysis in Reservoirs with Double Porosity Behaviour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure analysis for a slug test which corresponds to the flow period of a Drill Stem test is extended to wells in reservoirs with double-porosity behaviour. Solutions are obtained for either pseudo-steady state or transient interporosity flow. The distinctive specific features of both solutions are identified. Results presented are applicable to both naturally-fractured and layered reservoirs with the more permeable layer connecting to the wellbore. Type curves based on the pseudo-steady or transient interporosity flow are presented. These type curves are similar to the existing homogenous single layer type curve with addition of interporosity flow lines indicating double-porosity behaviour.

Mateen, Khalid; Ramey, Henry J. Jr.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Section 13: Flow control 1 Section 13: Flow control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geometries for Energyefficient Flow Around Bodies Abstract 14:30 ­ 14:50: Elfriede Friedmann (Universität

Kohlenbach, Ulrich

391

Experimental characterization of spin motor nozzle flow.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mach number in the inviscid core of the flow exiting scarfed supersonic nozzles was measured using pitot probes. Nozzle characterization experiments were conducted in a modified section of an obsolete M = 7.3 test section/nozzle assembly on Sandia's Hypersonic Wind Tunnel. By capitalizing on existing hardware, the cost and time required for tunnel modifications were significantly reduced. Repeatability of pitot pressure measurements was excellent, and instrumentation errors were reduced by optimizing the pressure range of the transducers used for each test run. Bias errors in probe position prevented us from performing a successful in situ calibration of probe angle effects using pitot probes placed at an angle to the nozzle centerline. The abrupt throat geometry used in the Baseline and Configuration A and B nozzles modeled the throat geometry of the flight vehicle's spin motor nozzles. Survey data indicates that small (''unmeasurable'') differences in the nozzle throat geometries produced measurable flow asymmetries and differences in the flow fields generated by supposedly identical nozzles. Therefore, data from the Baseline and Configuration A and B nozzles cannot be used for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation. Configuration C and D nozzles replaced the abrupt throat geometry of Baseline and Configuration A and B nozzles with a 0.500-inch streamwise radius of curvature in the throat region. This throat geometry eliminated the flow asymmetries, flow separation in the nozzle throat, and measurable differences between the flow fields from identical nozzles that were observed in Baseline/A/B nozzles. Data from Configuration C and D nozzles can be used for CFD code validation.

Erven, Rocky J.; Peterson, Carl Williams; Henfling, John Francis

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Long-term corrosion testing pan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.

Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO{sub 2}-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for which work began at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests to further develop the technology of SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis as part of the HyS Cycle. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both thermodynamic efficiency and hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. The anode and cathode are formed by spraying platinum containing catalyst on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). In most testing the material of the PEM was NafionR. The electrolyzer cell active area can be as large as 54.8 cm{sup 2}. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is a sulfuric acid solution containing sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide could be varied in the range of 1 to 6 atm (15 to 90 psia). Temperatures could be controlled in the range from ambient to 80 C. Hydrogen generated at the cathode of the cell was collected for the purpose of flow measurement and composition analysis. The test facility proved to be easy to operate, versatile, and reliable.

Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

394

Insights Gained from Testing Alternate Cell Designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cell for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900șC. The INL has been testing various solid oxide cell designs to characterize their electrolytic performance operating in the electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Some results presented in this report were obtained from cells, initially developed by the Forschungszentrum Jülich and now manufactured by the French ceramics firm St. Gobain. These cells have an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. They were initially developed as fuel cells, but are being tested as electrolytic cells in the INL test stands. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with ~10 ”m thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes, ~1400 ”m thick nickel-YSZ steam-hydrogen electrodes, and manganite (LSM) air-oxygen electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 to 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900°C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed another fuel cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. The NASA cell is structurally symmetrical, with both electrodes supporting the thin electrolyte and containing micro-channels for gas diffusion. This configuration is called a bi-electrode supported cell or BSC. The electrodes are made by freeze-casting, a modified tape casting technique which creates the many micro-channels in the YSZ electrode green tape. This report presents results of the INL’s testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; G. K. Housley; M. S. Sohal; D. G. Milobar; Thomas Cable

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry using energy flow method Azimuthal angle distribution at Q2 >100 GeV2 Energy flow method.Ukleja on behalf of the ZEUS Collaboration #12; Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I

396

SHINE Vacuum Pump Test Verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normetex pumps used world-wide for tritium service are no longer available. DOE and other researchers worldwide have spent significant funds characterizing this pump. Identification of alternate pumps is required for performance and compatibility with tritium gas. Many of the pumps that could be used to meet the functional performance requirements (e.g. pressure and flow conditions) of the Normetex pump have features that include the use of polymers or oils and greases that are not directly compatible with tritium service. This study assembles a test system to determine the flow characteristics for candidate alternate pumps. These tests are critical to the movement of tritium through the SHINE Tritium Purification System (TPS). The purpose of the pump testing is two-fold: (1) obtain baseline vacuum pump characteristics for an alternate (i.e. ''Normetex replacement'') pump intended for use in tritium service; and (2) verify that low pressure hydrogen gas can be transported over distances up to 300 feet by the candidate pumps. Flow rates and nominal system pressures have been identified for the SHINE Mo-99 production process Tritium Purification System (TPS). To minimize the line sizes for the transfer of low pressure tritium from the Neutron Driver Accelerator System (NDAS) to the primary processing systems in the TPS, a ''booster'' pump has been located near the accelerator in the design. A series of pump tests were performed at various configurations using hydrogen gas (no tritium) to ensure that this concept is practical and maintains adequate flow rates and required pressures. This report summarizes the results of the tests that have been performed using various pump configurations. The current design of the Tritium Purification System requires the ''booster'' pump to discharge to or to be backed by another vacuum pump. Since Normetex pumps are no longer manufactured, a commercially available Edwards scroll pump will be used to back the booster pump. In this case the ''booster pump'' is an Adixen Molecular Drag Pump (MDP 5011) and the backing pump is an Edwards (nXDS15iC) scroll pump. Various configurations of the two pumps and associated lengths of 3/4 inch tubing (0 feet to 300 feet) were used in combination with hydrogen and nitrogen flow rates ranging from 25-400 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm) to determine whether the proposed pump configuration meets the design criteria for SHINE. The results of this study indicate that even under the most severe conditions (300 feet of tubing and 400 sccm flow rate) the Adixen 5011 MDP can serve as a booster pump to transport gases from the accelerator (NDAS) to the TPS. The Target Gas Receiving System pump (Edwards nXDS15iC) located approximately 300 feet from the accelerator can effectively back the Adixen MDP. The molecular drag pump was able to maintain its full rotational speed even when the flow rate was 400 sccm hydrogen or nitrogen and 300 feet of tubing was installed between the drag pump and the Edwards scroll pump. In addition to maintaining adequate rotation, the pressure in the system was maintained below the target pressure of 30 torr for all flow rates, lengths of tubing, and process gases. This configuration is therefore adequate to meet the SHINE design requirements in terms of flow and pressure.

Morgan, Gregg A; Peters, Brent

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.

Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Legore, V.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

E-Print Network 3.0 - active dielectric microstructures Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plasma Actuators for Active Aerodynamic Flow Control," AIAA... Results Using Aerogels and Ferroelectrics for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Actuators Ryan Durscher......

399

Flow Battery System Design for Manufacturability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flow battery energy storage systems can support renewable energy generation and increase energy efficiency. But, presently, the costs of flow battery energy storage systems can be a significant barrier for large-scale market penetration. For cost- effective systems to be produced, it is critical to optimize the selection of materials and components simultaneously with the adherence to requirements and manufacturing processes to allow these batteries and their manufacturers to succeed in the market by reducing costs to consumers. This report analyzes performance, safety, and testing requirements derived from applicable regulations as well as commercial and military standards that would apply to a flow battery energy storage system. System components of a zinc-bromine flow battery energy storage system, including the batteries, inverters, and control and monitoring system, are discussed relative to manufacturing. The issues addressed include costs and component availability and lead times. A service and support model including setup, maintenance and transportation is outlined, along with a description of the safety-related features of the example flow battery energy storage system to promote regulatory and environmental, safety, and health compliance in anticipation of scale manufacturing.

Montoya, Tracy Louise; Meacham, Paul Gregory; Perry, David; Broyles, Robin S.; Hickey, Steven; Hernandez, Jacquelynne

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Assembly flow simulation of a radar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A discrete event simulation model has been developed to predict the assembly flow time of a new radar product. The simulation was the key tool employed to identify flow constraints. The radar, production facility, and equipment complement were designed, arranged, and selected to provide the most manufacturable assembly possible. A goal was to reduce the assembly and testing cycle time from twenty-six weeks to six weeks. A computer software simulation package (SLAM II) was utilized as the foundation a for simulating the assembly flow time. FORTRAN subroutines were incorporated into the software to deal with unique flow circumstances that were not accommodated by the software. Detailed information relating to the assembly operations was provided by a team selected from the engineering, manufacturing management, inspection, and production assembly staff. The simulation verified that it would be possible to achieve the cycle time goal of six weeks. Equipment and manpower constraints were identified during the simulation process and adjusted as required to achieve the flow with a given monthly production requirement. The simulation is being maintained as a planning tool to be used to identify constraints in the event that monthly output is increased. ``What-if`` studies have been conducted to identify the cost of reducing constraints caused by increases in output requirement.

Rutherford, W.C.; Biggs, P.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Piezoelectric axial flow microvalve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a fuel cell operable with a quantity of fuel and a quantity of an oxidizer to produce electrical power, the fuel cell including a fuel cell body including a labyrinth system structured to permit the fuel and the oxidizer to flow therethrough; at least a first catalyst in fluid communication with the labyrinth; and at least a first microvalve operably disposed within at least a portion of the labyrinth. The microvalve utilizes a deflectable member operable upon the application of a voltage from a voltage source. The microvalve includes an elongated flow channel formed therein and extending substantially longitudinally between the first and second ends to permit substantially longitudinal flow of the fluid therethrough and between the first and second ends; and the deflectable member disposed on the valve body, the deflectable member including at least a first piezoelectric portion that is piezoelectrically operable to deflect the deflectable member between an open position and a closed position upon the application of a voltage, the deflectable member in the closed position being operable to resist the flow of the fluid through the flow channel.

Gemmen, Randall; Thornton, Jimmy; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Clark, William W.

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

402

Radio frequency (RF) heated supersonic flow laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique supersonic flow apparatus which employs an inductively-coupled, radio frequency (RF) torch to supply high enthalpy source gas to the nozzle inlet is described. The main features of this system are the plasma tube, a cooled nozzle assembly, and a combustion/expansion chamber with a heat exchanger. A description of these components with current test data is presented. In addition, a discussion of anticipated experiments utilizing this system is included.

Wantuck, P.; Watanabe, H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Development of slotted orifice flow conditioner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentric rings of radial slots. The porosity of each ring varied so that the conditioner generated a six step parabolic profile similar to the profile tested with Fluent The overall porosity of the parabolic conditioner was 25. 1'/o, which is lower than... 19 Velocity Profile Procedure . Co Measurement Procedure Data Reduction . . . . . . 19 21 22 RESULTS 24 LDA Velocity Profile and Turbulence Intensity Analysis 24 Tube Bundle, Uniform Slotted Orifice Flow Conditioner . . Parabolic Slotted...

Ihfe, Larry Michael

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Binary fish passage models for uniform and nonuniform flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Binary fish passage models are considered by many fisheries managers to be the best 21 available practice for culvert inventory assessments and for fishway and barrier design. 22 Misunderstandings between different binary passage modeling approaches often arise, 23 however, due to differences in terminology, application and presentation. In this paper 24 one-dimensional binary fish passage models are reviewed and refined to clarify their 25 origins and applications. For uniform flow, a simple exhaustion-threshold (ET) model 26 equation is derived that predicts the flow speed threshold in a fishway or velocity barrier 27 that causes exhaustion at a given maximum distance of ascent. Flow speeds at or above 28 the threshold predict failure to pass (exclusion). Flow speeds below the threshold predict 29 passage. The binary ET model is therefore intuitive and easily applied to predict passage 30 or exclusion. It is also shown to be consistent with the distance-maximizing model. The 31 ET model s limitation to uniform flow is addressed by deriving a passage model that 32 accounts for nonuniform flow conditions more commonly found in the field, including 33 backwater profiles and drawdown curves. Comparison of these models with 34 experimental observations of volitional passage for Gambusia affinis in uniform and 35 nonuniform flows indicates reasonable prediction of binary outcomes (passage or 36 exclusion) if the flow speed is not near the threshold flow velocity. More research is 37 needed on fish behavior, passage strategies under nonuniform flow regimes and 38 stochastic methods that account for individual differences in swimming performance at or 39 near the threshold flow speed. Future experiments should track and measure ground 40 speeds of ascending fish to test nonuniform flow passage strategies and to improve model 41 predictions. Stochastic models, such as Monte-Carlo techniques, that account for 42 different passage performance among individuals and allow prediction of the percentage 43 of fish passing would be particularly useful near flow speed thresholds where binary 44 passage models are clearly limited.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Electrocapturing flow cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flow cell for electrophoretically-assisted capturing analytes from a flow. The flow cell includes a specimen chamber, a first membrane, a second membrane, a first electrode chamber, and a second electrode chamber. The specimen chamber may have a sample inlet and a sample outlet. A first portion of the first membrane may be coupled to a first portion of the specimen chamber. A first portion of the second membrane may be coupled to a second portion of the specimen chamber. The first electrode chamber may be configured to accept a charge. A portion of the first electrode chamber may be coupled to a second portion of the first membrane. A second electrode chamber may be configured to accept an opposite charge. A portion of the second electrode chamber may be coupled to a second portion of the second membrane.

Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

Long-term corrosion testing plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Prototype to Test WHY prototype to test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prototype to Test METHOD WHY prototype to test HOW to prototype to test Prototyping to test or design space. The fundamental way you test your prototypes is by letting users experience them and react to them. In creating prototypes to test with users you have the opportunity to examine your solution

Prinz, Friedrich B.

408

Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit Running a test case: 1 Get the component to a known state (set up). 2 Cause some event (the test case). 3 Check the behaviour. · Record pass/fail · Track statistics · Typically we want to do a lot of test cases so it makes sense to automate. · Test cases

Peters, Dennis

409

Complex-Wide Waste Flow Analysis V1.0 verification and validation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complex-wide waste flow analysis model (CWWFA) was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) to evaluate waste management scenarios with emphasis on identifying and prioritizing technology development opportunities to reduce waste flows and public risk. In addition, the model was intended to support the needs of the Complex-Wide Environmental Integration (EMI) team supporting the DOE`s Accelerating Cleanup: 2006 Plan. CWWFA represents an integrated environmental modeling system that covers the life cycle of waste management activities including waste generation, interim process storage, retrieval, characterization and sorting, waste preparation and processing, packaging, final interim storage, transport, and disposal at a final repository. The CWWFA shows waste flows through actual site-specific and facility-specific conditions. The system requirements for CWWFA are documented in the Technical Requirements Document (TRD). The TRD is intended to be a living document that will be modified over the course of the execution of CWWFA development. Thus, it is anticipated that CWWFA will continue to evolve as new requirements are identified (i.e., transportation, small sites, new streams, etc.). This report provides a documented basis for system verification of CWWFA requirements. System verification is accomplished through formal testing and evaluation to ensure that all performance requirements as specified in the TRD have been satisfied. A Requirement Verification Matrix (RVM) was used to map the technical requirements to the test procedures. The RVM is attached as Appendix A. Since February of 1997, substantial progress has been made toward development of the CWWFA to meet the system requirements. This system verification activity provides a baseline on system compliance to requirements and also an opportunity to reevaluate what requirements need to be satisfied in FY-98.

Hsu, K.M.; Lundeen, A.S.; Oswald, K.B.; Shropshire, D.E.; Robinson, J.M.; West, W.H.

1997-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

410

Intrusion detection sensor testing tools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intrusion detection sensors must be frequently tested to verify that they are operational, and they must be periodically tested to verify that they are functioning at required performance levels. Concerns involving this testing can include: The significant amount of manpower required, inconsistent results due to variability in methods and personnel, exposure of personnel to hazardous environments, and difficulty in obtaining access to the areas containing some of the intrusion sensors. To address these concerns, the Department of Energy directed Sandia National Labs. to develop intrusion detection sensor testing tools. Over the past two years Sandia has developed several sensor testing tool prototypes. This paper describes the evolution of an exterior intrusion detection sensor tester and automatic data logger, and also describes various interior intrusion detection sensor test fixtures that can be remotely activated to simulate an intruder.

Hayward, D.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

Bauer, Steve

412

Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

Bauer, Steve

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

413

Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

McGrail, Bernard P. (Pasco, WA); Martin, Paul F. (Richland, WA); Lindenmeier, Clark W. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that, due to excessive wastage, certain tube samples needed to be removed and replaced in order to ensure that Test Sections B and C would have a chance of remaining in the boiler for their intended exposure period. These suspect tube samples were replaced and the two remaining test sections were put back into service. The tube samples that were removed from Test Sections B and C were set aside for later analysis at the end of the planned exposure period. Test Sections B and C were again examined approximately six months later. At that time, measured wall thickness losses raised concerns about additional tube samples. These suspect samples were also removed, set aside for later analysis, and replaced. The test sections then went back into service until the end of the second exposure period, which was concluded in May 2003 when, due to evidence of excessive wastage, the valves were opened increasing cooling steam flow and thereby effectively stopping corrosion. In August 2003, Test Sections B and C were removed for closer examination. Section C had experienced about 42 months of service at the desired team temperature set point with 28.5 months at temperature at full temperature. Additional suspect samples were removed from Test Section B, then, it was re-installed into the boiler (at the location originally occupied by Section C), where it remained in service until the end of the program. Due to this removal history, the samples from Test Section B had a total service duration that varied from a minimum of 15.5 months (for samples that performed poorly) to 37 months for samples the survived for the full intended service exposure for Section B. The figure below shows a schematic of Test Section B and indicates the length of service exposure for different locations. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section B, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. This report also is intended to compare and summarize the results for all three test sections. The analysis of T

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Hydrogeologic investigations at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site was established in 1950 as a continental area for testing nuclear devices and, since 1963, all nuclear detonations there have been underground. Most tests are conducted in vertical shafts with a small percentage conducted in tunnels. The majority of detonation points are above the water table, primarily in volcanic rocks or alluvium. In the testing areas the water table is 450--700 m below the surface. Pre- and post- event geologic investigations are conducted for each test location and long-term studies assess the impact of underground testing on a more regional scale. Studies in progress have not identified any impact on the regional ground water system from testing, but some local effects have been recognized. In some areas where several large tests have been conducted below the water table, water levels hundreds of meters above the regional water table have been measured and radioactivity has been discovered associated with fractures in a few holes. Flow-through and straddle packer testing has revealed unexpectedly high hydraulic pressures at depth. Recently, a multiple completion monitoring well installed to study three zones has confirmed the existence of a significant upward hydraulic gradient. These observations of local pressurization and fracture flow are being further explored to determine the influence of underground nuclear testing on the regional hydrogeologic system.

Hawkins, W L [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Trudeau, D A [Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [Geological Survey, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Drellack, S L [Raytheon Services Nevada, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States)] [Raytheon Services Nevada, Inc., Mercury, NV (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

417

AVTA: Quantum Escape PHEV Testing Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a Quantum Escape PHEV 2010, an experimental model not currently for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

418

AVTA: Honda Civic HEV 2013 Testing Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2013 Honda Civic hybrid electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

419

AVTA: Honda CRZ HEV 2011 Testing Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2011 Honda CRZ hybrid electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

420

AVTA: Mercedes Benz HEV 2010 Testing Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Mercedes Benz hybrid-electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity flow test" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

AVTA: 2011 Chevrolet Volt Testing Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a Chevrolet Volt 2011. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

422

ENERGY FLOWS CLIMATE CHANGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY FLOWS FORCINGS CLIMATE CHANGE A REALLY TOUGH PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz, BNL, 7-20-11 www average temperature 15°C or 59°F #12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Power per area Energy per time per area Unit" temperature to radiative flux. #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per

Schwartz, Stephen E.

423

Flow cytometry apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An obstruction across the flow chamber creates a one dimensional convergence of a sheath fluid. A passageway in the construction directs flat cells near to the area of one dimensional convergence in the sheath fluid to provide proper orientation of flat cells at fast rates.

Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

AGN and Cooling Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For two decades the steady-state cooling-flow model has dominated the literature of cluster and elliptical-galaxy X-ray sources. For ten years this model has been in severe difficulty from a theoretical point of view, and it is now coming under increasing pressure observationally. For two decades the steady-state cooling-flow model has dominated the literature of cluster and elliptical-galaxy X-ray sources. For ten years this model has been in severe difficulty from a theoretical point of view, and it is now coming under increasing pressure observationally. A small number of enthusiasts have argued for a radically different interpretation of the data, but had little impact on prevailing opinion because the unsteady heating picture that they advocate is extremely hard to work out in detail. Here I explain why it is difficult to extract robust observational predictions from the heating picture. Major problems include the variability of the sources, the different ways in which a bi-polar flow can impact on X-ray emission, the weakness of synchrotron emission from sub-relativistic flows, and the sensitivity of synchrotron emission to a magnetic field that is probably highly localized.

James Binney

2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

425

Soil Remediation Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

U.S. Geothermal Announces More Test Results From the Neal Hot...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

a renewable energy company focused on the production of electricity from geothermal energy, announced today results from a second, higher rate flow test of the first full...

427

Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

428

Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Constant pressure high throughput membrane permeation testing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a membrane testing system for individual evaluation of a plurality of planar membranes subjected to a feed gas on one side and a sweep gas on a second side. The membrane testing system provides a pressurized flow of a feed and sweep gas to each membrane testing cell in a plurality of membrane testing cells while a stream of retentate gas from each membrane testing cell is ported by a retentate multiport valve for sampling or venting, and a stream of permeate gas from each membrane testing cell is ported by a permeate multiport valve for sampling or venting. Back pressure regulators and mass flow controllers act to maintain substantially equivalent gas pressures and flow rates on each side of the planar membrane throughout a sampling cycle. A digital controller may be utilized to position the retentate and permeate multiport valves cyclically, allowing for gas sampling of different membrane cells over an extended period of time.

Albenze, Erik J.; Hopkinson, David P.; Luebke, David R.

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

430

Results of the fourth Hanna field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase (Hanna IVB) of a coal gasification experiment near Hanna, Wyoming, was completed in September 1979. The experiment attempted to link and gasify coal between process wells spaced 34.3 meters apart. Intermediate wells were positioned between the process wells so that the link could be relayed over shorter distances. Reverse combustion linking was attempted over a 22.9-meter and a 11.4-meter distance of the total well spacing. Thermal activity was generally noted in the upper 3 meters of the coal seam during the link. Two attempts to gasify over the 34.3-meter distance resulted in the propagation of the burn front at the coal overburden interface. Post-burn evaluation indicates fractures as major influencing factors of the combustion process. The Hanna IVB field test provided much insight into influence that geologic features have on in situ coal combustion. The influence of these faults, permeable zones, and cleats, on the air flow patterns can drastically change the overall results of a gasification experiment and should be studied further. The overall results of Hanna IVB were discouraging because of the rapid decline in the heating values for the production gas and the amount of coal gasified. With more complete geologic characerization prior to experimentation and proper well completions, it is believed that most of the subsurface operational problems encountered during Hanna IV could have been avoided.

Covell, J. R.; Wojdac, L. F.; Barbour, F. A.; Gardner, G. W.; Glass, R.; Hommert, P. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Effects of external pressure on the terminal lymphatic flow rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressure applied to the skin of the canine cause the terminal lymphat- ic flow rate to increase until the external pressure reaches 60mm Hg. At an external pressure of 60mm Hg reduced lymphatic flow is observed in some of the test animals. At 75mm Hg... resulting from the external pressure begins to col- lapse the lymph vessels. External pressure between 60 and 75mm Hg restricts or completely occludes the terminal lymphatic flow rate. ACKNOWLEDGENENTS I would like to express my appreciation...

Seale, James Lewis

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

SATURATED ZONE IN-SITU TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters used in the development of parameter distributions for total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]), Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]), Saturated Zone Colloid Transport (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170006]), and ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). Specifically, this scientific analysis contributes the following to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as part of a natural barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests cond