National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for activity critical materials

  1. Critical Materials:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Facilities » Critical Materials Hub Critical Materials Hub Green light reflection from a low-oxygen environment 3D printer laser deposition of metal powder alloys. Photo courtesy of The Critical Materials Institute, Ames Laboratory Green light reflection from a low-oxygen environment 3D printer laser deposition of metal powder alloys. Photo courtesy of The Critical Materials Institute, Ames Laboratory Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic,

  2. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentations during the Critical Materials Workshop held on April 3, 2012 overviewing critical materials strategies

  3. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  4. Critical Materials Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Materials Workshop Sheraton Crystal City 1800 Jefferson Davis Highway, ... Hubs 9:35 am - 9:45 am DOE and Critical Materials National Academies Criticality 9:45 am - ...

  5. The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Critical Materials Institute Director Alex King, Operations Manager Cynthia Feller, Jenni Brockpahler and Melinda Thach. Photo left to right: CMI Director Alex King, Operations Manager Cynthia Feller, Jenni Brockpahler and Melinda Thach. Not pictured: Carol Bergman. CMI staff phone 515-296-4500, e-mail CMIdirector@ameslab.gov The Critical Materials Institute focuses on technologies that make better use of materials and eliminate the need for materials that are subject to supply disruptions.

  6. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  7. Critical Materials Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and Technology Policy (OSTP) convened four work groups: * Critical Material Criteria ... 28- 29, 2012) 15 Education and Training: Skills Required Across the Rare Earth Supply ...

  8. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop U.S. Department of Energy April 3, 2012 eere.energy.gov Dr. Leo Christodoulou Program Manager Advanced Manufacturing Office Energy Efficiency and...

  9. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  10. My Account | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    My Account Primary tabs Log in(active tab) Request new password Username * Enter your Critical Materials Institute username. Password * Enter the password that accompanies your username. Log in

  11. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources The Critical Materials Institute offers connections to resources, including: List of resources U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table Government agency contacts CMI unique facilities CMI recent presentations Photographs via Flick'r: Critical Materials Institute, The Ames Laboratory Videos from The Ames Laboratory Webinars from Colorado School of Mines To offer comments on the CMI website or to ask questions, please contact us via e-mail at CMIdirector@ameslab.gov or call 515-296-4500.

  12. invention disclosures | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute will be defined by how well it meets its mission to assure supply chains of materials critical to clean energy technologies. To enable innovation in...

  13. Careers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Careers The Critical Materials Institute at the The Ames Laboratory, a Department of Energy national laboratory affiliated with Iowa State University, offers a variety of career opportunities. These include: Postdoctoral Research Associate Also, The Ames Laboratory participates in federal programs that help develop the research workforce. These include the following programs with the U.S. Department of Energy: Graduate Student Research Program (new in 2014) Science Undergraduate Laboratory

  14. About Critical Materials | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    earth metals, includes links to a whitepaper "Understanding the Rare Earth Materials Crisis" and "Rare Earths FAQs" Massachusetts Institute of Technology: a comprehensive...

  15. CMI Social Media | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Social Media Facebook: Critical Materials Institute Twitter: CMI_hub LinkedIn: Critical Materials Institute Flickr: Critical Materials Institute

  16. Latest News | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News News releases CMI in the news News archive CMI social media Latest News News about CMI: Critical Materials Institute gains ten industrial and research affiliates, April 11, 2016 On energy.gov: Critical Materials Institute Gains Ten Industrial and Research Affiliates How true is conventional wisdon about price volatility of tech metals?, Feb. 11, 2016 Need rare-earths know-how? The Critical Materials Institute offers lower-cost access to experts and research, Dec. 1, 2015 Get schooled in

  17. 2011 Critical Materials Strategy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines the role that rare earth metals and other key materials play in clean energy technologies such as wind turbines, electric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting.

  18. 2010 Critical Materials Strategy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010.

  19. News Releases | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases Critical Materials Institute gains ten industrial and research affiliates, April 11, 2016 How true is conventional wisdom about price volatility of tech metals?, Feb. 11, 2016 Ames Laboratory scientist named to National Academy of Inventors, Jan. 11, 2016 Need rare-earths know-how? The Critical Materials Institute offers lower-cost access to experts and research, December 1, 2015 Get schooled in rare-earth metals: CMI, Iowa State to offer unique materials science class, November 30,

  20. Human Resources at Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Human Resources at Critical Materials Institute Each partner within the Critical Materials Institute manages its own hiring. Use these links to find key contacts for CMI partners that are most likely to hire for CMI research projects: The Ames Laboratory | Careers at Iowa State University Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Careers Idaho National Laboratory | Careers Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Careers Colorado School of Mines | Employment

  1. DOE and Critical Materials Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "DOE and Critical Materials" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  2. CMI Webinar: Energy Materials and Criticality, 2015-2030 | Critical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Webinar: Energy Materials and Criticality, 2015-2030 The CMI Webinar series includes a CMI-only presentation "CMI Webinar: Energy Materials and Criticality, 2015-2030" by Rod...

  3. Critical Materials Hub | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities » Critical Materials Hub Critical Materials Hub Green light reflection from a low-oxygen environment 3D printer laser deposition of metal powder alloys. Photo courtesy of The Critical Materials Institute, Ames Laboratory Green light reflection from a low-oxygen environment 3D printer laser deposition of metal powder alloys. Photo courtesy of The Critical Materials Institute, Ames Laboratory Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic,

  4. Critical Materials Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshops » Critical Materials Workshop Critical Materials Workshop April 3, 2012 AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical materials, and the foundational aspects of Energy Innovation Hubs. Additionally, the workshop solicited input from the critical materials community on R&D gaps that could be addressed by DOE. Questions or suggestions may

  5. Critical Materials Institute Affiliates Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Critical Materials Institute Affiliates Program MEMBER AGREEMENT ("Agreement") WHEREAS, The Ames Laboratory ("AMES"), a U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") National Laboratory operated by Iowa State University of Science and Technology ("ISU") under the authority of its Contract DE-AC02-07CH11358, with administrative offices at 311 TASF, Ames, IA 50011-3020, is the recipient of funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and

  6. Critical Materials Institute UPDATE | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute UPDATE An error occurred. Try watching this video on www.youtube.com, or enable JavaScript if it is disabled in your browser. The Critical Materials...

  7. News about CMI Partners | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    joins the Critical Materials Institute Reverse mining: Scientists extract rare earth materials from consumer products, March 7, 2013 UCDavis: Navrotsky Participates in DOE-funded...

  8. CMI Grand Challenge Problems | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    needed to discover and implement advanced materials for specific uses, and to close the gap on the timeframe on which materials criticality typically emerges, CMI will leverage...

  9. CMI Course Inventory: Chemistry Engineering | Critical Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to rare earths and critical materials. Other courses are available in these areas: Geology EngineeringGeochemistry Mining Engineering Metallurgical EngineeringMaterials...

  10. CMI Course Inventory: Mining Engineering | Critical Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to rare earths and critical materials. Other courses are available in these areas: Geology EngineeringGeochemistry Metallurgical EngineeringMaterials Science Chemistry...

  11. Critical Materials Workshop Final Participant List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    List of participants who attended the Critical Materials Workshop held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA

  12. CMI Offers Webinars on Critical Materials and Rare Earths | Critical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about critical materials at no charge. These began in March 2015: December 9: Alex King, CMI, and Stacy Joiner, Ames Laboratory, discuss the updates to the CMI Affiliates...

  13. Critical_Materials_Summary.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CriticalMaterialsSummary.pdf CriticalMaterialsSummary.pdf PDF icon CriticalMaterialsSummary.pdf More Documents & Publications RFI U.S. Department of Energy - Critical...

  14. Additive Manufacturing Meets the Critical Materials Shortage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find out how the Energy Department's Advanced Manufacturing Office is working to address potential shortages of critical materials through additive manufacturing, or 3D printing.

  15. Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    View the text version of the video. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy Speaker * Dr. Diana Bauer, Office of Policy and International Affairs View the text version of ...

  16. Critical Materials Workshop Final Participant List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of Energy Satish Vishnubhatla Danfoss David Waldeck U of Pittsburgh Frederick Walker Air Products Critical Materials Workshop April 3, 2012 Arlington, VA Final ...

  17. News About CMI | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Speciality Metal Recycling Firm Teams Up with US Critical Materials Institute, Nov. 17, 2015 American Manganese Inc. Enters NDA with U.S. Government's Ames Laboratory on Lithium ...

  18. Contacts: Alex King, Director, Critical Materials Institute,...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute researchers named Most Influential Scientific Minds of 2014 Contacts: Alex King, Director, Critical Materials Institute, (515) 296-4505 Laura Millsaps, Public Affairs,...

  19. CMI Factsheet | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Factsheet 3D printer uses laser and metals to build new combinations of materials What ... role in emerging energy storage and battery technologies, such as hybrid and electric ...

  20. My Account | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    My Account Primary tabs Log in Request new password(active tab) Username or e-mail address * E-mail new password

  1. Security Notice | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User login Username * Password * Request new password Log in Forgot Your Password? Security Notice This computer system is operated on a U.S. Federal Government network (unclassified information only). This system is for the use of authorized users only. Unauthorized access is prohibited and makes you liable to civil and criminal penalties. Individuals using this computer system without authority, or in excess of their authority, are subject to having all of their activities monitored and

  2. What CMI Does | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lack of secure supply chains for some raw materials critical to clean energy technologies ... labs as if they were a single organization. A pdf version of What CMI Does is ...

  3. Critical Materials Institute uses the Materials Genome approach...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Critical Materials Institute, led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Ames ... When the market price of rare earth elements like europium and terbium went through the ...

  4. CMI Industry Survey | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Industry Survey Thank you for your interest in Critical Materials Institute Education, Training and Outreach. Please share how you are interested in education and training about critical materials. There are additional comment boxes below to allow for any additional ideas you may have. My name is: * I would like to be contacted by telephone, so I am providing a phone number: I would like to be contacted by e-mail; please use this e-mail address: My role in education and outreach about

  5. Critical Materials Institute Gains Ten Industrial and Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Materials Institute Gains Ten Industrial and Research Affiliates April 12, 2016 ... The Critical Materials Institute, a U.S. Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the ...

  6. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  7. The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials December 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis The Department...

  8. Critical Materials Research in DOE Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "Critical Materials Research in DOE" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  9. Older Public Presentations | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Older Public Presentations CMI leaders and scientists have given public presentations about rare earths and critical materials. Here are a few of their older presentations. CMI Kickoff Meeting Plenary Sessions, September 2013: Alex King, director: CMI Welcome Karl Gschneidner, chief science officer: CMI Overview Bruce Moyer, leader for Diversifying Supply Adam Schwartz, leader for Developing Substitutes Eric Peterson, leader for Improving Reuse and Recycling Tom Lograsso, leader for Crosscutting

  10. Request for Information (RFI) for Updated Critical Materials Strategy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Request for Information (RFI) for Updated Critical Materials Strategy Request for Information (RFI) for Updated Critical Materials Strategy PDF icon Request for Information (RFI) for Updated Critical Materials Strategy More Documents & Publications RFI U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy Request for Information RFI: DOE Materials Strategy Microsoft Word - FINAL Materials Strategy Request for Information May 5 2010

  11. FA 4: Crosscutting Research | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4: Crosscutting Research Focus Area 4 - Lograsso, Schwegler CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 4 File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 4 CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview CMI org chart for FA4 File: Read more about CMI org chart for FA4 CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) File: Read more about CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) Critical Materials Institute

  12. REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s REACT Project, short for “Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies”, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

  13. CMI Webinar: Critical Elements in Phosphate | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Elements in Phosphate The CMI Webinar series began with a presentation on Critical Elements in Phosphate by Patrick Zhang, Florida Industrial and Phosphate Research Institute (FIPR), on March 24, 2015. The recording of the webinar runs nearly 38 minutes (37:54

  14. Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... materials and to promote their recycling, their re-use, and their more efficient use. ... of critical materials, including their responsible extraction and recycling and re-use. ...

  15. The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials December 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis The Department of Energy today released its Critical Materials Strategy. The strategy examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy, based on extensive research by the Department during the past year. The report focuses on materials used in four technologies - wind

  16. Critical Materials Institute Gains Ten Industrial and Research Affiliates |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Critical Materials Institute Gains Ten Industrial and Research Affiliates Critical Materials Institute Gains Ten Industrial and Research Affiliates April 12, 2016 - 10:32am Addthis News release from the Ames Laboratory, April 11, 2016. The Critical Materials Institute, a U.S. Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Laboratory, has gained ten new affiliates to its research program, seeking ways to eliminate and reduce reliance on rare-earth metals and other

  17. Meet CMI Researcher Eric Peterson | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peterson CMI focus area leader Eric Peterson CMI researcher Eric Peterson leads Focus Area 3, Improving Reuse and Recycling, for the Critical Materials Institute. At Idaho National...

  18. US-EU-Japan Working Group on Critical Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Okada, President, Santoku Corporation 10:20 Life Cycle knowledge-base for materials criticality management and resource policy support Gian Andrea Blengini, Scientific OfficerSr. ...

  19. Meet CMI Researcher Corby Anderson | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corby Anderson Image of Corby Anderson, researcher at Critical Materials Institute CMI researcher Dr. Corby Anderson has more than 34 years of global experience in industrial...

  20. Meet CMI Leader Iver Anderson | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leader Iver Anderson Iver Anderson Iver E. Anderson leads the Critical Materials Institute Industry Council and efforts in Technology Deployment. Iver is a Senior Metallurgist at...

  1. Critical Materials Institute signs new member United Technologies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    signs new member United Technologies Research Center Contacts: For release: Aug. 18, 2015 Alex King, Director, Critical Materials Institute, (515) 296-4505 Laura Millsaps, Ames...

  2. Meet CMI Leaders and Administrators | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Critical Materials Institute leaders and administrators include: Director Alex King Deputy Director Rod Eggert Chief Scientist Karl Gschneidner Operations Cynthia Feller...

  3. EV Everywhere Workshop: Electric Motors and Critical Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Workshop: Power Electronics and Thermal Management Breakout Session Report Electric Motors and Critical Materials EV Everywhere - Charge ...

  4. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  5. CMI Unique Facilities | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Combinatoric Sample Arrays Ferromagnetic Materials Characterization Facility Thermal Analysis in High Magnetic Fields Each link provides information about the unique...

  6. Microsoft Word - TRILATERAL CRITICAL MATERIALS WORKSHOP Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... magnetic mechanisms (for nanocomposites, non-rare-earth materials, and neodymium-iron-boron magnets). * Techniques to enhance the stability and texture of nanocomposite structures ...

  7. Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy January 9, 2013 - 12:30pm Addthis Europium, a rare earth element that has the same relative hardness of lead, is used to create fluorescent lightbulbs. With no proven substitutes, europium is considered critical to the clean energy economy. | Photo courtesy of the Ames Laboratory. Europium, a rare earth element that has the same relative hardness

  8. CMI at Mines Hosts 160 Sixth Graders | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Mines Hosts 160 Sixth Graders Colorado School of Mines graduate student Mandi Hutchinson shows a compact fluorescent light bulb as she discusses the use of critical materials and rare earths in current technologies. The Denver School of Science and Technology's (DSST) College View sixth graders visited the Colorado School of Mines campus on Wednesday, July 8, for their fourth annual visit. More than 160 students enjoyed critical materials and energy presentations delivered by the Critical

  9. Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future October 19, 2011 - 5:46pm Addthis David Sandalow David Sandalow Former Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) and Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs Why does it matter? Four clean energy technologies-wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting-use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the next five years. Earlier this month, United States, Japanese

  10. Critical parameters of superconducting materials and structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Dykes, J.W.; Mosley, W.D.; Chaiken, A.; Ralls, K.; Radousky, H.

    1995-02-01

    We report here the completion of a one year project to investigate the synthesis, electronic structure, defect structure, and physical transport properties of high temperature superconducting oxide materials. During the course of this project we produced some of the finest samples of single crystal detwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and stoichiometrically perfect (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3}. We deduced the Fermi surface of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, (La,Sr){sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, and (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3} through the recording of the electron momentum density in these materials as measured by positron annihilation spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission. We also performed extensive studies on Pr substituted (Y,Pr)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} so as to further understand the origin of the electron pairing leading to superconductivity.

  11. CMI hosts EU, Japan to discuss global critical materials strategy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI hosts EU, Japan to discuss global critical materials strategy Submitted by mlthach on Wed, 09102014 - 18:00 Finding ways to ensure the planet's supply of rare earths and...

  12. CMI Unique Facility: Filtration Test Facility | Critical Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Filtration Test Facility The Filtration Test Facility is one of half a dozen unique facilities developed by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S....

  13. Quantum critical scaling and superconductivity in heavy electron materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Quantum critical scaling and superconductivity in heavy electron materials Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on November 16, 2016 Title: Quantum critical scaling and superconductivity in heavy electron materials Authors: Yang, Yi-feng ; Pines, David ; Curro, N. J. Publication Date: 2015-11-17 OSTI Identifier: 1226180 Grant/Contract Number: de-na0001842-0 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name:

  14. Electric Motors and Critical Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge … Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop on July 24, 2012 held at the Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL. PDF icon 7b_electric_motors-and_critical_materials_ed.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Workshop: Power Electronics and Thermal Management Breakout Session Report EV Everywhere Workshop: Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout Group Report EV Everywhere - Charge to Breakout Sessions

  15. Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Critical Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Critical Materials Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Critical Materials January 18, 2013 - 10:15am Addthis Miss the Google+ Hangout on Critical Materials? Watch the video of it now. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs More about critical materials: Check out the Department's 2011 Critical Materials Strategy report. Learn how the new Critical Materials Hub will address challenges across the entire lifecycle of materials

  16. What is a CriticalMaterial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A N E N E R G Y I N N O V A T I O N H U B This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. What is a "Critical Material?" * Any substance used in technology that is subject to supply risks, and for which there are no easy substitutes. * Or, in plain English - stuff you really need but can't always get. * The list of materials that are considered critical depends on who, where and when you ask. * CMI focuses on clean energy

  17. Exascale Supercomputing and Materials DARHT: A Critical Component

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in this issue Exascale Supercomputing and Materials DARHT: A Critical Component Running VPIC on Roadrunner MOVING FROM EMPIRICAL OBSERVATION TO PREDICTIVE DESIGN AND CONTROL About the Cover Amy Bauer, Improvised & Foreign Design Group scientist, illustrates how LANL's advanced computing and simulation are transforming materials. Predictive-design-and-control developments aid Bauer's group to better understand or forensically diagnose nuclear threats. CHARLESMCMILLAN 2010 has been an

  18. ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials, December 6, 2010 PDF...

  19. Criticality safety analysis on fissile materials in Fukushima reactor cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xudong; Lemaitre-Xavier, E.; Ahn, Joonhong; Hirano, Fumio

    2013-07-01

    The present study focuses on the criticality analysis for geological disposal of damaged fuels from Fukushima reactor cores. Starting from the basic understanding of behaviors of plutonium and uranium, a scenario sequence for criticality event is considered. Due to the different mobility of plutonium and uranium in geological formations, the criticality safety is considered in two parts: (1) near-field plutonium system and (2) far-field low enriched uranium (LEU) system. For the near-field plutonium system, a mathematical analysis for pure-solute transport was given, assuming a particular buffer material and waste form configuration. With the transport and decay of plutonium accounted, the critical mass of plutonium was compared with the initial load of a single canister. Our calculation leads us to the conclusion that our system with the initial loading being the average mass of plutonium in an assembly just before the accident is very unlikely to become critical over time. For the far-field LEU system, due to the uncertainties in the geological and geochemical conditions, calculations were made in a parametric space that covers the variation of material compositions and different geometries. Results show that the LEU system could not remain sub-critical within the entire parameter space assumed, although in the iron-rich rock, the neutron multiplicity is significantly reduced.

  20. CMI Webinar: Eric Peterson, April 2016, part 2 | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute 2 Eric Peterson, Idaho National Laboratory, presented on Recycling and Reuse of Critical Materials on April 27, 2016. The full webinar ran nearly an hour; the archive is available in three files of 15 to 18 minutes each. This second part runs 17:02. Here are links to the first part and the third

  1. CMI Webinar: Eric Peterson, April 2016, part 3 | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute 3 Eric Peterson, Idaho National Laboratory, presented on Recycling and Reuse of Critical Materials on April 27, 2016. The full webinar ran nearly an hour; the archive is available in three files of 15 to 18 minutes each. This third part runs 18:06. Here are links to the first part and the second

  2. U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-12-01

    The Critical Materials Strategy builds on the Department’s previous work in this area and provides a foundation for future action. This Strategy is a first step toward a comprehensive response to the challenges before us. We hope it will also encourage others to engage in a dialogue about these issues and work together to achieve our Nation’s clean energy goals.

  3. U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

    2010-12-01

    This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical materials strategy, based upon additional events and information, by the end of 2011.DOE's strategy with respect to critical materials rests on three pillars. First, diversified global supply chains are essential. To manage supply risk, multiple sources of materials are required. This means taking steps to facilitate extraction, processing and manufacturing here in the United States, as well as encouraging other nations to expedite alternative supplies. In all cases, extraction and processing should be done in an environmentally sound manner. Second, substitutes must be developed. Research leading to material and technology substitutes will improve flexibility and help meet the material needs of the clean energy economy. Third, recycling, reuse and more efficient use could significantly lower world demand for newly extracted materials. Research into recycling processes coupled with well-designed policies will help make recycling economically viable over time.The scope of this report is limited. It does not address the material needs of the entire economy, the entire energy sector or even all clean energy technologies. Time and resource limitations precluded a comprehensive scope. Among the topics that merit additional research are the use of rare earth metals in catalytic converters and in petroleum refining. These topics are discussed briefly in Chapter 2.

  4. Meet CMI Researcher Anja Mudring | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anja Mudring CMI researcher Anja Mudring CMI researcher Anja Mudring is a materials chemist who is harmessing the promising qualities of ionic liquids, salts in a liquid state, to optimize processes for critical materials. "Ionic liquids have a lot of useful qualities, but most useful for materials processing is that ionic liquids are made up of two parts: the cation and the anion. We can play around with the chemical identities of each of those components and that opens the doors to huge

  5. FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3: Improving Reuse and Recycling Focus Area 3 - Peterson, Jones CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 3 File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 3 CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview Photo montage: recycling File: Read more about Photo montage: recycling CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) File: Read more about CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) Critical Materials

  6. Mines Welcomes Middle School Students | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mines Welcomes Middle School Students Denver middle school students at Mines. Denver middle school students at Mines museum. Denver middle school students watch chemistry show at Mines. CMI partner Colorado School of Mines welcomed 180 sixth and seventh grade students from the Denver School of Science and Technology. The students spent the day at Mines to learn about Earth, energy, the environment, critical materials and mining. The students enjoyed a chemistry show by professor Jim Horan, and

  7. CMI Education and Outreach in 2016 | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 collage of three photos during CMI graduate and post doctoral professional meeting. To train and prepare future professionals, CMI education and outreach offered a postdoc/grad student professional meeting at Colorado School of Mines, with more than 40 presentations offered during the two-day meeting in February. CMI education and outreach in 2016: CMI Director Alex King provided a guest lecture on Critical Materials and Clean Energy Technologies to 50 undergraduate students, graduate

  8. Meet CMI Researcher Theresa Windus | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theresa Windus Image of Theresa Windus, researcher at Critical Materials Institute CMI researcher Theresa Windus joined Iowa State University as a full professor and an associate researcher with DOE's Ames Laboratory in August of 2006. She develops new methods and algorithms for high performance computational chemistry as well as applying those techniques to both basic and applied research. Her current interests are rare earth and heavy element chemistry, catalysis, aerosol formation, cellulose

  9. CMI Webinar: Eric Peterson, April 2016, part 1 | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Eric Peterson, April 2016, part 1 Eric Peterson, Idaho National Laboratory, presented on Recycling and Reuse of Critical Materials on April 27, 2016. The full webinar ran nearly an hour; the archive is available in three files of 15 to 18 minutes each. This first part runs 15:45. Here are links to the second part and the third part. The CMI Webinar series is organized by the CMI education and outreach team at Colorado School of Mines. Additional information about CMI Webinars is

  10. A new neutron absorber material for criticality control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Alan H.

    2007-07-01

    A new neutron absorber material based on a nickel metal matrix composite has been developed for applications such as the Transport, Aging, and Disposal (TAD) canister for the Yucca Mountain Project. This new material offers superior corrosion resistance to withstand the more demanding geochemical environments found in a 300,000 year to a million year repository. The lifetime of the TAD canister is currently limited to 10,000 years, reflecting the focus of current regulations embodied in 10 CFR 63. The use of DOE-owned nickel stocks from decommissioned enrichment facilities could reduce the cost compared to stainless steel/boron alloy. The metal matrix composite allows the inclusion of more than one neutron absorber compound, so that the exact composition may be adjusted as needed. The new neutron absorber material may also be used for supplementary criticality control of stored or transported PWR spent fuel by forming it into cylindrical pellets that can be inserted into a surrogate control rod. (authors)

  11. RFI U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy Request...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RFI U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy Request for Information RFI U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy Request for Information U.S....

  12. Join Us Tuesday, Jan. 15 for a Google+ Hangout on Critical Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What are critical materials? We will be answering that question and more during our first Google+ Hangout.

  13. Coating Active Materials for Applications in Electrochemical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon precursor on the electro-active material to form a carbon-coated electro-active material Process reduces manufacturing cost Coating process produces carbon-coated metal...

  14. Active nondestructive assay of nuclear materials: principles...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Active nondestructive assay of nuclear materials: principles and applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Active nondestructive assay of nuclear ...

  15. Need rare-earths know-how? The Critical Materials Institute offers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Need rare-earths know-how? The Critical Materials Institute offers lower-cost access to experts and research Contacts: For release: Dec. 1, 2015 Alex King, Director, Critical...

  16. ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE, SEPTEMBER 8-9, 2014 ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL ...

  17. Activation of porous MOF materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2013-04-23

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritical fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  18. Activation of porous MOF materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2014-04-01

    A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritcal fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

  19. Meet CMI Researcher Ryan Ott | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ryan Ott CMI researcher Ryan Ott leads the CMI project on rapid assessment methodologies. This includes using 3d printing for discovering new materials, which he describes in this CMI Success Story and this video on The Ames Laboratory's YouTube channel. He's also The Ames Laboratory's lead researcher on a project to help improve the processing techniques to reclaim rare-earth materials. The project harnesses fundamental materials science to help address possible shortages in rare earths, which

  20. Meet CMI Researcher Patrice Turchi | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Prototyping of Rare Earth-Based Alloys from ab initio Electronic Structure and Thermodynamics." That is about the development of a Materials Design Simulator (MDS) for guiding...

  1. CMI Education Partners Offer Courses | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of courses taught by CMI Team members is available by university and grouped by topic: Geology Engineering Geochemistry Mining Engineering Metallurgical Engineering Material...

  2. Meet CMI Researcher Lynn Boatner | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Battelle Distinguished Inventor, is currently the Director of the ORNL Center for Radiation Detection Materials and Systems, and he leads the Synthesis and Properties of...

  3. Die Materials for Critical Applications and Increased Production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    To resist heat checking, die materials should have a low coefficient of thermal expansion, high thermal conductivity, high hot yield strength, good temper softening resistance, ...

  4. Meet CMI Researcher Brian Sales | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contributions in the areas of materials for nuclear waste storage, the solid-state generation of electrical power directly from heat, and the lossless transport of...

  5. CMI Education and Outreach in 2013 | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 2013: Hardin Valley Academy in Knoxville, Tennessee, December: CMI Director Alex King talked to sophomores Materials Research Society, Dec. 2: Karl Gschneidner, chief...

  6. CMI Education Partner: Iowa State University | Critical Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...Industrial Engineering Geology Chemistry http:... MAT E 273. Principles of Materials Science and Engineering. ... Geochemical conditions of ore formation using stable-isotope ...

  7. Meet CMI Leader Barry Martin | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Institute's education and outreach could be, beginning with the proposal writing team and Nigel Middleton. Beginning in May 2014, Martin leads the education and...

  8. Meet CMI Researcher Patrick Zhang | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Patrick Zhang CMI Researcher Patrick Zhang is at the Florida Industrial and Phosphate Research Institute (FIPR). In March 2015, he offered the first CMI Webinar: Critical Elements in Phosphate Ore: Recovery of Rare Earths and Uranium from Florida Phosphate Ore Processing. A recording of the webinar is available

  9. 10 Things You Didn't Know About Critical Materials | Critical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wind turbines and energy-efficient lighting to electric vehicles and thin-film solar cells -- use materials with ... energy economy (they have high demand and limited ...

  10. CMI Education Resources for K-12 | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    howtosmile.org claims to have all the best science and math activities. Try the virtual electromagnet. CMI partner Molycorp provides resources for students How To Make Glow...

  11. Nanoporous Materials Can Tune the Critical Point of a Pure Substance |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Nanoporous Materials Can Tune the Critical Point of a Pure Substance Previous Next List Braun, Efrem; Chen, Joseph J.; Schnell, Sondre K.; Lin, Li-Chiang; Reimer, Jeffrey A.; and Smit, Berend. Nanoporous Materials Can Tune the Critical Point of a Pure Substance. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed., 48, 114349-14352 (2015). DOI: 10.1002/anie.201506865 NanoporousMaterialsCanTune Abstract: Molecular simulations and NMR

  12. CMI Education Partner: Colorado School of Mines | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Education Partner: Colorado School of Mines Colorado School of Mines offers courses in several areas: Geology Engineering/Geochemistry Mining Engineering Metallurgical Engineering/Materials Science Chemistry Engineering Mineral Economics and Business Geology Engineering/Geochemistry GEGN101. EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS. 4.0 Hours. (I, II, S) Fundamental concepts concerning the nature, composition and evolution of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere of the

  13. Meet CMI Researcher David Reed | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Reed CMI researcher David Reed is the principal investigator for the CMI project bioleaching for recovery of recycled rare earth elements. CMI Researcher David Reed is the PI for project 3.2.5 Bioleaching for Recovery of Recycled REE. The objective of this project is to develop and deploy a biological strategy for recovery of rare earth elements from recyclable materials. His collaborators include Vicki Thompson, Dayna Daubaras, and Debra Bruhn at Idaho National Laboratory and Yongqin Jiao

  14. Meet CMI Researcher Ed Jones | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ed Jones CMI focus area deputy leader Ed Jones CMI researcher Ed Jones has been at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 22 years, where his work has centered on the analysis, engineering, reliability and performance of energy, environmental, and national asset systems, including infrastructure and materials. He has developed extensive capabilities in the application of probabilistic methods and models to complex performance problems. Recent innovations have been applied to carbon

  15. CMI Education and Outreach in 2014 | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 CMI education and outreach in 2014: Denver students visit geology museum at Colorado School of Mines. Colorado School of Mines, October 18: 14 members of the Owen Branch of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Denver visited Colorado School of Mines for a museum tour to see minerals, phosphors and metals and to discuss the materials people use daily. Colorado School of Mines, July 17: 150 underserved sixth graders visited Colorado School of Mines. Colorado School of Mines, July 9: 180 6th and

  16. Critical and strategic materials proceedings of the laboratory study group meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    These Proceedings serve to identify the appropriate role for the DOE-BES-DMS Laboratory program concerning critical and strategic materials, identify and articulate high priority DOE-BES-DMS target areas so as to maximize programmatic responsiveness to national needs concerning critical and strategic materials, and identify research, expertise, and resources (including Collaborative Research Centers) that are relevant to critical and strategic materials that is either underway or in place under the DOE-BES-DMS Laboratory program. Laboratory statements of collaborative research are given.

  17. Critical materials research needed to secure U.S. manufacturing, officials say

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Department officials said yesterday that developing alternatives to critical materials, like rare earth metals used in solar panels and wind turbines, is crucial to American manufacturing stability and can help the United States circumvent global market pressures.

  18. Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future

  19. Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Rare-Earth Research | Department of Energy Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research June 15, 2011 - 7:07pm Addthis The plasma torch in the Retech plasma furnace is one tool used in Materials Preparation Center to create ultra-high purity metal alloy samples, particularly rare-earth metals, located at the Ames Lab. | Photo Courtesy of

  20. Critical Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... 182 buildings at a much higher rate than in retrofitting existing buildings, as new buildings could be designed 183 with the unique characteristics of LED lighting in mind. ...

  1. Material and Chemical Processing (Concentrated Solar) (4 Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Material and Chemical Processing (Concentrated Solar) (4 Activities) Material and Chemical Processing (Concentrated Solar) (4 Activities) Below is information about the student ...

  2. Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR Authors: Mounce, Andrew M. [1] ; Thompson, Joe David [1] ; Bauer, Eric Dietzgen [1] ; Reyes, A. P. [2] ; Kuhns, P. L. [2] + Show Author

  3. Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel Magnetic States in the Heavy-Fermion Quantum-Critical Material CeRhIn5 at High Magnetic Fields Studied by NMR × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of

  4. Energy Department Awards Up to $4 Million for Projects to Recover Critical Materials from Geothermal Fluids

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced four research and development (R&D) projects in California, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming that will receive up to $4 million in total funding to assess the occurrence of rare-earth minerals and other critical materials that may be dissolved in higher-temperature fluids associated with energy extraction.

  5. Coating Active Materials for Applications in Electrochemical Devices |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Coating Active Materials for Applications in Electrochemical Devices Technology available for licensing: A process that includes suspending/dissolving an electro-active material and a carbon precursor in a solvent; and then depositing the carbon precursor on the electro-active material to form a carbon-coated electro-active material Process reduces manufacturing cost Coating process produces carbon-coated metal oxides without the problems associated with

  6. Surface-Modified Active Materials for Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active Materials for Lithium Ion Battery Electrodes Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ... Berkeley Lab researcher Gao Liu has developed a new fabrication technique for lithium ion ...

  7. Critically safe vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeren, Joseph D.

    1994-01-01

    A vacuum pickup of critically safe quantity and geometric shape is used in cleanup of radioactive materials. Collected radioactive material is accumulated in four vertical, parallel, equally spaced canisters arranged in a cylinder configuration. Each canister contains a filter bag. An upper intake manifold includes four 90 degree spaced, downward facing nipples. Each nipple communicates with the top of a canister. The bottom of each canister communicates with an exhaust manifold comprising four radially extending tubes that meet at the bottom of a centrally located vertical cylinder. The top of the central cylinder terminates at a motor/fan power head. A removable HEPA filter is located intermediate the top of the central cylinder and the power head. Four horizontal bypass tubes connect the top of the central cylinder to the top of each of the canisters. Air enters the vacuum cleaner via a hose connected to the intake manifold. Air then travels down the canisters, where particulate material is accumulated in generally equal quantities in each filter bag. Four air paths of bag filtered air then pass radially inward to the bottom of the central cylinder. Air moves up the central cylinder, through the HEPA filter, through a vacuum fan compartment, and exits the vacuum cleaner. A float air flow valve is mounted at the top of the central cylinder. When liquid accumulates to a given level within the central cylinder, the four bypass tubes, and the four canisters, suction is terminated by operation of the float valve.

  8. Material and Chemical Processing (Concentrated Solar) (4 Activities) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Material and Chemical Processing (Concentrated Solar) (4 Activities) Material and Chemical Processing (Concentrated Solar) (4 Activities) Below is information about the student activity/lesson plan from your search. Grades 5-8 Subject Solar Summary Concentrated sunlight is a versatile and high-quality form of energy with several potential applications besides producing heat and electricity. Today, scientists are developing systems that use concentrated sunlight to

  9. Predicting critical temperatures of iron(II) spin crossover materials: Density functional theory plus U approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yachao

    2014-12-07

    A first-principles study of critical temperatures (T{sub c}) of spin crossover (SCO) materials requires accurate description of the strongly correlated 3d electrons as well as much computational effort. This task is still a challenge for the widely used local density or generalized gradient approximations (LDA/GGA) and hybrid functionals. One remedy, termed density functional theory plus U (DFT+U) approach, introduces a Hubbard U term to deal with the localized electrons at marginal computational cost, while treats the delocalized electrons with LDA/GGA. Here, we employ the DFT+U approach to investigate the T{sub c} of a pair of iron(II) SCO molecular crystals (α and β phase), where identical constituent molecules are packed in different ways. We first calculate the adiabatic high spin-low spin energy splitting ΔE{sub HL} and molecular vibrational frequencies in both spin states, then obtain the temperature dependent enthalpy and entropy changes (ΔH and ΔS), and finally extract T{sub c} by exploiting the ΔH/T − T and ΔS − T relationships. The results are in agreement with experiment. Analysis of geometries and electronic structures shows that the local ligand field in the α phase is slightly weakened by the H-bondings involving the ligand atoms and the specific crystal packing style. We find that this effect is largely responsible for the difference in T{sub c} of the two phases. This study shows the applicability of the DFT+U approach for predicting T{sub c} of SCO materials, and provides a clear insight into the subtle influence of the crystal packing effects on SCO behavior.

  10. Review of activities in USA on HTS materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    Rapid progress in attaining practical applications of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) has been made since the discovery of these new materials. Many critical parameters influencing HTS powder synthesis and wire processing have been identified through a combination of fundamental exploration and applied research. The complexity of these novel materials with regard to phase behavior and physical properties has become evident as a result of these careful studies. Achieving optimal mechanical and superconducting properties in wires and tapes will require further understanding and synergy among several different technical disciplines. Highlights of efforts towards producing practical superconductors for electric power applications based on rare earth-, bismuth-, and thallium-based systems are reviewed.

  11. Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Device Development | Department of Energy Presentation given at the 2011 Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop including an overview about Fraunhofer IPM, new funding situation in Germany, high temperature material and modules, energy-autarkic sensors, and thermoelectric metrology. PDF icon konig.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials and Device Development Thermoelectric Activities of European Community within

  12. Thermal initiation of explosive materials using photon-based active

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interrogation methods (u) (Conference) | SciTech Connect Thermal initiation of explosive materials using photon-based active interrogation methods (u) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal initiation of explosive materials using photon-based active interrogation methods (u) Authors: Heger, Arlen S [1] ; Holbert, Keith E [1] ; Bowman, William J [2] ; Mc Cauhey, Madeline [2] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory [Los Alamos National Laboratory ASU [ASU

  13. Thermal initiation of explosive materials using photon-based active

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interrogation methods (u) (Conference) | SciTech Connect Thermal initiation of explosive materials using photon-based active interrogation methods (u) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal initiation of explosive materials using photon-based active interrogation methods (u) × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public

  14. Long-lived activation products in reactor materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Lepel, E.L.; Sanders, R.W.; Wilkerson, C.L.; Silker, W.; Thomas, C.W.; Abel, K.H.; Robertson, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to assess the problems posed to reactor decommissioning by long-lived activation products in reactor construction materials. Samples of stainless steel, vessel steel, concrete, and concrete ingredients were analyzed for up to 52 elements in order to develop a data base of activatable major, minor, and trace elements. Large compositional variations were noted for some elements. Cobalt and niobium concentrations in stainless steel, for example, were found to vary by more than an order of magnitude. A thorough evaluation was made of all possible nuclear reactions that could lead to long lived activation products. It was concluded that all major activation products have been satisfactorily accounted for in decommissioning planning studies completed to date. A detailed series of calculations was carried out using average values of the measured compositions of the appropriate materials to predict the levels of activation products expected in reactor internals, vessel walls, and bioshield materials for PWR and BWR geometries. A comparison is made between calculated activation levels and regulatory guidelines for shallow land disposal according to 10 CFR 61. This analysis shows that PWR and BWR shroud material exceeds the Class C limits and is, therefore, generally unsuitable for near-surface disposal. The PWR core barrel material approaches the Class C limits. Most of the remaining massive components qualify as either Class A or B waste with the bioshield clearly Class A, even at the highest point of activation. Selected samples of activated steel and concrete were subjected to a limited radiochemical analysis program as a verification of the computer model. Reasonably good agreement with the calculations was obtained where comparison was possible. In particular, the presence of /sup 94/Nb in activated stainless steel at or somewhat above expected levels was confirmed.

  15. ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. – EU – JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE, SEPTEMBER 8-9, 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda from the fourth meeting of the Annual Trilateral U.S. – EU – Japan Conference on Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future

  16. Annual Trilateral U.S. – EU – Japan Conference on Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future, October 4-5, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda from the first meeting of the Annual Trilateral U.S. – EU – Japan Conference on Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future

  17. DOE Releases Request for Information on Critical Materials, Including Fuel Cell Platinum Group Metal Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Request for Information (RFI) is soliciting feedback from industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders on issues related to the demand, supply, opportunities for developing substitutes, and potential for using materials more efficiently in the energy sector.

  18. Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernard, Patrick; Baudry, Michelle

    2000-12-05

    A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

  19. Using DFT Methods to Study Activators in Optical Materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-08-17

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of various activators (ranging from transition metal ions, rare-earth ions, ns2 ions, to self-trapped and dopant-bound excitons) in phosphors and scintillators are reviewed. As a single-particle ground-state theory, DFT calculations cannot reproduce the experimentally observed optical spectra, which involve transitions between multi-electronic states. However, DFT calculations can generally provide sufficiently accurate structural relaxation and distinguish different hybridization strengths between an activator and its ligands in different host compounds. This is important because the activator-ligand interaction often governs the trends in luminescence properties in phosphors and scintillators, and can be used to search for new materials.more » DFT calculations of the electronic structure of the host compound and the positions of the activator levels relative to the host band edges in scintillators are also important for finding optimal host-activator combinations for high light yields and fast scintillation response. Mn4+ activated red phosphors, scintillators activated by Ce3+, Eu2+, Tl+, and excitons are shown as examples of using DFT calculations in phosphor and scintillator research.« less

  20. Materials for Consideration in Standardized Canister Design Activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Enos, David George; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-02

    This document identifies materials and material mitigation processes that might be used in new designs for standardized canisters for storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. It also addresses potential corrosion issues with existing dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) that could be addressed in new canister designs. The major potential corrosion risk during storage is stress corrosion cracking of the weld regions on the 304 SS/316 SS canister shell due to deliquescence of chloride salts on the surface. Two approaches are proposed to alleviate this potential risk. First, the existing canister materials (304 and 316 SS) could be used, but the welds mitigated to relieve residual stresses and/or sensitization. Alternatively, more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic or duplex stainless steels, could be used. Experimental testing is needed to verify that these alternatives would successfully reduce the risk of stress corrosion cracking during fuel storage. For disposal in a geologic repository, the canister will be enclosed in a corrosion-resistant or corrosion-allowance overpack that will provide barrier capability and mechanical strength. The canister shell will no longer have a barrier function and its containment integrity can be ignored. The basket and neutron absorbers within the canister have the important role of limiting the possibility of post-closure criticality. The time period for corrosion is much longer in the post-closure period, and one major unanswered question is whether the basket materials will corrode slowly enough to maintain structural integrity for at least 10,000 years. Whereas there is extensive literature on stainless steels, this evaluation recommends testing of 304 and 316 SS, and more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic, duplex, and super-duplex stainless steels, at repository-relevant physical and chemical conditions. Both general and localized corrosion testing methods would be used to establish corrosion rates and component lifetimes. Finally, it is unlikely that the aluminum-based neutron absorber materials that are commonly used in existing DPCs would survive for 10,000 years in disposal environments, because the aluminum will act as a sacrificial anode for the steel. We recommend additional testing of borated and Gd-bearing stainless steels, to establish general and localized corrosion resistance in repository-relevant environmental conditions.

  1. Enhancing activated-peroxide formulations for porous materials :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauter, Paula; Tucker, Mark D.; Tezak, Matthew S.; Boucher, Raymond

    2012-12-01

    During an urban wide-area incident involving the release of a biological warfare agent, the recovery/restoration effort will require extensive resources and will tax the current capabilities of the government and private contractors. In fact, resources may be so limited that decontamination by facility owners/occupants may become necessary and a simple decontamination process and material should be available for this use. One potential process for use by facility owners/occupants would be a liquid sporicidal decontaminant, such as pHamended bleach or activated-peroxide, and simple application devices. While pH-amended bleach is currently the recommended low-tech decontamination solution, a less corrosive and toxic decontaminant is desirable. The objective of this project is to provide an operational assessment of an alternative to chlorine bleach for low-tech decontamination applications activated hydrogen peroxide. This report provides the methods and results for activatedperoxide evaluation experiments. The results suggest that the efficacy of an activated-peroxide decontaminant is similar to pH-amended bleach on many common materials.

  2. Heavy fermions, quantum criticality, and unconventional superconductivity in filled skutterudites and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andraka, Bohdan

    2015-05-14

    The main goal of this program was to explore the possibility of novel states and behaviors in Pr-based system exhibiting quantum critical behavior, PrOs?Sb??. Upon small changes of external parameter, such as magnetic field, physical properties of PrOs?Sb?? are drastically altered from those corresponding to a superconductor, to heavy fermion, to field-induced ordered phase with primary quadrupolar order parameter. All these states are highly unconventional and not understood in terms of current theories thus offer an opportunity to expand our knowledge and understanding of condensed matter. At the same time, these novel states and behaviors are subjects to intense international controversies. In particular, two superconducting phases with different transition temperatures were observed in some samples and not observed in others leading to speculations that sample defects might be partially responsible for these exotic behaviors. This work clearly established that crystal disorder is important consideration, but contrary to current consensus this disorder suppresses exotic behavior. Superconducting properties imply unconventional inhomogeneous state that emerges from unconventional homogeneous normal state. Comprehensive structural investigations demonstrated that upper superconducting transition is intrinsic, bulk, and unconventional. The high quality of in-house synthesized single crystals was indirectly confirmed by de Haas-van Alphen quantum oscillation measurements. These measurements, for the first time ever reported, spanned several different phases, offering unprecedented possibility of studying quantum oscillations across phase boundaries.

  3. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  4. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term Irradiation at Elevated Temperature: Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-20

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, dislocation loop formation and growth, radiation induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, as well as the possibility for void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiation-induced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses to 200 dpa and beyond). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible, as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. This project builds upon joint work at the proposing institutions, under a NERI-C program that is scheduled to end in September, to understand the effects of radiation on these important materials. The objective of this project is to conduct critical experiments to understand the evolution of microstructural and microchemical features (loops, voids, precipitates, and segregation) and mechanical properties (hardening and creep) under high temperature and full dose range radiation, including the effect of differences in the initial material composition and microstructure on the microstructural response, including key questions related to saturation of the microstructure at high doses and temperatures.

  5. Timelines | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE History Timeline » Timeline of Events: 2012 Timeline of Events: 2012 August 10, 2012: Memorandum of agreement to preserve historic contributions of K-25 August 10, 2012: Memorandum of agreement to preserve historic contributions of K-25 In a ceremony at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the Department announces formal completion of a memorandum of agreement to preserve the historic contributions of Oak Ridge's K-25 site to the World War II Manhattan Project. Read more November 12, 2012:

  6. Research | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Four Research Thrusts organizational chart of four research thrusts (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses for leaders.) CMI has more than 30 projects focused in four areas. Project titles are available in a table, which can be sorted by project leader, location of project leader, project title or project number. CMI research is conducted at partner institutions, including national laboratories, universities and

  7. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for ... including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability ... as well as encouraging additional supplies around the world. ...

  8. CRITICAL MATERIALS MUSEUM DISPLAY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pedestal cases would give a very unique feel to the exhibit. It can be crafted to feel modern and avant-garde. It can easily display the three points of the display, which are...

  9. Critical Materials Institute

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Bonded Magnets 19. Procedure for Concentrating Rare-earth Elements in Ne odymium Iron Boron- based Permanent Magnets for Efficient RecyclingRecovery 20. Enhancing Consumer ...

  10. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Funding Opportunity Announcements: Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/SBTT) SBIR/SBTT list of open/future funding opportunities Specific funding opportunity: SBIR/STTR Topics FY14 (Nov. 6, 2013) Department of Energy: doing business with small business Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Notice of intent to issue FOA (December 2013) Energy Department Announces $3 Million to Lower Cost of Geothermal Energy and Boost U.S.

  11. Critical Materials Institute |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI outreach at Colorado School of Mines for National Engineer Week 2016 Tour at Colorado School of Mines Geology Musuem for National Engineers Week CMI education and outreach ...

  12. Disclaimers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    makes any warranty, express or implied, including warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the...

  13. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. L. Putman

    1999-09-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

  14. High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of our long-standing partnership with Mexico to prevent proliferation and secure the materials that can be used by terrorists in an improvised nuclear device or dirty bomb." ...

  15. Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermoelectric cooling of high-performance infrared systems for surveillance PDF icon taylor.pdf More Documents & Publications Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric ...

  16. Geek-Up[3.18.2011]: Catalytically Active Material and BELLA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PNL scientists are making catyltically active material that may help advance fuel cell and solar energy storage applications and Berkeley is "boosting" their BELLA accelerator.

  17. Demolitions Produce Recyclable Materials for Organization Promoting Economic Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolitions have helped generate more than 8 million pounds of metal at the Piketon site for recycling, further promoting economic activity in the region thanks to the American Recovery and...

  18. Solar Energy Educational Material, Activities and Science Projects

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Solar Energy Educational Materials Solar with glasses "The sun has produced energy for billions of years. Solar energy is the solar radiation that reaches the earth. Solar energy can be converted directly or indirectly into other forms of energy, such as heat and electricity. ... [It can be] used for heating water for domestic use, space heating of buildings, drying agricultural products, and generating electrical energy." - Edited excerpt from Solar Energy - Energy from the Sun DOE

  19. Review of Interests and Activities in Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2012 Advanced Manufacturing Office Workshop on Membrane Technology 2012 DOE Membrane Workshop Sharon Robinson overview of historical R&D 2012 DOE Membrane Workshop Final Report 2005 ITP Report: Materials for Separation Technologies: Energy and Emission Reduction Opportunities 2005 ITP Report: Hybrid Separations/Distillation Technology: Research Opportunities for Energy and Emissions Reduction PDF icon Historical Membrane Workshop Results -2012 at the Army Research Laboratory | Department of

  20. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

  1. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

    2001-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  2. Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

    2000-01-01

    An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

  3. Exploratory research on mutagenic activity of coal-related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warshawsky, D.; Schoeny, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The following samples were found to be mutagenic for strains TA1538, TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium: ETTM-10, ETTM-11, ETTM-15, ETTM-16, and ETTM-17. ETTM-13 was marginally mutagenic for TA1537. ETTM-14 was slightly mutagenic for TA1537, TA1538, and TA98. Mutagenicity by all samples was demonstrated only in the presence of hepatic enzyme extracts (S9) which provided metabolic activation. ETTM-11 was shown to be the most mutagenic sample assayed thus far; specific activity was 2.79 x 10/sup 4/ TA98 revertants/mg sample. Fractionation by serial extractions with increasingly polar organic solvents was done at least 2 x with ETTM-10, ETTM-11, ETTM-15, ETTM-16 and ETTM-17. For some samples highly mutagenic fractions were observed.

  4. Recovery of Rare Earths, Precious Metals and Other Critical Materials from Geothermal Waters with Advanced Sorbent Structures

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Pamela M. Kinsey

    2015-09-30

    The work evaluates, develops and demonstrates flexible, scalable mineral extraction technology for geothermal brines based upon solid phase sorbent materials with a specific focus upon rare earth elements (REEs). The selected organic and inorganic sorbent materials demonstrated high performance for collection of trace REEs, precious and valuable metals. The nanostructured materials typically performed better than commercially available sorbents. Data contains organic and inorganic sorbent removal efficiency, Sharkey Hot Springs (Idaho) water chemsitry analysis, and rare earth removal efficiency from select sorbents.

  5. Application of neutron-activation analysis to geological materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1980-12-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is an extremely sensitive, selective, and precise method, which yields a wealth of elemental information from even a small-sized sample. By varying neutron fluxes, irradiation times, decay and counting intervals in instrumental NAA, it is possible to accurately determine about 35 elements in a geological aliquot. When INAA is coupled with coincidence-noncoincidence Ge(Li)-Na(Tl) counting, it enhances the sensitivities of various elements by order of magnitude. The attractive features of INAA are that it is fast, nondestructive and economical.

  6. THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

  7. Neutron Activation and Thermoluminescent Detector Responses to a Bare Pulse of the CEA Valduc SILENE Critical Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Celik, Cihangir; McMahan, Kimberly L.; Lee, Yi-kang; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Authier, Nicolas; Piot, Jerome; Jacquet, Xavier; Rousseau, Guillaume; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2015-09-01

    This benchmark experiment was conducted as a joint venture between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the US and the Centre de Valduc in France planned this experiment. The experiment was conducted on October 11, 2010 in the SILENE critical assembly facility at Valduc. Several other organizations contributed to this experiment and the subsequent evaluation, including CEA Saclay, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex (NSC), Babcock International Group in the United Kingdom, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this experiment was to measure neutron activation and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) doses from a source similar to a fissile solution critical excursion. The resulting benchmark can be used for validation of computer codes and nuclear data libraries as required when performing analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). A secondary goal of this experiment was to qualitatively test performance of two CAAS detectors similar to those currently and formerly in use in some US DOE facilities. The detectors tested were the CIDAS MkX and the Rocky Flats NCD-91. These detectors were being evaluated to determine whether they would alarm, so they were not expected to generate benchmark quality data.

  8. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Access to Hopper Phase II (Cray XE6) If you are a current NERSC user, you are enabled to use Hopper Phase II. Use your SSH client to connect to Hopper II:...

  9. Rattling Nucleons: New Developments in Active Interrogation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Runkle; David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Active interrogation is a vigorous area of research and development due to its promise of offering detection and characterization capabilities of special nuclear material in environments where passive detection fails. The primary value added by active methods is the capability to penetrate shielding - special nuclear material itself, incidental materials, or intentional shielding - and advocates hope that active interrogation will provide a solution to the problem of detecting shielded uranium, which is at present the greatest obstacle to interdiction efforts. The technique also provides a unique benefit for quantifying nuclear material in high background-radiation environments, an area important for nuclear material safeguards and material accountancy. Progress has been made in the field of active interrogation on several fronts, most notably in the arenas of source development, systems integration, and the integration and exploitation of multiple fission and non-fission signatures. But penetration of interrogating radiation often comes at a cost, not only in terms of finance and dose but also in terms of induced backgrounds, system complexity, and extended measurement times (including set up and acquisition). These costs make the calculus for deciding to implement active interrogation more subtle than may be apparent. The purpose of this review is thus to examine existing interrogation methods, compare and contrast their attributes and limitations, and identify missions where active interrogation may hold the most promise.

  10. Electrode-active material for electrochemical batteries and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varma, Ravi

    1987-01-01

    A battery electrode material comprising a non-stoichiometric electrode-active material which forms a redox pair with the battery electrolyte, an electrically conductive polymer present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 5% by weight of the electrode-active material, and a binder. The conductive polymer provides improved proton or ion conductivity and is a ligand resulting in metal ion or negative ion vacancies of less than about 0.1 atom percent. Specific electrodes of nickel and lead are disclosed.

  11. Electrode-active material for electrochemical batteries and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varma, R.

    1983-11-07

    A battery electrode material comprises a non-stoichiometric electrode-active material which forms a redox pair with the battery electrolyte, an electrically conductive polymer present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 5% by weight of the electrode-active material, and a binder. The conductive polymer provides improved proton or ion conductivity and is a ligand resulting in metal ion or negative ion vacancies of less than about 0.1 atom percent. Specific electrodes of nickel and lead are disclosed.

  12. IFMIF - International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity/Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rennich, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Environmental acceptability, safety, and economic viability win ultimately be the keys to the widespread introduction of fusion power. This will entail the development of radiation- resistant and low- activation materials. These low-activation materials must also survive exposure to damage from neutrons having an energy spectrum peaked near 14 MeV with annual radiation doses in the range of 20 displacements per atom (dpa). Testing of candidate materials, therefore, requires a high-flux source of high energy neutrons. The problem is that there is currently no high-flux source of neutrons in the energy range above a few MeV. The goal, is therefore, to provide an irradiation facility for use by fusion material scientists in the search for low-activation and damage-resistant materials. An accellerator-based neutron source has been established through a number of international studies and workshops` as an essential step for materials development and testing. The mission of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is to provide an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium (D-Li) neutron source to produce high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials up to about a full lifetime of anticipated use in fusion energy reactors. would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator-based irradiation tests. It would generate material- specific activation and radiological properties data, and support the analysis of materials for use in safety, maintenance, recycling, decommissioning, and waste disposal systems.

  13. Material Activation Benchmark Experiments at the NuMI Hadron Absorber Hall in Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumura, H.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Toyoda, A.; Yashima, H.; Sekimoto, S.; Iwase, H.; Oishi, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Leveling, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Lauten, G.; Mokhov, N.; Vaziri, K.

    2014-06-15

    In our previous study, double and mirror symmetric activation peaks found for Al and Au arranged spatially on the back of the Hadron absorber of the NuMI beamline in Fermilab were considerably higher than those expected purely from muon-induced reactions. From material activation bench-mark experiments, we conclude that this activation is due to hadrons with energy greater than 3 GeV that had passed downstream through small gaps in the hadron absorber.

  14. Real space mapping of ionic diffusion and electrochemical activity in energy storage and conversion materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Kumar, Amit; Dudney, Nancy J; Jesse, Stephen

    2014-05-06

    A method and system for probing mobile ion diffusivity and electrochemical reactivity on a nanometer length scale of a free electrochemically active surface includes a control module that biases the surface of the material. An electrical excitation signal is applied to the material and induces the movement of mobile ions. An SPM probe in contact with the surface of the material detects the displacement of mobile ions at the surface of the material. A detector measures an electromechanical strain response at the surface of the material based on the movement and reactions of the mobile ions. The use of an SPM tip to detect local deformations allows highly reproducible measurements in an ambient environment without visible changes in surface structure. The measurements illustrate effective spatial resolution comparable with defect spacing and well below characteristic grain sizes of the material.

  15. Method of preparing porous, active material for use in electrodes of secondary electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1977-01-01

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure.The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  16. Electrode including porous particles with embedded active material for use in a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1978-04-25

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure. The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  17. GUIDANCE FOR THE PROPER CHARACTERIZATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF LOW SPECIFIC ACTIVITY MATERIALS AND SURFACE CONTAMINATED OBJECTS FOR DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PORTSMOUTH JH; BLACKFORD LT

    2012-02-13

    Regulatory concerns over the proper characterization of certain waste streams led CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to develop written guidance for personnel involved in Decontamination & Decommissioning (D&D) activities, facility management and Waste Management Representatives (WMRs) involved in the designation of wastes for disposal on and off the Hanford Site. It is essential that these waste streams regularly encountered in D&D operations are properly designated, characterized and classified prior to shipment to a Treatment, Storage or Disposal Facility (TSDF). Shipments of waste determined by the classification process as Low Specific Activity (LSA) or Surface Contaminated Objects (SCO) must also be compliant with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation (DOE) regulations as well as Department of Energy (DOE) orders. The compliant shipment of these waste commodities is critical to the Hanford Central Plateau cleanup mission. Due to previous problems and concerns from DOE assessments, CHPRC internal critiques as well as DOT, a management decision was made to develop written guidance and procedures to assist CHPRC shippers and facility personnel in the proper classification of D&D waste materials as either LSA or SCO. The guidance provides a uniform methodology for the collection and documentation required to effectively characterize, classify and identify candidate materials for shipping operations. A primary focus is to ensure that waste materials generated from D&D and facility operations are compliant with the DOT regulations when packaged for shipment. At times this can be difficult as the current DOT regulations relative to the shipment of LSA and SCO materials are often not clear to waste generators. Guidance is often sought from NUREG 1608/RAMREG-003 [3]: a guidance document that was jointly developed by the DOT and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and published in 1998. However, NUREG 1608 [3] is now thirteen years old and requires updating to comply with the newer DOT regulations. Similar challenges present themselves throughout the nuclear industry in both commercial and government operations and therefore, this is not only a Hanford Site problem. Shipping radioactive wastes as either LSA or SCO rather than repacking it is significantly cheaper than other DOT radioactive materials shipping classifications particularly when the cost of packages is included. Additionally, the need to 'repackage' materials for transport can often increase worker exposure, necessitated by 'repackaging' waste materials into DOT 7 A Type A containers.

  18. CMI Develops Critical Materials Museum Exhibit | Critical Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show, showcasing minerals and elements used in smartphones. Here's a video: (1:18) Rare Earths on display in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous...

  19. Effect of packing material on methane activation in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-12-15

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sphere), ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sphere), and ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1620 mesh). Investigations on the surface properties and shape of the three packing materials clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by the material used. Capacitances inside the discharge gap are estimated from chargevoltage plots, and a comparison of the generated and transferred charges for different packing conditions show that the difference in surface properties between ?- and ?-phase Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} affects the discharge characteristics. Moreover, all packing conditions show different charge characteristics that are related to the electron density. Finally, the packing material's shape affects the local electron temperature, which is strongly related to methane conversion. The combined results indicate that both microscale and macroscale variations in a packing material affect the discharge characteristics, and a packing material should be considered carefully for effective methane activation.

  20. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  1. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1996-09-24

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

  2. Progress and goals for INMM ASC N15 consensus standard ""Administrative practices for the determination and reporting of results of non-destructive assay measurements of nuclear material in situ for safeguards nuclear criticality safety and other purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracken, David S; Lamb, Frank W

    2009-01-01

    This paper will discuss the goals and progress to date on the development of INMM Accredited Standard Committee (ASC) N15 consensus standard Administrative Practices for the Determination and Reporting of Results of Non-Destructive Assay Measurements of Nuclear Material in situ for Safeguards, Nuclear Criticality Safety, and Other Purposes. This standard will define administrative practices in the areas of data generation and reporting of NDA assay of holdup deposits with consideration of the stakeholders of the reported results. These stakeholders may include nuclear material accounting and safeguards, nuclear criticality safety, waste management, health physics, facility characterization, authorization basis, radiation safety, and site licensing authorities. Stakeholder input will be solicited from interested parties and incorporated during the development of the document. Currently only one consensus standard exists that explicitly deals with NDA holdup measurements: ASTM C1455 Standard Test Method for Nondestructive Assay of Special Nuclear Material Holdup Using Gamma-Ray Spectroscopic Methods. The ASTM International standard emphasizes the activities involved in actually making measurements, and was developed by safeguards and NDA experts. This new INMM ASC N15 standard will complement the existing ASTM international standard. One of the largest driving factors for writing this new standard was the recent emphasis on in situ NDA measurements by the safeguards community due to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) recommendation 2007-1 on in situ NDA measurements. Specifically, DNFSB recommendation 2007-1 referenced the lack of programmatic requirements for accurate in situ measurements and the use of measurement results for compliance with safety based requirements. That being the case, this paper will also discuss the progress made on the Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2007-1 Safety-Related In Situ Nondestructive Assay of Radioactive Materials. Some of the information that will be presented includes observations made during site visits, how information useful to all facilities using nondestructive assay to determine holdup material quantities will be disseminated, and preliminary results of a gap analysis performed on current in situ nondestructive assay holdup measurements.

  3. course inventory | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Read more about CMI Education Partner: Colorado School of Mines CMI Course Inventory: Mineral Economics and Business Mineral Economics and Business Of the six CMI Team members that ...

  4. CMI Affiliates | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INFINIUM has demonstrated its process across a broad range of metals, including magnesium, titanium, tantalum, dysprosium, neodymium, solar-grade silicon and aluminum, enabling ...

  5. Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developer Resources Developer Resources Apps for Energy Apps for Energy The Energy Department is challenging developers to use the Green Button data access program to bring residential and commercial utility data to life with fun and creative apps. Read more Learn about Green Button Learn about Green Button Apps for Energy submissions must use Green Button data. To learn more, start here. Read more NREL Resources NREL Resources NREL offers a number resources for Green Button app developers. Find

  6. Diversifying Supply | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diversifying Supply diagram for focus area 1 diversifying supply (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses of the leaders.)

  7. News Archive | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... August 4, 2015 The Denver Post: Molycorp path to ... speed metals research, Feb. 22, 2014 Earthwise: Rare earth ... CMI in the news 2013 Forex Trading Times: Rare Earth ...

  8. Critical Materials Institute - invention disclosures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a>

  9. High Command Fidelity Electromagnetically Driven Calorimeter (High-CoFi EleDriCal)
    Patent...

  10. Organizational Leadership | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizational Leadership organizational chart for CMI leadership More details on the research organizational structure are available on the research home page. The CMI Advisory Board met March 7, 2014, at The Ames Laboratory.

  11. Electric Motors and Critical Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    system efficiency targets are unrealistic (excepting AEV 100 targets) * Need torque density as a useful addition to targets (specific operating ranges) Barriers Interfering with...

  12. CMI Values | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Values CMI Values -- we listen, we are safe, we collaborate, we respect, we move fast, we are agile, we are responsible, and we deliver. We Listen: We are driven by the needs of technology and our best information comes from our industry partners. We Are Safe: We conduct all of our work in a manner that protects our workers, the public and the environment. We Collaborate: We bring together the best available expertise to solve the problems at hand. We Respect: We treat each other well and value

  13. Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Areas FA 1: Diversifying Supply FA 2: Developing Substitutes FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling FA 4: Crosscutting Research...

  14. Critical Materials Institute - course inventory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimations and limitations of reserves, and their sociological, political, and economic effects. Offered in alternate years. GE credit: SciEng | SE, SL.-I. (I.) Verosub

  15. ...

  16. Crosscutting Research | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crosscutting Research diagram for focus area four, crosscutting research (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses of the leaders.) The Ames Laboratory offers more information about the rapid assessment project in this news release and video

  17. Privacy Notice | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    certain information automatically. What we collect and store automatically is: the Internet Protocol (IP) address of the domain from which you access the Internet (i.e....

  18. Studies on Supercapacitor Electrode Material from Activated Lignin-Derived Mesoporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Dipendu; Li, Yunchao; Bi, Zhonghe; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong Kahk; Hensley, Dale K; Grappe, Hippolyte A.; Meyer III, Harry M; Dai, Sheng; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized mesoporous carbon from pre-cross-linked lignin gel impregnated with a surfactant as the pore-forming agent, and then activated the carbon through physical and chemical methods to obtain activated mesoporous carbon. The activated mesoporous carbons exhibited 1.5- to 6-fold increases in porosity with a maximum BET specific surface area of 1148 m2/g and a pore volume of 1.0 cm3/g. Slow physical activation helped retain dominant mesoporosity; however, aggressive chemical activation caused some loss of the mesopore volume fraction. Plots of cyclic voltammetric data with the capacitor electrode made from these carbons showed an almost rectangular curve depicting the behavior of ideal double-layer capacitance. Although the pristine mesoporous carbon exhibited the same range of surface-area-based capacitance as that of other known carbon-based supercapacitors, activation decreased the surface-area-based specific capacitance and increased the gravimetric-specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbons. Surface activation lowered bulk density and electrical conductivity. Warburg impedance as a vertical tail in the lower frequency domain of Nyquist plots supported good supercapacitor behavior for the activated mesoporous carbons. Our work demonstrated that biomass-derived mesoporous carbon materials continue to show potential for use in specific electrochemical applications.

  19. Electrodes and electrochemical storage cells utilizing tin-modified active materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anani, Anaba; Johnson, John; Lim, Hong S.; Reilly, James; Schwarz, Ricardo; Srinivasan, Supramaniam

    1995-01-01

    An electrode has a substrate and a finely divided active material on the substrate. The active material is ANi.sub.x-y-z Co.sub.y Sn.sub.z, wherein A is a mischmetal or La.sub.1-w M.sub.w, M is Ce, Nd, or Zr, w is from about 0.05 to about 1.0, x is from about 4.5 to about 5.5, y is from 0 to about 3.0, and z is from about 0.05 to about 0.5. An electrochemical storage cell utilizes such an electrode as the anode. The storage cell further has a cathode, a separator between the cathode and the anode, and an electrolyte.

  20. Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratzel, A.C. III

    1998-09-01

    This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

  21. M-transfer activity of MCM-41 materials in 1-hexene isomerization reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, J.M.; Hernandez, F.; Terres, E.; Toledo, A.; Navarrete, J.

    1996-10-01

    The gasoline reformulation scheme includes the use of oxygenated additives MTBE (methyl-ter-butyl-ether), TAME (ter-amyl-methyl-ether), ETBE (ethyl-ter-butyl-ether) and DIPE (di-isopropyl-ether), which have the iso-olefins (i-C{sub 3}{sup =}, i-C{sub 4}{sup =}, i-C{sub 5}{sup =}) as precursors. In this respect, olefin production from FCC units must be enhanced to cover the demand. A series of new catalytic materials with lower hydrogen transfer activity could enhance the olefin yield from the FCC reactors.

  22. Activated barrier for protection of special nuclear materials in vital areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timm, R.E.; Miranda, J.E.; Reigle, D.L.; Valente, A.D.

    1984-07-15

    The Argonne National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory have recently installed an activated barrier, the Access Denial System (ADS) for the upgrade of safeguards of special nuclear materials. The technology of this system was developed in the late 70's by Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque. The installation was the first for the Department of Energy. Subsequently, two additional installations have been completed. The Access Denial System, combined with physical restraints, provide the system delay. The principal advantages of the activated barrier are: (1) it provides an order of magnitude improvement in delay over that of a fixed barrier, (2) it can be added to existing vital areas with a minimum of renovations, (3) existing operations are minimally impacted, and (4) health and safety risks are virtually nonexistent. Hardening of the vital areas using the ADS was accomplished in a cost-effective manner. 3 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  1. SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

    2012-02-13

    Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

  2. Determination of uranium and thorium in semiconductor memory materials by high fluence neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Northcutt, K.J.; Scott, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and thorium were measured by absolute neutron activation analysis in high-purity materials used to manufacture semiconductor memories. The main thrust of the study concerned aluminum and aluminum alloys used as sources for thin film preparation, evaporated metal films, and samples from the Czochralski silicon crystal process. Average levels of U and Th were found for the source alloys to be approx. 65 and approx. 45 ppB, respectively. Levels of U and Th in silicon samples fell in the range of a few parts per trillion. Evaporated metal films contained about 1 ppB U and Th, but there is some question about these results due to the possibility of contamination.

  3. Processes for making dense, spherical active materials for lithium-ion cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Sun-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2011-11-22

    Processes are provided for making dense, spherical mixed-metal carbonate or phosphate precursors that are particularly well suited for the production of active materials for electrochemical devices such as lithium ion secondary batteries. Exemplified methods include precipitating dense, spherical particles of metal carbonates or metal phosphates from a combined aqueous solution using a precipitating agent such as ammonium hydrogen carbonate, sodium hydrogen carbonate, or a mixture that includes sodium hydrogen carbonate. Other exemplified methods include precipitating dense, spherical particles of metal phosphates using a precipitating agent such as ammonium hydrogen phosphate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, sodium phosphate, sodium hydrogen phosphate, sodium dihydrogen phosphate, or a mixture of any two or more thereof. Further provided are compositions of and methods of making dense, spherical metal oxides and metal phosphates using the dense, spherical metal precursors. Still further provided are electrodes and batteries using the same.

  4. In-Situ Radiological Surveys to Address Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements During Remediation Activities at the Shallow Land Disposal Area, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania - 12268

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Phillip; Mihalo, Mark; Eberlin, John; Lambert, Mike; Matthews, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Cabrera Services Inc. (CABRERA) is the remedial contractor for the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site in Armstrong County Pennsylvania, a United States (US) Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) contract. The remediation is being completed under the USACE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) which was established to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites previously used by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). As part of the management of the FUSRAP, the USACE is overseeing investigation and remediation of radiological contamination at the SLDA Site in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 US Code (USC), Section 9601 et. seq, as amended and, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 300.430(f) (2). The objective of this project is to clean up radioactive waste at SLDA. The radioactive waste contains special nuclear material (SNM), primarily U-235, in 10 burial trenches, Cabrera duties include processing, packaging and transporting the waste to an offsite disposal facility in accordance with the selected remedial alternative as defined in the Final Record of Decision (USACE, 2007). Of particular importance during the remediation is the need to address nuclear criticality safety (NCS) controls for the safe exhumation and management of waste containing fissile materials. The partnership between Cabrera Services, Inc. and Measutronics Corporation led to the development of a valuable survey tool and operating procedure that are essential components of the SLDA Criticality Safety and Material Control and Accountability programs. Using proven existing technologies in the design and manufacture of the Mobile Survey Cart, the continued deployment of the Cart will allow for an efficient and reliable methodology to allow for the safe exhumation of the Special Nuclear Material in existing SLDA trenches. (authors)

  5. New Request for Information to Inform Department of Energy Critical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Request for Information to Inform Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy New Request for Information to Inform Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy ...

  6. Process for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase of catalytically active material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Dale L.; Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei

    1995-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase reaction product of catalytically active material comprising one or more alkali metals, one or more alkaline earth metals, and one or more Group VIII transition metals. The process comprises reacting together one or more alkali metal oxides and/or salts, one or more alkaline earth metal oxides and/or salts, one or more Group VIII transition metal oxides and/or salts, capable of forming a catalytically active reaction product, in the optional presence of an additional source of oxygen, using a laser beam to ablate from a target such metal compound reactants in the form of a vapor in a deposition chamber, resulting in the deposition, on a heated substrate in the chamber, of the desired oxide phase reaction product. The resulting product may be formed in variable, but reproducible, stoichiometric ratios. The homogeneous oxide solid phase product is useful as a catalyst, and can be produced in many physical forms, including thin films, particulate forms, coatings on catalyst support structures, and coatings on structures used in reaction apparatus in which the reaction product of the invention will serve as a catalyst.

  7. Criticality Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2003-03-12

    The purpose of the ''Criticality Model Report'' is to validate the MCNP (CRWMS M&O 1998h) code's ability to accurately predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a range of conditions spanned by various critical configurations representative of the potential configurations commercial reactor assemblies stored in a waste package may take. Results of this work are an indication of the accuracy of MCNP for calculating eigenvalues, which will be used as input for criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. The scope of this report is to document the development and validation of the criticality model. The scope of the criticality model is only applicable to commercial pressurized water reactor fuel. Valid ranges are established as part of the validation of the criticality model. This model activity follows the description in BSC (2002a).

  8. Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Irradiation is known to have a significant impact on the properties and performance of Zircaloy cladding and structural materials (material degradation processes, e.g., effects of hydriding).  This...

  9. Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material detection Active stimulation of highly enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paff, Marc G.; Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; Kiff, Scott; Nowack, Aaron; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-06-21

    A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.

  10. Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material detection – Active stimulation of highly enriched uranium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paff, Marc G.; Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; Kiff, Scott; Nowack, Aaron; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-06-21

    A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highlymore » Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.« less

  11. IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rennich, M.J. [comp.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

  12. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Calderoni; P. Sharpe; M. Shimada

    2009-09-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Materials Benchmarking Activities for CAMP Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about materials...

  14. Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials and Device Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at the 2011 Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop including an overview about Fraunhofer IPM, new funding situation in Germany, high temperature material and modules, energy-autarkic sensors, and thermoelectric metrology.

  15. An in situ electron microscopy technique for the study of thermally activated reactions in multilayered materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, M.A.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Weihs, T.P.

    1995-04-14

    A novel in situ transmission electron microscopy technique for the observation of reaction processes in multilayered materials is reported. The technique involves constant heating rate experiments of multilayered materials in image and diffraction modes. Because the fine scale microstructure of multilayered materials is typically a small fraction of the TEM specimen thickness, realistic comparison of the microstructural evolution with that of similarly processed thick foil samples is possible. Such experiments, when well designed, can provide rapid characterization of phase transformations and stability of nano-structured materials. The results of these experiments can be recorded in both video and micrograph format. The results and limitations of this technique will be shown for the Al/Zr and Al/Monel multilayered systems.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Active, Tailorable Adhesives for Dissimilar Material Bonding, Repair and Assembly

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Michigan State University at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Active, tailorable...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Active, Tailorable Adhesives for Dissimilar Material Bonding, Repair and Assembly

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Michigan State University at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about active, tailorable...

  18. Method of making active magnetic refrigerant materials based on Gd-Si-Ge alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pecharsky, Alexandra O.; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2006-10-03

    An alloy made of heat treated material represented by Gd.sub.5(Si.sub.xGe.sub.1-x).sub.4 where 0.47.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.56 that exhibits a magnetic entropy change (-.DELTA.S.sub.m) of at least 16 J/kg K, a magnetostriction of at least 2000 parts per million, and a magnetoresistance of at least 5 percent at a temperature of about 300K and below, and method of heat treating the material between 800 to 1600 degrees C. for a time to this end.

  19. Materials Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Videos Materials

  20. SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, H.

    2009-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

  1. Industrial Activities at DOE: Efficiency, Manufacturing, Process, and Materials R&D

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of industrial activities at DOE by Joe Cresko, EERE Advanced Manufacturing Office, at the EERE QC Workshop held December 9-10, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.

  2. Material protection control and accounting program activities at the electrochemical plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAllister, S.

    1997-11-14

    The Electrochemical Plant (ECP) is the one of the Russian Federation`s four uranium enrichment plants and one of three sites in Russia blending high enriched uranium (HEU) into commercial grade low enriched uranium. ECP is located approximately 200 km east of Krasnoyarsk in the closed city of Zelenogorsk (formerly Krasnoyarsk- 45). DOE`s MPC&A program first met with ECP in September of 1996. The six national laboratories participating in DOE`s Material Protection Control and Accounting program are cooperating with ECP to enhance the capabilities of the physical protection, access control, and nuclear material control and accounting systems. The MPC&A work at ECP is expected to be completed during fiscal year 2001.

  3. Material protection control and accounting program activities at the Urals electrochemical integrated plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAllister, S.

    1997-11-14

    The Urals Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) is the Russian Federation`s largest uranium enrichment plant and one of three sites in Russia blending high enriched uranium (HEU) into commercial grade low enriched uranium. UEIP is located approximately 70 km north of Yekaterinburg in the closed city of Novouralsk (formerly Sverdlovsk- 44). DOE`s MPC&A program first met with UEIP in June of 1996, however because of some contractual issues the work did not start until September of 1997. The six national laboratories participating in DOE`s Material Protection Control and Accounting program are cooperating with UEIP to enhance the capabilities of the physical protection, access control, and nuclear material control and accounting systems. The MPC&A work at UEIP is expected to be completed during fiscal year 2001.

  4. Active investigation of material damage under load using micro-CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navalgund, Megha Mishra, Debasish; Manoharan, V.; Zunjarrao, Suraj

    2015-03-31

    Due the growth of composite materials across multiple industries such as Aviation, Wind there is an increasing need to not just standardize and improve manufacturing processes but also to design these materials for the specific applications. One of the things that this translates to is understanding how failure initiates and grows in these materials and at what loads, especially around internal flaws such as voids or features such as ply drops. Traditional methods of investigating internal damage such as CT lack the resolution to resolve ply level damage in composites. Interrupted testing with layer removal can be used to investigate internal damage using microscopy; however this is a destructive method. Advanced techniques such as such as DIC are useful for in-situ damage detection, however are limited to surface information and would not enable interrogating the volume. Computed tomography has become a state of the art technique for metrology and complete volumetric investigation especially for metallic components. However, its application to the composite world is still nascent. This paper demonstrates micro-CT’s capability as a gauge to quantitatively estimate the extent of damage and understand the propagation of damage in PMC composites while the component is under stress.

  5. National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  6. Ion-exchange sorption and preparative chromatography of biologically active materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samsonov, G.V.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the problems of fine physico-chemical biotechnology; types of highly permeable network polyelectrolytes; methods for studying the permeability and porosity of network polyelectrolytes; the conformation state and flexibility of the structural elements of network polyelectrolytes; ion-exchange processes without the sorption of physiologically active substances; ion exchange, hydration, and swelling; nucleosides, nucleotides, alkaloids, sulfonamides, and miscellaneous physiologically active subtances; sharp front formation for the exchange of ions with the same valences; standard quasi-equilibrium frontal chromatography on ionites; sorption kinetics in ionites with structural heterogeneity; experimental investigations of the diffusivities of organic and physiologically active ions in ionite beads; and increasing the efficiency of low-pressure chromatography by using surface-layer and bidispersed ionites.

  7. AVLIS Criticality risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.J., LLNL

    1998-04-29

    Evaluation of criticality safety has become an important task in preparing for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) uranium enrichment runs that will take place during the Integrated Process Demonstration (IPD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This integrated operation of AVLIS systems under plant-like conditions will be used to verify the performance of process equipment and to demonstrate the sustained integrated enrichment performance of these systems using operating parameters that are similar to production plant specifications. Because of the potential criticality concerns associated with enriched uranium, substantial effort has been aimed towards understanding the potential system failures of interest from a criticality standpoint, and evaluating them in detail. The AVLIS process is based on selective photoionization of uranium atoms of atomic weight 235 (U-235) in a vapor stream, followed by electrostatic extraction. The process is illustrated in Figure 1. Two major subsystems are involved: the uranium separator and the laser system. In the separator, metallic uranium is fed into a crucible where it is heated and vaporized by an electron beam. The atomic U-235/U-238 vapor stream moves away from the molten uranium and is illuminated by precisely tuned beams of dye laser light. Upon absorption of the tuned dye laser light, the U-235 atoms become excited and eject electrons (become photoionized), giving them a net positive charge. The ions of U-235 are moved preferentially by an electrostatic field to condense on the product collector, forming the enriched uranium product. The remaining vapor, which is depleted in U-235 (tails), passes unaffected through the photoionization/extractor zone and accumulates on collectors in the top of the separator. Tails and product collector surfaces operate at elevated temperatures so that deposited materials flow as segregated liquid streams. The separated uranium condensates (uranium enriched in U-235 and uranium depleted in U-235) are cooled and accumulated in solid metallic form in canisters. The collected product and tails material is weighed and transferred into certified, critically safe, shipping containers (DOT specification 6M with 2R containment vessel). These will be temporarily stored, and then shipped offsite either for use by a fuel fabricator, or for disposal. Tails material will be packaged for disposal. A criticality risk assessment was performed for AVLIS IPD runs. In this analysis, the likelihood of occurrence of a criticality was examined. For the AVLIS process, there are a number of areas that have been specifically examined to assess whether or not the frequency of occurrence of a criticality is credible (frequency of occurrence > 10-6/yr). In this paper, we discuss only two of the areas: the separator and canister operations.

  8. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  9. Upper critical fields and thermally-activated transport of Nd(0.7Fe0.3) FeAs single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakirev, Fedor F; Jaroszynski, J; Hunte, F; Balicas, L; Jo, Youn - Jung; Raicevic, I; Gurevich, A; Larbalestier, D C; Fang, L; Cheng, P; Jia, Y; Wen, H H

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements of the resistivity and the upper critical field H{sub c2} of Nd(O{sub 0.7}F{sub 0.3})FeAs single crystals in strong DC and pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T and 60 T, respectively. We found that the field scale of H{sub c2} is comparable to {approx}100 T of high T{sub c} cuprates. H{sub c2}(T) parallel to the c-axis exhibits a pronounced upward curvature similar to what was extracted from earlier measurements on polycrystalline samples. Thus this behavior is indeed an intrinsic feature of oxypnictides, rather than manifestation of vortex lattice melting or granularity. The orientational dependence of H{sub c2} shows deviations from the one-band Ginzburg-Landau scaling. The mass anisotropy decreases as T decreases, from 9.2 at 44K to 5 at 34K. Spin dependent magnetoresistance and nonlinearities in the Hall coefficient suggest contribution to the conductivity from electron-electron interactions modified by disorder reminiscent that of diluted magnetic semiconductors. The Ohmic resistivity measured below T{sub c} but above the irreversibility field exhibits a clear Arrhenius thermally activated behavior over 4--5 decades. The activation energy has very different field dependencies for H{parallel}ab and H{perpendicular}ab. We discuss to what extent different pairing scenarios can manifest themselves in the observed behavior of H{sub c2}, using the two-band model of superconductivity. The results indicate the importance of paramagnetic effects on H{sub c2}(T), which may significantly reduce H{sub c2}(0) as compared to H{sub c2}(0) {approx}200--300 T based on extrapolations of H{sub c2}(T) near T{sub c} down to low temperatures.

  10. Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Critical aspects of technology ...

  11. Active magnetic refrigerants based on Gd-Si-Ge material and refrigeration apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-04-28

    Active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4, where x is equal to or less than 0.5, as a magnetic refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic-II/ferromagnetic-I first order phase transition and extraordinary magneto-thermal properties, such as a giant magnetocaloric effect, that renders the refrigerant more efficient and useful than existing magnetic refrigerants for commercialization of magnetic regenerators. The reversible first order phase transition is tunable from approximately 30 K to approximately 290 K (near room temperature) and above by compositional adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for refrigerating, air conditioning, and liquefying low temperature cryogens with significantly improved efficiency and operating temperature range from approximately 10 K to 300 K and above. Also an active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4, where x is equal to or greater than 0.5, as a magnetic heater/refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/paramagnetic second order phase transition with large magneto-thermal properties, such as a large magnetocaloric effect that permits the commercialization of a magnetic heat pump and/or refrigerant. This second order phase transition is tunable from approximately 280 K (near room temperature) to approximately 350 K by composition adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for low level heating for climate control for buildings, homes and automobile, and chemical processing.

  12. Active magnetic refrigerants based on Gd-Si-Ge material and refrigeration apparatus and process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    1998-04-28

    Active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd{sub 5} (Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 4}, where x is equal to or less than 0.5, as a magnetic refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic-II/ferromagnetic-I first order phase transition and extraordinary magneto-thermal properties, such as a giant magnetocaloric effect, that renders the refrigerant more efficient and useful than existing magnetic refrigerants for commercialization of magnetic regenerators. The reversible first order phase transition is tunable from approximately 30 K to approximately 290 K (near room temperature) and above by compositional adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for refrigerating, air conditioning, and liquefying low temperature cryogens with significantly improved efficiency and operating temperature range from approximately 10 K to 300 K and above. Also an active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd{sub 5} (Si{sub x} Ge{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 4}, where x is equal to or greater than 0.5, as a magnetic heater/refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/paramagnetic second order phase transition with large magneto-thermal properties, such as a large magnetocaloric effect that permits the commercialization of a magnetic heat pump and/or refrigerant. This second order phase transition is tunable from approximately 280 K (near room temperature) to approximately 350 K by composition adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for low level heating for climate control for buildings, homes and automobile, and chemical processing. 27 figs.

  13. SU-E-T-590: An Activation Study of Materials and Devices Present in a Proton Treatment Room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitznagel, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The use of protons for radiation therapy is growing rapidly. One consequence of protons interacting with different media is activation. These nuclear reactions induced by the protons, scattered neutrons, and gamma rays, activate different materials encountered, particularly by the therapists. The purpose of this study was to examine the derived nuclides from the activation, and also the decay rate. Methods: The study was conducted in our proton therapy facility. Protons are derived from a synchrocyclotron and pass through field shipping systems, apertures, and range compensators to define the beam within the patient.Included materials of concerns measured; the patient support couch, sheet rock in the wall, solid plastics used for quality assurance and dosimetry, and the passive scattering system itself, which includes brass apertures, and Lucite or blue wax compensators. All devices were studied post irradiation using gamma spectroscopy to determine the nuclides, and a sodium iodine scintillation detector to measure decay, particularly when the dose rate fell to background levels. Results: We have also determined from the measurements we will maintain brass apertures for three months before sending them for scrap. Some of the radionuclides arrived from these measurements included Na-22 for the blue wax compensator, C1-34m for the sheetrock, and Sc-44 and Co-60 for the brass apertures. We found compensators made out of Lucite or wax decayed to background in 2 hours. The patient support couch decayed to background in approximately 40 minutes, and sheet rock decayed in 80 minutes. In terms of the aperture layers, the most proximal aperture slab had much higher activity than the distal slab. Also the proximal sides of the slabs were much more activate than the distal. Conclusion: We have given proper instruction to therapists performing quality assurance in terms of the handled plastics, and to handle apertures rapidly as possible.

  14. Iowa lab gets critical materials research center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE hub is set to be the largest R&D effort toward alleviating the global shortage of rare earth metals.

  15. Complete Project List | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    substitutes, improve reuse and recycling, enable research, sustain the environment, study the supply chain and analyze economics. The institute started with more than 30 projects. ...

  16. FA 1: Diversifying Supply | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1: Diversifying Supply Focus Area 1 - Moyer, Herbst CMI pilot-scale separations test bed (image) File: Read more about CMI pilot-scale separations test bed (image) CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 1 File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Focus Area 1 CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview File: Read more about CMI Org Chart with Hotlinks: Research Overview CMI org chart for research with hotlinks (pdf) File: Read more about CMI org chart for research with hotlinks

  17. FA 2: Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2: Developing Substitutes Focus Area 2 - Schwatrz, Sales U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file May 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file May 2016 U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file January 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file January 2016 Image Lisa Savagian, Oak Ridge Science Semester, Fall 2015 File: Author: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Publication Year: 2015

  18. rare earth recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rare earth recycling Meet CMI Researcher David Reed CMI researcher David Reed is the principal investigator for the CMI project bioleaching for recovery of recycled rare earth...

  19. CMI Organizational Interactions | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research in other ways with different levels of financial commitment and ownership of intellectual property. CMI Associates: CMI Associates may use the unique capabilities and...

  20. Working with CMI: Team | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Board and Director and full execution of CMI's Master Nondisclosure Agreement and the Intellectual Property Management Plan (IPMP). Link to current Team Members For more...

  1. Comments/Questions | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CommentsQuestions To offer comments on the CMI website or to ask questions, please contact us: CMIdirector@ameslab.gov 515-296-4500 or use this web form for comments. Thanks...

  2. Papers by CMI Researchers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Anisotropy Energies for (Fe1-xCox)2B, J. of Phy.: Conds. Matter, 2015, 27, 266002, doi:10.10880953-89842726266002 B. S. Pujari, P. Larson, V. P. Antropov, and K. D. ...

  3. Energy Department Releases New Critical Materials Strategy |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    information-gathering, permitting for domestic production, financial assistance for domestic production and processing, stockpiling, recycling, education and diplomacy. ...

  4. Meet the CMI Researchers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory, biogeochemistry Karl Gschneidner, Ames Laboratory, video, retirement Stephen Harrison, Simbol Scott Herbst, Idaho National Laboratory Ed Jones, Lawrence...

  5. News about CMI People | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    People 2016 ORNL's Davidson, DePaoli elected AlChE fellows, March 21, 2016 Alexandra Navrotsky named 2016 V.M. Goldschmidt medalist, Feb. 22, 2016 Ames Laboratory scientist named to National Academy of Inventors, Jan. 11, 2016 Ames Laboratory scientist's calculation featured on cover of Physical Review Letters, Jan. 4, 2016 2015 Michael Chance is Wigner Fellow at ORNL who conducts CMI research on fluorescent lighting, Nov. 30, 2015 ORNL's Zacharia, Paranthaman named AAAS fellows, Nov. 23, 2015

  6. One Integrated Team | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One Integrated Team These were the Team Members in 2013, when CMI launched. Use this link to see a list of current Team Members or learn more about partnering with CMI. map of CMI partner locations in the United States

  7. Government Agency Contacts | Critical Materials Institute

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    House executive order National Defense Resources Preparedness U.S. White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Office of...

  8. CMI Guidance Documents | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Guidance Documents This page has links to pdf versions of CMI Guidance Documents for CMI staff: Publication process flow chart Acknowledgement text Foreign travel Press releases IP protection The Microsoft Word versions of these, and additional guidance documents, are available in the data storage server. Tags: guidance document

  9. CMI Program Benefits | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Benefits CMI Participation Benefits Affiliate Associate Team Provides cost share or has a contract for CMI project work optional required ● CMI bi-weekly newsletters and CMI monthly webinars ● ● ● Opportunities to expand engagement under appropriate contractual terms ● ● ● Representation on Industry Council ● ● Priority notification of inventions available for licensing, to the extent allowed by Fairness of Opportunity requirements ● ● CMI Annual Meetings and

  10. CMI Team Members | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Team Members CMI is a public/private partnership that brings together the best and brightest research minds from universities, national laboratories and the private sector to find innovative technology solutions that will help avoid a supply shortage that would threaten our clean energy industry as well as our security interests. CMI Team Members have research subcontracts from CMI or are providing cost sharing funds. Requirements include specific research project deliverables within the

  11. CMI Education and Outreach | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015, September 2015 and December 2015. Office of Special Programs & Continuing Education (SPACE) offers a variety of educational programs for industry, K-12 and university....

  12. CMI Success Stories | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electric vehicles, efficient lighting and advanced batteries. CMI Director Alex King credits a close collaboration with industry as key to making technology transfer happen...

  13. CMI Recent Presentations | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are available here. CMI first annual meeting Plenary sessions, September 9, 2014: Alex King, director: CMI Accomplishments and Plans Rod Eggert, deputy director: Rare Earth Supply...

  14. Webinars Highlight CMI Research | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    online. TBD: Eric Peterson, Idaho National Laboratory, on recycling December 9: Alex King, CMI, and Stacy Joiner, Ames Laboratory, discussed updates to the CMI Affiliates...

  15. Working with CMI: Affiliates | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working at NNSA The work at NNSA will challenge you. You may take on significant responsibility quickly, and you will always be engaged in some of the most important national issues of our time. The work at NNSA will challenge you. You may take on significant responsibility quickly, and you will always be engaged in some of the most important national issues of our time. A wide variety of career paths can help you find the type of job that suits your professional goals and lay the groundwork for

  16. Working with CMI: Associates | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Associates CMI Associates work with CMI researchers to define a scope of work, budget and timeline for the work. Once internally approved, the entity must execute either a CRADA or SPP with Ames or another Team national laboratory before work may begin. For more information, contact Stacy Joiner: joiner@ameslab.gov, 515-294-5932 CMIaffiliates@ameslab.gov CMI Membership Program, The Ames Laboratory, 311 TASF, Ames, IA, 50011-3020

  17. CMI Education Partner: Purdue University | Critical Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Typically offered Fall. EAS 38500 - Principles Of Engineering Geology: Credit Hours: 3.00. Application ... Isotope geology, geo- and cosmo-chronology with particular emphasis upon the ...

  18. CMI in the News | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    American Manganese Inc. Enters NDA with U.S. Government's Ames Laboratory on Lithium Ion Battery Recycling The Ames Laboratory: Rare earths for life: an 85th birthday visit...

  19. Improving Reuse & Recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving Reuse & Recycling series of images of recycling: trash heap, light bulbs, circuit boards diagram for focus area three, improving reuse and recycling (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses of the leaders.)

  20. CMI Membership Benefits | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    projects related to the Affiliates' needs Three month non-exclusive R&D use license option to Affiliate Fund Research Six month option1 for commercial license2 to...

  1. Critical Materials Institute Affiliates Program MEMBER AGREEMENT

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    be in accordance to the DOE Work for Others (WFO) Class Patent Waiver and corresponding Master WFO agreement for work to be performed by the CMI with affiliate funds. Foreign...

  2. CMI Membership Program | Critical Materials Institute

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    CMI Advisory Board and Director. This level of participation is required to sign CMI's Master Non-disclosure Agreement and the Intellectual Property Management Plan (IPMP)....

  3. CMI Affiliate Members | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tech Montana Tech (http:mtech.educamp) logo for CMI affiliate NAMS Native American Mining Solutions (NAMS) Native American Mining Solutions, of Kennewick, Washington, is a...

  4. CMI Invention Disclosures | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    link to licensing information Selective Composite Membranes for Lithium Extraction from ... of Permanent Magnets Additive Manufacturing of Bonded Permanent Magnets using a ...

  5. Chief Research Scientist | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    329 2.234 2.368 2.495 2.558 2.454 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.329 2.234 2.368 2.495 2.558 2.454 2000-2016 Regular 2.206 2.111 2.249 2.376 2.439 2.333 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.206 2.111 2.249 2.376 2.439 2.333 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.521 2.427 2.556 2.688 2.750 2.648 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.521 2.427 2.556 2.688 2.750 2.648 2000-2016 Premium 2.873 2.777 2.896 3.016 3.080 2.983 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.873 2.777 2.896 3.016 3.080 2.983 2000

    Chief Research

  6. The Use of Catalysts in Near-Critical Water Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2005-06-26

    The use of heterogeneous catalysts in near-critical water processing provides many challenges of material stability in addition to the normal questions of chemical activity. Conventional catalyst materials developed in traditional organic chemistry or petroleum chemistry applications provide a source of information of materials with the required activities but often without the required stability when used in hot liquid water. The importance of the use of catalysts in near-critical water processing plays a particularly crucial role for the development of renewable fuels and chemicals based on biomass feedstocks. Stability issues include both those related to the catalytic metal and also to the catalyst support material. In fact, the stability of the support is the most likely concern when using conventional catalyst formulations in near-critical water processing. Processing test results are used to show important design parameters for catalyst formulations for use in wet biomass gasification in high-pressure water and in catalytic hydrogenations in water for production of value-added chemical products from biomass in the biorefinery concept. Analytical methods including powder x-ray diffraction for crystallite size and composition determination, surface area and porosity measurements, and elemental analysis have all been used to quantify differences in catalyst materials before and after use. By these methods both the chemical and physical stability of heterogeneous catalysts can be verified.

  7. CMI Course Inventory: Recycling/Industrial Engineering | Critical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to rare earths and critical materials. Other courses are available in these areas: Geology EngineeringGeochemistry Mining Engineering Metallurgical EngineeringMaterials...

  8. Method of making active magnetic refrigerant, colossal magnetostriction and giant magnetoresistive materials based on Gd-Si-Ge alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Alexandra O.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2003-07-08

    Method of making an active magnetic refrigerant represented by Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4 alloy for 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0 comprising placing amounts of the commercially pure Gd, Si, and Ge charge components in a crucible, heating the charge contents under subambient pressure to a melting temperature of the alloy for a time sufficient to homogenize the alloy and oxidize carbon with oxygen present in the Gd charge component to reduce carbon, rapidly solidifying the alloy in the crucible, and heat treating the solidified alloy at a temperature below the melting temperature for a time effective to homogenize a microstructure of the solidified material, and then cooling sufficiently fast to prevent the eutectoid decomposition and improve magnetocaloric and/or the magnetostrictive and/or the magnetoresistive properties thereof.

  9. Tritium breeding materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Johnson, C.E.; Abdou, M.

    1984-03-01

    Tritium breeding materials are essential to the operation of D-T fusion facilities. Both of the present options - solid ceramic breeding materials and liquid metal materials are reviewed with emphasis not only on their attractive features but also on critical materials issues which must be resolved.

  10. Energy Materials Network Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Materials Network (EMN) is a national lab-led initiative that aims to dramatically decrease the time-to-market for advanced materials innovations critical to many clean energy technologies. Through targeted consortia offering accessible suites of advanced research and development capabilities, EMN is accelerating materials development to address U.S. manufacturers' most pressing materials challenges.

  11. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  12. Photocatalytic activity of PANI loaded coordination polymer composite materials: Photoresponse region extension and quantum yields enhancement via the loading of PANI nanofibers on surface of coordination polymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Zhongping; Qi, Ji; Xu, Xinxin Liu, Lu; Wang, Yi

    2013-09-15

    To enhance photocatalytic property of coordination polymer in visible light region, polyaniline (PANI) loaded coordination polymer photocatalyst was synthesized through in-situ chemical oxidation of aniline on the surface of coordination polymer. The photocatalytic activity of PANI loaded coordination polymer composite material for degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) was investigated. Compared with pure coordination polymer photocatalyst, which can decompose RhB merely under UV light irradiation, PANI loaded coordination polymer photocatalyst displays more excellent photocatalytic activity in visible light region. Furthermore, PANI loaded coordination polymer photocatalyst exhibits outstanding stability during the degradation of RhB. - Graphical abstract: PANI loaded coordination polymer composite material, which displays excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light was firstly synthesized through in-situ chemical oxidation of aniline on surface of coordination polymer. Display Omitted - Highlights: This PANI loaded coordination polymer composite material represents the first conductive polymer loaded coordination polymer composite material. PANI/coordination polymer composite material displays more excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradation of MO in visible light region. The combination of coordination polymer and PANI will enable us to design high-activity, high-stability and visible light driven photocatalyst in the future.

  13. Materials Discovery | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery Images of red and yellow particles NREL's research in materials discovery serves as a foundation for technological progress in renewable energies. Our experimental activities in inorganic solid-state materials innovation span a broad range of technological readiness levels-from basic science through applied research to device development-relying on a high-throughput combinatorial materials science approach, followed by traditional targeted experiments. In addition, our researchers work

  14. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a ...

  15. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities...

  16. A novel approach to prepare optically active ion doped luminescent materials via electron beam evaporation into ionic liquids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Richter, K.; Lorbeer, C.; Mudring, A. -V.

    2014-11-10

    A novel approach to prepare luminescent materials via electron-beam evaporation into ionic liquids is presented which even allows doping of host lattices with ions that have a strong size mismatch. Thus, to prove this, MgF2 nanoparticles doped with Eu3+ were fabricated. The obtained nanoparticles featured an unusually high luminescence lifetime and the obtained material showed a high potential for application.

  17. Investigation of criticality safety control infraction data at a nuclear facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Merhege, James F.; Costa, David A.; Art, Blair M.; Gubernatis, David C.

    2014-10-27

    Chemical and metallurgical operations involving plutonium and other nuclear materials account for most activities performed at the LANL's Plutonium Facility (PF-4). The presence of large quantities of fissile materials in numerous forms at PF-4 makes it necessary to maintain an active criticality safety program. The LANL Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) Program provides guidance to enable efficient operations while ensuring prevention of criticality accidents in the handling, storing, processing and transportation of fissionable material at PF-4. In order to achieve and sustain lower criticality safety control infraction (CSCI) rates, PF-4 operations are continuously improved, through the use of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma (LSS) business practices. Employing LSS, statistically significant variations (trends) can be identified in PF-4 CSCI reports. In this study, trends have been identified in the NCS Program using the NCS Database. An output metric has been developed that measures ADPSM Management progress toward meeting its NCS objectives and goals. Using a Pareto Chart, the primary CSCI attributes have been determined in order of those requiring the most management support. Data generated from analysis of CSCI data help identify and reduce number of corresponding attributes. In-field monitoring of CSCI's contribute to an organization's scientific and technological excellence by providing information that can be used to improve criticality safety operation safety. This increases technical knowledge and augments operational safety.

  18. Investigation of criticality safety control infraction data at a nuclear facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Merhege, James F.; Costa, David A.; Art, Blair M.; Gubernatis, David C.

    2014-10-27

    Chemical and metallurgical operations involving plutonium and other nuclear materials account for most activities performed at the LANL's Plutonium Facility (PF-4). The presence of large quantities of fissile materials in numerous forms at PF-4 makes it necessary to maintain an active criticality safety program. The LANL Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) Program provides guidance to enable efficient operations while ensuring prevention of criticality accidents in the handling, storing, processing and transportation of fissionable material at PF-4. In order to achieve and sustain lower criticality safety control infraction (CSCI) rates, PF-4 operations are continuously improved, through the use of Lean Manufacturing andmore » Six Sigma (LSS) business practices. Employing LSS, statistically significant variations (trends) can be identified in PF-4 CSCI reports. In this study, trends have been identified in the NCS Program using the NCS Database. An output metric has been developed that measures ADPSM Management progress toward meeting its NCS objectives and goals. Using a Pareto Chart, the primary CSCI attributes have been determined in order of those requiring the most management support. Data generated from analysis of CSCI data help identify and reduce number of corresponding attributes. In-field monitoring of CSCI's contribute to an organization's scientific and technological excellence by providing information that can be used to improve criticality safety operation safety. This increases technical knowledge and augments operational safety.« less

  19. Transformational, Large Area Fabrication of Nanostructured Materials Using Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study that will address critical additional steps over large areas of as-synthesized nanostructured materials, such as annealing, phase transformation, or activation of dopants, dramatically reducing the processing costs of the solid-state lighting and photovoltaic materials.

  20. CMI Unique Facility: Bulk Combinatoric Materials Synthesis Facility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bulk Combinatoric Materials Synthesis Facility The Bulk Combinatoric Materials Synthesis Facility is one of half a dozen unique facilities developed by the Critical Materials...

  1. PRECLOSURE CRITICALITY ANALYSIS PROCESS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.E. Danise

    2004-10-25

    This report describes a process for performing preclosure criticality analyses for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These analyses will be performed from the time of receipt of fissile material until permanent closure of the repository (preclosure period). The process describes how criticality safety analyses will be performed for various configurations of waste in or out of waste packages that could occur during preclosure as a result of normal operations or event sequences. The criticality safety analysis considers those event sequences resulting in unanticipated moderation, loss of neutron absorber, geometric changes, or administrative errors in waste form placement (loading) of the waste package. The report proposes a criticality analyses process for preclosure to allow a consistent transition from preclosure to postclosure, thereby possibly reducing potential cost increases and delays in licensing of Yucca Mountain. The proposed approach provides the advantage of using a parallel regulatory framework for evaluation of preclosure and postclosure performance and is consistent with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's approach of supporting risk-informed, performance-based regulation for fuel cycle facilities, ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'', and 10 CFR Part 63. The criticality-related criteria for ensuring subcriticality are also described as well as which guidance documents will be utilized. Preclosure operations and facilities have significant similarities to existing facilities and operations currently regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; therefore, the design approach for preclosure criticality safety will be dictated by existing regulatory requirements while using a risk-informed approach with burnup credit for in-package operations.

  2. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.K.; Reed, S.T.; Ashley, C.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1999-07-20

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties. 6 figs.

  3. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, Janda K.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Neiser, Richard A.; Moffatt, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties.

  4. Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

  5. CMI Unique Facility: Ferromagnetic Materials Characterization Facility |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute Ferromagnetic Materials Characterization Facility The Ferromagnetic Materials Characterization Facility is one of more than a dozen unique facilities developed by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S. Department of Energy. CMI ferromagnetic materials characterization facility at The Ames Laboratory. In the search for substitute materials to replace rare earths in permanent magnets, whenever promising materials are identified,

  6. Activation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response Services Activated At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CARLSBAD, N.M., 252014, 11:43 a.m. (MDT) - Emergency response services have been activated at the Waste...

  7. Vulnerability of critical infrastructures : identifying critical nodes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Roger Gary; Robinson, David Gerald

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this research was the development of tools and techniques for the identification of critical nodes within critical infrastructures. These are nodes that, if disrupted through natural events or terrorist action, would cause the most widespread, immediate damage. This research focuses on one particular element of the national infrastructure: the bulk power system. Through the identification of critical elements and the quantification of the consequences of their failure, site-specific vulnerability analyses can be focused at those locations where additional security measures could be effectively implemented. In particular, with appropriate sizing and placement within the grid, distributed generation in the form of regional power parks may reduce or even prevent the impact of widespread network power outages. Even without additional security measures, increased awareness of sensitive power grid locations can provide a basis for more effective national, state and local emergency planning. A number of methods for identifying critical nodes were investigated: small-world (or network theory), polyhedral dynamics, and an artificial intelligence-based search method - particle swarm optimization. PSO was found to be the only viable approach and was applied to a variety of industry accepted test networks to validate the ability of the approach to identify sets of critical nodes. The approach was coded in a software package called Buzzard and integrated with a traditional power flow code. A number of industry accepted test networks were employed to validate the approach. The techniques (and software) are not unique to power grid network, but could be applied to a variety of complex, interacting infrastructures.

  8. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  9. Definition of Small Gram Quantity Contents for Type B Radioactive Material Transportation Packages: Activity-Based Content Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sitaraman, S; Kim, S; Biswas, D; Hafner, R; Anderson, B

    2010-10-27

    Since the 1960's, the Department of Transportation Specification (DOT Spec) 6M packages have been used extensively for transportation of Type B quantities of radioactive materials between Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, laboratories, and productions sites. However, due to the advancement of packaging technology, the aging of the 6M packages, and variability in the quality of the packages, the DOT implemented a phased elimination of the 6M specification packages (and other DOT Spec packages) in favor of packages certified to meet federal performance requirements. DOT issued the final rule in the Federal Register on October 1, 2004 requiring that use of the DOT Specification 6M be discontinued as of October 1, 2008. A main driver for the change was the fact that the 6M specification packagings were not supported by a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that was compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 71 (10 CFR 71). Therefore, materials that would have historically been shipped in 6M packages are being identified as contents in Type B (and sometimes Type A fissile) package applications and addenda that are to be certified under the requirements of 10 CFR 71. The requirements in 10 CFR 71 include that the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) must identify the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents (10 CFR 71.33(b)(1) and 10 CFR 71.33(b)(2)), and that the application (i.e., SARP submittal or SARP addendum) demonstrates that the external dose rate (due to the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents) on the surface of the packaging (i.e., package and contents) not exceed 200 mrem/hr (10 CFR 71.35(a), 10 CFR 71.47(a)). It has been proposed that a 'Small Gram Quantity' of radioactive material be defined, such that, when loaded in a transportation package, the dose rates at external points of an unshielded packaging not exceed the regulatory limits prescribed by 10 CFR 71 for non-exclusive shipments. The mass of each radioisotope presented in this paper is limited by the radiation dose rate on the external surface of the package, which per the regulatory limit should not exceed 200 mrem/hr. The results presented are a compendium of allowable masses of a variety of different isotopes (with varying impurity levels of beryllium in some of the actinide isotopes) that, when loaded in an unshielded packaging, do not result in an external dose rate on the surface of the package that exceeds 190 mrem/hr (190 mrem/hr was chosen to provide 5% conservatism relative to the regulatory limit). These mass limits define the term 'Small Gram Quantity' (SGQ) contents in the context of radioactive material transportation packages. The term SGQ is isotope-specific and pertains to contents in radioactive material transportation packages that do not require shielding and still satisfy the external dose rate requirements. Since these calculated mass limits are for contents without shielding, they are conservative for packaging materials that provide some limited shielding or if the contents are placed into a shielded package. The isotopes presented in this paper were chosen as the isotopes that Department of Energy (DOE) sites most likely need to ship. Other more rarely shipped isotopes, along with industrial and medical isotopes, are planned to be included in subsequent extensions of this work.

  10. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

  11. Activation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane William (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the reeptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

  12. Apparatus and method for critical current measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Joe A.; Dye, Robert C.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the measurement of the critical current of a superconductive sample, e.g., a clad superconductive sample, the apparatus including a conductive coil, a means for maintaining the coil in proximity to a superconductive sample, an electrical connection means for passing a low amplitude alternating current through the coil, a cooling means for maintaining the superconductive sample at a preselected temperature, a means for passing a current through the superconductive sample, and, a means for monitoring reactance of the coil, is disclosed, together with a process of measuring the critical current of a superconductive material, e.g., a clad superconductive material, by placing a superconductive material into the vicinity of the conductive coil of such an apparatus, cooling the superconductive material to a preselected temperature, passing a low amplitude alternating current through the coil, the alternating current capable of generating a magnetic field sufficient to penetrate, e.g., any cladding, and to induce eddy currents in the superconductive material, passing a steadily increasing current through the superconductive material, the current characterized as having a different frequency than the alternating current, and, monitoring the reactance of the coil with a phase sensitive detector as the current passed through the superconductive material is steadily increased whereby critical current of the superconductive material can be observed as the point whereat a component of impedance deviates.

  13. SILENE Benchmark Critical Experiments for Criticality Accident Alarm Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    In October 2010 a series of benchmark experiments was conducted at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE [1] facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). This presentation will discuss the geometric configuration of these experiments and the quantities that were measured and will present some preliminary comparisons between the measured data and calculations. This series consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. During the first experiment the reactor was bare (unshielded), but during the second and third experiments it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. During each experiment several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor, and some of these detectors were themselves shielded from the reactor by high-density magnetite and barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond. All the concrete was provided by CEA Saclay, and the BoroBond was provided by Y-12 National Security Complex. Figure 1 is a picture of the SILENE reactor cell configured for pulse 1. Also included in these experiments were measurements of the neutron and photon spectra with two BICRON BC-501A liquid scintillators. These two detectors were provided and operated by CEA Valduc. They were set up just outside the SILENE reactor cell with additional lead shielding to prevent the detectors from being saturated. The final detectors involved in the experiments were two different types of CAAS detectors. The Babcock International Group provided three CIDAS CAAS detectors, which measured photon dose and dose rate with a Geiger-Mueller tube. CIDAS detectors are currently in use at Y-12 in the newly constructed Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility. The second CAAS detector used a {sup 6}LiF TLD to absorb neutrons and a silicon detector to count the charge particles released by these absorption events. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provided four of these detectors, which had formerly been used at the Rocky Flats facility in the United States.

  14. weapons material | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    material

  15. Natural time analysis of critical phenomena: The case of pre-fracture electromagnetic emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potirakis, S. M.; Karadimitrakis, A.; Eftaxias, K.

    2013-06-15

    Criticality of complex systems reveals itself in various ways. One way to monitor a system at critical state is to analyze its observable manifestations using the recently introduced method of natural time. Pre-fracture electromagnetic (EM) emissions, in agreement to laboratory experiments, have been consistently detected in the MHz band prior to significant earthquakes. It has been proposed that these emissions stem from the fracture of the heterogeneous materials surrounding the strong entities (asperities) distributed along the fault, preventing the relative slipping. It has also been proposed that the fracture of heterogeneous material could be described in analogy to the critical phase transitions in statistical physics. In this work, the natural time analysis is for the first time applied to the pre-fracture MHz EM signals revealing their critical nature. Seismicity and pre-fracture EM emissions should be two sides of the same coin concerning the earthquake generation process. Therefore, we also examine the corresponding foreshock seismic activity, as another manifestation of the same complex system at critical state. We conclude that the foreshock seismicity data present criticality features as well.

  16. Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Activities and events provide Residential Network members the opportunity to discuss similar needs and challenges, and to collectively identify effective strategies and useful resources.

  17. Decontamination of Anthrax spores in critical infrastructure and critical assets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boucher, Raymond M.; Crown, Kevin K.; Tucker, Mark David; Hankins, Matthew Granholm

    2010-05-01

    Decontamination of anthrax spores in critical infrastructure (e.g., subway systems, major airports) and critical assets (e.g., the interior of aircraft) can be challenging because effective decontaminants can damage materials. Current decontamination methods require the use of highly toxic and/or highly corrosive chemical solutions because bacterial spores are very difficult to kill. Bacterial spores such as Bacillus anthracis, the infectious agent of anthrax, are one of the most resistant forms of life and are several orders of magnitude more difficult to kill than their associated vegetative cells. Remediation of facilities and other spaces (e.g., subways, airports, and the interior of aircraft) contaminated with anthrax spores currently requires highly toxic and corrosive chemicals such as chlorine dioxide gas, vapor- phase hydrogen peroxide, or high-strength bleach, typically requiring complex deployment methods. We have developed a non-toxic, non-corrosive decontamination method to kill highly resistant bacterial spores in critical infrastructure and critical assets. A chemical solution that triggers the germination process in bacterial spores and causes those spores to rapidly and completely change to much less-resistant vegetative cells that can be easily killed. Vegetative cells are then exposed to mild chemicals (e.g., low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, quaternary ammonium compounds, alcohols, aldehydes, etc.) or natural elements (e.g., heat, humidity, ultraviolet light, etc.) for complete and rapid kill. Our process employs a novel germination solution consisting of low-cost, non-toxic and non-corrosive chemicals. We are testing both direct surface application and aerosol delivery of the solutions. A key Homeland Security need is to develop the capability to rapidly recover from an attack utilizing biological warfare agents. This project will provide the capability to rapidly and safely decontaminate critical facilities and assets to return them to normal operations as quickly as possible, sparing significant economic damage by re-opening critical facilities more rapidly and safely. Facilities and assets contaminated with Bacillus anthracis (i.e., anthrax) spores can be decontaminated with mild chemicals as compared to the harsh chemicals currently needed. Both the 'germination' solution and the 'kill' solution are constructed of 'off-the-shelf,' inexpensive chemicals. The method can be utilized by directly spraying the solutions onto exposed surfaces or by application of the solutions as aerosols (i.e., small droplets), which can also reach hidden surfaces.

  18. Catalyst material and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matson, D.W.; Fulton, J.L.; Linehan, J.C.; Bean, R.M.; Brewer, T.D.; Werpy, T.A.; Darab, J.G.

    1997-07-29

    The material of the present invention is a mixture of catalytically active material and carrier materials, which may be catalytically active themselves. Hence, the material of the present invention provides a catalyst particle that has catalytically active material throughout its bulk volume as well as on its surface. The presence of the catalytically active material throughout the bulk volume is achieved by chemical combination of catalytically active materials with carrier materials prior to or simultaneously with crystallite formation. 7 figs.

  19. Catalyst material and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Linehan, John C.; Bean, Roger M.; Brewer, Thomas D.; Werpy, Todd A.; Darab, John G.

    1997-01-01

    The material of the present invention is a mixture of catalytically active material and carrier materials, which may be catalytically active themselves. Hence, the material of the present invention provides a catalyst particle that has catalytically active material throughout its bulk volume as well as on its surface. The presence of the catalytically active material throughout the bulk volume is achieved by chemical combination of catalytically active materials with carrier materials prior to or simultaneously with crystallite formation.

  20. Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compatibility of Materials Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Download presentation slides from the Energy Department webinar "Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials" held on August 13, 2013. PDF icon Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Webinar Slides More Documents & Publications Forklift Storage Tank R&D: Timely, Critical, Exemplary Materials Compatibility Hydrogen Compatible Materials Workshop

  1. Criticality Safety Lessons Learned in a Deactivation and Decommissioning Environment [A Guide for Facility and Project Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIRIDER, L.T.

    2003-08-06

    This document was designed as a reference and a primer for facility and project managers responsible for Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) processes in facilities containing significant inventories of fissionable materials. The document contains lessons learned and guidance for the development and management of criticality safety programs. It also contains information gleaned from occurrence reports, assessment reports, facility operations and management, NDA program reviews, criticality safety experts, and criticality safety evaluations. This information is designed to assist in the planning process and operational activities. Sufficient details are provided to allow the reader to understand the events, the lessons learned, and how to apply the information to present or planned D&D processes. Information is also provided on general lessons learned including criticality safety evaluations and criticality safety program requirements during D&D activities. The document also explores recent and past criticality accidents in operating facilities, and it extracts lessons learned pertinent to D&D activities. A reference section is included to provide additional information. This document does not address D&D lessons learned that are not pertinent to criticality safety.

  2. Materials characterization activities for %E2%80%9CTake Our Sons&Daughters to Work Day%E2%80%9D 2013.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Pimentel, Adam S.; Sparks, Elizabeth Schares; Hanlon, Brittany Paula

    2013-09-01

    We created interactive demonstration activities for Take Our Daughters&Sons to Work Day (TODSTWD) 2013 in order to promote general interest in chemistry and also generate awareness of the type of work our laboratories can perform. %E2%80%9CCurious about Mars Rover Curiosity?%E2%80%9D performed an elemental analysis on rocks brought to our lab using the same technique utilized on the planet Mars by the NASA robotic explorer Curiosity. %E2%80%9CFood is Chemistry?%E2%80%9D utilized a mass spectrometer to measure, in seconds, each participant's breath in order to identify the food item consumed for the activity. A total of over 130 children participated in these activities over a 3 hour block, and feedback was positive. This document reports the materials (including handouts), experimental procedures, and lessons learned so that future demonstrations can benefit from the baseline work performed. We also present example results used to prepare the Food activity and example results collected during the Curiosity demo.

  3. Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Research | Department of Energy Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials Research Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials Research May 31, 2012 - 5:56pm Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced plans to invest up to $120 million over five years to launch a new Energy Innovation Hub, establishing a multidisciplinary and sustained effort to identify problems and develop solutions across the

  4. Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

  5. Institute for Multiscale Materials Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science and mechanics of soft, responsive, engineered materials. Activities combine theory, experiment, and numerical simulation of phenomena in soft materials spanning 7-14...

  6. Review of Nevada Site Office Criticality Safety Assessments at the Criticality Experiments Facility and Training Assembly for Criticality Safety and Appraisal of the Criticality Experiments Facility Startup Plan, October 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides the results of an independent oversight review of criticality safety assessment activities conducted by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nevada Site Office

  7. Radiation Safety Training Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

  8. AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-09-10

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging Facility. As the ongoing design evolution remains fluid, the results from this design calculation should be evaluated for applicability to any new or modified design. Consequently, the results presented in this document are limited to the current design. The information contained in this document was developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering and is intended for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the various criticality related activities performed in the Aging Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before the use of the information for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

  9. Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM The purpose of this Quality Assurance for Capital Project Critical Decision Review Module (QA RM) is to identify, integrate, and clarify the QA performance objectives, criteria, and guidance needed to review project documents and activities. PDF icon Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM More Documents & Publications Line Management Understanding of QA and Oversight Facility Software

  10. Criticality Safety Training

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-12-01

    CST is a web-based training program designed to help the user to safely access and work in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present.

  11. The Study of Electromagnetic Wave Propogation in Photonic Crystals Via Planewave Based Transfer (Scattering) Matrix Method with Active Gain Material Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ming LI

    2007-12-01

    In this dissertation, a set of numerical simulation tools are developed under previous work to efficiently and accurately study one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional(2D), 2D slab and three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal structures and their defects effects by means of spectrum (transmission, reflection, absorption), band structure (dispersion relation), and electric and/or magnetic fields distribution (mode profiles). Furthermore, the lasing property and spontaneous emission behaviors are studied when active gain materials are presented in the photonic crystal structures. Various physical properties such as resonant cavity quality factor, waveguide loss, propagation group velocity of electromagnetic wave and light-current curve (for lasing devices) can be obtained from the developed software package.

  12. FY2014 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-01

    The Propulsion Materials Program actively supports the energy security and reduction of greenhouse emissions goals of VTO by investigating and identifying the materials properties that are most essential for continued development of cost-effective, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly next-generation heavy and light-duty powertrains. The technical approaches available to enhance propulsion systems focus on improvements in both vehicle efficiency and fuel substitution, both of which must overcome the performance limitations of the materials currently in use. Propulsion Materials Program activities work with national laboratories, industry experts, and VTO powertrain systems (e.g., Advanced Combustion Engines [ACE], Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machines [APEEM], and fuels) teams to develop strategies that overcome materials limitations in future powertrain performance. The technical maturity of the portfolio of funded projects ranges from basic science to subsystem prototype validation. Projects within a Propulsion Materials Program activity address materials concerns that directly impact critical technology barriers within each of the above programs, including barriers that impact fuel efficiency, thermal management, emissions reduction, improved reliability, and reduced manufacturing costs. The program engages only the barriers that result from material property limitations and represent fundamental, high-risk materials issues.

  13. Multi-Material Joining: Challenges and Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Joining is a Critical Enabling Manufacturing Technology Nuclear Energy Fusion Energy Fossil Energy Oil & gas Solar, wind Battery, fuel cell Automotive Aerospace ...

  14. Material Misfits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues submit Material Misfits How well nanocomposite materials align at their interfaces determines what properties they have, opening broad new avenues of materials-science...

  15. Quantification of corrosion resistance of a new-class of criticality control materials: thermal-spray coatings of high-boron iron-based amorphous metals - Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Shaw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-03-28

    An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was produced as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. Earlier studies have shown that ingots and melt-spun ribbons of these materials have good passive film stability in these environments. Thermal spray coatings of these materials have now been produced, and have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both atmospheric and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here.

  16. The radioactive materials packaging handbook: Design, operations, and maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shappert, L.B.; Bowman, S.M.; Arnold, E.D.

    1998-08-01

    As part of its required activities in 1994, the US Department of Energy (DOE) made over 500,000 shipments. Of these shipments, approximately 4% were hazardous, and of these, slightly over 1% (over 6,400 shipments) were radioactive. Because of DOE`s cleanup activities, the total quantities and percentages of radioactive material (RAM) that must be moved from one site to another is expected to increase in the coming years, and these materials are likely to be different than those shipped in the past. Irradiated fuel will certainly be part of the mix as will RAM samples and waste. However, in many cases these materials will be of different shape and size and require a transport packaging having different shielding, thermal, and criticality avoidance characteristics than are currently available. This Handbook provides guidance on the design, testing, certification, and operation of packages for these materials.

  17. Only critical information was scanned

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Only critical information was scanned. Entire document is available upon request - Click here to email a...

  18. Functional Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functional Materials Researchers in NETL's Functional Materials Development competency work to discover and develop advanced functional materials and component processing technologies to meet technology performance requirements and enable scale-up for proof-of-concept studies. Research includes separations materials and electrochemical and magnetic materials, specifically: Separations Materials Synthesis, purification, and basic characterization of organic substances, including polymers and

  19. Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    network (Patent) | DOEPatents Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network Title: Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network A durable electrode material suitable for use in Li ion batteries is provided. The material is comprised of a continuous network of graphite regions integrated with, and in good electrical contact with a composite comprising graphene sheets and an electrically active material, such as silicon,

  20. Applicability of reactor code WIMS for nuclear criticality safety studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matausek, M.V.; Marinkovic, N.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to examine applicability of the reactor code WIMS for calculating criticality parameters of nonreactor configurations containing fissile materials. Results are given and discussed for some typical configurations containing {sup 235}U.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science Materials science worker Sandia materials scientists are creating scientifically tailored materials for U.S. energy applications and critical defense needs. Sandia's focus on scientifically tailored materials capitalizes on our expertise in solid-state sciences, advanced atomic-level diagnostics, and materials synthesis and processing science. Our research uses Sandia's experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities to establish the state of the art in materials

  2. Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors and Materials Argonne uses its materials and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical and biological agents and explosives. Argonne uses its materials and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical and biological agents and explosives. Our goal is to develop critical security technologies to prevent and manage events

  3. Criticality Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Nuclear Safety » Criticality Safety Criticality Safety Nuclear Safety Basis The Nuclear Facility Safety Program establishes and maintains the DOE requirements for nuclear criticality safety. The DOE detailed requirements for criticality safety are contained in Section 4.3 of the DOE Order 420.1,Facility Safety. Criticality safety requirements are based on the documented safety analysis required by 10 CFR 830, Subpart B. Related Links 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management American

  4. Structural Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Materials Structural Materials Development enables advanced technologies through the discovery, development, and demonstration of cost-effective advanced structural materials for use in extreme environments (high-temperature, high-stress, erosive, and corrosive environments, including the performance of materials in contact with molten slags and salts). Research includes materials design and discovery, materials processing and manufacturing, and service-life prediction of materials

  5. Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-02-07

    This standard provides a framework for generating Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) supporting fissionable material operations at Department of Energy (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities. This standard imposes no new criticality safety analysis requirements.

  6. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A.; Lookman, Turab

    2015-11-13

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning’ transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaoticmore » behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. As a result, these findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched.« less

  7. Spent Fuel Criticality Benchmark Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2001-07-23

    Characteristics between commercial spent fuel waste packages (WP), Laboratory Critical Experiments (LCEs), and commercial reactor critical (CRC) evaluations are compared in this work. Emphasis is placed upon comparisons of CRC benchmark results and the relative neutron flux spectra in each system. Benchmark evaluations were performed for four different pressurized water reactors using four different sets of isotopes. As expected, as the number of fission products used to represent the burned fuel inventory approached reality, the closer to unity k{sub eff} became. Examination of material and geometry characteristics indicate several fundamental similarities between the WP and CRC systems. In addition, spectral evaluations were performed on a representative pressurized water reactor CRC, a 21-assembly area of the core modeled in a potential WP configuration, and three LCEs considered applicable benchmarks for storage packages. Fission and absorption reaction spectra as well as relative neutron flux spectra are generated and compared for each system. The energy dependent reaction rates are the product of the neutron flux spectrum and the energy dependent total macroscopic cross section. With constant source distribution functions, and the total macroscopic cross sections for the fuel region in the CRCs and WP being composed of nearly the same isotopics, the resulting relative flux spectra in the CRCs and WP are very nearly the same. Differences in the relative neutron flux spectra between WPs and CRCs are evident in the thermal energy range as expected. However, the relative energy distribution of the absorption, fission, and scattering reaction rates in both the CRCs and the WP are essentially the same.

  8. Meet CMI Researcher Eric Schwegler | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Previously he served as Deputy Lead for Focus Area 4. Eric received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry in 1998 from the University of Minnesota, following undergraduate degrees in ...

  9. Meet CMI Leader Carol Bergman | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meet CMI Leader Carol Bergman Carol Bergman worked in the Ames Laboratory Budget Office for several years before joining CMI in January 2015. She ensures that CMI operates in a...

  10. Meet CMI Leader Cynthia Feller | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feller Cynthia Feller has been with Ames Lab for 22 years, beginning her career in Public Affairs and spending nine years in the Directors' office before joining the CMI team as...

  11. Meet CMI Researcher Rod Eggert | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More formally, he is professor and former director of the Division of Economics and ... was Editor of Resources Policy, an international journal of mineral economics and policy. ...

  12. Die Materials for Critical Applications and Increased Production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Most of these alloys exhibit superior thermal fatigue resistance, but suffer from other shortcomings. Authors: David Schwam ; John Wallace ; Sebastian Birceanu Publication Date: ...

  13. Meet CMI Student Lisa Savagian | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lisa Savagian poster of Lisa Savagian, an Oak Ridge Science Semester participant from Hope College in Holland, Michigan. Lisa Savagian worked in the Lynn Boatner laboratory at...

  14. Post-Doc Researchers Needed | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Department of Energy national laboratory ... Large scale density functional calculations applied to ... on recovery of rare earth (RE) metals from scrap sources. ...

  15. Human Resources at Ames Laboratory | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management » Human Resource Directors (HRD) Human Resource Directors (HRD) Name Organization Phone Number E-Mail Brian Carter Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) (503) 230-4527 becarter@bpa.gov Jeffrey Williams Environmental Management/Consolidated Business Center (EM) (513) 744-0987 jeffrey.williams@emcbc.doe.gov Connie Nottingham Richland Operations Office (EM) (509) 373-6288 connie.nottingham@rl.doe.gov Lee Moody Savannah River Operations (EM) Lee.moody@srs.gov Christine Jenkins National

  16. Human Resources at Colorado School of Mines | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado School of Mines Employment at Colorado School of Mines Office of Human Resources: 1500 Illinois St., Suite 110 Golden, CO 80401 (303) 273-3250 (303) 384-2025 FAX Mike Dougherty mdougher@imines.edu Associate Vice President and Director (303)273-3554 Veronica Graves vgraves@mines.edu Assistant Director (303)-273-3056 Link to Office of Human Resources Link to Job Openings

  17. Human Resources at Idaho National Laboratory | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho National Laboratory Link to Office of Human Resources INL Staffing (208) 526-5888 Link to infographic on reasons to work at INL

  18. Human Resources at Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact Information The main contact for human resources for CMI at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: David Lett Phone: 865-576-5675 Email: lettdg@ornl.gov Link to ORNL's career website

  19. Meet CMI Researcher Karl Gschneidner | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center from 1966 to 1996. Gschneidner received a B.S. degree from the University of Detroit in 1952 and his Ph.D. from Iowa State University in 1957. He was at the Los Alamos...

  20. Patrice Turchi Installed as 2015 TMS President | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Patrice Turchi Installed as 2015 TMS President Submitted by mlthach on Tue, 03/31/2015 - 13:41 TMS installed Patrice Turchi as its 2015 President on March 17, 2015. Publish Date: Sunday, March 22, 2015 - 13:45 Article URL: http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/631506/?sc=rsla&utm_content=bufferf46a7&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer Article Source: Newswise

  1. U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2013 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE PLAN FYS 2014 & 2015 U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Inspector General Table of Contents Page Message from the Inspector General ii At a Glance: Performance Results for FY 2013 iii Overview 1 Our Organization 2 External Factors Challenging Our Organization 4 Our Management Challenges 5 Measuring Our FY 2013 Performance 6 Our FY 2014 and FY 2015 Performance Plan 15 Appendix A 18 Audit Work Plan for FY 2014 18 Inspection Work Plan for

  2. Meet CMI Leader Deb Covey | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bell Telephone Company's Management Training program in DallasFt. Worth. She completed her MS at the University of Texas at Dallas in management and administrative sciences.

  3. News about Rare Earths, New or Critical Materials, and Their...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth Elements and National Security, October 2014 The Rare Earth Elements in Your Smartphone, 4:05 video on BloombergTV, August 8, 2014 Jony Ive Speaks on Future Products,...

  4. Anne de Guibert, SAFT, Critical Materials and Alternatives for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    B6AnnedeGuibert.ppt More Documents & Publications Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review...

  5. Meet CMI Researcher Tim McIntyre | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactor instrumentation and controls, electricity grid resilient controls and global security missions. Tim has given more than a dozen invited talks, published more than 20...

  6. US-EU-Japan Working Group on Critical Materials

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    US e-Chromic America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 828 likes US e-Chromic National Renewable Energy Laboratory US e-Chromic, based in Boulder, Colorado, was formed in March 2011, for the purpose of developing and commercializing reflective electrochromic (EC) thin film based on options to patents exclusively licensed from NREL. The company has exclusive rights to 3 issued and 1 pending NREL patents and non-exclusive rights to 3 issued and 7 pending NREL patents. Our EC thin film will be

  7. First License for a CMI Invention | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First License for a CMI Invention diagram of membrane solvent extraction system developed by CMI researchers Diagram of membrane solvent extraction system developed by CMI...

  8. CRITICAL MATERIALS MUSEUM DISPLAY STATUS AND "HOW-TO" REPORT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI as an entity to those yet unaware, and explain the mission of CMI. The exhibit design aims to inspire students and all audiences to take action and to ask questions...

  9. The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    substitutes; and 3) promoting recycling, reuse and more efficient use to ... efficient use, and end-of-life recycling; integrate scientific research, ...

  10. Department of Energy Releases its 2011 Critical Materials Strategy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    innovation to find substitutes, promote recycling and help secure supplies of rare earth ... supply, developing substitutes, and improving recycling, reuse and more efficient use. ...

  11. Ideas for Transatlantic Cooperation on Critical Materials,Chairs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...Animateurs: Jeff Skeer, DOE Office of Policy and International Affairs and Renzo Tomellini, EC Directorate General for Research and Innovation Ideas for Transatlantic Cooperation ...

  12. Meet CMI Researcher Bob Fox | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research in the areas of supercritical fluid chemistry, metal complexation reactions, nanomaterials, alternative fuels, laser surface cleaning, and laser spectroscopy. Dr. ...

  13. Critical Materials Institute gains new member Eck Industries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which utilize byproducts of rare-earth mining as alloying elements to improve aluminum casting alloys," Weiss said. "We are devoting significant resources to this partnership,...

  14. Other Education and Outreach Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Other Academic Alliances NNSA's Defense Science University Programs has academic alliances with three other universities: Washington State University off site link University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) off site link University of Nevada Reno (UNR) off site link The current awards for other academic alliances are as follows: Title Organization; State Investigator Total Budget* Project Period Science Based Stockpile Stewardship Collaborative Research Development University of Nevada, Las Vegas;

  15. Meet CMI Researcher Paul Canfield | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physicist in Ames Laboratory and a Distinguished Professor of Physics, holding the Robert Allen Wright Professorship. Dr. Canfield's research is centered on the design, discovery,...

  16. EERE Announces Up to $4 Million for Critical Materials Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    potentially improve the economic and production benefits of geothermal energy projects. ... including solar panels, wind turbines, electric vehicles, and energy-saving lighting. ...

  17. Leave your comment about CMI website | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a confirmation code. To make this process easier in the future, we recommend you enable Javascript. Type the text: Try another challenge Get an audio challenge Help I'm a human t...

  18. Rare Earths -- The Fraternal Fifteen | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earths -- The Fraternal Fifteen cover of Rare Earths - The Fraternal Fifteen pamplet from 1964 What are rare earths? To see and read an elementary primer, check Rare Earths - The Fraternal Fifteen. The 46-page pamphlet describes this family of chemical elements that have similar chemical properties and different physical behaviors, especially the magnetic and optical properties. "Rare earths impact all of us," Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr., explains. "When you watch TV or use a

  19. CMI Celebrates National Engineers Week | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Celebrates National Engineers Week CMI members and industry contacts will celebrate the DiscoverE National Engineers Week in a variety of ways. These include: Colorado School of Mines: Mines will offer outreach for Denver high school students on Feb. 26, 2015 Open this pdf file to see an agenda for the 2015 event. 2014: DiscoverE Engineering Week, Feb. 20: Colorado School of Mines hosted more than 100 high school students Purdue University: Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day, Feb. 28

  20. CMI Education Partner: Brown University | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Partner: Brown University Brown University offers courses in several areas: Engineering School Institute of Environment and Study Brown University: Engineering School http://www.brown.edu/academics/engineering/undergraduate-study/courses ENGN 0030 - Introduction to Engineering: An introduction to various engineering disciplines, thought processes, and issues. Topics include computing in engineering, engineering design, optimization, and estimation. Case studies in engineering are used

  1. CMI Webinar: Vitalij Pecharsky, September 2015 | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Vitalij Pecharsky, September 2015 The CMI webinar on September 30 featured Vitalij Pecharsky, discussing his upcoming online course "Chemical and Physical Metallurgy of Rare Earth Metals," which will be offered at Iowa State University in Spring 2016.

  2. Resources Available with CMI Login | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of several public webinars also are available, including a CMI review by Alex King in August 2015 and review of the updated Affiliates program in December 2015) CMI...

  3. CMI Education and Outreach in 2015 | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the Colorado Energy Expo. CMI education and outreach in 2015: CMI webinar: Alex King, CMI, and Stacy Joiner, Ames Laboratory, discussed updates to the CMI Affiliates...

  4. Meet CMI Director Alex King | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director Alex King CMI Director Alex King CMI Director Alex King was born and raised in London. He attended the University of Sheffield as an undergraduate and earned his doctorate...

  5. Meet CMI Leader Cynthia Howell | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Howell Dr. Cynthia Howell CMI education, training and outreach program manager is Dr. Cynthia Howell. She works at Colorado School of Mines half-time in this position for CMI and half-time for the Colorado Energy Research Institute. She brings a national perspective and knowledge of energy, education, industry and workforce issues with expertise in partnership development, collaborative project design, education reform and tool development. She has unique multidisciplinary experience working and

  6. Meet CMI Researcher Vitalij Pecharsky | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    metallurgy of rare earths. The course offered at Iowa State University is available as a distance education course for researchers and industry representatives. It is offered...

  7. U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This latest set of export quotas were non-element specific and applied to all exports of REEs, which in turn led to price spikes for the lower valued light rare earth elements ...

  8. Colorado School of Mines Researchers Win Patent | Critical Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News News releases CMI in the news News archive CMI social media Colorado School of Mines Researchers Win Patent The Coloroado School of Mines 2013 highlights include news that...

  9. DOE Releases Request for Information on Critical Materials, Including...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sector, including fuel cell platinum group metal catalysts. The RFI is soliciting feedback from industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other ...

  10. Critical Materials Institute An Energy Innovation Hub Alexander King, Director

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Criminal Investigator Criminal Investigator Special Agent Responsibilities The Office of Investigations conducts investigations of DOE personnel, contractors, and others receiving DOE funds concerning alleged violations of law that impact DOE programs, operations, facilities, and personnel. Examples of issues investigated by the OIG include soliciting and/or accepting a bribe, overcharging the Government on contracts and grants, providing false data and information, supplying defective or

  11. Meet CMI Researcher Parans Paranthaman | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parans Paranthaman Image of Parans Paranthaman, CMI researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Parans Paranthaman at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a CMI researcher focused on additive manufacturing of permanent magnets, lithium separation from geothermal brine and lithium and sodium ion battery development. In February 2016, the AAAS inducted Paranthaman as an AAAS Fellow for chemistry. AAAS Fellows are recognized for meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications. In 2015,

  12. Meet CMI Researcher Tom Lograsso | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researcher Thomas Lograsso leads Focus Area 2, Developing Substitutes. He started this role in May 2014. Previously he led Focus Area 4, Crosscutting Research while serving as...

  13. Meet CMI Researcher Bruce Moyer | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science and technology, specializing in both fundamental and applied aspects of solvent extraction and ion exchange. His fundamental interests have involved the chemistry of...

  14. Meet CMI Researcher Scott Herbst | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    process chemistry and engineering, and development of new separation methods based on solvent extraction and ion exchange. With well over 100 publications and several patents in...

  15. 2014 CMI Plenary: CMI Education and Outreach Programs | Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute 2014 CMI Plenary: CMI Education and Outreach Programs File: PDF icon 2014-cmi-plenary-education.pdf

  16. What would we do without rare earths? | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an Energy Innovation Hub created by the U.S. Department of Energy, has a big problem to solve -- what would we do without rare earths? Rare earths are a big part of our modern...

  17. EV Everywhere Workshop: Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This is a copy of the notice submitted to the Federal Register for the EV Everywhere logo contest. This document, concerning the EV Everywhere logo contest is an action issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the

  18. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-01-16

    The Propulsion Materials program focuses on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines. Projects within the Propulsion Materials Program address materials concerns that directly impact the critical technical barriers in each of these programs—barriers such as fuel efficiency, thermal management, emissions reduction, and reduced manufacturing costs.

  19. The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothe, Robert E

    2003-10-15

    The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Bioscience Computing and Information Science Electromagnetics Engineering Science Geoscience Materials Science About Materials Science Research Image Gallery Video Gallery Facilities Nanodevices and Microsystems Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Research Materials Processing Sandia research staff understand, characterize, model, and ultimately control materials fabrication technologies that are critical to component development and production. Plasma Spray

  1. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research May 7-8, 2009 Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter...

  2. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences February 9-10, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation...

  3. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos ...

  4. Critical Infrastructure Modeling System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-01

    The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System (CIMS) is a 3D modeling and simulation environment designed to assist users in the analysis of dependencies within individual infrastructure and also interdependencies between multiple infrastructures. Through visual cuing and textual displays, a use can evaluate the effect of system perturbation and identify the emergent patterns that evolve. These patterns include possible outage areas from a loss of power, denial of service or access, and disruption of operations. Method ofmore » Solution: CIMS allows the user to model a system, create an overlay of information, and create 3D representative images to illustrate key infrastructure elements. A geo-referenced scene, satellite, aerial images or technical drawings can be incorporated into the scene. Scenarios of events can be scripted, and the user can also interact during run time to alter system characteristics. CIMS operates as a discrete event simulation engine feeding a 3D visualization.« less

  5. Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. L. Putman

    2012-04-01

    Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications, and additional information from readers and from personnel who took course 00INL189. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that fissionable material handlers and criticality safety officers must understand. The reorganization is based on and consistent with changes made to course 00INL189 due to a review of course exam results and to discussions with personnel who conduct area-specific training.

  6. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Patrick B.; Schutte, Carol L.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development.

  7. Static critical phenomena in Co-Ni-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of critical phenomenon in such materials has received increased experimental and theoretical attention for better understanding of the magnetic phase transition behavior as ...

  8. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, S.; Johnson, D.R.

    1999-04-26

    The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

  9. Materials Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

  10. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  11. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  12. Facility Software Quality Assurance (SQA) for Captal Project Critical

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Decisions RM | Department of Energy Software Quality Assurance (SQA) for Captal Project Critical Decisions RM Facility Software Quality Assurance (SQA) for Captal Project Critical Decisions RM The purpose of this Software Quality Assurance for Capital Project Critical Decision Review Module (SQA RM) is to identify, integrate, and clarify, in one EM document, the SQA performance objectives, criteria, and guidance needed to review project documents and activities. PDF icon Facility Software

  13. EXTERNAL CRITICALITY CALCULATION FOR DOE SNF CODISPOSAL WASTE PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Radulescu

    2002-10-18

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate the potential for criticality for the fissile material that could accumulate in the near-field (invert) and in the far-field (host rock) beneath the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal waste packages (WPs) as they degrade in the proposed monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The scope of this calculation is limited to the following DOE SNF types: Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), Enrico Fermi, Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Fort St. Vrain, Melt and Dilute, Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, and Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomics reactor (TRIGA). The results of this calculation are intended to be used for estimating the probability of criticality in the near-field and in the far-field. There are no limitations on use of the results of this calculation. The calculation is associated with the waste package design and was developed in accordance with the technical work plan, ''Technical Work Plan for: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel and Plutonium Disposition Work Packages'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC [BSC], 2002a). This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) per the activity evaluation under work package number P6212310Ml in the technical work plan TWP-MGR-MD-0000 10 REV 01 (BSC 2002a).

  14. Critical Oxidation Reactions Optimized with Solvent Swap | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Rare-Earth Research | Department of Energy Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research June 15, 2011 - 7:07pm Addthis The plasma torch in the Retech plasma furnace is one tool used in Materials Preparation Center to create ultra-high purity metal alloy samples, particularly rare-earth metals, located at the Ames Lab. | Photo Courtesy of

  15. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  16. A primer for criticality calculations with DANTSYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear safety analyst has to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. Although deterministic methods often do not provide exact models of a system, a substantial amount of reliable information on nuclear systems can be obtained using these methods if the user understands their limitations. To guide criticality specialists in this area, the Nuclear Criticality Safety Group at the University of New Mexico (UNM) in cooperation with the Radiation Transport Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has designed a primer to help the analyst understand and use the DANTSYS deterministic transport code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. DANTSYS is the new name of the group of codes formerly known as: ONEDANT, TWODANT, TWOHEX, TWOGQ, and THREEDANT. The primer is designed to teach bu example, with each example illustrating two or three DANTSYS features useful in criticality analyses. Starting with a Quickstart chapter, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for DANTSYS input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with DANTSYS. Each chapter has a list of basic objectives at the beginning identifying the goal of the chapter and the individual DANTSYS features covered in detail in the chapter example problems. On completion of the primer, it is expected that the user will be comfortable doing criticality calculations with DANTSYS and can handle 60--80% of the situations that normally arise in a facility. The primary provides a set of input files that can be selective modified by the user to fit each particular problem.

  17. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences February 9-10, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:05

  18. Approval of the Critical Decision 4.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SUBJECT: ACTION: Approval of the Critical Decision 4 for the Closeout of the General Atomics (GA) Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project, Project Baseline Summary VL-GA-0012, and the Transfer for the GA Project Files to the Office of Legacy Management (LM) ISSUE: None BACKGROUND: Activities associated with the cleanup of the GA HCF and surrounding site were completed on September 28,2003. The GA site has been remediated to negotiated cleanup standards and

  19. Materials Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Characterization Researchers in the Materials Characterization Research competency conduct studies of both natural and engineered materials from the micropore (nanometers) to macropore (meters) scale. Research includes, but is not limited to, thermal, chemical, mechanical, and structural (nano to macro) interactions and processes with regard to natural and engineered materials. The primary research investigation tools include SEM, XRD, micro XRD, core logging, medical CT, industrial

  20. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report XI, Volume V. Critical review of the design basis. [Critical review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report XI, Technical Audit, is a compendium of research material used during the Initial Effort in making engineering comparisons and decisions. Volumes 4 and 5 of Report XI present those studies which provide a Critical Review of the Design Basis. The Critical Review Report, prepared by Intercontinental Econergy Associates, Inc., summarizes findings from an extensive review of the data base for the H-Coal process design. Volume 4 presents this review and assessment, and includes supporting material; specifically, Design Data Tabulation (Appendix A), Process Flow Sheets (Appendix B), and References (Appendix C). Volume 5 is a continuation of the references of Appendix C. Studies of a proprietary nature are noted and referenced, but are not included in these volumes. They are included in the Limited Access versions of these reports and may be reviewed by properly cleared personnel in the offices of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.

  1. Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Screening of Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Materials Benchmarking Activities for ...

  2. Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division Homepage |...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    MSE Home About Research Areas Reports and Activities Science Highlights Principal ... Materials Chemistry Biomolecular Materials Synthesis and Processing Science Scattering and ...

  3. Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    laser spectroscopy, molecular beam epitaxy, and novel approaches for hybrid, organic and nanoparticle materials synthesis. Research activities include: Low-dimensional materials...

  4. Materials Physics | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics A photo of laser light rays going in various directions atop a corrugated metal substrate In materials physics, NREL focuses on realizing materials that transcend the present constraints of photovoltaic (PV) and solid-state lighting technologies. Through materials growth and characterization, coupled with theoretical modeling, we seek to understand and control fundamental electronic and optical processes in semiconductors. Capabilities Optimizing New Materials An illustration showing

  5. Audit on Subcritical Experiment Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of nuclear weapon materials, such as plutonium, with the use of complex, high-speed diagnostic instruments. The experiments are subcritical because no critical mass is formed and...

  6. Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The purpose of the activity was to observe Subcritical Experiment activities at the U1a Complex, discuss ongoing activities at the National Criticality Experiment Research Center, ...

  7. Presidential Proclamation: Critical Infrastructure Security and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presidential Proclamation: Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 Presidential Proclamation: Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 A ...

  8. Microsoft Word - Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proclamation -- Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY AND RESILIENCE MONTH, 2013 - - - - - - - BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE ...

  9. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  10. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  11. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  12. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  13. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

    2000-08-01

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  14. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

    2000-08-31

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  15. material recovery

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dispose of dangerous nuclear and radiological material, and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise.

  16. Innovative Materials, Processes, and Tools Improve Performance, Quality of White LEDs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumileds Lighting joined forces with Sandia National Laboratories to investigate critical materials issues related to solid-state lighting technology.

  17. Production of battery grade materials via an oxalate method ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production of battery grade materials via an oxalate method Title: Production of battery grade materials via an oxalate method An active electrode material for electrochemical ...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. ...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. ...

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. ...

  1. CMI Course Inventory: Metallurgical Engineering/Materials Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to rare earths and critical materials. Other courses are available in these areas: Geology EngineeringGeochemistry Mining Engineering Chemistry Engineering Mineral...

  2. Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical aspects of technology commercialization of preproduction high performance thermoelectric materials available for device developers, data analysis, and future plans are discussed

  3. Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

  4. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research January 5-6, 2011 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences

  5. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research May 7-8, 2009 Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE ASCR Program Manager Yukiko Sekine Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:54

  6. Cermet materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C.

    2008-12-23

    A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

  7. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  8. Aqueous cutting fluid for machining fissionable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duerksen, Walter K.; Googin, John M.; Napier, Jr., Bradley

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a cutting fluid for machining fissionable material. The cutting fluid is formed of glycol, water and boron compound in an adequate concentration for effective neutron attenuation so as to inhibit criticality incidents during machining.

  9. CRAD, NNSA- Criticality Safety (CS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    CRAD for Criticality Safety (CS). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and thorough assessment of elements of safety and health programs.

  10. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Aquila, D.M.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  11. Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Saeid Ghamaty

    2012-08-16

    This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

  12. An assessment of criticality safety at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado, July--September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattson, Roger J.

    1989-09-01

    This is a report on the 1989 independent Criticality Safety Assessment of the Rocky Flats Plant, primarily in response to public concerns that nuclear criticality accidents involving plutonium may have occurred at this nuclear weapon component fabrication and processing plant. The report evaluates environmental issues, fissile material storage practices, ventilation system problem areas, and criticality safety practices. While no evidence of a criticality accident was found, several recommendations are made for criticality safety improvements. 9 tabs.

  13. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  14. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Page...

  15. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Pag...

  16. FY2008 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-01-01

    This program focuses on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development.

  17. FY2012 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-01-01

    FY2012 annual progress report focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development.

  18. Propulsion materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Edward J.; Sullivan, Rogelio A.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  19. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences August 3-4, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors [not available] NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion

  20. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics November 12-13, 2009 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences

  1. Advanced Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Manufacturing Office NOTICE OF INTENT: Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Reducing Energy of Materials And Decreasing Emissions in M NOTICE OF INTENT: Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Reducing Energy of Materials And Decreasing Emissions in M The Energy Department intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement for approximately $70 million entitled "Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute for Reducing EMbodied-energy And Decreasing

  2. Meeting Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP Meeting Materials Meeting Materials Here you will find various items to be used before and during the requirements review. The following documents are included: Case study worksheet to be filled in by meeting participants Sample of a completed case study from a Nuclear Physics requirements workshop held in 2011 A graph of NERSC and HEP usage as a function of time A powerpoint template you can use at the requirements review Downloads CaseStudyTemplate.docx | unknown Case Study Worksheet -

  3. A MATERIAL WORLD Tailoring Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WINTER* 2000-2001 A MATERIAL WORLD Tailoring Materials for the Future A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL VOLUME 2, NO. 4 ALSO: New Materials for Microsystems Predictive Modeling Meets the Challenge S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y ON THE COVER: Bonnie Mckenzie operates a dual beam Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscope (FIB/SEM). The image on the computer screen shows a cross section of a radiation-hardened device. The cross section was rendered with the FIB/SEM and allowed the

  4. Materials at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

  5. Hardfacing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

    2012-01-17

    A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  6. Training Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Materials Training Materials The following tutorials are produced by NERSC staff and are intended to provide basic instruction on NERSC systems. Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category Introduction to Hybrid OpenMP/MPI Programming June 24, 2004 | Author(s): Helen He | Download File: hybridTalk.pdf | pdf | 1005 KB sample managed list Using OpenMP October 20, 2010 | Author(s): Helen He | Introduction to MPI January 11, 2010 | Author(s): Richard

  7. Reference Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials There are a variety of reference materials the NSSAB utilizes and have been made available on its website. Documents Fact Sheets - links to Department of Energy Nevada Field Office webpage Public Reading Room NTA Public Reading Facility Open Monday through Friday, 7:30 am to 4:30 pm (except holidays) 755C East Flamingo Road Las Vegas, Nevada 89119 Phone (702) 794-5106 http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/testingarchive.aspx DOE Electronic Database Also available to the public is an

  8. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems. Activity Area A: Urban and rural ahs analysis. Resource materials. Final report, August 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, H.; Holstein, J.; Ottesen, J.; Hoffman, P.

    1995-11-01

    The identification of technical, operational, and safety issues was accomplished primarily through a comprehensive literature search and a series of expert workshops. The literature search included identification and review of a broad range of previous AHS, IVHS, and related topic research and findings. This work supported a preliminary identification and/or confirmation and detailed description of major technical features, for example, (1) geometric design characteristics such as interchange design, lane width, and median configuration and (2) vehicle characteristics such as braking and acceleration capabilities. Accident type and severity data were also obtained and analyzed for various roadway categories and roadway improvements. Considering improved safety as a primary driver for the implementation of AHSs, current accident statistics were examined carefully to assess their potential utility as an indicator of likely AHS benefits. A summary of freeway design and operating characteristic information was developed not only to guide the ongoing work in this activity area, but to serve as a key point of reference for the team`s other seven activity areas throughout the remainder of the program.

  9. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

  10. Use of a Web Site to Enhance Criticality Safety Training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, S T; Morman, J

    2003-08-04

    Currently, a website dedicated to enhancing communication and dissemination of criticality safety information is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). This website was developed as part of the DOE response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 97-2, which reflected the need to make criticality safety information available to a wide audience. The website is the focal point for DOE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) activities, resources and references, including hyperlinks to other sites actively involved in the collection and dissemination of criticality safety information. The website is maintained by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under auspices of the NCSP management. One area of the website contains a series of Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training (NCSET) modules. During the past few years, many users worldwide have accessed the NCSET section of the NCSP website and have downloaded the training modules as an aid for their training programs. This trend was remarkable in that it points out a continuing need of the criticality safety community across the globe. It has long been recognized that training of criticality safety professionals is a continuing process involving both knowledge-based training and experience-based operations floor training. As more of the experienced criticality safety professionals reach retirement age, the opportunities for mentoring programs are reduced. It is essential that some method be provided to assist the training of young criticality safety professionals to replenish this limited human expert resource to support on-going and future nuclear operations. The main objective of this paper is to present the features of the NCSP website, including its mission, contents, and most importantly its use for the dissemination of training modules to the criticality safety community. We will discuss lessons learned and several ideas for future development in the area of web-based training for criticality safety professionals. Our effort is intended to stimulate a discussion of ideas and solicit participation in the development of the next generation of a web-based criticality training site that can be used to assist the training of newcomers to this important safety discipline.

  11. Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-01

    Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

  12. Criticality assessment of LLRWDF closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrack, A.G.; Weber, J.H.; Woody, N.D.

    1992-10-06

    During the operation of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF), large amounts (greater than 100 kg) of enriched uranium (EU) were buried. This EU came primarily from the closing and decontamination of the Naval Fuels Facility in the time period from 1987--1989. Waste Management Operations (WMO) procedures were used to keep the EU boxes separated to prevent possible criticality during normal operation. Closure of the LLRWDF is currently being planned, and waste stabilization by Dynamic Compaction (DC) is proposed. Dynamic compaction will crush the containers in the LLRWDF and result in changes in their geometry. Research of the LLRWDF operations and record keeping practices have shown that the EU contents of trenches are known, but details of the arrangement of the contents cannot be proven. Reviews of the trench contents, combined with analysis of potential critical configurations, revealed that some portions of the LLRWDF can be expected to be free of criticality concerns while other sections have credible probabilities for the assembly of a critical mass, even in the uncompacted configuration. This will have an impact on the closure options and which trenches can be compacted.

  13. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  14. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-09-23

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  15. Burnup estimation of fuel sourcing radioactive material based on monitored Cs and Pu isotopic activity ratios in Fukushima N. P. S. accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, T.; Suzuki, M.; Ando, Y.

    2012-07-01

    After the severe core damage of Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Station, radioactive material leaked from the reactor buildings. As part of monitoring of radioactivity in the site, measurements of radioactivity in soils at three fixed points have been performed for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs with gamma-ray spectrometry and for Pu, Pu, and {sup 240}Pu with {alpha}-ray spectrometry. Correlations of radioactivity ratios of {sup 134}Cs to {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 238}Pu to the sum of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu with fuel burnup were studied by using theoretical burnup calculations and measurements on isotopic inventories, and compared with the Cs and Pu radioactivity rations in the soils. The comparison indicated that the burnup of the fuel sourcing the radioactivity was from 18 to 38 GWd/t, which corresponded to that of the fuel in the highest power and, therefore, the highest decay heat in operating high-burnup fueled BWR cores. (authors)

  16. A Review of Criticality Accidents 2000 Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas P. McLaughlin; Shean P. Monahan; Norman L. Pruvost; Vladimir V. Frolov; Boris G. Ryazanov; Victor I. Sviridov

    2000-05-01

    Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Sixty accidental power excursions are reviewed. Sufficient detail is provided to enable the reader to understand the physical situation, the chemistry and material flow, and when available the administrative setting leading up to the time of the accident. Information on the power history, energy release, consequences, and causes are also included when available. For those accidents that occurred in process plants, two new sections have been included in this revision. The first is an analysis and summary of the physical and neutronic features of the chain reacting systems. The second is a compilation of observations and lessons learned. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this report.

  17. Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kung, Harold H.; Lee, Jung K.

    2014-07-15

    A durable electrode material suitable for use in Li ion batteries is provided. The material is comprised of a continuous network of graphite regions integrated with, and in good electrical contact with a composite comprising graphene sheets and an electrically active material, such as silicon, wherein the electrically active material is dispersed between, and supported by, the graphene sheets.

  18. FUEL HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this design calculation is to perform a criticality evaluation of the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) and the operations and processes performed therein. The current intent of the FHF is to receive transportation casks whose contents will be unloaded and transferred to waste packages (WP) or MGR Specific Casks (MSC) in the fuel transfer bays. Further, the WPs will also be prepared in the FHF for transfer to the sub-surface facility (for disposal). The MSCs will be transferred to the Aging Facility for storage. The criticality evaluation of the FHF features the following: (I) Consider the types of waste to be received in the FHF as specified below: (1) Uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF); (2) Canistered CSNF (with the exception of horizontal dual-purpose canister (DPC) and/or multi-purpose canisters (MPCs)); (3) Navy canistered SNF (long and short); (4) Department of Energy (DOE) canistered high-level waste (HLW); and (5) DOE canistered SNF (with the exception of MCOs). (II) Evaluate the criticality analyses previously performed for the existing Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-certified transportation casks (under 10 CFR 71) to be received in the FHF to ensure that these analyses address all FHF conditions including normal operations, and Category 1 and 2 event sequences. (III) Evaluate FHF criticality conditions resulting from various Category 1 and 2 event sequences. Note that there are currently no Category 1 and 2 event sequences identified for FHF. Consequently, potential hazards from a criticality point of view will be considered as identified in the ''Internal Hazards Analysis for License Application'' document (BSC 2004c, Section 6.6.4). (IV) Assess effects of potential moderator intrusion into the fuel transfer bay for defense in depth. The SNF/HLW waste transfer activity (i.e., assembly and canister transfer) that is being carried out in the FHF has been classified as safety category in the ''Q-list'' (BSC 2003, p. A-6). Therefore, this design calculation is subject to the requirements of the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004), even though the FHF itself has not yet been classified in the Q-list. Performance of the work scope as described and development of the associated technical product conform to the procedure AP-3.124, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''.

  19. Microsoft Word - FINAL Materials Strategy Request for Information May 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 | Department of Energy FINAL Materials Strategy Request for Information May 5 2010 Microsoft Word - FINAL Materials Strategy Request for Information May 5 2010 PDF icon Microsoft Word - FINAL Materials Strategy Request for Information May 5 2010 More Documents & Publications RFI: DOE Materials Strategy RFI U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy Request for Information Microsoft Word - FINAL Materials Strategy Request for Information May 5 2010 DE-FOA-0001346 --

  20. Critical current of the dispersion superconducting phase, obtained during aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanov, Y.P.; Smirnov, L.V.; Sadovskiy, V.D.; Volkenshteyn, N.V.

    1983-12-01

    High critical parameters of plastic superconductors on a base of solid solutions are obtained as a result of plastic deformation and heat treatment. At the same time, the critical current and field of monocrystalline samples turn out to be significantly lower. The preservation of superconducting in high magnetic fields is conditioned by the presence of a dense network of very thin intersecting filaments, which remain superconducting during the conversion of the main mass of the material into the normal state with the help of an electron microscope. A lamellar threddike structure was determined which was conditioned by plastic deformation and the breakdown of a solid solution.

  1. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ID 412- 11/16/2012 - Page 1 Log No 2012-263 Reference Materials * Transporting Radioactive Waste to the Nevada National Security Site fact sheet (ww.nv.energy.gov/library/factsheets/DOENV_990.pdf) - Generators contract with commercial carriers - U.S. Department of Transportation regulations require carriers to select routes which minimize radiological risk * Drivers Route and Shipment Information Questionnaire completed by drivers to document routes taken to the NNSS upon entry into Nevada -

  2. Materials for Energy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials for Energy The discovery and synthesis of new compounds are critical bottlenecks both for grand challenge science and for Argonne's research strategies in energy, environment, biology and national security. In the search for alternative energy sources, we need to make new discoveries in materials science. We need catalysts to convert feedstocks into fuels, new architectures for better solar cells and materials for advanced energy storage, including lithium batteries. New high-tech

  3. Los Alamos Critical Assemblies Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1981-06-01

    The Critical Assemblies Facility of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been in existence for thirty-five years. In that period, many thousands of measurements have been made on assemblies of /sup 235/U, /sup 233/U, and /sup 239/Pu in various configurations, including the nitrate, sulfate, fluoride, carbide, and oxide chemical compositions and the solid, liquid, and gaseous states. The present complex of eleven operating machines is described, and typical applications are presented.

  4. Hazardous Material Shipments | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Material Shipments GET (General Employee Training): General Information: Materials and Transportation personnel perform domestic and international shipping activities associated with hazardous materials transported onsite and offsite. All activities are performed by personnel who have been trained for their respective transportation functions, as required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) and International Air Transport Association (IATA). Shipments are made for the research and

  5. Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03

    The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

  6. Chemistry and Materials Science Department annual report, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borg, R.J.; Sugihara, T.T.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W.

    1989-12-31

    This is the first annual report of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) Department. The principal purpose of this report is to provide a concise summary of our scientific and technical accomplishments for fiscal years 1988 and 1989. The report is also tended to become part of the archival record of the Department`s activities. We plan to publish future editions annually. The activities of the Department can be divided into three broad categories. First, C&MS staff are assigned by the matrix system to work directly in a program. These programmatic assignments typically involve short deadlines and critical time schedules. A second category is longer-term research and development in technologies important to Laboratory programs. The focus and direction of this technology-base work are generally determined by programmatic needs. Finally, the Department manages its own research program, mostly long-range in outlook and basic in orientation. These three categories are not mutually exclusive but form a continuum of technical activities. Representative examples of all three are included in this report. The principal subject matter of this report has been divided into six sections: Innovations in Analysis and Characterization, Advanced Materials, Metallurgical Science and Technology, Surfaces and Interfaces, Energetic Materials and Chemical Synthesis, and Energy-Related Research and Development.

  7. Casting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Anil R.; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M.; Neece, Faurice D.; Singh, Nipendra P.

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  8. Alloy materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  9. Construction material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2008-07-22

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  10. Storage containers for radioactive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

    1980-07-31

    A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

  11. Material Protection, Accounting and Control

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Overview and Advanced Instrumentation Development Michael Miller, Ph.D. National Technical Director Los Alamos National Laboratory Instrumentation and Control Review Meeting September 17, 2014 LA-UR-14-27347 2 Introduction September 17, 2014 n Preventing, deterring, and detecting misuse of nuclear materials and associated fuel cycle technologies is of paramount concern to both national and global security. Success in this area is critical for the existing and future nuclear energy enterprise.

  12. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-31

    This report summarizes EMaCC activities for fiscal year 1990 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the department. The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the department. (JL)

  13. Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.; Janikowski, Stuart K.

    2006-01-10

    A method for destroying halocarbons. Halocarbon materials are reacted in a dehalogenation process wherein they are combined with a solvent in the presence of a catalyst. A hydrogen-containing solvent is preferred which functions as both a solvating agent and hydrogen donor. To augment the hydrogen donation capacity of the solvent if needed (or when non-hydrogen-containing solvents are used), a supplemental hydrogen donor composition may be employed. In operation, at least one of the temperature and pressure of the solvent is maintained near, at, or above a critical level. For example, the solvent may be in (1) a supercritical state; (2) a state where one of the temperature or pressure thereof is at or above critical; or (3) a state where at least one of the temperature and pressure thereof is near-critical. This system provides numerous benefits including improved reaction rates, efficiency, and versatility.

  14. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including transitions from magnetic to nonmagnetic phases in a broad pressure-temperature range; using X-ray methods including the newly developed RIXS high-pressure technique to explore pressure-tuned electronic excitations in strongly correlated 3d-materials; and advancing transport and magnetic techniques for measurements on small samples at very high pressures in a wide temperature range, with the application of focused ion beam technology and photolithography tailored to the design of microcircuits down to a nanoscale size, thus expanding the horizon in the search for novel physical phenomena at ultrahigh pressures. Apply new optical magnetic sensing techniques with NV- centers in diamond to detect superconductivity and magnetic transitions with unprecedented spatial resolution.

  15. Electrorecycling of Critical and Value Metals from Mobile Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lister, Tedd E.; Wang, Peming; Anderko, Andre

    2014-09-01

    Mobile electronic devices such as smart phones and tablets are a significant source of valuable metals that should be recycled. Each year over a billion devices are sold world-wide and the average life is only a couple years. Value metals in phones are gold, palladium, silver, copper, cobalt and nickel. Devices now contain increasing amounts of rare earth elements (REE). In recent years the supply chain for REE has moved almost exclusively to China. They are contained in displays, speakers and vibrators within the devices. By US Department of Energy (DOE) classification, specific REEs (Nd, Dy, Eu, Tb and Y) are considered critical while others (Ce, La and Pr) are deemed near critical. Effective recycling schemes should include the recovery of these critical materials. By including more value materials in a recovery scheme, more value can be obtained by product diversification and less waste metals remains to be disposed of. REEs are mined as a group such that when specific elements become critical significantly more ore must be processed to capture the dilute but valuable critical elements. Targeted recycling of items containing the more of the less available critical materials could address their future criticality. This presentation will describe work in developing aqueous electrochemistry-based schemes for recycling metals from scrap mobile electronics. The electrorecycling process generates oxidizing agents at an anode while reducing dissolved metals at the cathode. E vs pH diagrams and metals dissolution experiments are used to assess effectiveness of various solution chemistries. Although several schemes were envisioned, a two stages process has been the focus of work: 1) initial dissolution of Cu, Sn, Ag and magnet materials using Fe+3 generated in acidic sulfate and 2) final dissolution of Pd and Au using Cl2 generated in an HCl solution. Experiments were performed using simulated metal mixtures. Both Cu and Ag were recovered at ~ 97% using Fe+3 while leaving Au and Ag intact. REE were extracted from the dissolved mixture using conventional methods. A discussion of future research directions will be discussed.

  16. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-07

    This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

  17. The role of lanthanides in optical materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    A survey is presented of the use of the lanthanides as chemical components in transmitting optical materials and as activators in materials for luminescent, electro-optic, magneto-optic, and various photosensitive applications.

  18. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and thin film solar cells, to explore non-vacuum ink-based approaches to solar cell production, as well as large-scale and low-cost deposition and processing of thin film CdTe material.

  19. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  20. Thermal criticality in a repository environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, E.E.

    1995-11-01

    This report explores a scenario in which burial containers fail and fissile material is transported through the tuff by water to some location, away from the burial site, where an over-moderated critical mass gradually accumulates. Because of the low solubilities of plutonium and uranium, and the low ground water velocities, the analysis shows that such a scenario with {sup 239}Pu is probably impossible because the time required to accumulate a critical mass is large compared with the half-life of the {sup 239}Pu. In the case of {sup 235}U, the analysis indicates that the accumulation rates are so low that relatively small fission power levels would consume the {sup 235}U as fast as it accumulates, and that the thermal conductivity of the tuff is large enough to prevent a significant increase in temperature. Thus, the conditions for the removal of water by boiling and the associated autocatalytic increase in reactivity are not met in the case of {sup 235}U. An explosive release of energy does not appear to be possible. A simple water voiding model, which allows water removal at about the fastest possible rate, was used to explore a scenario in which the fuel accumulation rate was arbitrarily increased enough to cause water boiling and the associated dryout of the tuff. Calculations for this case indicate that disruption of the tuff, leading to a neutronic shutdown, would probably occur before an explosive energy release could be generated. Additional scenarios, which should be investigated in future work are identified.

  1. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 6. Automotive Metals - Crosscutting The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight ...

  2. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 2. Automotive Metals - Wrought The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight ...

  3. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - Cover and Contents The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total ...

  4. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 1. Introduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 1. Introduction The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total ...

  5. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 8. Polymer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 8. Polymer Composites Research and Development The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a ...

  6. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - A. Acronyms...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - A. Acronyms and Abbreviations The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight ...

  7. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 10. Nondestruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 10. Nondestructive Evaluation The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight ...

  8. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive Metals - Cast The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction ...

  9. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 4. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 4. Automotive Metals - Titanium The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight ...

  10. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1. Recycling FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 11. Recycling The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction ...

  11. 2014 Annual Merit review Results Report - Materials Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    review Results Report - Materials Technologies 2014 Annual Merit review Results Report - Materials Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies research activities PDF...

  12. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5. Automotive Metals - Steel FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 5. Automotive Metals - Steel The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a ...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Lightweight Materials activity (LM) focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty ...

  14. Overview of Joining Activities in Lightweighting Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  15. Critical heat flux test apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welsh, Robert E.; Doman, Marvin J.; Wilson, Edward C.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

  16. Canister Transfer Facility Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.E. Monroe-Rammsy

    2000-10-13

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the criticality risk in the surface facility for design basis events (DBE) involving Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) standardized canisters (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System [CRWMS] Management and Operating Contractor [M&O] 2000a). Since some of the canisters will be stored in the surface facility before they are loaded in the waste package (WP), this calculation supports the demonstration of concept viability related to the Surface Facility environment. The scope of this calculation is limited to the consideration of three DOE SNF fuels, specifically Enrico Fermi SNF, Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA) SNF, and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF.

  17. Conditioning of carbonaceous material prior to physical beneficiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warzinski, Robert P.; Ruether, John A.

    1987-01-01

    A carbonaceous material such as coal is conditioned by contact with a supercritical fluid prior to physical beneficiation. The solid feed material is contacted with an organic supercritical fluid such as cyclohexane or methanol at temperatures slightly above the critical temperature and pressures of 1 to 4 times the critical pressure. A minor solute fraction is extracted into critical phase and separated from the solid residuum. The residuum is then processed by physical separation such as by froth flotation or specific gravity separation to recover a substantial fraction thereof with reduced ash content. The solute in supercritical phase can be released by pressure reduction and recombined with the low-ash, carbonaceous material.

  18. Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Protection Standards | Department of Energy Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Energy asset owners are facing a monumental challenge as they address compliance with the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Standards (CIP-002 through CIP-009). The increased

  19. Quantum Criticality and Black Holes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sachdev, Subir [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2009-09-01

    I will describe the behavior of a variety of condensed matter systems in the vicinity of zero temperature quantum phase transitions. There is a remarkable analogy between the hydrodynamics of such systems and the quantum theory of black holes. I will show how insights from this analogy have shed light on recent experiments on the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Studies of new materials and trapped ultracold atoms are yielding new quantum phases, with novel forms of quantum entanglement. Some materials are of technological importance: e.g. high temperature superconductors. Exact solutions via black hole mapping have yielded first exact results for transport coefficients in interacting many-body systems, and were valuable in determining general structure of hydrodynamics. Theory of VBS order and Nernst effect in cuprates. Tabletop 'laboratories for the entire universe': quantum mechanics of black holes, quark-gluon plasma, neutrons stars, and big-bang physics.

  20. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, Michael L; Shingledecker, John P

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.