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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Critical Materials:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

2

Critical Materials Institute  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

Alex King

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

Critical Materials Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

4

Critical Materials Hub  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

5

CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INL Recovery of Critical Materials from Consumer Devices 3 3-2 3.2.6 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 McGuire, Michael ORNL...

6

CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INL National Technology Roadmap for Critical Materials 4 4-3 4.3.3 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 Payne, Steve LLNL New Efficient...

7

Careers | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy,MUSEUM DISPLAYCareers The Critical Materials Institute

8

The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Burst BufferFluoriteSedimentsThe Critical

9

Critical Materials Strategy Summary  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison UraniumCredit-Based Interest RateCriticalCritical

10

Critical Materials Workshop  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebratePartners with Siemens onSite | Department ofServicesCritical

11

Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos Welcome and Overview of Workshop and Energy Innovation Hubs Speakers * Dr. Leo...

12

DOE and Critical Materials Video (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a text version of the "DOE and Critical Materials" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

13

Critical Materials Institute List of Projects | Critical Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-GovNaturalInstitute Critical Materials

14

Critical Materials Workshop Final Participant List  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

List of participants who attended the Critical Materials Workshop held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA

15

Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications September 2011 Resnick Institute Report C in the generation, storage, transmission, conversion and conservation of energy. + Institute Leadership Harry://resnick.caltech.edu Pasadena, CA. USA + #12;Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications California Institute

16

Critical Materials Research in DOE Video (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a text version of the "Critical Materials Research in DOE" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

17

EV Everywhere Workshop: Electric Motors and Critical Materials...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout Group Report EV Everywhere Workshop: Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout Group Report Presentation given at the EV...

18

Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy Video (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a text version of the "Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

19

REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s REACT Project, short for “Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies”, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Geothermal materials development activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

Kukacka, L.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Mines Welcomes Middle School Students | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science and Technology. The students spent the day at Mines to learn about Earth, energy, the environment, critical materials and mining. The students enjoyed a chemistry show...

22

Microsoft Word - TRILATERAL CRITICAL MATERIALS WORKSHOP Summary...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

efficient and environmentally superior separation and extraction processes, R&D on material substitutes, more efficient use with minimization of waste, and enhanced...

23

Critical Materials Hub | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison UraniumCredit-Based Interest RateCritical

24

Comments/Questions | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporous Materials | Center Upcoming Eventshourly

25

Criticality safety analysis on fissile materials in Fukushima reactor cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study focuses on the criticality analysis for geological disposal of damaged fuels from Fukushima reactor cores. Starting from the basic understanding of behaviors of plutonium and uranium, a scenario sequence for criticality event is considered. Due to the different mobility of plutonium and uranium in geological formations, the criticality safety is considered in two parts: (1) near-field plutonium system and (2) far-field low enriched uranium (LEU) system. For the near-field plutonium system, a mathematical analysis for pure-solute transport was given, assuming a particular buffer material and waste form configuration. With the transport and decay of plutonium accounted, the critical mass of plutonium was compared with the initial load of a single canister. Our calculation leads us to the conclusion that our system with the initial loading being the average mass of plutonium in an assembly just before the accident is very unlikely to become critical over time. For the far-field LEU system, due to the uncertainties in the geological and geochemical conditions, calculations were made in a parametric space that covers the variation of material compositions and different geometries. Results show that the LEU system could not remain sub-critical within the entire parameter space assumed, although in the iron-rich rock, the neutron multiplicity is significantly reduced.

Liu, Xudong; Lemaitre-Xavier, E.; Ahn, Joonhong [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hirano, Fumio [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Geological Isolation Research and Development Directorate, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical materials strategy, based upon additional events and information, by the end of 2011.DOE's strategy with respect to critical materials rests on three pillars. First, diversified global supply chains are essential. To manage supply risk, multiple sources of materials are required. This means taking steps to facilitate extraction, processing and manufacturing here in the United States, as well as encouraging other nations to expedite alternative supplies. In all cases, extraction and processing should be done in an environmentally sound manner. Second, substitutes must be developed. Research leading to material and technology substitutes will improve flexibility and help meet the material needs of the clean energy economy. Third, recycling, reuse and more efficient use could significantly lower world demand for newly extracted materials. Research into recycling processes coupled with well-designed policies will help make recycling economically viable over time.The scope of this report is limited. It does not address the material needs of the entire economy, the entire energy sector or even all clean energy technologies. Time and resource limitations precluded a comprehensive scope. Among the topics that merit additional research are the use of rare earth metals in catalytic converters and in petroleum refining. These topics are discussed briefly in Chapter 2.

Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

CMI hosts EU, Japan to discuss global critical materials strategy |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2,MaterialsMaterialsCritical

28

CMI in Research Publications in 2013 | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2,MaterialsMaterialsCritical3

29

Join Us Tuesday, Jan. 15 for a Google+ Hangout on Critical Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

What are critical materials? We will be answering that question and more during our first Google+ Hangout.

30

A new neutron absorber material for criticality control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new neutron absorber material based on a nickel metal matrix composite has been developed for applications such as the Transport, Aging, and Disposal (TAD) canister for the Yucca Mountain Project. This new material offers superior corrosion resistance to withstand the more demanding geochemical environments found in a 300,000 year to a million year repository. The lifetime of the TAD canister is currently limited to 10,000 years, reflecting the focus of current regulations embodied in 10 CFR 63. The use of DOE-owned nickel stocks from decommissioned enrichment facilities could reduce the cost compared to stainless steel/boron alloy. The metal matrix composite allows the inclusion of more than one neutron absorber compound, so that the exact composition may be adjusted as needed. The new neutron absorber material may also be used for supplementary criticality control of stored or transported PWR spent fuel by forming it into cylindrical pellets that can be inserted into a surrogate control rod. (authors)

Wells, Alan H. [PhD Consultant, 2846 Peachtree Walk, Duluth, GA 30096 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE, SEPTEMBER 8-9, 2014 ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL...

32

Activation of porous MOF materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritcal fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Activation of porous MOF materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the treatment of solvent-containing MOF material to increase its internal surface area involves introducing a liquid into the MOF in which liquid the solvent is miscible, subjecting the MOF to supercritical conditions for a time to form supercritical fluid, and releasing the supercritical conditions to remove the supercritical fluid from the MOF. Prior to introducing the liquid into the MOF, occluded reaction solvent, such as DEF or DMF, in the MOF can be exchanged for the miscible solvent.

Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

34

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Critical Materials | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

essential to clean energy technologies. 8. Critical materials include five rare earth elements -- dysprosium, terbium, europium, neodymium and yttrium. Other elements --...

35

First anniversary gift for Critical Material Institute? Inventions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to clean energy technologies. The inventions include improved extractive processes, recycling techniques, and substitute materials-technologies designed to increase...

36

US-EU-Japan Working Group on Critical Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for high- efficiency motors" Mamoru Nakamura, Director, Material Research Institute for Sustainable Development, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology...

37

Die Materials for Critical Applications and Increased Production Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Die materials for aluminum die-casting need to be resistant to heat checking, and have good resistance to washout and to soldering in a fast flow of molten aluminum. To resist heat checking, die materials should have a low coefficient of thermal expansion, high thermal conductivity, high hot yield strength, good temper softening resistance, high creep strength, and adequate ductility. To resist the washout and soldering, die materials should have high hot hardness, good temper resistance, low solubility in molten aluminum and good oxidation resistance. It is difficult for one material to satisfy with all above requirements. In practice, H13 steel is the most popular material for aluminum die casting dies. While it is not an ideal choice, it is substantially less expensive to use than alternative materials. However, in very demanding applications, it is sometimes necessary to use alternative materials to ensure a reasonable die life. Copper-base, nickel-base alloys and superalloys, titanium-,molybdenum-, tungsten-base alloys, and to some extent yttrium and niobium alloys, have all been considered as potential materials for demanding die casting applications. Most of these alloys exhibit superior thermal fatigue resistance, but suffer from other shortcomings.

David Schwam; John Wallace; Sebastian Birceanu

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Critical materials research needed to secure U.S. manufacturing, officials say  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Department officials said yesterday that developing alternatives to critical materials, like rare earth metals used in solar panels and wind turbines, is crucial to American manufacturing stability and can help the United States circumvent global market pressures.

39

What is the Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISP Sign InWhat Was ThereinWhatWhat is

40

Critical Materials:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site | Department of Energyto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Active, polymer-based composite material implementing simple shear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel active material for controllable, high work density applications was designed, fabricated, analyzed, and tested. This active material uses a lens-shaped element to implement simple shear motion with gas pressure actuation. The lens element...

Lee, Sang Jin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Conducting polymers as potential active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electronically,conducting polymers represent an interesting class of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors because of the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized types of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilizes conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 40 watt-hours per kilogram of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated.

Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Raistrick, I.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferraris, J.P. [Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Conducting polymers as potential active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electronically,conducting polymers represent an interesting class of materials for use in electrochemical capacitors because of the combination of high capacitive energy density and low materials cost. Three generalized types of electrochemical capacitors can be constructed using conducting polymers as active material, and in the third of these, which utilizes conducting polymers that can be both n- and p-doped, energy densities of up to 40 watt-hours per kilogram of active material on both electrodes have been demonstrated.

Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Raistrick, I.; Gottesfeld, S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Ferraris, J.P. (Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Material and Chemical Processing (Concentrated Solar) (4 Activities...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

chemical reactions, and to treat materials for increased hardness and resistance to corrosion. The activities are: Can sunlight break down different kinds of plastics? Can...

45

The critical role of microscopy and spectroscopy in the development of new materials for microelectronics packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been over thirty years since sintered aluminum nitride (AlN) has been the focus of many research and development activities in Japan, the U.S., and Europe. Only in the past 5 years has there been significant use of this material in microelectronics. There are many reasons for this considerable time for application including, technology needs and acceptance of a new material. Also important has been the role of materials understanding of AlN through the use of microscopy and spectroscopy. We illustrate the use of both standard and unique characterization techniques to elucidate the nature of the crystalline defects which control the important property of thermal conductivity.

Youngman, R.A. [Carborundum Corp., Phoenix, AZ (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Early detection of critical material degradation by means of electromagnetic multi-parametric NDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an increasing number of power plants operated in excess of their original design service life an early recognition of critical material degradation in components will gain importance. Many years of reactor safety research allowed for the identification and development of electromagnetic NDE methods which detect precursors of imminent damage with high sensitivity, at elevated temperatures and in a radiation environment. Regarding low-alloy heat-resistant steel grade WB 36 (1.6368, 15NiCuMoNb5), effects of thermal and thermo-mechanical aging on mechanical-technological properties and several micromagnetic parameters have been thoroughly studied. In particular knowledge regarding the process of copper precipitation and its acceleration under thermo-mechanical load has been enhanced. Whilst the Cu-rich WB 36 steel is an excellent model material to study and understand aging effects related to neutron radiation without the challenge of handling radioactive specimens in a hot cell, actually neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel materials were investigated as well. The neutron fluence experienced and the resulting shift of the ductile-brittle transition temperature were determined electromagnetically, and it was shown that weld and base material can be distinguished from the cladded side of the RPV wall. Low-cycle fatigue of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 347 (1.4550, X6CrNiNb18-10) has been characterized with electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) at temperatures of up to 300 °C. Time-of-flight and amplitude of the transmitted ultrasound signal were evaluated against the number of load cycles applied and observed as an indication of the imminent material failure significantly earlier than monitoring stresses or strains.

Szielasko, Klaus; Tschuncky, Ralf; Rabung, Madalina; Altpeter, Iris; Dobmann, Gerd [Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing (IZFP), Campus E3 1, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Seiler, Georg; Herrmann, Hans-Georg; Boller, Christian [Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing (IZFP), Campus E3 1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany and Saarland University, Chair of NDT and Quality Assurance, Campus E3 1, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

47

Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated ...

Zhao, Wei

48

Active infrared materials for beam steering.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mid-infrared (mid-IR, 3 {micro}m -12 {micro}m) is a highly desirable spectral range for imaging and environmental sensing. We propose to develop a new class of mid-IR devices, based on plasmonic and metamaterial concepts, that are dynamically controlled by tunable semiconductor plasma resonances. It is well known that any material resonance (phonons, excitons, electron plasma) impacts dielectric properties; our primary challenge is to implement the tuning of a semiconductor plasma resonance with a voltage bias. We have demonstrated passive tuning of both plasmonic and metamaterial structures in the mid-IR using semiconductors plasmas. In the mid-IR, semiconductor carrier densities on the order of 5E17cm{sup -3} to 2E18cm{sup -3} are desirable for tuning effects. Gate control of carrier densities at the high end of this range is at or near the limit of what has been demonstrated in literature for transistor style devices. Combined with the fact that we are exploiting the optical properties of the device layers, rather than electrical, we are entering into interesting territory that has not been significantly explored to date.

Brener, Igal; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Gin, Aaron V.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Miao, Xiaoyu; Barrick, Todd A.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

activation structural materials: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

activation structural materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Active vibration...

50

Modeling mining economics and materials markets to inform criticality assessment and mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional criticality-assessment methods drawn from the existing literature are often limited to evaluations of scarcity risks, or rely on price as an indicator of criticality. Such approaches, however, are ill-suited ...

Poulizac, Claire Marie Franc?oise

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Soft Autonomous Materials --Using Active Elasticity and Embedded Distributed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft Autonomous Materials -- Using Active Elasticity and Embedded Distributed Computation Nikolaus and demonstrate shape changing, and autonomous, sensor-based locomotion using distributed control. We show elasticity in their designs [23]. Here we show soft robots that can autonomously undergo shape-change and gen

Liang, Haiyi

52

Safety Activities on Safety-Critical Software for Reactor Protection System Gee-Yong Park1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Activities on Safety-Critical Software for Reactor Protection System Gee-Yong Park1 , Kee, 373-1 Guseong, Yuseong, Daejon, 305-701 KOREA INTRODUCTION A fully-digitalized reactor protection Instrumentation & Control Systems) project in order to be used in newly-constructed nuclear power plants and also

Jee, Eunkyoung

53

Critical Role of Magnesium Ions in DNA Polymerase 's Closing and Active Site Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical Role of Magnesium Ions in DNA Polymerase 's Closing and Active Site Assembly Linjing Yang nucleotide with conserved catalytic residues (Asp190, Asp192, Asp256) and the two functional magnesium ions adjustments of the nucleotide-binding and catalytic magnesium ions help guide polymerase selection

Schlick, Tamar

54

Design of semi-active variable impedance materials using field-responsive fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I explored the design of a thin variable impedance material using electrorheological (ER) fluid that is intended to be worn by humans. To determine the critical design parameters of this material, the shear ...

Eastman, Douglas Elmer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Module Design, Materials, and Packaging Research Team: Activities and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our team activities are directed at improving PV module reliability by incorporating new, more effective, and less expensive packaging materials and techniques. New and existing materials or designs are evaluated before and during accelerated environmental exposure for the following properties: (1) Adhesion and cohesion: peel strength and lap shear. (2) Electrical conductivity: surface, bulk, interface and transients. (3) Water vapor transmission: solubility and diffusivity. (4) Accelerated weathering: ultraviolet, temperature, and damp heat tests. (5) Module and cell failure diagnostics: infrared imaging, individual cell shunt characterization, coring. (6) Fabrication improvements: SiOxNy barrier coatings and enhanced wet adhesion. (7) Numerical modeling: Moisture ingress/egress, module and cell performance, and cell-to-frame leakage current. (8) Rheological properties of polymer encapsulant and sheeting materials. Specific examples will be described.

McMahon, T. J.; del Cueto, J.; Glick, S.; Jorgensen, G.; Kempe, M.; Kennedy, C.; Pern, J.; Terwilliger, K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

Bernard, Patrick (Massy, FR); Baudry, Michelle (Le Pontaroux, FR)

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

57

Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Silicone Materials for Sustainable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Photovoltaic (PV) industry has aggressive goals to decrease $/kWh and lower the overall cost of ownership for Sustainable Energy: Emphasis on Photovoltaic Materials for Module Assembly and Installation with Ann Norris properties that make them excellent candidates for photovoltaic module encapsulants and other materials

Crawford, T. Daniel

58

Materials for Consideration in Standardized Canister Design Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies materials and material mitigation processes that might be used in new designs for standardized canisters for storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. It also addresses potential corrosion issues with existing dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) that could be addressed in new canister designs. The major potential corrosion risk during storage is stress corrosion cracking of the weld regions on the 304 SS/316 SS canister shell due to deliquescence of chloride salts on the surface. Two approaches are proposed to alleviate this potential risk. First, the existing canister materials (304 and 316 SS) could be used, but the welds mitigated to relieve residual stresses and/or sensitization. Alternatively, more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic or duplex stainless steels, could be used. Experimental testing is needed to verify that these alternatives would successfully reduce the risk of stress corrosion cracking during fuel storage. For disposal in a geologic repository, the canister will be enclosed in a corrosion-resistant or corrosionallowance overpack that will provide barrier capability and mechanical strength. The canister shell will no longer have a barrier function and its containment integrity can be ignored. The basket and neutron absorbers within the canister have the important role of limiting the possibility of post-closure criticality. The time period for corrosion is much longer in the post-closure period, and one major unanswered question is whether the basket materials will corrode slowly enough to maintain structural integrity for at least 10,000 years. Whereas there is extensive literature on stainless steels, this evaluation recommends testing of 304 and 316 SS, and more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic, duplex, and superduplex stainless steels, at repository-relevant physical and chemical conditions. Both general and localized corrosion testing methods would be used to establish corrosion rates and component lifetimes. Finally, it is unlikely that the aluminum-based neutron absorber materials that are commonly used in existing DPCs would survive for 10,000 years in disposal environments, because the aluminum will act as a sacrificial anode for the steel. We recommend additional testing of borated and Gd-bearing stainless steels, to establish general and localized corrosion resistance in repository-relevant environmental conditions.

Bryan, Charles R.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; David Enos; Stephanie Teich-McGoldrick; Ernest Hardin

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

About Critical Materials | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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60

News about Rare Earths, New or Critical Materials, and Their Uses: |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Contacts: Alex King, Director, Critical Materials Institute, (515) 296-4505  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops 2008O" ContactsContacts forFive Critical

62

Critical Material Parameters for Modeling Devices Made from an Epoxy-Based Shape Memory Polymer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sandwiched with a thermocouple between them, the temperature curve shows that 90 minutes is more than sufficient time to complete heat a single specimen to the test temperature............................ 45 ix 34 High temperature tensile test... for Testing and Materials DIC Digital Image Correlation DMA Dynamic Mechanical Analysis DSC Differential Scanning Calorimetry FEA Finite Element...

Erel, Veysel

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

63

Access to Critical Raw Materials: A U.S. Perspective Statement of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and engineered materials create the potential for rapid increases in demand for some elements used previously in response to depletion of existing reserves and growing demand for mineral resources. Reserves are a subset will not keep up with the explosion of demand due to the time lags involved in bringing new production capacity

64

ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials2014Energy ANNUAL DOE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE

65

ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials2014Energy ANNUAL DOE

66

Synthesis and characterization of activated carbo-aluminosilicate material from oil shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis and characterization of activated carbo-aluminosilicate material from oil shale Reyad activated carbo-aluminosilicate materials were prepared from oil shale by chemical activation. The chemical Published by Elsevier Inc. Keywords: Synthesis; Activated carbo-aluminosilicate; Adsorption; Oil shale

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

67

Productivity Techniques and Quality Aspects in the Criticality Safety Evaluation of Y-12 Type-B Fissile Material Packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inventory of certified Type-B fissile material packages consists of ten performance-based packages for offsite transportation purposes, serving transportation programs at the Y-12 National Security Complex. The containment vessels range from 5 to 19 in. in diameter and from 17 to 58 in. in height. The drum assembly external to the containment vessel ranges from 18 to 34 in. in diameter and from 26 to 71 in. in height. The weight of the packaging (drum assembly and containment vessel) ranges from 239 to 1550 lb. The older DT-nn series of Cellotex-based packages are being phased-out and replaced by a new generation of Kaolite-based ('Y-12 patented insulation') packages capable of withstanding the dynamic crush test 10 CFR 71.73(c)(2). Three replacement packages are in various stages of development; two are in use. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 6M specification package, which does not conform to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements for Type-B packages, is no longer authorized for service on public roads. The ES-3100 shipping package is an example of a Kaolite-based Type-B fissile material package developed as a replacement package for the DOT 6M. With expanded utility, the ES-3100 is designed and licensed for transporting highly enriched uranium and plutonium materials on public roads. The ES-3100 provides added capability for air transport of up to 7-kg quantities of uranium material. This paper presents the productivity techniques and quality aspects in the criticality safety evaluation of Y-12 packages using the ES-3100 as an example.

DeClue, J. F.

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term Irradiation at Elevated Temperature: Critical Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, dislocation loop formation and growth, radiation induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, as well as the possibility for void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiation-induced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses to 200 dpa and beyond). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible, as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. This project builds upon joint work at the proposing institutions, under a NERI-C program that is scheduled to end in September, to understand the effects of radiation on these important materials. The objective of this project is to conduct critical experiments to understand the evolution of microstructural and microchemical features (loops, voids, precipitates, and segregation) and mechanical properties (hardening and creep) under high temperature and full dose range radiation, including the effect of differences in the initial material composition and microstructure on the microstructural response, including key questions related to saturation of the microstructure at high doses and temperatures.

Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

active nuclear material: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(SM) is a universal statutory designation to indicate materials bearing uranium that is depleted in the isotope uranium-235, or at the natural isotopic ratio, and thorium. The...

70

CRITICAL MATERIALS MUSEUM DISPLAY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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71

Timelines | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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72

Resources | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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73

CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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74

Critical Materials Institute |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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75

Research | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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76

Resources | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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77

Critical Materials Strategy Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site | Department of Energyto Partnering |

78

Critical Materials Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site | Department of Energyto Partnering |

79

Critical Materials Workshop Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site | Department of Energyto Partnering |

80

Disclaimers | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Characterization of Nanoscale Reinforced Polymer Composites as Active Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based polymer nanocomposites have generated a lot of interest as potential multifunctional materials due to the exceptional physical properties of SWNTs. To date, investigations into the electromechanical...

Deshmukh, Sujay

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

82

Multiple-Coincidence Active Neutron Interrogation of Fissionable Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a beam of tagged 14.1 MeV neutrons to probe for the presence of fissionable materials, we have measured n-?-? coincidences from depleted uranium (DU). The multiple coincidence rate is substantially above that measured from lead, tungsten, and iron. The presence of coincidences involving delayed gammas in the DU time spectra provides a signature for fissionable materials that is distinct from non-fissionable ones. In addition, the information from the tagged neutron involved in the coincidence gives the position of the fissionable material in all three dimensions. The result is an imaging probe for fissionable materials that is more compact and that produces much less radiation than other solutions.

J.P. Hurley, R.P. Keegan, J.R. Tinsley, R. Trainham, and S.C. Wilde

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Active vibration suppression of a exible structure using smart material and a modular control patch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active vibration suppression of a ÂŻexible structure using smart material and a modular control of vibration suppression of a ÂŻexible structure using smart materials and a miniaturized digital controller demonstrated the capacity of smart material being used as sensors and actuators for vibration suppression

84

Site-Dependent Activity of Atomic Ti Catalysts in Al-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site-Dependent Activity of Atomic Ti Catalysts in Al-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials Abdullah Al storage processes. Here we analyze the role of atomic Ti catalysts in the hydrogenation of Al-based hydrogen storage materials. We show that Ti atoms near the Al surface activate gas-phase H2, a key step

Ciobanu, Cristian

85

Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume I. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the plasma materials interaction field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the field of plasma materials interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be central for near-term experiments, for intermediate-range reactor devices including D-T burning physics experiments, and for long-term reactor machines. Critical technical issues are ones central to understanding and successful operation of existing and near-term experiments/reactors or devices of great importance for the long run, i.e., ones which will require an extensive, long-term development effort and thus should receive attention now. Four subgroups were formed to assess the critical PMI issues along four major lines: (1) PMI and plasma confinement physics experiments; (2) plasma-edge modelling and theory; (3) surface physics; and (4) materials technology for in-vessel components and the first wall. The report which follows is divided into four major sections, one for each of these topics.

Conn, R.W.; Gauster, W.B.; Heifetz, D.; Marmar, E.; Wilson, K.L. (eds.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Demolitions Produce Recyclable Materials for Organization Promoting Economic Activity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Demolitions have helped generate more than 8 million pounds of metal at the Piketon site for recycling, further promoting economic activity in the region thanks to the American Recovery and...

87

Mechanical counter-pressure space suit design using active materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suits have the potential to greatly improve the mobility of astronauts as they conduct planetary exploration activities; however, the underlying technologies required to provide ...

Holschuh, Bradley Thomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Material and Chemical Processing (Concentrated Solar) (4 Activities) |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment Accident TolerantDepartment ofMaterial Balance

89

Critical analysis of the Hanford spent nuclear fuel project activity based cost estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, the SNFP developed a baseline change request (BCR) and submitted it to DOE-RL for approval. The schedule was formally evaluated to have a 19% probability of success [Williams, 1998]. In December 1997, DOE-RL Manager John Wagoner approved the BCR contingent upon a subsequent independent review of the new baseline. The SNFP took several actions during the first quarter of 1998 to prepare for the independent review. The project developed the Estimating Requirements and Implementation Guide [DESH, 1998] and trained cost account managers (CAMS) and other personnel involved in the estimating process in activity-based cost (ABC) estimating techniques. The SNFP then applied ABC estimating techniques to develop the basis for the December Baseline (DB) and documented that basis in Basis of Estimate (BOE) books. These BOEs were provided to DOE in April 1998. DOE commissioned Professional Analysis, Inc. (PAI) to perform a critical analysis (CA) of the DB. PAI`s review formally began on April 13. PAI performed the CA, provided three sets of findings to the SNFP contractor, and initiated reconciliation meetings. During the course of PAI`s review, DOE directed the SNFP to develop a new baseline with a higher probability of success. The contractor transmitted the new baseline, which is referred to as the High Probability Baseline (HPB), to DOE on April 15, 1998 [Williams, 1998]. The HPB was estimated to approach a 90% confidence level on the start of fuel movement [Williams, 1998]. This high probability resulted in an increased cost and a schedule extension. To implement the new baseline, the contractor initiated 26 BCRs with supporting BOES. PAI`s scope was revised on April 28 to add reviewing the HPB and the associated BCRs and BOES.

Warren, R.N.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Materials and Textile Architecture Analyses for Mechanical Counter-Pressure Space Suits using Active Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical counter-pressure (MCP) space suits have the potential to improve the mobility of astronauts as they conduct planetary exploration activities. MCP suits differ from traditional gas-pressurized space suits by ...

Buechley, Leah

93

Criticality Safety Evaluation of a LLNL Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hands-on experimental training in the physical behavior of multiplying systems is one of ten key areas of training required for practitioners to become qualified in the discipline of criticality safety as identified in DOE-STD-1135-99, ''Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification''. This document is a criticality safety evaluation of the training activities (or operations) associated with HS-3200, ''Laboratory Class for Criticality Safety''. These activities utilize the Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS). The original intent of HS-3200 was to provide LLNL fissile material handlers with a practical hands-on experience as a supplement to the academic training they receive biennially in HS-3100, ''Fundamentals of Criticality Safety'', as required by ANSI/ANS-8.20-1991, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Training''. HS-3200 is to be enhanced to also address the training needs of nuclear criticality safety professionals under the auspices of the NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

Heinrichs, D P

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

Overview of Joining Activities in Lightweighting Materials | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDieselEnergy Joining Activities in Lightweighting

95

THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Criticality Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

A. Alsaed

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

97

Electrode-active material for electrochemical batteries and method of preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery electrode material comprises a non-stoichiometric electrode-active material which forms a redox pair with the battery electrolyte, an electrically conductive polymer present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 5% by weight of the electrode-active material, and a binder. The conductive polymer provides improved proton or ion conductivity and is a ligand resulting in metal ion or negative ion vacancies of less than about 0.1 atom percent. Specific electrodes of nickel and lead are disclosed.

Varma, R.

1983-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

Electrode-active material for electrochemical batteries and method of preparation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery electrode material comprising a non-stoichiometric electrode-active material which forms a redox pair with the battery electrolyte, an electrically conductive polymer present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 5% by weight of the electrode-active material, and a binder. The conductive polymer provides improved proton or ion conductivity and is a ligand resulting in metal ion or negative ion vacancies of less than about 0.1 atom percent. Specific electrodes of nickel and lead are disclosed.

Varma, Ravi (Hinsdale, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Real space mapping of ionic diffusion and electrochemical activity in energy storage and conversion materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for probing mobile ion diffusivity and electrochemical reactivity on a nanometer length scale of a free electrochemically active surface includes a control module that biases the surface of the material. An electrical excitation signal is applied to the material and induces the movement of mobile ions. An SPM probe in contact with the surface of the material detects the displacement of mobile ions at the surface of the material. A detector measures an electromechanical strain response at the surface of the material based on the movement and reactions of the mobile ions. The use of an SPM tip to detect local deformations allows highly reproducible measurements in an ambient environment without visible changes in surface structure. The measurements illustrate effective spatial resolution comparable with defect spacing and well below characteristic grain sizes of the material.

Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Kumar, Amit; Dudney, Nancy J; Jesse, Stephen

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

100

Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 MAG LAB REPORTS Volume 18 No. 1 CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

GUIDANCE FOR THE PROPER CHARACTERIZATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF LOW SPECIFIC ACTIVITY MATERIALS AND SURFACE CONTAMINATED OBJECTS FOR DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regulatory concerns over the proper characterization of certain waste streams led CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to develop written guidance for personnel involved in Decontamination & Decommissioning (D&D) activities, facility management and Waste Management Representatives (WMRs) involved in the designation of wastes for disposal on and off the Hanford Site. It is essential that these waste streams regularly encountered in D&D operations are properly designated, characterized and classified prior to shipment to a Treatment, Storage or Disposal Facility (TSDF). Shipments of waste determined by the classification process as Low Specific Activity (LSA) or Surface Contaminated Objects (SCO) must also be compliant with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation (DOE) regulations as well as Department of Energy (DOE) orders. The compliant shipment of these waste commodities is critical to the Hanford Central Plateau cleanup mission. Due to previous problems and concerns from DOE assessments, CHPRC internal critiques as well as DOT, a management decision was made to develop written guidance and procedures to assist CHPRC shippers and facility personnel in the proper classification of D&D waste materials as either LSA or SCO. The guidance provides a uniform methodology for the collection and documentation required to effectively characterize, classify and identify candidate materials for shipping operations. A primary focus is to ensure that waste materials generated from D&D and facility operations are compliant with the DOT regulations when packaged for shipment. At times this can be difficult as the current DOT regulations relative to the shipment of LSA and SCO materials are often not clear to waste generators. Guidance is often sought from NUREG 1608/RAMREG-003 [3]: a guidance document that was jointly developed by the DOT and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and published in 1998. However, NUREG 1608 [3] is now thirteen years old and requires updating to comply with the newer DOT regulations. Similar challenges present themselves throughout the nuclear industry in both commercial and government operations and therefore, this is not only a Hanford Site problem. Shipping radioactive wastes as either LSA or SCO rather than repacking it is significantly cheaper than other DOT radioactive materials shipping classifications particularly when the cost of packages is included. Additionally, the need to 'repackage' materials for transport can often increase worker exposure, necessitated by 'repackaging' waste materials into DOT 7 A Type A containers.

PORTSMOUTH JH; BLACKFORD LT

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

102

Transgenic Evaluation of Activated Mutant Alleles of SOS2 Reveals a Critical Requirement for Its Kinase Activity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Sevilla 41080, Spain In Arabidopsis thaliana, the calcium binding protein Salt Overly Sensitive3 (SOS3 of SOS2 can be constructed in vitro by changing Thr168 to Asp in the activation loop of the kinase is known to elicit a rapid increase in the free calcium concentration in the cytoplasm (Knight et al., 1997

Schumaker, Karen

103

Technical assessment of critical Plasma-Materials Interaction (PMI) and High Heat Flux (HHF) issues for alternative fusion concepts (AFCs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of approaches to fusion energy are being pursued as alternative fusion concepts (AFCs). The goal of these systems is to provide a more desirable method of producing fusion energy than the mainline programs. Some of the AFCs have both a Low Power Density (LPD) option and a High Power Density (HPD) option. A summary of representative AFC programs and their associated PMI and HHF issues is followed by the technical assessment of the critical issues. These requirements are discussed relative to the mainline and/or HPD components. The HPD options are contrasted with a tabulation of the characteristics of components for the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP), which is representative of the HPD concept.

Downing, J.N.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Chitosancellulose composite for wound dressing material. Part 2. Antimicrobial activity, blood absorption ability, and biocompatibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chitosan­cellulose composite for wound dressing material. Part 2. Antimicrobial activity, blood. In this study, the novel composites containing CS and cellulose (CEL) (i.e., [CEL 1 CS]), which we have previ fibroblasts. The [CEL 1 CS] composites were found to inhibit the growth of both Gram positive and negative

Reid, Scott A.

106

Materializing Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated and informed by perspectives on sustainability and design, this paper draws on a diverse body of scholarly works related to energy and materiality to articulate a perspective on energy-as-materiality and propose a design approach of materializing energy. Three critical themes are presented: the intangibility of energy, the undifferentiatedness of energy, and the availability of energy. Each theme is developed through combination of critical investigation and design exploration, including the development and deployment of several novel design artifacts: Energy Mementos and The Local Energy Lamp. A framework for interacting with energy-as-materiality is proposed involving collecting, keeping, sharing, and activating energy. A number of additional concepts are also introduced, such as energy attachment, energy engagement, energy attunement, local energy and energy meta-data. Our work contributes both a broader, more integrative design perspective on energy and materiality as well as a diversity of more specific concepts and artifacts that may be of service to designers and researchers of interactive systems concerned with sustainability and energy. Author Keywords Sustainability, energy, materiality, design, design theory

James Pierce; Eric Paulos

107

Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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109

Studies on Supercapacitor Electrode Material from Activated Lignin-Derived Mesoporous Carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We synthesized mesoporous carbon from pre-cross-linked lignin gel impregnated with a surfactant as the pore-forming agent, and then activated the carbon through physical and chemical methods to obtain activated mesoporous carbon. The activated mesoporous carbons exhibited 1.5- to 6-fold increases in porosity with a maximum BET specific surface area of 1148 m2/g and a pore volume of 1.0 cm3/g. Slow physical activation helped retain dominant mesoporosity; however, aggressive chemical activation caused some loss of the mesopore volume fraction. Plots of cyclic voltammetric data with the capacitor electrode made from these carbons showed an almost rectangular curve depicting the behavior of ideal double-layer capacitance. Although the pristine mesoporous carbon exhibited the same range of surface-area-based capacitance as that of other known carbon-based supercapacitors, activation decreased the surface-area-based specific capacitance and increased the gravimetric-specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbons. Surface activation lowered bulk density and electrical conductivity. Warburg impedance as a vertical tail in the lower frequency domain of Nyquist plots supported good supercapacitor behavior for the activated mesoporous carbons. Our work demonstrated that biomass-derived mesoporous carbon materials continue to show potential for use in specific electrochemical applications.

Saha, Dipendu [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Yunchao [ORNL] [ORNL; Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL] [ORNL; Chen, Jihua [ORNL] [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL] [ORNL; Hensley, Dale K [ORNL] [ORNL; Grappe, Hippolyte A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL] [ORNL; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Electrodes and electrochemical storage cells utilizing tin-modified active materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrode has a substrate and a finely divided active material on the substrate. The active material is ANi.sub.x-y-z Co.sub.y Sn.sub.z, wherein A is a mischmetal or La.sub.1-w M.sub.w, M is Ce, Nd, or Zr, w is from about 0.05 to about 1.0, x is from about 4.5 to about 5.5, y is from 0 to about 3.0, and z is from about 0.05 to about 0.5. An electrochemical storage cell utilizes such an electrode as the anode. The storage cell further has a cathode, a separator between the cathode and the anode, and an electrolyte.

Anani, Anaba (Lauderhill, FL); Johnson, John (Calverton, NY); Lim, Hong S. (Agoura Hills, CA); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Schwarz, Ricardo (Los Alamos, NM); Srinivasan, Supramaniam (College Station, TX)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Status and key issues of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels as the structural material for a DEMO blanket  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status and key issues of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels R&D are reviewed as the primary candidate structural material for fusion energy demonstration reactor blankets. This includes manufacturing technology, the as-fabricated and irradiates material database and joining technologies. The review indicated that the manufacturing technology, joining technology and database accumulation including irradiation data are ready for initial design activity, and also identifies various issues that remain to be solved for engineering design activity and qualification of the material for international fusion material irradiation facility (IFMIF) irradiation experiments that will validate the data base.

Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Odette, G.R. [University of California, Santa Barbara; Jitsukawa, Shiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Kurtz, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Moeslang, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Germany; Lindau, R. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Germany

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The development of structural materials for reduced long-term activation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reliable calculation of neutron-induced activation of materials requires the inclusion of all kinematically allowed reactions and subsequent reaction chains. While neutron-induced reactions have been sufficiently covered in the past, sequential (x,n) reactions with charged particles x, produced in a first-step reaction, were neglected. To include this type of reaction three new libraries and a preparatory code were developed to produce pseudo cross sections for the European reference code FISPACT. Inventory calculations with the updated FISPACT code, done for all stable elements, showed for 30 elements an increase of at least one of the radiological quantities activity, dose rate and decay heat. Two types of candidate structural materials were investigated: ferritic-martensitic steels and vanadium-based alloys. While V-Cr-Ti alloys without impurities are known to have far superior long-term activation properties, a realistic assumption of technically achievable amounts of tramp elements leads nearly to the same level of activation as for the optimized ferritic-martensitic steels.

Ehrlich, K.; Cierjacks, S.W.; Kelzenberg, S.; Moeslang, A. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Human Resources at Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials  

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114

Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

Shao, Yanqiu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China) [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); College of Chemistry, Mudanjiang Normal University, Mudanjiang 157012 (China); Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)] [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan, Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)] [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Kan, Qiubin, E-mail: qkan@mail.jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)] [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Using Critical Chain Project Management Methodologies to Build a Production Schedule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is the proper management of the essential project details across functions: materials, labor activities the proper management of materials and labor activities. Costs and activity durations were estimated usingUsing Critical Chain Project Management Methodologies to Build a Production Schedule By Clayton D

de Weck, Olivier L.

116

Present status of plasma-wall interactions research and materials development activities in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known in the fusion engineering community that the plasma confinement performance in magnetic fusion devices is strongly affected by edge-plasma interactions with surface components. These plasma-material interactions (PMI) include fuel particle recycling and impurity generation both during normal and off-normal operation. To understand and then to control PMI effects, considerable effort has been made, particularly over the last decade in US, supported by Department of Energy, Division of Development and Technology. Also, because plasma-facing components are generally expected to receive significant amount of heat due to plasma bombardment and run-away electrons, materials must tolerate high-heat fluxes (HHF). The HHF-component research has been conducted in parallel with PMI research. One strong motivation for these research activities is that DT-burning experiments are currently planned in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) in early 1990s. Several different but mutually complementary approaches have been taken in the PMI+HHF research. The first approach is to conduct PMI experiments using toroidal fusion devices such as TFTR. The second one is to simulate elemental processes involved in PMI using ion beams and electron beams, etc. The last one but not least is to use non-tokamak plasma facilities. Along with these laboratory activities, new materials have been developed and evaluated from the PMI+HHF point of view. In this paper, several major PMI+HHF research facilities in US and their activities are briefly reviewed. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Crosscutting Research | Critical Materials Institute  

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118

My Account | Critical Materials Institute  

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119

News Archive | Critical Materials Institute  

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120

News Releases | Critical Materials Institute  

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Privacy Notice | Critical Materials Institute  

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122

Security Notice | Critical Materials Institute  

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My Account | Critical Materials Institute  

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Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute  

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Diversifying Supply | Critical Materials Institute  

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126

Electric Motors and Critical Materials  

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127

Latest News | Critical Materials Institute  

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128

CMI Factsheet | Critical Materials Institute  

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129

Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute  

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invention disclosures | Critical Materials Institute  

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131

Organizational Leadership | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/O performance onAbout Mission Statement

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity source material Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and gain-material for new lasers. The talk... Nano-Materials and Ultrafast Optoelectronic Devices" Abstract: Today's progress in the materials... sciences and nano-technologies...

133

Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation`s defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE`s capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation's defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE's capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

Processes for making dense, spherical active materials for lithium-ion cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes are provided for making dense, spherical mixed-metal carbonate or phosphate precursors that are particularly well suited for the production of active materials for electrochemical devices such as lithium ion secondary batteries. Exemplified methods include precipitating dense, spherical particles of metal carbonates or metal phosphates from a combined aqueous solution using a precipitating agent such as ammonium hydrogen carbonate, sodium hydrogen carbonate, or a mixture that includes sodium hydrogen carbonate. Other exemplified methods include precipitating dense, spherical particles of metal phosphates using a precipitating agent such as ammonium hydrogen phosphate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, sodium phosphate, sodium hydrogen phosphate, sodium dihydrogen phosphate, or a mixture of any two or more thereof. Further provided are compositions of and methods of making dense, spherical metal oxides and metal phosphates using the dense, spherical metal precursors. Still further provided are electrodes and batteries using the same.

Kang, Sun-Ho (Naperville, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

137

Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe-and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences, UniVersity of Western Australia, Australia ReceiVed: August 7, 2006 between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities, and Bonded Interactions G. V; In Final Form: December 6, 2006 Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net

Downs, Robert T.

138

An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

P. Calderoni; P. Sharpe; M. Shimada

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

In-Situ Radiological Surveys to Address Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements During Remediation Activities at the Shallow Land Disposal Area, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania - 12268  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cabrera Services Inc. (CABRERA) is the remedial contractor for the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site in Armstrong County Pennsylvania, a United States (US) Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) contract. The remediation is being completed under the USACE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) which was established to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites previously used by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). As part of the management of the FUSRAP, the USACE is overseeing investigation and remediation of radiological contamination at the SLDA Site in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 US Code (USC), Section 9601 et. seq, as amended and, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 300.430(f) (2). The objective of this project is to clean up radioactive waste at SLDA. The radioactive waste contains special nuclear material (SNM), primarily U-235, in 10 burial trenches, Cabrera duties include processing, packaging and transporting the waste to an offsite disposal facility in accordance with the selected remedial alternative as defined in the Final Record of Decision (USACE, 2007). Of particular importance during the remediation is the need to address nuclear criticality safety (NCS) controls for the safe exhumation and management of waste containing fissile materials. The partnership between Cabrera Services, Inc. and Measutronics Corporation led to the development of a valuable survey tool and operating procedure that are essential components of the SLDA Criticality Safety and Material Control and Accountability programs. Using proven existing technologies in the design and manufacture of the Mobile Survey Cart, the continued deployment of the Cart will allow for an efficient and reliable methodology to allow for the safe exhumation of the Special Nuclear Material in existing SLDA trenches. (authors)

Norris, Phillip; Mihalo, Mark; Eberlin, John; Lambert, Mike [Cabrera Services (United States); Matthews, Brian [Nuclear Safety Associates (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Autoclave Instructions Autoclaves use high temperatures and pressure to inactivate biologically active material to ensure it is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be autoclaved in 15 minutes. Check the protocol. 3. Autoclave waste liquids or solids for 45 active material to ensure it is non-viable prior to waste disposal. See below for directions on how sharps or other items that could pose a hazard. Remove these items or contact NSM or the Biology

de Lijser, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700076 Novel Method for Synthesis of Nano-Materials: Combustion of Active  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOI: 10.1002/adem.200700076 Novel Method for Synthesis of Nano-Materials: Combustion of Active- and combustion synthesis. A combination of combustion and reactive solution approaches leads to so- called solution (aqueous) combustion synthesis (SCS) method.[1­3] Typically SCS involves a self-sustained reaction

Mukasyan, Alexander

142

Hydrogen storage in zeolites: activation of the pore space through incorporation of guest materials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Solid state hydrogen storage materials have become a key area of research over the past 20 years. In this work, the potential of zeolites to… (more)

Turnbull, Matthew Simon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - activation decoupler material Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Materials Science and Technology Division... and decouple transport and local electrochemical reactivity on the nanometer scale. Electrochemical ... Source: Pint, Bruce...

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon materials Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon dioxide through a natural process known as carbonation reaction that results... in carbon dioxide sequestration in these materials. About 19% of the carbon dioxide produced...

145

Recyclable synthesis, characterization, and antimicrobial activity of chitosan-based polysaccharide composite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composite materials Chieu D. Tran, Simon Duri, April L. Harkins Department of Chemistry, Marquette to synthesize novel, biocompatible, and biodegradable composite materials from cellulose (CEL) and chitosan (CS the [CELĂľCS] composites. Since, the IL can be removed from the composites by washing them with water

Reid, Scott A.

146

Computational modeling and design of actively-cooled microvascular materials Soheil Soghrati a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the optimization study, the IGFEM solver is validated through comparison with infrared measurements of the thermal of such systems to a broad field including autonomic materials [6], biotechnology [7,8], chemical reactors [9 in two specific ways: (i) by direct extraction of heat from the thermally loaded material, and (ii

Sottos, Nancy R.

147

Criticality safety assessment of tank 241-C-106 remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A criticality safety assessment was performed in support of Project 320 for the retrieval of waste from tank 241-C-106 to tank 241-AY-102. The assessment was performed by a multi-disciplined team consisting of expertise covering the range of nuclear engineering, plutonium and nuclear waste chemistry,and physical mixing hydraulics. Technical analysis was performed to evaluate the physical and chemical behavior of fissile material in neutralized Hanford waste as well as modeling of the fluid dynamics for the retrieval activity. The team has not found evidence of any credible mechanism to attain neutronic criticality in either tank and has concluded that a criticality accident is incredible.

Waltar, A.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

148

Overview of Fraunhofer IPM Activities in High Temperature Bulk Materials and Device Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given at the 2011 Thermoelectrics Applications Workshop including an overview about Fraunhofer IPM, new funding situation in Germany, high temperature material and modules, energy-autarkic sensors, and thermoelectric metrology.

149

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Active, Tailorable Adhesives for Dissimilar Material Bonding, Repair and Assembly  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Michigan State University at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Active, tailorable...

150

An active system for the detection of special fissile material in small watercraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technique. The MCNP Monte Carlo transport code was used to simulate the use of a pulsed neutron generator to induce fission in the fissile material and then estimate the detector response. The detector modeled was based on elastic scattering-induced recoil...

Johansen, Norman Alfan, III

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment Video (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a text version of the "National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

152

Active magnetic refrigerants based on Gd-Si-Ge material and refrigeration apparatus and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4, where x is equal to or less than 0.5, as a magnetic refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic-II/ferromagnetic-I first order phase transition and extraordinary magneto-thermal properties, such as a giant magnetocaloric effect, that renders the refrigerant more efficient and useful than existing magnetic refrigerants for commercialization of magnetic regenerators. The reversible first order phase transition is tunable from approximately 30 K to approximately 290 K (near room temperature) and above by compositional adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for refrigerating, air conditioning, and liquefying low temperature cryogens with significantly improved efficiency and operating temperature range from approximately 10 K to 300 K and above. Also an active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4, where x is equal to or greater than 0.5, as a magnetic heater/refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/paramagnetic second order phase transition with large magneto-thermal properties, such as a large magnetocaloric effect that permits the commercialization of a magnetic heat pump and/or refrigerant. This second order phase transition is tunable from approximately 280 K (near room temperature) to approximately 350 K by composition adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for low level heating for climate control for buildings, homes and automobile, and chemical processing.

Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA)

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

Active magnetic refrigerants based on Gd-Si-Ge material and refrigeration apparatus and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd{sub 5} (Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 4}, where x is equal to or less than 0.5, as a magnetic refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic-II/ferromagnetic-I first order phase transition and extraordinary magneto-thermal properties, such as a giant magnetocaloric effect, that renders the refrigerant more efficient and useful than existing magnetic refrigerants for commercialization of magnetic regenerators. The reversible first order phase transition is tunable from approximately 30 K to approximately 290 K (near room temperature) and above by compositional adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for refrigerating, air conditioning, and liquefying low temperature cryogens with significantly improved efficiency and operating temperature range from approximately 10 K to 300 K and above. Also an active magnetic regenerator and method using Gd{sub 5} (Si{sub x} Ge{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 4}, where x is equal to or greater than 0.5, as a magnetic heater/refrigerant that exhibits a reversible ferromagnetic/paramagnetic second order phase transition with large magneto-thermal properties, such as a large magnetocaloric effect that permits the commercialization of a magnetic heat pump and/or refrigerant. This second order phase transition is tunable from approximately 280 K (near room temperature) to approximately 350 K by composition adjustments. The active magnetic regenerator and method can function for low level heating for climate control for buildings, homes and automobile, and chemical processing. 27 figs.

Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Pecharsky, V.K.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

CMI Offers Webinars on Critical Materials and Rare Earths | Critical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating theCEFRCBenefits Benefits

155

CMI Webinar: Critical Elements in Phosphate | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating theCEFRCBenefits BenefitsCMITeamCMI

156

Nuclear material safeguards for enrichments plants: Part 4, Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant: Diversion scenarios and IAEA safeguards activities: Safeguards training course  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication is Part 4 of a safeguards training course in Nuclear Material Safeguards for enrichment plants. This part of the course deals with diversion scenarios and safeguards activities at gas centrifuge enrichment plants.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Schemes for the use of conducting polymers as active materials in electrochemical supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a novel conducting polymer based system for use in electrochemical capacitors is described. This system utilizes a new conducting polymer, poly-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-thiophene (PFPT), that can be reversibly n- and p-doped to high charge density. The electrochemical n-dopability of this material can be further improved by cycling in acetonitrile solution that contains a new electrolyte, tetramethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate (Me{sub 4}NCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}). We discuss these improvements in n-dopability in terms of potential electronic and steric influences. We believe that the substituent fluorophenyl group does not communicate with the polythiophene backbone through resonance, and conclude that the ability to n-dope PFPT to high charge density may occur as a result of electron transfer reactions from the conducting polymer backbone into the substituent. This new system for electrochemical capacitors provides the best achievable performance from conducting polymers and generates high energy and power densities that are comparable with noble metal oxide systems, potentially at a fraction of the cost.

Rudge, A.; Davey, J.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferraris, J.P. [Texas Univ., Richardson, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Use of Catalysts in Near-Critical Water Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of heterogeneous catalysts in near-critical water processing provides many challenges of material stability in addition to the normal questions of chemical activity. Conventional catalyst materials developed in traditional organic chemistry or petroleum chemistry applications provide a source of information of materials with the required activities but often without the required stability when used in hot liquid water. The importance of the use of catalysts in near-critical water processing plays a particularly crucial role for the development of renewable fuels and chemicals based on biomass feedstocks. Stability issues include both those related to the catalytic metal and also to the catalyst support material. In fact, the stability of the support is the most likely concern when using conventional catalyst formulations in near-critical water processing. Processing test results are used to show important design parameters for catalyst formulations for use in wet biomass gasification in high-pressure water and in catalytic hydrogenations in water for production of value-added chemical products from biomass in the biorefinery concept. Analytical methods including powder x-ray diffraction for crystallite size and composition determination, surface area and porosity measurements, and elemental analysis have all been used to quantify differences in catalyst materials before and after use. By these methods both the chemical and physical stability of heterogeneous catalysts can be verified.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2005-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

159

Upper critical fields and thermally-activated transport of Nd(0.7Fe0.3) FeAs single crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the resistivity and the upper critical field H{sub c2} of Nd(O{sub 0.7}F{sub 0.3})FeAs single crystals in strong DC and pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T and 60 T, respectively. We found that the field scale of H{sub c2} is comparable to {approx}100 T of high T{sub c} cuprates. H{sub c2}(T) parallel to the c-axis exhibits a pronounced upward curvature similar to what was extracted from earlier measurements on polycrystalline samples. Thus this behavior is indeed an intrinsic feature of oxypnictides, rather than manifestation of vortex lattice melting or granularity. The orientational dependence of H{sub c2} shows deviations from the one-band Ginzburg-Landau scaling. The mass anisotropy decreases as T decreases, from 9.2 at 44K to 5 at 34K. Spin dependent magnetoresistance and nonlinearities in the Hall coefficient suggest contribution to the conductivity from electron-electron interactions modified by disorder reminiscent that of diluted magnetic semiconductors. The Ohmic resistivity measured below T{sub c} but above the irreversibility field exhibits a clear Arrhenius thermally activated behavior over 4--5 decades. The activation energy has very different field dependencies for H{parallel}ab and H{perpendicular}ab. We discuss to what extent different pairing scenarios can manifest themselves in the observed behavior of H{sub c2}, using the two-band model of superconductivity. The results indicate the importance of paramagnetic effects on H{sub c2}(T), which may significantly reduce H{sub c2}(0) as compared to H{sub c2}(0) {approx}200--300 T based on extrapolations of H{sub c2}(T) near T{sub c} down to low temperatures.

Balakirev, Fedor F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jaroszynski, J [NHMFL, FSU; Hunte, F [NHMFL, FSU; Balicas, L [NHMFL, FSU; Jo, Youn - Jung [NHMFL, FSU; Raicevic, I [NHMFL, FSU; Gurevich, A [NHMFL, FSU; Larbalestier, D C [NHMFL, FSU; Fang, L [CHINA; Cheng, P [CHINA; Jia, Y [CHINA; Wen, H H [CHINA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fossil energy materials needs assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of needs for materials of construction for fossil energy systems was prepared by ORNL staff members who conducted a literature search and interviewed various individuals and organizations that are active in the area of fossil energy technology. Critical materials problems associated with fossil energy systems are identified. Background information relative to the various technologies is given and materials research needed to enhance the viability and improve the economics of fossil energy processes is discussed. The assessment is presented on the basis of materials-related disciplines that impact fossil energy material development. These disciplines include the design-materials interface, materials fabrication technology, corrosion and materials compatibility, wear phenomena, ceramic materials, and nondestructive testing. The needs of these various disciplines are correlated with the emerging fossil energy technologies that require materials consideration. Greater emphasis is given to coal technology - particularly liquefaction, gasification, and fluidized bed combustion - than to oil and gas technologies because of the perceived inevitability of US dependence on coal conversion and utilization systems as a major part of our total energy production.

King, R.T.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

GKTC ACTIVITIES TO PROVIDE NUCLEAR MATERIAL PHYSICAL PROTECTION, CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING TRAINING FOR 2011-2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The GKTC was created at the Kyiv Institute of Nuclear Research as a result of collaborative efforts between the United States and Ukraine. The GKTC has been designated by the Ukrainian Government to provide the MPC&A training and methodological assistance to nuclear facilities and nuclear specialists. In 2010 the GKTC has conducted the planned assessment of training needs of Ukrainian MPC&A specialists. The objective of this work is to acquire the detailed information about the number of MPC&A specialists and guard personnel, who in the coming years should receive the further advanced training. As a result of the performed training needs evaluation the GKTC has determined that in the coming years a number of new training courses need to be developed. Some training courses are already in the process of development. Also taking into account the specific of activity on the guarding of nuclear facilities, GKTC has begun to develop the specialized training courses for the guarding unit personnel. The evaluation of needs of training of Ukrainian specialists on the physical protection shows that without the technical base of learning is not possible to satisfy the needs of Ukrainian facilities, in particular, the need for further training of specialists who maintains physical protection technical means, provides vulnerability assessment and testing of technical means. To increase the training effectiveness and create the basis for specialized training courses holding the GKTC is now working on the construction of an Interior (non-classified) Physical Protection Training Site. The objective of this site is to simulate the actual conditions of the nuclear facility PP system including the complex of engineering and technical means that will help the GKTC training course participants to consolidate the knowledge and gain the practical skills in the work with PP system engineering and technical means for more effective performance of their official duties. This paper briefly describes the practical efforts applied to the provision of physical protection specialists advanced training in Ukraine and real results on the way to implement such efforts in 2011-2012.

Romanova, Olena; Gavrilyuk, Victor I.; Kirischuk, Volodymyr; Gavrilyuk-Burakova, Anna; Diakov, Oleksii; Drapey, Sergiy; Proskurin, Dmitry; Dickman, Deborah A.; Ferguson, Ken

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Method of making active magnetic refrigerant, colossal magnetostriction and giant magnetoresistive materials based on Gd-Si-Ge alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method of making an active magnetic refrigerant represented by Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4 alloy for 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0 comprising placing amounts of the commercially pure Gd, Si, and Ge charge components in a crucible, heating the charge contents under subambient pressure to a melting temperature of the alloy for a time sufficient to homogenize the alloy and oxidize carbon with oxygen present in the Gd charge component to reduce carbon, rapidly solidifying the alloy in the crucible, and heat treating the solidified alloy at a temperature below the melting temperature for a time effective to homogenize a microstructure of the solidified material, and then cooling sufficiently fast to prevent the eutectoid decomposition and improve magnetocaloric and/or the magnetostrictive and/or the magnetoresistive properties thereof.

Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Pecharsky, Alexandra O. (Ames, IA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA)

2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

163

CMI Education and Outreach | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by CMI TEAM members: Colorado School of Mines Office of Special Programs & Continuing Education (SPACE) offers a variety of educational programs for industry, K-12 and university....

164

Government Agency Contacts | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermalGo Back to SchoolGovernment Agency

165

Chief Research Scientist | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof a blast-resistantChemistry

166

Critical Materials Institute Affiliates Program MEMBER AGREEMENT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-GovNatural

167

Ideas for Transatlantic Cooperation on Critical Materials,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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168

News About CMI | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn CyberNeutronsNew researchIn This Section EMC2

169

News about CMI Partners | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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170

News about CMI People | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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171

2011 Critical Materials Strategy | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement Awardflash2007-42attachment1.pdfmodule(EE) | DepartmentFeedstock 2011Department2011

172

Improving Reuse & Recycling | Critical Materials Institute  

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173

What CMI Does | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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174

2010 Critical Materials Strategy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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175

Critical Materials Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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176

Critical Materials Workshop | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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177

Critical Materials Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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178

Critical Materials Workshop Final Participant List  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009Site | Department of Energyto Partnering

179

FA 1: Diversifying Supply | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced OilExtracting theExtremeM ^ FF. WardF.1:

180

FA 2: Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

FA 4: Crosscutting Research | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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182

Older Public Presentations | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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183

Iowa lab gets critical materials research center  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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184

CMI Invention Disclosures | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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185

CMI Recent Presentations | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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186

CMI Social Media | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science, andAnalysis1 SolelyCHANGE INDOECMI

187

CMI Unique Facilities | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science, andAnalysis1 SolelyCHANGE INDOECMIUnique

188

CMI in Research Publications | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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189

CMI in the News | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy, science, andAnalysis1 SolelyCHANGEin Researchin the

190

CMI Affiliate Members | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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191

CMI Develops Outreach Resources | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating theCEFRC InDevelops Outreach

192

CMI Education and Outreach | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating theCEFRC InDevelopsEducation and

193

CMI Grand Challenge Problems | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating theCEFRC InDevelopsEducation

194

CMI Industry Survey | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating theCEFRC

195

CMI Membership Benefits | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating theCEFRCBenefits Benefits of CMI

196

CMI Membership Program | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating theCEFRCBenefits Benefits of

197

CMI Success Stories | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating theCEFRCBenefits BenefitsCMI

198

CMI Team Members | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating theCEFRCBenefits BenefitsCMITeam

199

Critical Materials Institute UPDATE | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASLNanoporousTestimonyContact Us -

200

CMI Guidance Documents | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2, 6/14/13)CLEANCMB @3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CMI Meeting September 2014 | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2, 6/14/13)CLEANCMB @3CMI

202

Meet the CMI Researchers | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey MathematicaMeasuringMedical PlansAboutMeet the

203

One Integrated Team | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeeding access1 TechnicalOil inventoriesquasicrystals |

204

Tank farm nuclear criticality review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of stored wastes at the Hanford Site Tank Farm Complex was reviewed by a team of senior technical personnel whose expertise covered all appropriate aspects of fissile materials chemistry and physics. The team concluded that the detailed and documented nucleonics-related studies underlying the waste tanks criticality safety basis were sound. The team concluded that, under current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality accident is incredible in any of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SST), double-shell tanks (DST), or double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTS) on the Hanford Site.

Bratzel, D.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

205

Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material characterization %3CU%2B2013%3E active stimulation of highly enriched uranium.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.

Marleau, Peter; Nowack, Aaron B.; Clarke, Shaun D. [University of Michigan; Monterial, Mateusz [University of Michigan; Paff, Marc [University of Michigan; Pozzi, Sara A. [University of Michigan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Critical Materials Institute uses the Materials Genome approach to  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on γ-Al2O3.Winter (Part 2) |IO

207

Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Structures and Materials, 3989:531- 538. Biggerstaff,2002. “Electroviscoelastic Materials As Active Dampers”,Smart Structures and Materials, 4695:345-350. Biggerstaff,

Biggerstaff, Janet M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

if it is a gas leak, do not activate building alarms, use mobile phones, hand held radios, electronic equipment or light flammable material!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas leak gas leak if it is a gas leak, do not activate building alarms, use mobile phones, hand held radios, electronic equipment or light flammable material! 1. If you discover a Gas Leak, shout and check that the nearest gas isolator switch is off. 4. Evacuate the building immediately, avoiding

Hickman, Mark

209

Critical pulse power components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical components for pulsed power conditioning systems will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be placed on those components requiring significant development efforts. Capacitors, for example, are one of the weakest elements in high-power pulsed systems, especially when operation at high-repetition frequencies for extended periods of time are necessary. Switches are by far the weakest active components of pulse power systems. In particular, opening switches are essentially nonexistent for most applications. Insulaton in all systems and components requires development and improvement. Efforts under way in technology base development of pulse power components will be discussed.

Sarjeant, W.J.; Rohwein, G.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Lecture notes for criticality safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

Fullwood, R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Durability of Materials in a Stress-Response Framework: Acrylic Materials for Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Durability of Materials in a Stress-Response Framework: Acrylic Materials for Photovoltaic Systems materials for enhanced photovoltaic (PV) performance, it is critical to have quantitative knowledge developed for solar radiation durability studies of solar and environmentally exposed photovoltaic materials

Rollins, Andrew M.

212

Nuclear criticality safety guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.] [eds.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Materials for breeding blankets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are several candidate concepts for tritium breeding blankets that make use of a number of special materials. These materials can be classified as Primary Blanket Materials, which have the greatest influence in determining the overall design and performance, and Secondary Blanket Materials, which have key functions in the operation of the blanket but are less important in establishing the overall design and performance. The issues associated with the blanket materials are specified and several examples of materials performance are given. Critical data needs are identified.

Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.C.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties.

Panitz, Janda K. (Sandia Park, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Neiser, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM); Moffatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties. 6 figs.

Panitz, J.K.; Reed, S.T.; Ashley, C.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Moffatt, W.C.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

10 Things You Didn't Know About Critical Materials | Critical Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation InExplosion Monitoring:Home|PhysicsGas SeparationsRelevant0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

217

Anomalous critical fields in quantum critical superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-temperature superconductivity. However, the exact mechanism by which this occurs remains poorly understood. The iron-pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As1?xPx)2 is perhaps the clearest example to date of a high temperature quantum critical superconductor, and so it is a... mixing of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity, suggesting that a highly unusual vortex state is realised in quantum critical superconductors. Quantum critical points (QCPs) can be associated with a variety of different order-disorder phenomena...

Putzke, C.; Walmsley, P.; Fletcher, J.D.; Malone, L.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; See, P.; Beere, H.E.; Ritchie, D.A.; Kasahara, S.; Mizukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Carrington, A.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Porous Materials Porous Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Porous Materials x Porous Materials · Physical properties * Characteristic impedance p = p 0 e -jk xa- = vej[ ] p x - j ; Zc= p ve = c ka 0k = c 1-j #12;2 Porous Materials · Specific acoustic impedance Porous Materials · Finite thickness ­ blocked p e + -jk (x-d)a p e - jk (x-d)a d x #12

Berlin,Technische Universität

219

Catalyst material and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The material of the present invention is a mixture of catalytically active material and carrier materials, which may be catalytically active themselves. Hence, the material of the present invention provides a catalyst particle that has catalytically active material throughout its bulk volume as well as on its surface. The presence of the catalytically active material throughout the bulk volume is achieved by chemical combination of catalytically active materials with carrier materials prior to or simultaneously with crystallite formation.

Matson, Dean W. (Kennewick, WA); Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Linehan, John C. (Richland, WA); Bean, Roger M. (Richland, WA); Brewer, Thomas D. (Richland, WA); Werpy, Todd A. (Richland, WA); Darab, John G. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Graphene nanosheets-polypyrrole hybrid material as a highly active catalyst support for formic acid electro-oxidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electro-oxidation when the weight feed ratio of GO to pyrrole monomer is 2 : 1. The superior performance. Therefore, the synthesis of hybrid materials consisting of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with PPy matrix polymerization method (Fig. 1). Then the palladium Fig. 1 Schematic of the synthesis of Pd/RGO-PPy catalysts

Gao, Hongjun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Nuclear Materials Contained in High-Activity Waste Arising from the Operations at the 'SHELTER' Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986, the explosion dispeesed nuclear materials contained in the nuclear fuel of the reactor core over the destroyed facilities at Unit No. 4 and over the territory immediately adjacent to the destroyed unit. The debris was buried under the Cascade Wall. Nuclear materials at the SHELTER can be characterized as spent nuclear fuel, fresh fuel assemblies (including fuel assemblies with damaged geometry and integrity, and individual fuel elements), core fragments of the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4, finely-dispersed fuel (powder/dust), uranium and plutonium compounds in water solutions, and lava-like nuclear fuel-containing masses. The new safe confinement (NSC) is a facility designed to enclose the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4 destroyed by the accident. Construction of the NSC involves excavating operations, which are continuously monitored including for the level of radiation. The findings of such monitoring at the SHELTER site will allow us to characterize the recovered radioactive waste. When a process material categorized as high activity waste (HAW) is detected the following HLW management operations should be involved: HLW collection; HLW fragmentation (if appropriate); loading HAW into the primary package KT-0.2; loading the primary package filled with HAW into the transportation cask KTZV-0.2; and storing the cask in temporary storage facilities for high-level solid waste. The CDAS system is a system of 3He tubes for neutron coincidence counting, and is designed to measure the percentage ratio of specific nuclear materials in a 200-liter drum containing nuclear material intermixed with a matrix. The CDAS consists of panels with helium counter tubes and a polyethylene moderator. The panels are configured to allow one to position a waste-containing drum and a drum manipulator. The system operates on the ‘add a source’ basis using a small Cf-252 source to identify irregularities in the matrix during an assay. The platform with the source is placed under the measurement chamber. The platform with the source material is moved under the measurement chamber. The design allows one to move the platform with the source in and out, thus moving the drum. The CDAS system and radioactive waste containers have been built. For each drum filled with waste two individual measurements (passive/active) will be made. This paper briefly describes the work carried out to assess qualitatively and quantitatively the nuclear materials contained in high-level waste at the SHELTER facility. These efforts substantially increased nuclear safety and security at the facility.

Cherkas, Dmytro

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fast Reactor Spent Fuel Processing: Experience and Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses operational and criticality safety experience associated with the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility which uses a pyrometallurgical process to treat spent fast reactor metallic fuel. The process is conducted in an inert atmosphere hot cell. The process starts with chopping metallic fuel elements into a basket. The basket is lowered into molten salt (LiCl-KCl) along with a steel mandrel. Active metal fission products, transuranic metals and sodium metal in the spent fuel undergo chemical oxidation and form chlorides. Voltage is applied between the basket, which serves as an anode, and the mandrel, which serves as a cathode, causing metallic uranium in the spent fuel to undergo electro-chemical oxidation thereby forming uranium chloride. Simultaneously at the cathode, uranium chloride undergoes electro-chemical reduction and deposits uranium metal onto the mandrel. The uranium metal and accompanying entrained salt are placed in a distillation furnace where the uranium melts forming an ingot and the entrained salt boils and subsequently condenses in a separate crucible. The uranium ingots are placed in long term storage. During the ten year operating history, over one hundred criticality safety evaluations were prepared. All criticality safety related limits and controls for the entire process are contained in a single document which required over thirty revisions to accommodate the process changes. Operational implementation of the limits and controls includes use of a near real-time computerized tracking system. The tracking system uses an Oracle database coupled with numerous software applications. The computerized tracking system includes direct fuel handler interaction with every movement of material. Improvements to this system during the ten year history include introduction of web based operator interaction, tracking of moderator materials and the development of a plethora database queries to assist in day to day operations as well as obtaining historical information. Over 12,000 driver fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2500 kg of 20% enriched uranium. Also, over one thousand blanket fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2400 kg of depleted uranium. These operations required over 35,000 fissile material transfers between zones and over 6000 transfers between containers. Throughout all of these movements, no mass limit violations occurred. Numerous lessons were learned over the ten year operating history. From a criticality safety perspective, the most important lesson learned was the involvement of a criticality safety practitioner in daily operations. A criticality safety engineer was assigned directly to facility operations, and was responsible for implementation of limits and controls including upkeep of the associated computerized tracking files. The criticality safety engineer was also responsible for conducting fuel handler training activities including serving on fuel handler qualification oral boards, and continually assessing operations from a criticality control perspective. The criticality safety engineer also attended bimonthly project planning meetings to identify upcoming process changes that would require criticality safety evaluation. Finally, the excellent criticality safety record was due in no small part to the continual support, involvement, trust, and confidence of project and operations mana

Chad Pope

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine System Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the supporting elements of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is the materials/manufacturing technologies task. The objective of this element is to address critical materials issues for both industrial and utility gas turbines. DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) will manage this element of the program, and a team from DOE-ORO and Oak Ridge National Laboratory is coordinating the planning for the materials/manufacturing effort. This paper describes that planning activity which is in the early stages.

Karnitz, M.A.; Devan, J.H.; Holcomb, R.S.; Ferber, M.K.; Harrison, R.W.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Measurements of D-T neutron induced radioactivity in plasma-facing materials and their role in qualification of activation cross-section libraries and codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

USDOE/JAERI collaborative program on induced radioactivity measurements has been spread over last five years and has covered, among others, a large number of plasma facing materials of interest to D-T fusion reactors, including ITER and DEMO. The experiments have consisted of irradiation of high purity material samples in a range of neutron energy spectra in simulated fusion environments of prototypical blanket assemblies driven by D-T neutrons at FNS/JAERI. A typical sample measured 10 mm in diameter by 1 mm thickness, and the neutron fluence ranged from {approximately}10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2} to {approximately}10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}, over an irradiation period of 30 m and 10 h. The irradiated samples were then cooled for varying times, from {approximately}10 m to {approximately}3 weeks, and their activity was derived by counting associated {gamma}-rays with intrinsic germanium detectors.

Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A.; Youssef, M.Z. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Definition of Small Gram Quantity Contents for Type B Radioactive Material Transportation Packages: Activity-Based Content Limitations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the 1960's, the Department of Transportation Specification (DOT Spec) 6M packages have been used extensively for transportation of Type B quantities of radioactive materials between Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, laboratories, and productions sites. However, due to the advancement of packaging technology, the aging of the 6M packages, and variability in the quality of the packages, the DOT implemented a phased elimination of the 6M specification packages (and other DOT Spec packages) in favor of packages certified to meet federal performance requirements. DOT issued the final rule in the Federal Register on October 1, 2004 requiring that use of the DOT Specification 6M be discontinued as of October 1, 2008. A main driver for the change was the fact that the 6M specification packagings were not supported by a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that was compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 71 (10 CFR 71). Therefore, materials that would have historically been shipped in 6M packages are being identified as contents in Type B (and sometimes Type A fissile) package applications and addenda that are to be certified under the requirements of 10 CFR 71. The requirements in 10 CFR 71 include that the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) must identify the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents (10 CFR 71.33(b)(1) and 10 CFR 71.33(b)(2)), and that the application (i.e., SARP submittal or SARP addendum) demonstrates that the external dose rate (due to the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents) on the surface of the packaging (i.e., package and contents) not exceed 200 mrem/hr (10 CFR 71.35(a), 10 CFR 71.47(a)). It has been proposed that a 'Small Gram Quantity' of radioactive material be defined, such that, when loaded in a transportation package, the dose rates at external points of an unshielded packaging not exceed the regulatory limits prescribed by 10 CFR 71 for non-exclusive shipments. The mass of each radioisotope presented in this paper is limited by the radiation dose rate on the external surface of the package, which per the regulatory limit should not exceed 200 mrem/hr. The results presented are a compendium of allowable masses of a variety of different isotopes (with varying impurity levels of beryllium in some of the actinide isotopes) that, when loaded in an unshielded packaging, do not result in an external dose rate on the surface of the package that exceeds 190 mrem/hr (190 mrem/hr was chosen to provide 5% conservatism relative to the regulatory limit). These mass limits define the term 'Small Gram Quantity' (SGQ) contents in the context of radioactive material transportation packages. The term SGQ is isotope-specific and pertains to contents in radioactive material transportation packages that do not require shielding and still satisfy the external dose rate requirements. Since these calculated mass limits are for contents without shielding, they are conservative for packaging materials that provide some limited shielding or if the contents are placed into a shielded package. The isotopes presented in this paper were chosen as the isotopes that Department of Energy (DOE) sites most likely need to ship. Other more rarely shipped isotopes, along with industrial and medical isotopes, are planned to be included in subsequent extensions of this work.

Sitaraman, S; Kim, S; Biswas, D; Hafner, R; Anderson, B

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

227

Nuclear Multifragmentation Critical Exponents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the critical exponents of nuclear multi-fragmentation have not been determined conclusively yet.

Wolfgang Bauer; William Friedman

1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

PRECLOSURE CRITICALITY ANALYSIS PROCESS REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a process for performing preclosure criticality analyses for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These analyses will be performed from the time of receipt of fissile material until permanent closure of the repository (preclosure period). The process describes how criticality safety analyses will be performed for various configurations of waste in or out of waste packages that could occur during preclosure as a result of normal operations or event sequences. The criticality safety analysis considers those event sequences resulting in unanticipated moderation, loss of neutron absorber, geometric changes, or administrative errors in waste form placement (loading) of the waste package. The report proposes a criticality analyses process for preclosure to allow a consistent transition from preclosure to postclosure, thereby possibly reducing potential cost increases and delays in licensing of Yucca Mountain. The proposed approach provides the advantage of using a parallel regulatory framework for evaluation of preclosure and postclosure performance and is consistent with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's approach of supporting risk-informed, performance-based regulation for fuel cycle facilities, ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'', and 10 CFR Part 63. The criticality-related criteria for ensuring subcriticality are also described as well as which guidance documents will be utilized. Preclosure operations and facilities have significant similarities to existing facilities and operations currently regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; therefore, the design approach for preclosure criticality safety will be dictated by existing regulatory requirements while using a risk-informed approach with burnup credit for in-package operations.

A.E. Danise

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

229

Radiation Safety Training Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

230

Materials characterization activities for %E2%80%9CTake Our Sons&Daughters to Work Day%E2%80%9D 2013.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We created interactive demonstration activities for Take Our Daughters&Sons to Work Day (TODSTWD) 2013 in order to promote general interest in chemistry and also generate awareness of the type of work our laboratories can perform. %E2%80%9CCurious about Mars Rover Curiosity?%E2%80%9D performed an elemental analysis on rocks brought to our lab using the same technique utilized on the planet Mars by the NASA robotic explorer Curiosity. %E2%80%9CFood is Chemistry?%E2%80%9D utilized a mass spectrometer to measure, in seconds, each participant's breath in order to identify the food item consumed for the activity. A total of over 130 children participated in these activities over a 3 hour block, and feedback was positive. This document reports the materials (including handouts), experimental procedures, and lessons learned so that future demonstrations can benefit from the baseline work performed. We also present example results used to prepare the Food activity and example results collected during the Curiosity demo.

Mowry, Curtis Dale; Pimentel, Adam S.; Sparks, Elizabeth Schares; Hanlon, Brittany Paula

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state {sup 13}C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N{sub 2} sorption, HR-TEM, and NH{sub 3} temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD) analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, ?-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H)-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

Gomes, Ruth; Bhaumik, Asim [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Dutta, Saikat [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

advanced composite material: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ULTRASONIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS CiteSeer Summary: With increased use of composite materials in critical structural...

233

2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

Andrea Hoffman

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The radioactive materials packaging handbook: Design, operations, and maintenance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its required activities in 1994, the US Department of Energy (DOE) made over 500,000 shipments. Of these shipments, approximately 4% were hazardous, and of these, slightly over 1% (over 6,400 shipments) were radioactive. Because of DOE`s cleanup activities, the total quantities and percentages of radioactive material (RAM) that must be moved from one site to another is expected to increase in the coming years, and these materials are likely to be different than those shipped in the past. Irradiated fuel will certainly be part of the mix as will RAM samples and waste. However, in many cases these materials will be of different shape and size and require a transport packaging having different shielding, thermal, and criticality avoidance characteristics than are currently available. This Handbook provides guidance on the design, testing, certification, and operation of packages for these materials.

Shappert, L.B.; Bowman, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arnold, E.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

Not Available

1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

236

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Review of Nevada Site Office Criticality Safety Assessments at the Criticality Experiments Facility and Training Assembly for Criticality Safety and Appraisal of the Criticality Experiments Facility Startup Plan, October 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report provides the results of an independent oversight review of criticality safety assessment activities conducted by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nevada Site Office

238

SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL Materials and Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL Materials and Methods Two adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta with a head-holding device (S1), scleral search coil for monitoring eye position (S2) and a recording chamber monkeys remain actively engaged in experiments, so precise histological identification of recording sites

Newsome, William

239

Uranium-233 waste definition: Disposal options, safeguards, criticality control, and arms control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US investigated the use of {sup 233}U for weapons, reactors, and other purposes from the 1950s into the 1970s. Based on the results of these investigations, it was decided not to use {sup 233}U on a large scale. Most of the {sup 233}U-containing materials were placed in long-term storage. At the end of the cold war, the US initiated, as part of its arms control policies, a disposition program for excess fissile materials. Other programs were accelerated for disposal of radioactive wastes placed in storage during the cold war. Last, potential safety issues were identified related to the storage of some {sup 233}U-containing materials. Because of these changes, significant activities associated with {sup 233}U-containing materials are expected. This report is one of a series of reports to provide the technical bases for future decisions on how to manage this material. A basis for defining when {sup 233}U-containing materials can be managed as waste and when they must be managed as concentrated fissile materials has been developed. The requirements for storage, transport, and disposal of radioactive wastes are significantly different than those for fissile materials. Because of these differences, it is important to classify material in its appropriate category. The establishment of a definition of what is waste and what is fissile material will provide the guidance for appropriate management of these materials. Wastes are defined in this report as materials containing sufficiently small masses or low concentrations of fissile materials such that they can be managed as typical radioactive waste. Concentrated fissile materials are defined herein as materials containing sufficient fissile content such as to warrant special handling to address nuclear criticality, safeguards, and arms control concerns.

Forsberg, C.W.; Storch, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lewis, L.C. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

The effective delayed neutron fraction for bare-metal criticals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Given sufficient material, a large number of actinides could be used to form bare-metal criticals. The effective delayed neutron fraction for a bare critical comprised of a fissile material is comparable with the absolute delayed neutron fraction. The effective delayed neutron fraction for a bare critical composed of a fissionable material is reduced by factors of 2 to 10 when compared with the absolute delayed neutron fraction. When the effective delayed neutron fraction is small, the difference between delayed and prompt criticality is small, and extreme caution must be used in critical assemblies of these materials. This study uses an approximate but realistic model to survey the actinide region to compare effective delayed neutron fractions with absolute delayed neutron fractions.

Pearlstein, S.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Tank farms criticality safety manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document defines the Tank Farms Contractor (TFC) criticality safety program, as required by Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Subpart 830.204(b)(6), ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (10 CFR 830.204 (b)(6)), and US Department of Energy (DOE) 0 420.1A, Facility Safety, Section 4.3, ''Criticality Safety.'' In addition, this document contains certain best management practices, adopted by TFC management based on successful Hanford Site facility practices. Requirements in this manual are based on the contractor requirements document (CRD) found in Attachment 2 of DOE 0 420.1A, Section 4.3, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety,'' and the cited revisions of applicable standards published jointly by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Nuclear Society (ANS) as listed in Appendix A. As an informational device, requirements directly imposed by the CRD or ANSI/ANS Standards are shown in boldface. Requirements developed as best management practices through experience and maintained consistent with Hanford Site practice are shown in italics. Recommendations and explanatory material are provided in plain type.

FORT, L.A.

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

242

Active terahertz metamaterials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we present an overview of research in our group in terahertz (THz) metamaterials and their applications. We have developed a series of planar metamaterials operating at THz frequencies, all of which exhibit a strong resonant response. By incorporating natural materials, e.g. semiconductors, as the substrates or as critical regions of metamaterial elements, we are able to effectively control the metamaterial resonance by the application of external stimuli, e.g., photoexcitation and electrical bias. Such actively controllable metamaterials provide novel functionalities for solid-state device applications with unprecedented performance, such as THz spectroscopy, imaging, and many others.

Chen, Hou-tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Dealloying below the critical potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventionally, the critical potential represents the potential marking the onset of bulk dealloying. The current density below the critical potential is only weakly dependent on potential, and the physical processes responsible for this passive-like behavior are poorly understood. In situ scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study the nature of the surface morphology which develops at potentials less than the critical potential. At fixed potential, the time-dependent evolution of the surface morphology was correlated with the observed current decay. This allowed the authors to identify and model the physical processes which control the current decay. They find two general regimes of power law behavior in the current decay corresponding to exhaustion of an activation-controlled dissolution process (t{sup {minus}1}) and the operation of one of three mechanisms of surface mass-transport control (t{sup {minus}5/8}, t{sup {minus}1/2}, and t{sup {minus}1/4}). Potential-pulsing experiments were performed in order to examine the effect of a blocking noble-metal layer on the nucleation and growth of the porous structure associated with bulk dealloying. These results were analyzed using a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami analysis. The Avrami exponents found were fractional and in the range of 1.25 to 1.8. The fractional exponents were interpreted in terms of the fractal dimension characterizing the initial stages of porosity formation during bulk dealloying.

Wagner, K.; Brankovic, S.R.; Dimitrov, N.; Sieradzki, K. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Quantification of corrosion resistance of a new-class of criticality control materials: thermal-spray coatings of high-boron iron-based amorphous metals - Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was produced as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. Earlier studies have shown that ingots and melt-spun ribbons of these materials have good passive film stability in these environments. Thermal spray coatings of these materials have now been produced, and have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both atmospheric and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Shaw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This standard provides a framework for generating Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) supporting fissionable material operations at Department of Energy (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities. This standard imposes no new criticality safety analysis requirements.

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

Materials Department Annual Report 1992  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Department Annual Report 1992 Published by the Materials Department Risø National and stone by Chr. Dahlgaard Larsen Materials Department Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Tel.: +45 46 77 46 77 Fax: +4542351173 #12;Abstract Selected activities ot the Materials Department at Riso

247

Materials Department Annual Report 1991  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Department Annual Report 1991 Published by the Materials Department Risø National, iron and stone by Chr. Dahlgaard Larsen Materials Department Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Tel.: +45 42 37 12 12 Fax: + 45 42 35 11 73 #12;Abstract Selected activities of the Materials

248

National Criticality Experiments Research Center: Capability and Status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After seven years, the former Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF), or Pajarito Site, has reopened for business as the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Four critical assembly machines (Comet, Planet, Flat-Top, and Godiva-IV) made the journey from Los Alamos to the NNSS. All four machines received safety system upgrades along with new digital control systems. Between these machines, systems ranging from the thermal through the intermediate to the fast spectrum may be assembled. Steady-State, transient, and super-prompt critical conditions may be explored. NCERC is the sole remaining facility in the United States capable of conducting general-purpose nuclear materials handling including the construction and operation of high-multiplication assemblies, delayed critical assemblies, and prompt critical assemblies. Reconstitution of the unique capabilities at NCERC ensures the viability of (1) The Nuclear Renaissance, (2) Stockpile Stewardship, and (3) and the next generation of criticality experimentalists.

Hayes, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

249

PRELIMINARY NUCLEAR CRITICALITY NUCLEAR SAFETY EVLAUATION FOR THE CONTAINER SURVEILLANCE AND STORAGE CAPABILITY PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington Safety Management Solutions (WSMS) provides criticality safety services to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) at the Savannah River Site. One activity at SRS is the Container Surveillance and Storage Capability (CSSC) Project, which will perform surveillances on 3013 containers (hereafter referred to as 3013s) to verify that they meet the Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) 3013 for plutonium storage. The project will handle quantities of material that are greater than ANS/ANSI-8.1 single parameter mass limits, and thus required a Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation (NCSE). The WSMS methodology for conducting an NCSE is outlined in the WSMS methods manual. The WSMS methods manual currently follows the requirements of DOE-O-420.1B, DOE-STD-3007-2007, and the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) SCD-3 manual. DOE-STD-3007-2007 describes how a NCSE should be performed, while DOE-O-420.1B outlines the requirements for a Criticality Safety Program (CSP). The WSRC SCD-3 manual implements DOE requirements and ANS standards. NCSEs do not address the Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) of non-reactor nuclear facilities that may be affected by overt or covert activities of sabotage, espionage, terrorism or other security malevolence. Events which are beyond the Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) are outside the scope of a double contingency analysis.

Low, M; Matthew02 Miller, M; Thomas Reilly, T

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Materials Scientist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

251

Materials Science Materials science has had a profound influence on the development of our technologically  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, special topic courses in materials are also offered, as well as opportunities for senior projects. A minorMaterials Science Materials science has had a profound influence on the development of our technologically advanced society. The availability of suitable materials has been critical to the realization

New Hampshire, University of

252

Criticality Calculations for Step-2 GPHS Modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Lipinski, Ronald J. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts Department, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Hensen, Danielle L. [Risk and Reliability Department Sandia National Laboratories, P.O Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

253

Criticality calculations for Step-2 GPHS modules.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) will use an improved version of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) module as its source of thermal power. This new version, referred to as the Step-2 GPHS Module, has additional and thicker layers of carbon fiber material (Fine Weaved Pierced Fabric) for increased strength over the original GPHS module. The GPHS uses alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu in the oxide form as the primary source of heat, and small amounts of other actinides are also present in the oxide fuel. Criticality calculations have been performed by previous researchers on the original version of the GPHS module (Step 0). This paper presents criticality calculations for the present Step-2 version. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code (MCNPX) was used for these calculations. Numerous configurations of GPHS module arrays surrounded by wet sand and other materials (to reflect the neutrons back into the stack with minimal absorption) were modeled. For geometries with eight GPHS modules (from a single MMRTG) surrounded by wet sand, the configuration is extremely sub-critical; k{sub eff} is about 0.3. It requires about 1000 GPHS modules (from 125 MMRTGs) in a close-spaced stack to approach criticality (k{sub eff} = 1.0) when surrounded by wet sand. The effect of beryllium in the MMRTG was found to be relatively small.

Hensen, Danielle Lynn; Lipinski, Ronald J.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Self limiting features of accidental criticality in a solution system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience with the SHEBA solution critical assembly during validation testing of accidental criticality alarm detectors provided several insights into the character of potential accidental excursions. Two observations were of particular interest. First, it is nearly impossible to maintain a solution system, particularly one employing low-enrichment material, in a constant state. If super-critical, the system will heat up, expand (or form bubbles), return to a sub-critical state, and shut down of its own accord without going into short period oscillations. Second, a very slow change in the system could produce a long ''pulse'' resulting in lengthy exposures, a high dose, but a low dose rate. The experiments dramatically contradicted the popular contention that accidental criticality is characterized by a blue flash, a clap of thunder, and violet expulsion of material. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Malenfant, R.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

0 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report The Lightweight Materials activity (LM)...

256

204 Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 205 of Architecture. The campus-wide Rice Quantum Institute is also active in the research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) MECH 340 Industrial Process Lab (1) MECH 343 Modeling of Dynamic Systems (4) MECH 371 Fluid Mechanics I204 Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 205 of Architecture. The campus-wide Rice Quantum. Degree Requirements for B.A., B.S.M.E. in Mechanical Engineering or B.A., B.S.M.S. in Materials Science

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

257

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities...

258

Applicability of ZPR critical experiment data to criticality safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than a hundred zero power reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR fast critical assembly facilities. To be sure, the original reason for performing these critical experiments was to support fast reactor development. Nevertheless, data from some of the assemblies are well suited to form the basis for valuable, new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to describe the ZPR data that would be of benefit to the criticality safety community and to explain how these data could be developed into practical criticality safety benchmarks.

Schaefer, R.W.; Aumeier, S.E.; McFarlane, H.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Electromagnetics close beyond the critical state: thermodynamic prospect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-called critical current density is the single material parameter of the theory, and characterizes the balance in material characterization as well as in more fundamental studies. In brief, the CSM postulates equation between magnetic and intrinsic pinning forces: J Ă? B = Fp. The transition between different

MajĂłs, Antonio BadĂ­a

260

Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications, and additional information from readers and from personnel who took course 00INL189. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that fissionable material handlers and criticality safety officers must understand. The reorganization is based on and consistent with changes made to course 00INL189 due to a review of course exam results and to discussions with personnel who conduct area-specific training.

V. L. Putman

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The Critical Mass Laboratory at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) at Rocky Flats northwest of Denver, Colorado, was built in 1964 and commissioned to conduct nuclear experiments on January 28, 1965. It was built to attain more accurate and precise experimental data to ensure nuclear criticality safety at the plant than were previously possible. Prior to its construction, safety data were obtained from long extrapolations of subcritical data (called in situ experiments), calculated parameters from reactor engineering 'models', and a few other imprecise methods. About 1700 critical and critical-approach experiments involving several chemical forms of enriched uranium and plutonium were performed between then and 1988. These experiments included single units and arrays of fissile materials, reflected and 'bare' systems, and configurations with various degrees of moderation, as well as some containing strong neutron absorbers. In 1989, a raid by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) caused the plant as a whole to focus on 'resumption' instead of further criticality safety experiments. Though either not recognized or not admitted for a few years, that FBI raid did sound the death knell for the CML. The plant's optimistic goal of resumption evolved to one of deactivation, decommissioning, and plantwide demolition during the 1990s. The once-proud CML facility was finally demolished in April of 2002.

Rothe, Robert E

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and lasers, as well as clean-energy technologies such as electric vehicles and wind turbines. For example, the best magnets for efficient electric motors - which can be found...

263

Meet CMI Leader Nigel Middleton | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and held several divisional Chief Engineer positions for the Chamber of Mines of South Africa Research Organization. Dr. Middleton has received many academic awards, and...

264

Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecemberGlossaryEnergyImportant| Department ofDepartment of

265

Iowa lab gets critical materials research center | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi NationalBusinessDepartmentat Larger Scale |

266

Rare Earths -- The Fraternal Fifteen | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1Principal

267

Resources Available with CMI Login | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter ApropaneBacteria -OrganizationResources

268

What is a ÂŤCritical Material?ÂŽ  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf TheViolations | Department of Energyis EIA? And What DoesWhatA

269

Additive Manufacturing Meets the Critical Materials Shortage | Department  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South ValleyASGovLtr.pdfAboutSheet, April 2014 | Department of EnergyFOA|of

270

Anne de Guibert, SAFT, Critical Materials and Alternatives for Storage  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysis ofDepartment

271

2014 CMI Plenary: CMI Education and Outreach Programs | Critical Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICS H.

272

Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart GridThird Quarterinto PARSCriteria Review

273

Post-Doc Researchers Needed | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22, 2014 InCollective2011 Review

274

The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and1Telework Telework The Department'sBlog »CleanTheEnergy

275

EV Everywhere Workshop: Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQ Contract ESPC IDIQ ContractConsumerof EnergyGroup Report |

276

Electric Motors and Critical Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQ Contract ESPC IDIQEnergyGovernment Officials.Electric

277

ORNL partners on critical materials hub | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&DNuclearNuclearCamilaOak Ridge

278

What would we do without rare earths? | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout PrintableBlenderWhat Makes Clouds Form, GrowWhatWhatWhat

279

EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement Tuesday, September 25- 7/20/2012 Electric

280

Energy Department Releases New Critical Materials Strategy | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department ofto CellulosicGeothermal Development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microsoft Word - TRILATERAL CRITICAL MATERIALS WORKSHOP Summary Report final 20111129  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32 MasterAcquisiti ---- Contra See AcquFOR007 Crucial

282

Human Resources at Ames Laboratory | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPAHydrazide Chemistry,Ames Laboratory

283

Human Resources at Colorado School of Mines | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPAHydrazide Chemistry,Ames

284

Human Resources at Idaho National Laboratory | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPAHydrazide Chemistry,AmesIdaho

285

Human Resources at Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Critical Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortalAllBPAHydrazideInstitute Oak Ridge

286

Critical_Materials_Summary.pdf | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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287

First anniversary gift for Critical Material Institute? Inventions. Eleven  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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288

Department of Energy Releases its 2011 Critical Materials Strategy |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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289

Exascale Supercomputing and Materials DARHT: A Critical Component  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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290

FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling | Critical Materials Institute  

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291

The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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292

CMI Celebrates National Engineers Week | Critical Materials Institute  

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293

CMI Education and Outreach in 2015 | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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294

CMI Education Resources for K-12 | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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295

U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is on Track | DepartmentEnergy 29, 2008U.S. Department

296

Meet CMI Director Alex King | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanicalMedicine High Energy Physics (HEP)

297

Meet CMI Leader Barry Martin | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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298

Meet CMI Leader Cynthia Feller | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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299

Meet CMI Leader Cynthia Howell | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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300

Meet CMI Leader Deb Covey | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Meet CMI Leader Iver Anderson | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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302

Meet CMI Researcher Anya Mudring | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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303

Meet CMI Researcher David Reed | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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304

Meet CMI Researcher Joni Barnes | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanicalMedicine High EnergyJoni Barnes CMI

305

Meet CMI Researcher Karl Gschneidner | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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306

Meet CMI Researcher Patrick Zhang | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanicalMedicine High EnergyJoni Barnes

307

Meet CMI Researcher Rod Eggert | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanicalMedicine High EnergyJoni BarnesRod Eggert

308

Meet CMI Researcher Ryan Ott | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanicalMedicine High EnergyJoni BarnesRod

309

Meet CMI Researcher Tim McIntyre | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanicalMedicine High EnergyJoni BarnesRodTim

310

Meet CMI Researcher Vitalij Pecharsky | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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311

US-EU-Japan Working Group on Critical Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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312

CMI Education and Outreach in 2013 | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2, 6/14/13)CLEANCMB @3 CMI

313

CMI Education and Outreach in 2014 | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2, 6/14/13)CLEANCMB @3 CMI4

314

CMI Unique Facility: Filtration Test Facility | Critical Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2,

315

CMI in Research Publications in 2014 | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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316

Leave your comment about CMI website | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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317

Meet CMI Leaders and Administrators | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey MathematicaMeasuringMedical PlansAbout UsMeet

318

Colorado School of Mines Researchers Win Patent | Critical Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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319

Patrice Turchi Installed as 2015 TMS President | Critical Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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320

Other Education and Outreach Resources | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/O performance onAboutOrhanAcademic Alliances

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

weapons material  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2%2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

322

Critical QCD in Nuclear Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed study of correlated scalars, produced in collisions of nuclei and associated with the $\\sigma$-field fluctuations, $(\\delta \\sigma)^2= $, at the QCD critical point (critical fluctuations), is performed on the basis of a critical event generator (Critical Monte-Carlo) developed in our previous work. The aim of this analysis is to reveal suitable observables of critical QCD in the multiparticle environment of simulated events and select appropriate signatures of the critical point, associated with new and strong effects in nuclear collisions.

N. G. Antoniou; Y. F. Contoyiannis; F. K. Diakonos; G. Mavromanolakis

2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

323

Innovative Materials, Processes, and Tools Improve Performance, Quality of White LEDs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lumileds Lighting joined forces with Sandia National Laboratories to investigate critical materials issues related to solid-state lighting technology.

324

Criticality & Recovery Preparedness: ePHI Systems Criticality Designation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Criticality & Recovery Preparedness: ePHI Systems 5100 EX.A Criticality Designation 1. Primary source of PHI for pre-research; or secondary source of PHI for research/pre-research; secondary source of PHI for treatment, payment or healthcare operations; or teaching Criticality mapped to Recovery

325

Critically damped quantum search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although measurement and unitary processes can accomplish any quantum evolution in principle, thinking in terms of dissipation and damping can be powerful. We propose a modification of Grover's algorithm in which the idea of damping plays a natural role. Remarkably, we have found that there is a critical damping value that divides between the quantum $O(\\sqrt{N})$ and classical O(N) search regimes. In addition, by allowing the damping to vary in a fashion we describe, one obtains a fixed-point quantum search algorithm in which ignorance of the number of targets increases the number of oracle queries only by a factor of 1.5.

Ari Mizel

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

326

Positive and Negative Electrodes: Novel and Optimized Materials...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Investigation of critical parameters in Li-ion battery electrodes Novel and Optimized Materials Phases for High Energy Density...

327

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear, and neutron spectra. The NE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) capabilities are based on a staff with decades

Kemner, Ken

328

Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

Valerie L. Putman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

331

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

ATS materials/manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Cermet materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

336

Supplementary Information: Estimation of Pfs Specific Activity Materials. Mouse anti-polyhistidine and goat anti-mouse IgG conjugated to alkaline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This was done by connecting the cathode and anode (nickel chromium wire) using alligator clips to a DC power. Estimations of Pfs specific activity. Pfs-chitosan conjugate was prepared and electrodeposited onto different

Rubloff, Gary W.

337

Criticality prevention during postaccident decontamination of TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) plant systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), the likelihood of a criticality outside of the reactor coolant system (RCS) during the plant cleanup was very small. Given the consequence of any possible critical event in the TMI-2 systems, However, it was always necessary to ensure that all steps were taken to prevent criticality. Therefore, engineered controls were developed to ensure that decontamination of plant systems containing fuel material could be conducted in a manner that precluded criticality.

Palau, G. L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Irreversible Thermodynamics and Smart Materials Systems Modelling. Example of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irreversible Thermodynamics and Smart Materials Systems Modelling. Example of Magnetic Shape Memory mechanisms in smart materials. This procedure is applied to Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys actuators of complex active materials for smart systems. Keywords: Smart material systems, Actuator design

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

339

Complex Materials  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

Cooper, Valentino

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

Complex Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

Cooper, Valentino

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Material Symbols   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the relation between the material, conventional symbol structures that we encounter in the spoken and written word, and human thought? A common assumption, that structures a wide variety of otherwise competing ...

Clark, Andy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this evaluation was compiled from References 1 and 2, reports on subsequent experiments in the series , and the experimental logbook, and from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this evaluation was compiled from References 1 and 2, reports on subsequent experiments in the series , and the experimental logbook, and from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Materials at LANL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nuclear material operations manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion.

Tyler, R.P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Microbial Fuel Cell Using Inexpensive Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial Fuel Cell Using Inexpensive Materials Group #4 Peter McAveney Brett Pedersen Jun-Chung Wong #12;Abstract We built and tested a microbial fuel cell using low-cost materials. Our intention- critical applications such as transportation. Microbial fuel cells cannot achieve comparable power

347

Stereo-Active Lone-Pair Control on the Ferromagnetic Behavior in VO(SeO2OH)2:A new acentric ferromagnetic material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new acentric ferromagnetic material, VO(SeO{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, has been synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, second harmonic generation (SHG), and magnetization measurements. The crystal structure of VO(SeO{sub 2}OH){sub 2} consists of linear chains of corner-shared V{sup 4+}O{sub 6} octahedra that are connected by SeO{sub 2}OH groups. The material exhibits a weak SHG efficiency, comparable to {alpha}-SiO{sub 2}, and a ferromagnetic transition (T{sub C}) at 2.5 K with a saturated magnetic moment of 1.09 {mu}B per formula unit ({mu}B/FU). The origin of the ferromagnetism is explained by the suppression of the antiferromagnetic superexchange (SE) and supersuper-exchange (SSE) interactions in the intra-chain and inter-chain magnetic interactions, respectively. In addition, using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that the SSE interactions depend on the O(2)-Se{sup 4+}-O(3) angle. As we demonstrate, the stereoactive lone-pair on Se{sup 4+} is the driving force for the inter-chain ferromagnetic interactions.

Kim, Sang-Hwan [University of Houston, Houston; Yeon, J [University of Houston, Houston; Safa-Sefat, Athena [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Halasyamani, P Shiv [University of Houston, Houston

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline: A Line in the Sand? Case Critical is presented by ASU's Global Professor, ASU's School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning The Keystone XL Pipeline, a large, and environmental pressures of the heated Pipeline controversy. #12;

Hall, Sharon J.

349

Modeling and Design of Material Separation Systems with Applications to Recycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Material separation technology is critical to the success of the material recycling industry. End-of-life products, post-consumer waste, industrial excess, or otherwise collected materials for reuse are typically mixed ...

Wolf, Malima Isabelle, 1981-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hardfacing material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Chemistry and Materials Science Department annual report, 1988--1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first annual report of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) Department. The principal purpose of this report is to provide a concise summary of our scientific and technical accomplishments for fiscal years 1988 and 1989. The report is also tended to become part of the archival record of the Department`s activities. We plan to publish future editions annually. The activities of the Department can be divided into three broad categories. First, C&MS staff are assigned by the matrix system to work directly in a program. These programmatic assignments typically involve short deadlines and critical time schedules. A second category is longer-term research and development in technologies important to Laboratory programs. The focus and direction of this technology-base work are generally determined by programmatic needs. Finally, the Department manages its own research program, mostly long-range in outlook and basic in orientation. These three categories are not mutually exclusive but form a continuum of technical activities. Representative examples of all three are included in this report. The principal subject matter of this report has been divided into six sections: Innovations in Analysis and Characterization, Advanced Materials, Metallurgical Science and Technology, Surfaces and Interfaces, Energetic Materials and Chemical Synthesis, and Energy-Related Research and Development.

Borg, R.J.; Sugihara, T.T.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W. [eds.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Critical behaviour in the elastic response of hydrogels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly responsive, or 'smart' materials are abundant in Nature; individual cells, for instance, can adapt their mechanical properties to the local surroundings through small changes in their internal structure. An effective method to enhance the responsiveness of synthetic materials is to operate near a critical point, where small variations lead to large changes in material properties. Recent theories have suggested that fibre/polymer networks can show critical behaviour near and below the point of marginal connectivity that separates rigid and floppy states [1-4]. To date, however, experimental evidence for criticality in such networks has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate critical behaviour in the stress response of synthetic hydrogels at low concentrations of order 0.1% volume fraction. We show, using computer simulations, that the observed response to stress can be understood by considering the influence of a zero-temperature critical point, i.e. the Maxwell isostatic point [5], together with the intrinsically nonlinear stretch response of semi-flexible polymer strands in the gel.

M. Dennison; M. Jaspers; P. H. J. Kouwer; C. Storm; A. E. Rowan; F. C. MacKintosh

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes EMaCC activities for fiscal year 1990 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the department. The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the department. (JL)

Not Available

1991-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Materials for geothermal production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials continue to be made in the geothermal materials project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, work was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems. Efforts to transfer the technologies developed in these efforts to other energy-related sectors of the economy continued and considerable success was achieved.

Kukacka, L.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Critical fields in ferromagnetic thin films: Identification of four regimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical fields in ferromagnetic thin films: Identification of four regimes Rub´en Cantero­film elements is a paradigm for a multi­scale pattern­forming system. On one hand, there is a material length functional ceases to be positive definite. The degenerate subspace consists of the "unstable modes

Otto, Felix

358

Experimental Criticality Benchmarks for SNAP 10A/2 Reactor Cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes computational benchmark models for nuclear criticality derived from descriptions of the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Critical Assembly (SCA)-4B experimental criticality program conducted by Atomics International during the early 1960's. The selected experimental configurations consist of fueled SNAP 10A/2-type reactor cores subject to varied conditions of water immersion and reflection under experimental control to measure neutron multiplication. SNAP 10A/2-type reactor cores are compact volumes fueled and moderated with the hydride of highly enriched uranium-zirconium alloy. Specifications for the materials and geometry needed to describe a given experimental configuration for a model using MCNP5 are provided. The material and geometry specifications are adequate to permit user development of input for alternative nuclear safety codes, such as KENO. A total of 73 distinct experimental configurations are described.

Krass, A.W.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nuclear Criticality Safety Application Guide: Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) is committed to performing and documenting safety analyses for facilities it manages for the Department of Energy (DOE). Safety analyses are performed to identify hazards and potential accidents; to analyze the adequacy of measures taken to eliminate, control, or mitigate hazards; and to evaluate potential accidents and determine associated risks. Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) are prepared to document the safety analysis to ensure facilities can be operated safely and in accordance with regulations. Many of the facilities requiring a SAR process fissionable material creating the potential for a nuclear criticality accident. MMES has long had a nuclear criticality safety program that provides the technical support to fissionable material operations to ensure the safe processing and storage of fissionable materials. The guiding philosophy of the program has always been the application of the double-contingency principle, which states: {open_quotes}process designs shall incorporate sufficient factors of safety to require at least two unlikely, independent, and concurrent changes in process conditions before a criticality accident is possible.{close_quotes} At Energy Systems analyses have generally been maintained to document that no single normal or abnormal operating conditions that could reasonably be expected to occur can cause a nuclear criticality accident. This application guide provides a summary description of the MMES Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the MMES Criticality Accident Alarm System requirements for inclusion in facility SARs. The guide also suggests a way to incorporate the analyses conducted pursuant to the double-contingency principle into the SAR. The prime objective is to minimize duplicative effort between the NCSA process and the SAR process and yet adequately describe the methodology utilized to prevent a nuclear criticality accident.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Burnup estimation of fuel sourcing radioactive material based on monitored Cs and Pu isotopic activity ratios in Fukushima N. P. S. accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the severe core damage of Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Station, radioactive material leaked from the reactor buildings. As part of monitoring of radioactivity in the site, measurements of radioactivity in soils at three fixed points have been performed for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs with gamma-ray spectrometry and for Pu, Pu, and {sup 240}Pu with {alpha}-ray spectrometry. Correlations of radioactivity ratios of {sup 134}Cs to {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 238}Pu to the sum of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu with fuel burnup were studied by using theoretical burnup calculations and measurements on isotopic inventories, and compared with the Cs and Pu radioactivity rations in the soils. The comparison indicated that the burnup of the fuel sourcing the radioactivity was from 18 to 38 GWd/t, which corresponded to that of the fuel in the highest power and, therefore, the highest decay heat in operating high-burnup fueled BWR cores. (authors)

Yamamoto, T.; Suzuki, M.; Ando, Y. [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Toranomon Towers Office, 14F, 4-1-28, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Secondary Energy Infobook Activities (19 Activities)'  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Infobook Activities (19 Activities) Grades: 9-12 Topics: Energy Basics Owner: NEED This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy...

362

2014 Annual Merit review Results Report - Materials Technologies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

review Results Report - Materials Technologies 2014 Annual Merit review Results Report - Materials Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies research activities...

363

Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

D`Aquila, D.M. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Tayloe, R.W. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science and Technology SHARE Materials Science and Technology Division The Materials Science and Technology Division is unique within the Department of Energy (DOE)...

365

Storage containers for radioactive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

1980-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed from 1962–1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967.a The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, relative fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector” (see Reference 1). The experiment studied in this evaluation was the second of the series and had the fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular pitch. One critical configuration was found (see Reference 3). Once the critical configuration had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U,bc and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configuration are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively.

Margaret A. Marshall

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical assemblies of precisely known materials and reproducible and easily calculated geometries have been constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the 1940s. Initially, these assemblies were built to provide information necessary for the nuclear weapons development effort. Subsequently, intensive studies of the assemblies themselves were undertaken to provide a better understanding of the physics of the fission process and other nuclear reactions in the nuclear materials from which these machine were constructed and in other materials irradiated in these assemblies. Some of these assemblies (notably Jezebel, Flattop, Big Ten, and Godiva) have been used as benchmark assemblies to compare the results of experimental measurements and computations of certain nuclear reaction parameters. These comparisons are used to validate both the input nuclear data and the computational methods. In addition to these normally fueled benchmark assemblies, other assembly machines are fueled periodically to provide specific and detailed results for parameter sensitivity studies for a large number of applications. Some of these machines and their applications are described.

Dowdy, E.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

2011 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

counties throughout Mississippi in an effort to inspire young students' interest in science and engineering. 2-70 Activity and Developments Task 1 - Multiscale Material...

369

Derivation of criticality safety benchmarks from ZPR fast critical assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scores of critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9, and ZPPR fast critical assembly facilities. Most of the assemblies were mockups of various liquid-metal fast breeder reactor designs. These tended to be complex, containing, for example, mockups of control rods and control rod positions. Some assemblies, however, were `physics benchmarks`. These relatively `clean` assemblies had uniform compositions and simple geometry and were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods. Assemblies in this last category are well suited to form the basis for new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of some of these benchmark candidates and to describe the strategy being used to create the benchmarks.

Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Casting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reference Material  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53Reference Materials There are a variety of

372

Materials Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImports 5.90 4.86(NHMFL)X-RayMaterials

373

Material and energy flows in the materials production, assembly, and end-of-life stages of the automotive lithium-ion battery life cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains material and energy flows for lithium-ion batteries with an active cathode material of lithium manganese oxide (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}). These data are incorporated into Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, replacing previous data for lithium-ion batteries that are based on a nickel/cobalt/manganese (Ni/Co/Mn) cathode chemistry. To identify and determine the mass of lithium-ion battery components, we modeled batteries with LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the cathode material using Argonne's Battery Performance and Cost (BatPaC) model for hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and electric vehicles. As input for GREET, we developed new or updated data for the cathode material and the following materials that are included in its supply chain: soda ash, lime, petroleum-derived ethanol, lithium brine, and lithium carbonate. Also as input to GREET, we calculated new emission factors for equipment (kilns, dryers, and calciners) that were not previously included in the model and developed new material and energy flows for the battery electrolyte, binder, and binder solvent. Finally, we revised the data included in GREET for graphite (the anode active material), battery electronics, and battery assembly. For the first time, we incorporated energy and material flows for battery recycling into GREET, considering four battery recycling processes: pyrometallurgical, hydrometallurgical, intermediate physical, and direct physical. Opportunities for future research include considering alternative battery chemistries and battery packaging. As battery assembly and recycling technologies develop, staying up to date with them will be critical to understanding the energy, materials, and emissions burdens associated with batteries.

Dunn, J.B.; Gaines, L.; Barnes, M.; Wang, M.; Sullivan, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

374

Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Biorefinery -A Sustainable Molecular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biocatalysis, with principles of green and supramolecular chemistry, we developed building blocksInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Biorefinery - A Sustainable In future research, developing materials, fuels and energy devices from renewable resources would

Crawford, T. Daniel

375

Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Site High Level Waste Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This criticality safety evaluation covers operations for waste in underground storage tanks at the high-level waste tank farms on the Hanford site. This evaluation provides the bases for criticality safety limits and controls to govern receipt, transfer, and long-term storage of tank waste. Justification is provided that a nuclear criticality accident cannot occur for tank farms operations, based on current fissile material and operating conditions.

ROGERS, C.A.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

376

Integrating agile practices into critical software development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating agile practices into critical software development Katarzyna Lukasiewicz, Janusz GĂłrski. In this text we describe our research towards introducing agile practices into critical software development processes Keywords-- safety-critical software; agile practices; software development; process improvement

Boyer, Edmond

377

Impact of Fuel Failure on Criticality Safety of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the United States is expected to remain in storage for considerably longer periods than originally intended (e.g., <40 years). Extended storage (ES) time and irradiation of nuclear fuel to high-burnup values (>45 GWd/t) may increase the potential for fuel failure during normal and accident conditions involving storage and transportation. Fuel failure, depending on the severity, can result in changes to the geometric configuration of the fuel, which has safety and regulatory implications. The likelihood and extent of fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the safety of the UNF is not well understood. The objective of this work is to assess and quantify the impact of fuel reconfiguration due to fuel failure on criticality safety of UNF in storage and transportation casks. This effort is primarily motivated by concerns related to the potential for fuel degradation during ES periods and transportation following ES. The criticality analyses consider representative UNF designs and cask systems and a range of fuel enrichments, burnups, and cooling times. The various failed-fuel configurations considered are designed to bound the anticipated effects of individual rod and general cladding failure, fuel rod deformation, loss of neutron absorber materials, degradation of canister internals, and gross assembly failure. The results quantify the potential impact on criticality safety associated with fuel reconfiguration and may be used to guide future research, design, and regulatory activities. Although it can be concluded that the criticality safety impacts of fuel reconfiguration during transportation subsequent to ES are manageable, the results indicate that certain configurations can result in a large increase in the effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}. Future work to inform decision making relative to which configurations are credible, and therefore need to be considered in a safety evaluation, is recommended.

Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Critical Infrastructure Interdependency Modeling: A Survey of U.S. and International Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nation’s health, wealth, and security rely on the production and distribution of certain goods and services. The array of physical assets, processes, and organizations across which these goods and services move are called "critical infrastructures".1 This statement is as true in the U.S. as in any country in the world. Recent world events such as the 9-11 terrorist attacks, London bombings, and gulf coast hurricanes have highlighted the importance of stable electric, gas and oil, water, transportation, banking and finance, and control and communication infrastructure systems. Be it through direct connectivity, policies and procedures, or geospatial proximity, most critical infrastructure systems interact. These interactions often create complex relationships, dependencies, and interdependencies that cross infrastructure boundaries. The modeling and analysis of interdependencies between critical infrastructure elements is a relatively new and very important field of study. The U.S. Technical Support Working Group (TSWG) has sponsored this survey to identify and describe this current area of research including the current activities in this field being conducted both in the U.S. and internationally. The main objective of this study is to develop a single source reference of critical infrastructure interdependency modeling tools (CIIMT) that could be applied to allow users to objectively assess the capabilities of CIIMT. This information will provide guidance for directing research and development to address the gaps in development. The results will inform researchers of the TSWG Infrastructure Protection Subgroup of research and development efforts and allow a more focused approach to addressing the needs of CIIMT end-user needs. This report first presents the field of infrastructure interdependency analysis, describes the survey methodology, and presents the leading research efforts in both a cumulative table and through individual datasheets. Data was collected from open source material and when possible through direct contact with the individuals leading the research.

Not Available

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Photovoltaic Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Materials for solid state lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dramatic improvement in the efficiency of inorganic and organic light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs) within the last decade has made these devices viable future energy efficient replacements for current light sources. However, both technologies must overcome major technical barriers, requiring significant advances in material science, before this goal can be achieved. Attention will be given to each technology associated with the following major areas of material research: (1) material synthesis, (2) process development, (3) device and defect physics, and (4) packaging. The discussion on material synthesis will emphasize the need for further development of component materials, including substrates and electrodes, necessary for improving device performance. The process technology associated with the LEDs and OLEDs is very different, but in both cases it is one factor limiting device performance. Improvements in process control and methodology are expected to lead to additional benefits of higher yield, greater reliability and lower costs. Since reliability and performance are critical to these devices, an understanding of the basic physics of the devices and device failure mechanisms is necessary to effectively improve the product. The discussion will highlight some of the more basic material science problems remaining to be solved. In addition, consideration will be given to packaging technology and the need for the development of novel materials and geometries to increase the efficiencies and reliability of the devices. The discussion will emphasize the performance criteria necessary to meet lighting applications, in order to illustrate the gap between current status and market expectations for future product.

Johnson, S.G.; Simmons, J.A.

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Review of Criticality Accidents 2000 Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Sixty accidental power excursions are reviewed. Sufficient detail is provided to enable the reader to understand the physical situation, the chemistry and material flow, and when available the administrative setting leading up to the time of the accident. Information on the power history, energy release, consequences, and causes are also included when available. For those accidents that occurred in process plants, two new sections have been included in this revision. The first is an analysis and summary of the physical and neutronic features of the chain reacting systems. The second is a compilation of observations and lessons learned. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this report.

Thomas P. McLaughlin; Shean P. Monahan; Norman L. Pruvost; Vladimir V. Frolov; Boris G. Ryazanov; Victor I. Sviridov

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Critical length limiting super-low friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the demonstration of super-low friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micro-mechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nano-manipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nano-devices with super-low friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

Ming Ma; Andrea Benassi; Andrea Vanossi; Michael Urbakh

2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

383

Conditioning of carbonaceous material prior to physical beneficiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbonaceous material such as coal is conditioned by contact with a supercritical fluid prior to physical beneficiation. The solid feed material is contacted with an organic supercritical fluid such as cyclohexane or methanol at temperatures slightly above the critical temperature and pressures of 1 to 4 times the critical pressure. A minor solute fraction is extracted into critical phase and separated from the solid residuum. The residuum is then processed by physical separation such as by froth flotation or specific gravity separation to recover a substantial fraction thereof with reduced ash content. The solute in supercritical phase can be released by pressure reduction and recombined with the low-ash, carbonaceous material.

Warzinski, Robert P. (Venetia, PA); Ruether, John A. (McMurray, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) Criticality Safety Controls...

385

Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

Schlesser, J.A. [ed.] [comp.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix C to...

387

Criticality Safety Code Validation with LWBR’s SB Cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first set of critical experiments from the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor Program included eight, simple geometry critical cores built with 233UO2-ZrO2, 235UO2-ZrO2, ThO2, and ThO2-233UO2 nuclear materials. These cores are evaluated, described, and modeled to provide benchmarks and validation information for INEEL criticality safety calculation methodology. In addition to consistency with INEEL methodology, benchmark development and nuclear data are consistent with International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project methodology.Section 1 of this report introduces the experiments and the reason they are useful for validating some INEEL criticality safety calculations. Section 2 provides detailed experiment descriptions based on currently available experiment reports. Section 3 identifies criticality safety validation requirement sources and summarizes requirements that most affect this report. Section 4 identifies relevant hand calculation and computer code calculation methodologies used in the experiment evaluation, benchmark development, and validation calculations. Section 5 provides a detailed experiment evaluation. This section identifies resolutions for currently unavailable and discrepant information. Section 5 also reports calculated experiment uncertainty effects. Section 6 describes the developed benchmarks. Section 6 includes calculated sensitivities to various benchmark features and parameters. Section 7 summarizes validation results. Appendices describe various assumptions and their bases, list experimenter calculations results for items that were independently calculated for this validation work, report other information gathered and developed by SCIENTEC personnel while evaluating these same experiments, and list benchmark sample input and miscellaneous supplementary data.

Putman, Valerie Lee

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Materials issues in high temperature ultrasonic transducers for under-sodium viewing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in some fast spectrum nuclear reactors. This material is optically opaque. To facilitate operations and maintenance activities, an ultrasonic under-sodium viewing system has been developed. In the USA, the technology was successfully demonstrated in the 1970s and, over the intervening 30+ years, the capability was lost. This paper reports materials challenges encountered in developing both single-element and linear phased-array 2-MHz transducers that must operate at temperatures up to 260 deg. C. The critical issues are fundamentally material selection: the ability of a transducer to be immersed into liquid sodium and function at 260 deg. C, to achieve wetting and transmission of ultrasound into the sodium, and to be able to be removed and re-used.

Bond, L. J.; Griffin, J. W.; Posakony, G. J.; Harris, R. V.; Baldwin, D. L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

389

Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

High critical current superconducting tapes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

How to solve materials and design problems in solar heating and cooling. Energy technology review No. 77  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A broad range of difficulties encountered in active and passive solar space heating systems and active solar space cooling systems is covered. The problems include design errors, installation mistakes, inadequate durability of materials, unacceptable reliability of components, and wide variations in performance and operation of different solar systems. Feedback from designers and manufacturers involved in the solar market is summarized. The designers' experiences with and criticisms of solar components are presented, followed by the manufacturers' replies to the various problems encountered. Information is presented on the performance and operation of solar heating and cooling systems so as to enable future designs to maximize performance and eliminate costly errors. (LEW)

Ward, D.S.; Oberoi, H.S.; Weinstein, S.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This is a reference guide to common methodologies and protocols for measuring critical performance properties of advanced hydrogen storage materials. It helps users to communicate clearly the relevan

393

Supercapacitors specialities - Materials review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrode material is a key component for supercapacitor cell performance. As it is known, performance comparison of commercial available batteries and supercapacitors reveals significantly lower energy storage capability for supercapacitor devices. The energy density of commercial supercapacitor cells is limited to 10 Wh/kg whereas that of common lead acid batteries reaches 35-40 Wh/kg. For lithium ion batteries a value higher than 100 Wh/kg is easily available. Nevertheless, supercapacitors also known as ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors have other advantages in comparison with batteries. As a consequence, many efforts have been made in the last years to increase the storage energy density of electrochemical capacitors. A lot of results from published work (research and review papers, patents and reports) are available at this time. The purpose of this review is a presentation of the progress to date for the use of new materials and approaches for supercapacitor electrodes, with focus on the energy storage capability for practical applications. Many reported results refer to nanostructured carbon based materials and the related composites, used for the manufacture of experimental electrodes. A specific capacitance and a specific energy are seldom revealed as the main result of the performed investigation. Thus for nanoprous (activated) carbon based electrodes a specific capacitance up to 200-220 F/g is mentioned for organic electrolyte, whereas for aqueous electrolyte, the value is limited to 400-500 F/g. Significant contribution to specific capacitance is possible from fast faradaic reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface in addition to the electric double layer effect. The corresponding energy density is limited to 30-50 Wh/kg for organic electrolyte and to 12-17 Wh/kg for aqueous electrolyte. However such performance indicators are given only for the carbon material used in electrodes. For a supercapacitor cell, where two electrodes and also other materials for cell assembling and packaging are used, the above mentioned values have to be divided by a factor higher than four. As a consequence, the specific energy of a prototype cell, hardly could exceed 10 Wh/kg because of difficulties with the existing manufacturing technology. Graphene based materials and carbon nanotubes and different composites have been used in many experiments reported in the last years. Nevertheless in spite of the outstanding properties of these materials, significant increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy in comparison with activated or nanoporous carbon is not achieved. Use of redox materials as metal oxides or conducting polymers in combination with different nanostructured carbon materials (nanocomposite electrodes) has been found to contribute to further increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy. Nevertheless, few results are reported for practical cells with such materials. Many results are reported only for a three electrode system and significant difference is possible when the electrode is used in a practical supercapacitor cell. Further improvement in the electrode manufacture and more experiments with supercapacitor cells with the known electrochemical storage materials are required. Device prototypes and commercial products with an energy density towards 15-20 Wh/kg could be realized. These may be a milestone for further supercapacitor device research and development, to narrow the storage energy gap between batteries and supercapacitors.

Obreja, Vasile V. N. [National Research and Development Institute for Microtechnologies (IMT-Bucuresti), Bucharest, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190 (Romania)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

Multimodal Options for Materials Research to Advance the Basis for Fusion Energy in the ITER Era  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well-coordinated international fusion materials research on multiple fundamental feasibility issues can serve an important role during the next ten years. An overview is given of the current state-of-the-art of major materials systems that are candidates for next-step fusion reactors, including a summary of existing knowledge regarding operating temperature and neutron irradiation fluence limits due to high temperature strength and radiation damage considerations, coolant compatibility information, and current industrial manufacturing capabilities. There are two inter-related overarching objectives of fusion materials research to be performed in the next decade: 1) understanding materials science phenomena in the demanding DT fusion energy environment, and 2) Using this improved understanding to develop and qualify materials to provide the basis for next-step facility construction authorization by funding agencies and public safety licensing authorities. The critical issues and prospects for development of high performance fusion materials are discussed along with recent research results and planned activities of the international materials research community.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL; Möslang, Anton [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany; Muroga, Takeo [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for destroying halocarbons. Halocarbon materials are reacted in a dehalogenation process wherein they are combined with a solvent in the presence of a catalyst. A hydrogen-containing solvent is preferred which functions as both a solvating agent and hydrogen donor. To augment the hydrogen donation capacity of the solvent if needed (or when non-hydrogen-containing solvents are used), a supplemental hydrogen donor composition may be employed. In operation, at least one of the temperature and pressure of the solvent is maintained near, at, or above a critical level. For example, the solvent may be in (1) a supercritical state; (2) a state where one of the temperature or pressure thereof is at or above critical; or (3) a state where at least one of the temperature and pressure thereof is near-critical. This system provides numerous benefits including improved reaction rates, efficiency, and versatility.

Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.; Janikowski, Stuart K.

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

Electrorecycling of Critical and Value Metals from Mobile Electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mobile electronic devices such as smart phones and tablets are a significant source of valuable metals that should be recycled. Each year over a billion devices are sold world-wide and the average life is only a couple years. Value metals in phones are gold, palladium, silver, copper, cobalt and nickel. Devices now contain increasing amounts of rare earth elements (REE). In recent years the supply chain for REE has moved almost exclusively to China. They are contained in displays, speakers and vibrators within the devices. By US Department of Energy (DOE) classification, specific REEs (Nd, Dy, Eu, Tb and Y) are considered critical while others (Ce, La and Pr) are deemed near critical. Effective recycling schemes should include the recovery of these critical materials. By including more value materials in a recovery scheme, more value can be obtained by product diversification and less waste metals remains to be disposed of. REEs are mined as a group such that when specific elements become critical significantly more ore must be processed to capture the dilute but valuable critical elements. Targeted recycling of items containing the more of the less available critical materials could address their future criticality. This presentation will describe work in developing aqueous electrochemistry-based schemes for recycling metals from scrap mobile electronics. The electrorecycling process generates oxidizing agents at an anode while reducing dissolved metals at the cathode. E vs pH diagrams and metals dissolution experiments are used to assess effectiveness of various solution chemistries. Although several schemes were envisioned, a two stages process has been the focus of work: 1) initial dissolution of Cu, Sn, Ag and magnet materials using Fe+3 generated in acidic sulfate and 2) final dissolution of Pd and Au using Cl2 generated in an HCl solution. Experiments were performed using simulated metal mixtures. Both Cu and Ag were recovered at ~ 97% using Fe+3 while leaving Au and Ag intact. REE were extracted from the dissolved mixture using conventional methods. A discussion of future research directions will be discussed.

Tedd E. Lister; Peming Wang; Andre Anderko

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL Record of Property Transferred from ______ ___________________________________ 2. DEAN (If Applies) ______ ___________________________________ 5. UNIVERSITY DIRECTOR OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ ___________________________________ 3. HOSPITAL DIRECTOR (If Applies) ______ IF YOU NEED

Oliver, Douglas L.

398

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

400

Active Waste Materials Corrosion and Decontamination Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stainless steel alloys, 304L and 316L, were corrosion tested in representative radioactive samples of three actual Hanford tank waste solutions (Tanks AW-101, C-104, AN-107). Both the 304L and 316L exhibited good corrosion performance when immersed in boiling waste solutions. The maximum general corrosion rate was 0.015 mm/y (0.60 mils per year). Generally, the 304L had a slightly higher rate than the 316L. No localized attack was observed after 122 days of testing in the liquid phase, liquid/vapor phase, or vapor phase. Radioactive plate-out decontamination tests indicated that a 24-hour exposure to 1 {und M} HNO{sub 3} could remove about 99% of the radioactive components in the metal film when exposed to the C-104 and AN-107 solutions. The decontamination results are less certain for the AW-101 solution, since the initial contamination readings exceeded the capacity of the meter used for this test.

MJ Danielson; MR Elmore; SG Pitman

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Nano Structured Activated Carbon for Hydrogen Storge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of a nanostructured synthetic carbons materials that have been synthesized by thermal-decomposition of aromatic rich polyether such as poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is reported. These polymers based nanostructured carbons efficacious for gas adsorption and storage and have Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of more than 3000 m2/g, and with average pore diameter of < 2nm. Surface-area, pore characteristics, and other critical variables for selecting porous materials of high gas adsorption capacities are presented. Analysis of the fragments evolved under various carbonization temperatures, and the correlation between the activation and carbonization temperatures provides a mechanistic perspective of the pore evolution during activation. Correlations between gas (N2 and H2) adsorption capacity and porous texture of the materials have been established. The materials possess excellent hydrogen storage properties, with hydrogen storage capacity up to 7.4 wt% (gravimetric) and ~ 45 g H2 L-1 (volumetric) at -196oC and 6.0 MPa.

Israel Cabasso; Youxin Yuan

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

402

Functional Materials for Energy | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Fuel Cells Thermoelectrics Separations Materials Catalysis Sensor Materials Polymers and Composites Carbon Fiber Related Research Chemistry and Physics at...

403

Degenerate and critical Bloch branes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last few years a number of works reported the appearance of thick branes with internal structure, induced by the parameter which controls the interaction between two scalar fields coupled to gravity in (4,1) dimensions in warped space-time with one extra dimension. Here we show that one can implement the control over the brane thickness without needing to change the potential parameter. On the contrary, this is going to be done by means of the variation of a parameter associated with the domain wall degeneracy. We also report the existence of novel and qualitatively different solutions for a critical value of the degeneracy parameter, which could be called critical Bloch branes.

Souza Dutra, A. de [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste, I-34100 Italy (Italy); UNESP-Campus de Guaratingueta-DFQ, Departmento de Fisica e Quimica, 12516-410 Guaratingueta SP Brasil (Brazil); Amaro de Faria, A. C. Jr.; Hott, M. [UNESP-Campus de Guaratingueta-DFQ, Departmento de Fisica e Quimica, 12516-410 Guaratingueta SP Brasil (Brazil)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

Ceder, Gerbrand (MIT); Persson, Kristin (LBNL)

405

High Critical Current Coated Conductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOE’s coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

406

Corrosion resistant ceramic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

Kaun, T.D.

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

407

Corrosion resistant ceramic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Corrosion resistant ceramic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document. This calculation is subject to the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004 [DIRS 171539]) because the CHF is included in the Q-List (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171190], p. A-3) as an item important to safety. This calculation is prepared in accordance with AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' [DIRS 168413].

C.E. Sanders

2005-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

410

Piezoelectric materials used in underwater acoustic transducers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Piezoelectric materials have been used in underwater acoustic transducers for nearly a century. In this paper, we reviewed four different types of piezoelectric materials: piezoelectric ceramics, single crystals, composites, and polymers, which are widely used in underwater acoustic transducers nowadays. Piezoelectric ceramics are the most dominant material type and are used as a single-phase material or one of the end members in composites. Piezoelectric single crystals offer outstanding electromechanical response but are limited by their manufacturing cost. Piezoelectric polymers provide excellent acoustic impedance matching and transducer fabrication flexibility although their piezoelectric properties are not as good as ceramics and single crystals. Composites combined the merits of ceramics and polymers and are receiving increased attention. The typical structure and electromechanical properties of each type of materials are introduced and discussed with respect to underwater acoustic transducer applications. Their advantages and disadvantages are summarized. Some of the critical design considerations when developing underwater acoustic transducers with these materials are also touched upon.

Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

411

Time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of ballistic impact events in polymer and nanocomposite materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A detailed understanding of how materials respond to ballistic shock-loading is critical for the design and development of new protective materials. However, the nonlinear viscoelastic deformation present in polymers and ...

Saini, Gagan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Durability of Acrylic: Stress and Response Characterization of Materials for Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Durability of Acrylic: Stress and Response Characterization of Materials for Photovoltaics Myles P of materials for enhanced photovoltaic (PV) performance, it is critical to have quantitative knowledge of acrylic PMMA are reported. Keywords-Acrylic, Degradation, Photovoltaics, Photodegradation I. INTRODUCTION

Rollins, Andrew M.

413

Reliability Analysis of Microelectronic Components and Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reliability Analysis of Microelectronic Components and Materials Increasing numbers of the degradation processes relevant to soldered joints is crucial for more reliable life-cycle predictions. Joining methods are critical for the reliable use of electronic packages. In particular, since the advent

Berlin,Technische Universität

414

Materials that Power Our World Nanostructured Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application #12;Strong Earnings Potential · Positive outlook for energy and electronics · Proprietary Cnano-c 1 Materials that Power Our World Nanostructured Carbon 22nd NREL Growth Forum (modified presentation) #12;Nanostructured Carbon Mission critical component in advanced energy & electronic devices 2

415

MATERIAL PROCESSING FOR SELF-ASSEMBLING MACHINE SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are developing an important aspect of a new technology based on self-reproducing machine systems. Such systems could overcome resource limitations and control the deleterious side effects of human activities on the environment. Machine systems capable of building themselves promise an increase in industrial productivity as dramatic as that of the industrial revolution. To operate successfully, such systems must procure necessary raw materials from their surroundings. Therefore, next to automation, most critical for this new technology is the ability to extract important chemicals from readily available soils. In contrast to conventional metallurgical practice, these extraction processes cannot make substantial use of rare elements. We have designed a thermodynamically viable process and experimentally demonstrated most steps that differ from common practice. To this end we had to develop a small, disposable vacuum furnace system. Our work points to a viable extraction process.

K. LACKNER; D. BUTT; C. WENDT

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Final Demolition and Disposition of 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory - 12267  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory was constructed in 1960 to provide a heavy shielded reactor room where quantities of plutonium or uranium in solution could be brought to near-critical configurations under carefully controlled and monitored conditions. In the late 1980's, the responsible contractor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), was directed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare the facility for unoccupied status. The facility was demolished under a Removal Action Work Plan pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The funding for this project was provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The primary rooms of concern with regards to contamination in 209-E facility, which is over 9,000 square feet, are the criticality assembly room (CAR), the mix room, and the change room. The CAR contained two reactor hoods (HO-140 and HO-170), which each had a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system. The CAR contained 13 tanks ranging from 38 L (10 gal) to 401 L (106 gal). Tanks TK-109 and TK-110 are below grade, and were removed as part of this demolition and disposition remedy. Nonradiological and radiological hazardous substances were removed, decontaminated, or fixed in place, prior to demolition. Except for the removal of below grade tanks TK-109 and TK-110, the facility was demolished to slab-on-grade. PNNL performed stabilization and deactivation activities that included removal of bulk fissile material and chemicals, flushing tanks, stabilizing contamination within gloveboxes and hoods, and packaging and removing waste. The removal of the contaminated plutonium equipment and materials from the 209E facility presented a number of challenges similar in nature to those associated with the inventory reduction and cleanup activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Although there were no bulk fissile materials or chemicals within the facility, there were residual radiological materials (isotopes of plutonium and americium) in the tanks and hoods. The complexity of the remedy was present because of the various configurations of the tanks and hoods, combined with the residual contaminants. Because of the weight and dimensional configuration, size reduction of the slab tanks, as well as removal and disposal of the different material used for moderation and absorption, were two examples of challenges that were resolved to complete the remedy. One of the key methods developed and implemented at the facility was the design and construction of a shroud to allow the cutting of the Pu contaminated tanks. The shroud design, development and implementation at the 209E Project was an example of enhanced work planning and task hazards analysis with worker involvement. This paper will present the lessons learned from the 209E facility inventory reduction activities including the shroud and other methodologies used. The initial Lessons Learned discussion for this project was scheduled for late January 2012. This facility is the first open-air demolition of a highly contaminated plutonium-contaminated facility accomplished by CH2M Hill under the Plateau Remediation Contract. The demolition was completed without spread of contamination to the workers and the surrounding area. As with any project of this complexity, there are significant accomplishments, as well as experience that can be applied to future demolition of plutonium-contaminated facilities on the Hanford Site. These experiences will be documented at a later date. (authors)

Woolery, Wade [US Department of Energy, Richland WA (United States); Dodd, Edwin III [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland WA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Electromigration kinetics and critical current of Pb-free interconnects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electromigration kinetics of Pb-free solder bump interconnects have been studied using a single bump parameter sweep technique. By removing bump to bump variations in structure, texture, and composition, the single bump sweep technique has provided both activation energy and power exponents that reflect atomic migration and interface reactions with fewer samples, shorter stress time, and better statistics than standard failure testing procedures. Contact metallurgies based on Cu and Ni have been studied. Critical current, which corresponds to the Blech limit, was found to exist in the Ni metallurgy, but not in the Cu metallurgy. A temperature dependence of critical current was also observed.

Lu, Minhua; Rosenberg, Robert [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Next Generation Technologies in Stimulus-Responsive Materials and Organic Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials ensure interconnectivity throughout the activeof decreased active layer interconnectivity and lower device

Unruh, Jr, David Allen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL NOTICE OF DESIGNATED DEPARTMENTAL OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS 1. Include a copy of any relevant documents. 2. Item MATERIALS COORDINATOR ­ IC-8 Mail, Fax or PDF the entire package to: MC 2010 Fax: 679-4240 REFERENCE # DMC

Oliver, Douglas L.

420

Thermal criticality in a repository environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explores a scenario in which burial containers fail and fissile material is transported through the tuff by water to some location, away from the burial site, where an over-moderated critical mass gradually accumulates. Because of the low solubilities of plutonium and uranium, and the low ground water velocities, the analysis shows that such a scenario with {sup 239}Pu is probably impossible because the time required to accumulate a critical mass is large compared with the half-life of the {sup 239}Pu. In the case of {sup 235}U, the analysis indicates that the accumulation rates are so low that relatively small fission power levels would consume the {sup 235}U as fast as it accumulates, and that the thermal conductivity of the tuff is large enough to prevent a significant increase in temperature. Thus, the conditions for the removal of water by boiling and the associated autocatalytic increase in reactivity are not met in the case of {sup 235}U. An explosive release of energy does not appear to be possible. A simple water voiding model, which allows water removal at about the fastest possible rate, was used to explore a scenario in which the fuel accumulation rate was arbitrarily increased enough to cause water boiling and the associated dryout of the tuff. Calculations for this case indicate that disruption of the tuff, leading to a neutronic shutdown, would probably occur before an explosive energy release could be generated. Additional scenarios, which should be investigated in future work are identified.

Morris, E.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Introduction to smart materials and their applications to structural health monitoring and control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Introduction to smart materials and their applications to structural health monitoring sensors Smart materials and sensing technologies Muscles: structural control, semi-active and active Monitoring and Control TechnologiesTechnologiesTechnologiesTechnologies 3Smart Materials Definition

422

Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Compilation of project summaries and significant accomplishments, FY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. A fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrates on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support. Assessments of materials needs and opportunities in the process industries are an on-going effort within the program. These assessments are being used for program planning and priority setting, followed by support of work to satisfy those needs. All the industries have identified materials as critical, particularly for high-temperature strength, corrosion resistance, and wear resistance. Also important from the energy efficiency viewpoint are membranes, catalytic membranes, and reactors for separations, both for processing and waste reduction. AIM focuses, therefore, on high-temperature materials, corrosion resistant materials, wear resistant materials, strong polymers, coatings, and membrane materials for industrial applications.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Graphene: from materials science to particle physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since its discovery in 2004, graphene, a two-dimensional hexagonal carbon allotrope, has generated great interest and spurred research activity from materials science to particle physics and vice versa. In particular, graphene has been found to exhibit outstanding electronic and mechanical properties, as well as an unusual low-energy spectrum of Dirac quasiparticles giving rise to a fractional quantum Hall effect when freely suspended and immersed in a magnetic field. One of the most intriguing puzzles of graphene involves the low-temperature conductivity at zero density, a central issue in the design of graphene-based nanoelectronic components. While suspended graphene experiments have shown a trend reminiscent of semiconductors, with rising resistivity at low temperatures, most theories predict a constant or even decreasing resistivity. However, lattice field theory calculations have revealed that suspended graphene is at or near the critical coupling for excitonic gap formation due to strong Coulomb interactions, which suggests a simple and straightforward explanation for the experimental data. In this contribution we review the current status of the field with emphasis on the issue of gap formation, and outline recent progress and future points of contact between condensed matter physics and Lattice QCD.

Joaquín E. Drut; Timo A. Lähde; Eero Tölö

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

424

Shipping container for fissile material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a shipping container for the interstate transportation of enriched uranium materials. The shipping container is comprised of a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical-shaped outer vessel lined with thermal insulation. Disposed inside the thermal insulation and spaced apart from the inner walls of the outer vessel is a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical inner vessel impervious to liquid and gaseous substances and having the inner surfaces coated with a layer of cadmium to prevent nuclear criticality. The cadmium is, in turn, lined with a protective shield of high-density urethane for corrosion and wear protection. 2 figs.

Crowder, H.E.

1984-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

425

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 May 2012 Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford...

426

Criticality Safety | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart GridThird Quarterinto PARSCriteria ReviewCriticality

427

Method for forming materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Method and composition for improving flux pinning and critical current in superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Superconducting materials and methods of forming superconducting materials are disclosed. Highly oxidized superconductors are heated at a relatively high temperature so as to release oxygen, which migrates out of the material, and form a non-superconducting phase which does not diffuse out of grains of the material. The material is then reoxidized at a lower temperature, leaving the non-superconducting inclusions inside a superconducting phase. The non-superconducting inclusions act as pinning centers in the superconductor, increasing the critical current thereof. 14 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

430

Method and composition for improving flux pinning and critical current in superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Superconducting materials and methods of forming superconducting materials are disclosed. Highly oxidized superconductors are heated at a relatively high temperature so as to release oxygen, which migrates out of the material, and form a non-superconducting phase which does not diffuse out of grains of the material. The material is then reoxidized at a lower temperature, leaving the non-superconducting inclusions inside a superconducting phase. The non-superconducting inclusions act as pinning centers in the superconductor, increasing the critical current thereof.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Consideration of nuclear criticality when disposing of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on general arguments presented in this report, nuclear criticality was eliminated from performance assessment calculations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a repository for waste contaminated with transuranic (TRU) radioisotopes, located in southeastern New Mexico. At the WIPP, the probability of criticality within the repository is low because mechanisms to concentrate the fissile radioisotopes dispersed throughout the waste are absent. In addition, following an inadvertent human intrusion into the repository (an event that must be considered because of safety regulations), the probability of nuclear criticality away from the repository is low because (1) the amount of fissile mass transported over 10,000 yr is predicted to be small, (2) often there are insufficient spaces in the advective pore space (e.g., macroscopic fractures) to provide sufficient thickness for precipitation of fissile material, and (3) there is no credible mechanism to counteract the natural tendency of the material to disperse during transport and instead concentrate fissile material in a small enough volume for it to form a critical concentration. Furthermore, before a criticality would have the potential to affect human health after closure of the repository--assuming that a criticality could occur--it would have to either (1) degrade the ability of the disposal system to contain nuclear waste or (2) produce significantly more radioisotopes than originally present. Neither of these situations can occur at the WIPP; thus, the consequences of a criticality are also low.

RECHARD,ROBERT P.; SANCHEZ,LAWRENCE C.; STOCKMAN,CHRISTINE T.; TRELLUE,HOLLY R.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

13:00-13:10 Opening: "Bridging the gap between discrete and continuum models", S. Luding, UT, The Netherlands Session 1 Physics in Critical State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, UT, The Netherlands Session 1 ­ Physics in Critical State 13:10-13:40 "Micromechanical characteristics of the critical state of granular materials", N. Kruyt, UT, The Netherlands 13:40-14:10 "Critical, The Netherlands 14:25-14:40 Coffee break Session 2 ­ Hydrodynamics and Granular Flows 14:40-15:10 "Coarsening

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

433

Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

Integrated Approach to Documenting Readiness for a Potential Criticality Incident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been 60 highly publicized criticality accidents1 over the last 60 years and the nature of the hazard is unique. Recent studies2 discuss the benefits of knowing what to expect during and immediately following these events. Emergency planning and response standards2 provide an effective tool for establishing an adequate level of readiness to a criticality accident. While these planning requirements cover a broad spectrum of activities to establish readiness, a concise and routinely reviewed criticality accident scenario may be the most valuable tool in developing a cohesive understanding and response to these challenging events. Using a guideline3 for criticality safety evaluations the analytical work and emergency planning to mitigate a criticality accident at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was developed. Using a single document the analysis that established the accident characteristics, response scenario based on emergency staffing and planning, and anticipated dose consequences were integrated. This single document approach provides a useful platform to integrate the initial planning and guide the review of proposed changes to emergency response plans.

Carlisle, Bruce S.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Jones, Robert A.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

435

Controlling colloidal phase transitions with critical Casimir forces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The critical Casimir effect provides a thermodynamic analogue of the well-known quantum mechanical Casimir effect. It acts between two surfaces immersed in a critical binary liquid mixture, and results from the confinement of concentration fluctuations of the solvent. Unlike the quantum mechanical effect, the magnitude and range of this attraction can be adjusted with temperature via the solvent correlation length, thus offering new opportunities for the assembly of nano and micron-scale structures. Here, we demonstrate the active assembly control of equilibrium phases using critical Casimir forces. We guide colloidal particles into analogues of molecular liquid and solid phases via exquisite control over their interactions. By measuring the critical Casimir particle pair potential directly from density fluctuations in the colloidal gas, we obtain insight into liquefaction at small scales: We apply the Van der Waals model of molecular liquefaction and show that the colloidal gas-liquid condensation is accurately described by the Van der Waals theory, even on the scale of a few particles. These results open up new possibilities in the active assembly control of micro and nanostructures.

Van Duc Nguyen; Suzanne Faber; Zhibing Hu; Gerard H. Wegdam; Peter Schall

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

436

Pushing the boundaries of the thermal conductivity of materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pushing the boundaries of the thermal conductivity of materials David G. Cahill, C. Chiritescu, Y. · Advances in time-domain thermoreflectance. · Amorphous limit to the thermal conductivity of materials. #12;50 nm Interfaces are critical at the nanoscale · Low thermal conductivity in nanostructured

Braun, Paul

437

CRITICALITY SAFETY TRAINING AT FLUOR HANFORD (FH)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fluor Hanford Criticality Safety engineers are extensively trained. The objectives and requirements for training are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society Standards (ANSI/ANS), and are captured in the Hanford Criticality Safety Program manual, HNF-7098. Qualification cards have been established for the general Criticality Safety Engineer (CSE) analyst, CSEs who support specific facilities, and for the facility Criticality Safety Representatives (CSRs). Refresher training and continuous education in the discipline are emphasized. Weekly Brown Bag Sessions keep the criticality safety engineers informed of the latest developments and historic perspectives.

TOFFER, H.

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

438

Molecular Imaging of the ATM Kinase Activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including from DNA double-strand breaks. ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events including DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. We sought to create a bioluminescent reporter that dynamically and noninvasively measures ATM kinase activity in living cells and subjects. Methods and Materials: Using the split luciferase technology, we constructed a hybrid cDNA, ATM-reporter (ATMR), coding for a protein that quantitatively reports on changes in ATM kinase activity through changes in bioluminescence. Results: Treatment of ATMR-expressing cells with ATM inhibitors resulted in a dose-dependent increase in bioluminescence activity. In contrast, induction of ATM kinase activity upon irradiation resulted in a decrease in reporter activity that correlated with ATM and Chk2 activation by immunoblotting in a time-dependent fashion. Nuclear targeting improved ATMR sensitivity to both ATM inhibitors and radiation, whereas a mutant ATMR (lacking the target phosphorylation site) displayed a muted response. Treatment with ATM inhibitors and small interfering (si)RNA-targeted knockdown of ATM confirm the specificity of the reporter. Using reporter expressing xenografted tumors demonstrated the ability of ATMR to report in ATM activity in mouse models that correlated in a time-dependent fashion with changes in Chk2 activity. Conclusions: We describe the development and validation of a novel, specific, noninvasive bioluminescent reporter that enables monitoring of ATM activity in real time, in vitro and in vivo. Potential applications of this reporter include the identification and development of novel ATM inhibitors or ATM-interacting partners through high-throughput screens and in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of ATM inhibitors in preclinical models.

Williams, Terence M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Nyati, Shyam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ross, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Rehemtulla, Alnawaz, E-mail: alnawaz@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Counterterms, critical gravity and holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider counterterms for odd dimensional holographic CFTs. These counterterms are derived by demanding cut-off independence of the CFT partition function on $S^d$ and $S^1 \\times S^{d-1}$. The same choice of counterterms leads to a cut-off independent Schwarzschild black hole entropy. When treated as independent actions, these counterterm actions resemble critical theories of gravity, i.e., higher curvature gravity theories where the additional massive spin-2 modes become massless. Equivalently, in the context of AdS/CFT, these are theories where at least one of the central charges associated with the trace anomaly vanishes. Connections between these theories and logarithmic CFTs are discussed. For a specific choice of parameters, the theories arising from counterterms are non-dynamical and resemble a DBI generalization of gravity. For even dimensional CFTs, analogous counterterms cancel log-independent cut-off dependence.

Kallol Sen; Aninda Sinha; Nemani V. Suryanarayana

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

440

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA); Doman, Marvin J. (McKeesport, PA); Wilson, Edward C. (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Critical Infrastructure and Cyber Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that employ stealth methods such as steganography, allowing botmasters to exploit public forums and search engines #1; As U.S. national elections draw near, an increase in phishing, scams and malicious code targeting candidates, campaigns, etc.... Chemical Manufacturing The Chemical Manufacturing sector combines organic and inorganic materials to make chemicals used in everyday life and that contribute to the national security, public safety, and economic security. The components...

Doll, Abby; Pirrong, Renee; Jennings, Matthew; Stasny, George; Giblin, Andy; Shaffer, Steph; Anderson, Aimee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Transporting particulate material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Criticality safety of an annular tank for fissile solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments performed to determine the criticality safety of annular tanks for storing fissile solutions are described. Six annular tanks were built in four nesting sizes to obtain experimental criticality data which could be used to validate computer codes employed in the design of such a safe storage system for an industrial plant. Each tank had an annular solution region thickness of 38 mm. The height of this region was 2.13 m, held 0.3 m off the floor by a stainless steel skirting. Walls were 6.4 mm-thick type 304L stainless steel. The uranyl nitrate solution contained 357 g U/l and had a density of 1.5 kg/m/sup 3/. The uranium was enriched to 93.2% /sup 235/U with other isotopes: 5.4% /sup 238/U, 1.0% /sup 234/U, and 0.4% /sup 236/U. The solution contained 0.5 molar nitric acid and a total impurity content of less than 1500 ppM. Important neutron absorbers, boron and cadmium, averaged 10 ppM and 30 ppM, respectively. Boron-loaded concrete and boron-loaded plaster were selected for the neutron moderator/absorber interior to the annular tank. Three configurations of tanks and reflector were taken to criticality and are reported. The critical uranium solution height in all tanks containing solution as a function of boron content in earthen interior material, tank array configuration, and other variables. (LCL)

Rothe, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Multifunctional three-dimensional macroporous nanoelectronic networks for smart materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multifunctional three-dimensional macroporous nanoelectronic networks for smart materials Jia Liua incorporation of active nanoelec- tronic networks within 3D materials reveals a powerful approach to smart for creating "very smart" systems, because this would transform conventional inactive materials into active

Heller, Eric

445

Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses: 1958 to 1982. Volume 1. Lookup tables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains - in chronological order - the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41.

Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

Determination of the critical degree of deformation of zirconium and Zr-1% Nb alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The critical degree of deformation of zirconium-1% niobium alloy and of pure zirconium melted and worked under the same conditions in an inert atmosphere was determined. Commercial iodide zirconium was used as the charge and the niobium content in the N-1 alloy was 0.98% wt. The critical degree of deformation was determined by compulsory averaging of the deformation intervals. To increase the accuracy of the experiments the use of recrystallized material was recommended.

Chirkin, A.V.; Shibani, I.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Cathode materials review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

448

Probabilistic assessment of critically flawed LMFBR PHTS piping elbows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the important functions of the Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) of a large Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) plant is to contain the circulating radioactive sodium in components and piping routed through inerted areas within the containment building. A significant possible failure mode of this vital system is the development of cracks in the piping components. This paper presents results from the probabilistic assessment of postulated flaws in the most-critical piping elbow of each piping leg. The criticality of calculated maximum sized flaws is assessed against an estimated material fracture toughness to determine safety factors and failure probability estimates using stress-strength interference theory. Subsequently, a different approach is also employed in which the randomness of the initial flaw size and loading are more-rigorously taken into account. This latter approach yields much smaller probability of failure values when compared to the stress-strength interference analysis results.

Balkey, K.R.; Wallace, I.T.; Vaurio, J.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Nanostructured magnetic materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

Chan, Keith T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

OPERATING TEMPERATURE WINDOWS FOR FUSION REACTOR STRUCTURAL MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPERATING TEMPERATURE WINDOWS FOR FUSION REACTOR STRUCTURAL MATERIALS S.J. Zinkle1 and N.M. Ghoniem reactor structural materials: four reduced-activation structural materials (oxide-dispersion- strengthened operating temperature limit of structural materials is determined by one of four factors, all of which

California at Los Angeles, University of

451

MECHATRONICS ASPECTS OF SMART MATERIALS INDUCED STRAIN ACTUATION Victor Giurgiutiu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MECHATRONICS ASPECTS OF SMART MATERIALS INDUCED STRAIN ACTUATION Victor Giurgiutiu University-777-0106, email victorg@sc.edu Abstract: The mechatronics aspects of smart materials induced-strain actuation are investigated. Smart materials, a.k.a. active materials, are able to transform electric, magnetic, thermal

Giurgiutiu, Victor

452

Evaluation and validation of criticality codes for fuel dissolver calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past ten years an OECD/NEA Criticality Working Group has examined the validity of criticality safety computational methods. International calculation tools which were shown to be valid in systems for which experimental data existed were demonstrated to be inadequate when extrapolated to fuel dissolver media. The spread of the results in the international calculation amounted to {plus minus} 12,000 pcm in the realistic fuel dissolver exercise n{degrees} 19 proposed by BNFL, and to {plus minus} 25,000 pcm in the benchmark n{degrees} 20 in which fissile material in solid form is surrounded by fissile material in solution. A theoretical study of the main physical parameters involved in fuel dissolution calculations was performed, i.e. range of moderation, variation of pellet size and the fuel double heterogeneity effect. The APOLLO/P{sub IC} method developed to treat latter effect, permits us to supply the actual reactivity variation with pellet dissolution and to propose international reference values. The disagreement among contributors' calculations was analyzed through a neutron balance breakdown, based on three-group microscopic reaction rates solicited from the participants. The results pointed out that fast and resonance nuclear data in criticality codes are not sufficiently reliable. Moreover the neutron balance analysis emphasized the inadequacy of the standard self-shielding formalism (NITAWL in the international SCALE package) to account for {sup 238}U resonance mutual self-shielding in the pellet-fissile liquor interaction. Improvements in the up-dated 1990 contributions, as do recent complementary reference calculations (MCNP, VIM, ultrafine slowing-down CGM calculation), confirm the need to use rigorous self-shielding methods in criticality design-oriented codes. 6 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Santamarina, A.; Smith, H.J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)); Whitesides, G.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

454

battery materials | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

battery materials battery materials Leads No leads are available at this time. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. Abstract: The...

455

Energy Materials & Processes | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in catalysts and energy materials needed to design new materials and systems for sustainable energy applications. By facilitating the development and rapid dissemination...

456

7r ^000 S*} Materials Eteparfmen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7»r ^£000 S*} Materials Eteparfmen Annual Report 1994 l***y-£ ·fflLJ*.'' £ Published bv M;)1t':ii,iN l)cn Ri\\o Viiion.il l,;tb'ii,iiof. #12;T ^ T i Y T C / T ^ Ki>. Materials Department #12;Abstract Selected activities of the Materials IX-partment at Riso National Laboratory during HW4

457

Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postdoctoral Researcher, Materials Chemistry (2 year contract) Adaptive Sensors Group Dublin City Foundation Ireland through the CLARITY CSET (www.clarity- centre.org), supplemented by significant project partners. The group's research strategy in materials chemistry research is to closely align activity

Humphrys, Mark

458

Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science College of Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science College of Engineering Michigan State................................................................................. 19 7. Integrity and Safety in Research and Creative Activities of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science offers Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree

459

Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies exists for low-dollar items of machinery, equipment, materials and supplies used for business purposes, or in activities...

460

Exciton transport and coherence in molecular and nanostructured materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past 20 years a new classes of optically active materials have been developed that are composites of nano-engineered constituents such as molecules, polymers, and nanocrystals. These disordered materials have ...

Akselrod, Gleb M. (Gleb Markovitch)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Elements of a nuclear criticality safety program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States are quite successful, as compared with other safety disciplines, at protecting life and property, especially when regarded as a developing safety function with no historical perspective for the cause and effect of process nuclear criticality accidents before 1943. The programs evolved through self-imposed and regulatory-imposed incentives. They are the products of conscientious individuals, supportive corporations, obliged regulators, and intervenors (political, public, and private). The maturing of nuclear criticality safety programs throughout the United States has been spasmodic, with stability provided by the volunteer standards efforts within the American Nuclear Society. This presentation provides the status, relative to current needs, for nuclear criticality safety program elements that address organization of and assignments for nuclear criticality safety program responsibilities; personnel qualifications; and analytical capabilities for the technical definition of critical, subcritical, safety and operating limits, and program quality assurance.

Hopper, C.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Chemomechanics of calcium leaching of cement-based materials at different scales : the role of CH-dissolution and C-S-H degradation on strength and durability performance of materials and structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calcium leaching is a durability threat for cement-based materials employed in critical infrastructures, such as Nuclear Waste Storage Systems. This thesis presents a comprehensive study of the material and structural ...

Heukamp, Franz H. (Franz Hoyte), 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Alternative Energy Engineering Activity (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes an alternative energy engineering activity to provide on-site technical assistance for alternative energy and conservation projects; develop information materials and...

464

Corrosion Resistance of Amorphous Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 coating - a new criticality-controlled material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. Modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in various relevant environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

465

Continuous-Estimator Representation for Monte Carlo Criticality Diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alternate means of computing diagnostics for Monte Carlo criticality calculations is proposed. Overlapping spherical regions or estimators are placed covering the fissile material with a minimum center-to-center separation of the 'fission distance', which is defined herein, and a radius that is some multiple thereof. Fission neutron production is recorded based upon a weighted average of proximities to centers for all the spherical estimators. These scores are used to compute the Shannon entropy, and shown to reproduce the value, to within an additive constant, determined from a well-placed mesh by a user. The spherical estimators are also used to assess statistical coverage.

Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

466

Critical shear stresses in cohesive soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CRITICAL SHEAR STRESSES IN COHESIVE SOILS A Thesis By ROBERT JAMES REKTORIK Approved as to style and content by: (Committee hairm g- c& ( ead of epartm ( mber) (Member) January 1964 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to acknowledge the guidance..., and Dummy Soil Sample 17 Typical Soil Samples after Scour Test, San Saba Clay 25 Typical Soil Samples after Scour Test, Houston Black Clay, K177 Regression of Critical Shearing Force on Per Cent Moisture . 31 10. Regression of Critical Shearing Force...

Rektorik, Robert James

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Materials sciences programs, fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Division of Materials Sciences is located within the DOE in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Division of Materials Sciences is responsible for basic research and research facilities in strategic materials science topics of critical importance to the mission of the Department and its Strategic Plan. Materials Science is an enabling technology. The performance parameters, economics, environmental acceptability and safety of all energy generation, conversion, transmission and conservation technologies are limited by the properties and behavior of materials. The Materials Sciences programs develop scientific understanding of the synergistic relationship amongst the synthesis, processing, structure, properties, behavior, performance and other characteristics of materials. Emphasis is placed on the development of the capability to discover technologically, economically, and environmentally desirable new materials and processes, and the instruments and national user facilities necessary for achieving such progress. Materials Sciences sub-fields include physical metallurgy, ceramics, polymers, solid state and condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, surface science and related disciplines where the emphasis is on the science of materials. This report includes program descriptions for 458 research programs including 216 at 14 DOE National Laboratories, 242 research grants (233 for universities), and 9 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants. The report is divided into eight sections. Section A contains all Laboratory projects, Section B has all contract research projects, Section C has projects funded under the SBIR Program, Section D describes the Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials and E has information on major user facilities. F contains descriptions of other user facilities; G, a summary of funding levels; and H, indices characterizing research projects.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Standards (CIP-002 through CIP-009). The increased use of wireless technologies and...

469

209-E Critical Mass Laboratory - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and controlled. Criticality experiments, where a nuclear chain reaction becomes self-sustaining, were also conducted. In addition, 209-E was a research facility where methods of...

470

Critical Mission Support Through Energy Security  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the critical mission support through energy security and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

471

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber Security Standards "Cybersecurity for...

472

Methods of chemically converting first materials to second materials utilizing hybrid-plasma systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of chemically converting a first material to a second material. A first plasma and a second plasma are formed, and the first plasma is in fluid communication with the second plasma. The second plasma comprises activated hydrogen and oxygen, and is formed from a water vapor. A first material is flowed into the first plasma to at least partially ionize at least a portion of the first material. The at least partially ionized first material is flowed into the second plasma to react at least some components of the first material with at least one of the activated hydrogen and activated oxygen. Such converts at least some of the first material to a second material. In another aspect, the invention encompasses a method of forming a synthetic gas by flowing a hydrocarbon-containing material into a hybrid-plasma system. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses a method of degrading a hydrocarbon-containing material by flowing such material into a hybrid-plasma system. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses a method of releasing an inorganic component of a complex comprising the inorganic component and an other component, wherein the complex is flowed through a hybrid-plasma system.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Coated ceramic breeder materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

475

UNDERGRADUATE Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK Materials Science & Engineering 2013 2014 #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines that still gives the students the opportunity to study science while earning an engineering degree. Materials

Tipple, Brett

476

Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Science & Engineering The University of Utah 2014-15 Undergraduate Handbook #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines that still gives the students the opportunity to study science while earning an engineering degree. Materials

Simons, Jack

477

A Materials Facilities Initiative -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

478

Computational Chemical Materials Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Thermal barrier coatings, wear resistance coatings, radiation resistant materials · Materials for opticalHome Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department to understand behavior and properties of materials as a function of ­ Chemical constitution ­ Composition

479

Active terahertz metamaterials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate planar terahertz metamaterial devices enabling actively controllable transmission amplitude, phase, or frequency at room temperature via carrier depletion or photoexcitation in the semiconductor substrate or in semiconductor materials incorporated into the metamaterial structure.

Chen, Hou-tong [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Apparatus for characterizing conductivity of superconducting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for noncontact, radio-frequency shielding current characterization of materials. Self- or mutual inductance changes in one or more inductive elements, respectively, occur when materials capable of supporting shielding currents are placed in proximity thereto, or undergo change in resistivity while in place. Such changes can be observed by incorporating the inductor(s) in a resonant circuit and determining the frequency of oscillation or by measuring the voltage induced on a coupled inductive element. The present invention is useful for determining the critical temperature and superconducting transition width for superconducting samples. 10 figures.

Doss, J.D.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity critical materials" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

482

Supporting Online Material Materials and Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Supporting Online Material Materials and Methods (15) For all possible earthquake pairs. The parameters chosen for window length, filter bandpass, negative sidelobe identification, and cross-correlation threshold are appropriate for high-frequency earthquakes. In order to remove false positives or poor data

Wolfe, Cecily J.

483

Analysis of a hypothetical criticality accident in a waste supercompactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hypothetical nuclear criticality accident in a waste supercompactor is examined. The material being compressed in the compactor is a homogeneous mixture of beryllium and {sup 239}Pu. The point-kinetics equations with simple thermal-hydraulic feedback are used to model the transient behavior of the system. A computer code has been developed to solve the model equations. The computer code calculates the fission power history, fission yield, bulk temperature of the system, and several other thermal-hydraulic parameters of interest. Calculations have been performed for the waste supercompactor for various material misloading configurations. The peak power for the various accident scenarios varies from 1.04 {times} 10{sup 17} to 4.85 {times} 10{sup 20} fissions per second (fps). The total yield varies from 8.21 {times} 10{sup 17} to 7.73 {times} 10{sup 18} fissions, and the bulk temperature of the system varies from 412 to >912 K.

Plaster, M.J.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Ruggles, A.E.; Wilkinson, A.D.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Puncture detecting barrier materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

A Summary of the Fatigue Properties of Wind Turbine Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. The materials used to construct these machines are subjected to a unique loading spectrum that contains several orders of magnitude more cycles than other fatigue critical structures, e.g., an airplane. To facilitate fatigue designs, a large database of material properties has been generated over the past several years that is specialized to materials typically used in wind turbines. In this paper, I review these fatigue data. Major sections are devoted to the properties developed for wood, metals (primarily aluminum) and fiberglass. Special emphasis is placed on the fiberglass discussion because this material is current the material of choice for wind turbine blades. The paper focuses on the data developed in the U.S., but cites European references that provide important insights.

SUTHERLAND, HERBERT J.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

486

Materials and Molecular Research Division: Annual report, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research activities are reported under the following headings: materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, energy storage systems, and work for others. (DLC)

Phillips, N.E.; Muller, R.H.; Peterson, C.V.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Machine Ethics and Human Ethics: A Critical View Francesco Amigoni and Viola Schiaffonati  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machine Ethics and Human Ethics: A Critical View Francesco Amigoni and Viola Schiaffonati@elet.polimi.it Abstract The rapid changes in the relationship between humans and machines evidence a progressive delegation of some human activities to machines. Among those, there are not only physical activities but also

Amigoni, Francesco

488

Critical aspects of hierarchical protein folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that the first order folding transitions of proteins observed at physiological chemical conditions end in a critical point for a given temperature and chemical potential of the surrounding water. We investigate this critical point using a hierarchical Hamiltonian and determine its universality class. This class differs qualitatively from those of other known models.

Alex Hansen; Mogens H. Jensen; Kim Sneppen; Giovanni Zocchi

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

489

Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources 2007 #12;ii #12;Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources Prepared for: Colorado Cattleman's Agricultural Land Trust 8833 Ralston Road Arvada, CO 80002 Great Outdoors Colorado 1600 Broadway, Suite 1650 Denver, CO 80202 Colorado

490

Joining of dissimilar materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

491

CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

WITTEKIND WD

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

492

Critical phenomena in N=2* plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study finite temperature critical behaviour of mass deformed N=4 SU(N) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling, also known as N=2* gauge theory. For certain range of the mass parameters, N=2* plasma undergoes a second-order phase transition. We compute all the static critical exponents of the model and demonstrate that the transition is of the mean-field theory type. We show that the dynamical critical exponent of the model is z=0, with multiple hydrodynamic relaxation rates at criticality. We point out that the dynamical critical phenomena in N=2* plasma is outside the dynamical universality classes established by Hohenberg and Halperin.

A. Buchel; C. Pagnutti

2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

493

New enhancements to SCALE for criticality safety analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the speed, available memory, and reliability of computer hardware increases and the cost decreases, the complexity and usability of computer software will increase, taking advantage of the new hardware capabilities. Computer programs today must be more flexible and user friendly than those of the past. Within available resources, the SCALE staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is committed to upgrading its computer codes to keep pace with the current level of technology. This paper examines recent additions and enhancements to the criticality safety analysis sections of the SCALE code package. These recent additions and enhancements made to SCALE can be divided into nine categories: (1) new analytical computer codes, (2) new cross-section libraries, (3) new criticality search sequences, (4) enhanced graphical capabilities, (5) additional KENO enhancements, (6) enhanced resonance processing capabilities, (7) enhanced material information processing capabilities, (8) portability of the SCALE code package, and (9) other minor enhancements, modifications, and corrections to SCALE. Each of these additions and enhancements to the criticality safety analysis capabilities of the SCALE code system are discussed below.

Hollenbach, D.F.; Bowman, S.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Parks, C.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computational Physics and Engineering Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

The Development, Content, Design, and Conduct of the 2011 Piloted US DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Criticality Safety Engineering Training and Education Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1973 the University of New Mexico conducted the first nationwide criticality safety training and education week-long short course for nuclear criticality safety engineers. Subsequent to that course, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) developed very successful 'hands-on' subcritical and critical training programs for operators, supervisors, and engineering staff. Since the inception of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCT&SP) in 1983, the DOE has stimulated contractor facilities and laboratories to collaborate in the furthering of nuclear criticality as a discipline. That effort included the education and training of nuclear criticality safety engineers (NCSEs). In 1985 a textbook was written that established a path toward formalizing education and training for NCSEs. Though the NCT&SP went through a brief hiatus from 1990 to 1992, other DOE-supported programs were evolving to the benefit of NCSE training and education. In 1993 the DOE established a Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) and undertook a comprehensive development effort to expand the extant LACEF 'hands-on' course specifically for the education and training of NCSEs. That successful education and training was interrupted in 2006 for the closing of the LACEF and the accompanying movement of materials and critical experiment machines to the Nevada Test Site. Prior to that closing, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was commissioned by the US DOE NCSP to establish an independent hands-on NCSE subcritical education and training course. The course provided an interim transition for the establishment of a reinvigorated and expanded two-week NCSE education and training program in 2011. The 2011 piloted two-week course was coordinated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and jointly conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) classroom education and facility training, the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) hands-on criticality experiments training, and the US DOE National Criticality Experiment Research Center (NCERC) hands-on criticality experiments training that is jointly supported by LLNL and LANL and located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) This paper provides the description of the bases, content, and conduct of the piloted, and future US DOE NCSP Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Education Project.

Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

ORSPHERE: CRITICAL, BARE, HEU(93.2)-METAL SPHERE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early 1970’s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950’s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. “The very accurate description of this sphere, as assembled, establishes it as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files.” (Reference 1) While performing the ORSphere experiments care was taken to accurately document component dimensions (±0. 0001 in. for non-spherical parts), masses (±0.01 g), and material data The experiment was also set up to minimize the amount of structural material in the sphere proximity. A three part sphere was initially assembled with an average radius of 3.4665 in. and was then machined down to an average radius of 3.4420 in. (3.4425 in. nominal). These two spherical configurations were evaluated and judged to be acceptable benchmark experiments; however, the two experiments are highly correlated.

Margaret A. Marshall

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

New functional polymers for sensors, smart materials and solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic polymers can be used as the active component of sensors, smart materials, chemical-delivery systems and the active layer of solar cells. The rational design and modification of the chemical structure of polymers ...

Lobez Comeras, Jose Miguel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z