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1

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses Title Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses...

2

On the benefits and costs of microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the benefits that Microgrids can provide to a variety of stakeholders and considers their costs. A flexible framework is proposed in which… (more)

Weyrich Morris, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Regulation, Unemployment, and Cost-Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf (“A stand-alone analysis of jobs is not included in aWachter, Job Displacement and Mortality: An Analysis Usingnew jobs are rounding errors in cost-benefit analyses that

Posner, Eric; Masur, Jonathan S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts Title Benefits and Costs of Aggressive...

5

Cost-Benefit Assessment of Cycle Alignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in this technical update report represents an in-depth study to evaluate the different methods used to improve cycle alignment. The study outlines the cost and benefits of using these different methods and describes their application. The collection and assemblage of this information will provide a reference for plant engineering and management personnel in their attempts to improve steam plant efficiency by implementing a systematic cycle alignment program. Through the use of t...

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits...

7

Benefit-cost in a Benevolent Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that there is a well-de?ned cost function C( y) for publicthe private values bene?t-cost test, but is potentiallythe private values bene?t-cost test, Lemma 4 implies y-

Bergstrom, Ted

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with pilot project (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot project Country...

9

Cost and benefit of energy efficient buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common misconception among developers and policy-makers is that "sustainable buildings" may not be financially justified. However, this report strives to show that building green is cost-effective and does make financial ...

Zhang, Wenying, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

SRS - Active Employee Benefits News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17/2013 17/2013 SEARCH GO spacer Active Employee Benefits News and Communications 01/16/13 NEW SIP IRS Determination Letter 06/09/11 Building Trades National Medical Screening Program 01/16/13 NEW Pension IRS Determination Letter 04/29/11 Pension Funding Letter & Notices 09/20/12 Income Levelling Communication 03/15/11 Potential Benefit Plan Considerations 05/14/12 2013 Benefits Changes 12/28/10 2011 FICA Reduction 05/02/12 EveMed Vision Insurance Introduces Paperless EOB's 12/15/10 Annual Notices: CHIP-ERRP-Life SARS 05/01/12 New Investment Options - SRNS Defined Contribution Plan 11/30/10 SMM - Life Insurance Revisions 04/10/12 Slides From 2012 Retiree Association Meetinq 11/04/10 Mental Health, Cadillac Plans, Grandfathered Plans

11

Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.vtpi.org/tranben.pdf Web Application Link: www.vtpi.org/tranben.pdf Cost: Free Language: English Related Tools TransportToolkit Prototype Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook Where's the Hydrogen Economy? ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS This guidebook describes how to create a comprehensive framework for evaluating the full impacts of a particular transit service or improvement.

12

Benefit-cost assessment of aviation environmental policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aids in the development of a framework in which to conduct global benefit-cost assessments of aviation policies. Current policy analysis tools, such as the aviation environmental portfolio management tool (APMT), ...

Gilmore, Christopher K. (Christopher Kenneth)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Title Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Fisk, William J., Douglas R. Black, and Gregory Brunner Journal Indoor Air Volume 21 Issue 3 Pagination 357-367 Keywords dampness and mold, health, ieq improvement, offices, temperature, ventilation Abstract This paper estimates some of the benefits and costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they are below 10 or 15 L/s per person, adding outdoor-air economizers and controls when absent, eliminating winter indoor temperatures greater than 23 °C, and reducing dampness and mold problems. The estimated benefits of the scenarios analyzed are substantial in magnitude, including increased work performance, reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, reduced absence, and improved thermal comfort for millions of office workers. The combined potential annual economic benefit of a set of non-overlapping scenarios is approximately $20 billion. While the quantitative estimates have a high uncertainty, the opportunity for substantial benefits is clear. Some IEQ improvement measures will save energy while improving health or productivity, and implementing these measures should be the highest priority.

14

Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Title Determining Benefits and Costs of Improved Water Heater Efficiencies Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-45618 Year of Publication 2000 Authors Lekov, Alexander B., James D. Lutz, Xiaomin Liu, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL-45618 Date Published May 4 Abstract Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential water heater energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a water heater and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers are significant. At the efficiency level examined in this paper, 35% of households with electric water heaters experience LCC savings, with an average savings of $106, while 4% show LCC losses, with an average loss of $40 compared to a pre-standard LCC average of $2,565. The remainder of the population (61%) are largely unaffected.

15

Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Assessing the Benefits and Costs of ITS Projects: Volume 1 Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cost. The most cost- effective project has the highestthe Benefits and Costs of ITS Projects: Volume 1 MethodologyAssessing the Benefits and Costs of ITS Projects: Volume 1

Gillen, David; Li, Jianling; Dahlgren, Joy; Chang, Elva

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Energy and the environment cost-benefit analysis  

SciTech Connect

Papers were presented covering the following topics: energy resources and projection; nuclear fission reactors and the environment; fossil fuel and the environment, with emphasis on coal; fusion power and the environment; cost benefit scales; experience of utilities in financing nuclear power plant; and ecosystem tolerance limits of power plant effluents. Each article was abstracted and indexed separately. (PCS)

Karam, R.A.; Morgan, K.Z. (eds.)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Costs and benefits of Daphnia defense against Chaoborus in nature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Costs and benefits of Daphnia defense against Chaoborus in nature Wiebke J. Boeing, Björn Wissel] Boeing et al. 1294 Introduction Our concept of the processes that shape food webs is typi- cally focused, Daphnia populations suffer heavy losses to predation by the invertebrate predator Chaoborus (Kajak

19

Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid incremental cost estimates were developed based onsizing . Final incremental cost estimates ranged from $1,786Energy Savings Estimates and Cost Benefit Calculations for

Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Economic Costs and Benefits of Distributed Energy Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this technical update is to provide an objective quantitative analysis of the current costs and benefits of DER, and thereby identify the factors that have the greatest impact on DER's cost-effectiveness. For the purposes of this analysis, DER as defined herein, are small generation units (1kW to 50MW), typically sited on the local T&D system and operated in parallel with the utility system. Energy storage technologies are not included in this technical update but may be considered in future ...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Transportation Cost and Benefit Analysis Congestion Costs Victoria Transport Policy Institute (www.vtpi.org)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Cost and Benefit Analysis ­ Congestion Costs Victoria Transport Policy Institute congestion is considered one of the most significant transportation problems. The capacity of a road depends, Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering, 13th Edition, Institute of Transportation Studies, UBC (Berkeley; www

O'Donnell, Tom

22

Cost Benefit Evaluation of HP Turbine Admission Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scheme used to position the control valves that admit steam to high-pressure turbines has a direct effect on the turbine’s performance. This report describes the two most common admission schemes, partial and full arc, and discusses their effects on heat rate, reliability, and cost versus benefit under different loading conditions and modes of operation.BackgroundHistorically, most steam turbines in coal-fired power plants operated in a ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

Analysis of costs-benefits tradeoffs of complex security systems  

SciTech Connect

Essential to a systems approach to design of security systems is an analysis of the cost effectiveness of alternative designs. While the concept of analysis of costs and benefits is straightforward, implementation can be at the least tedious and, for complex designs and alternatives, can become nearly intractable without the help of structured analysis tools. PACAIT--Performance and Cost Analysis Integrated Tools--is a prototype tool. The performance side of the analysis collates and reduces data from ASSESS, and existing DOE PC-based security systems performance analysis tool. The costs side of the analysis uses ACE, an existing DOD PC-based costs analysis tool. Costs are reported over the full life-cycle of the system, that is, the costs to procure, operate, maintain and retire the system and all of its components. Results are collected in Microsoft{reg_sign} Excel workbooks and are readily available to analysts and decision makers in both tabular and graphical formats and at both the system and path-element levels.

Hicks, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Security Systems Analysis and Development Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Strategic cost-benefit analysis of energy policies: detailed projections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current US energy policy includes many programs directed toward restructuring the energy system in order to decrease US dependence on foreign supplies and to increase our reliance on plentiful and environmentally benign energy forms. However, recent events have led to renewed concern over the direction of current energy policy. This study describes three possible energy strategies and analyzes each in terms of its economic, environmental, and national security benefits and costs. Each strategy is represented by a specific policy. In the first, no additional programs or policies are initiated beyond those currently in effect or announced. The second is directed toward reducing the growth in energy demand, i.e., energy conservation. The third promotes increased domestic supply through accelerated development of synthetic and unconventional fuels. The analysis focuses on the evaluation and comparison of these strategy alternatives with respect to their energy, economic, and environmental consequences. Results indicate that conservation can substantially reduce import dependence and slow the growth of energy demand, with only a small macroeconomic cost and with substantial environmental benefits; the synfuels policy reduces imports by a smaller amount, does not reduce the growth in energy demand, involves substantial environmental costs and slows the rate of economic growth. These relationships could be different if the energy savings per unit cost for conservation are less than anticipated, or if the costs of synthetic fuels can be significantly lowered. Given these uncertainties, both conservation and RD and D support for synfuels should be included in future energy policy. However, between these policy alternatives, conservation appears to be the preferred strategy. The results of this study are presented in three reports (see also BNL--51105 and BNL--51128). 11 references, 3 figures, 61 tables.

Davitian, H.; Groncki, P.J.; Kleeman, P.; Lukachinski, J.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cost/Benefit Analysis for Smart Distribution Applications v1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cost/Benefit Analysis for Smart Distribution Applications spreadsheet provides estimates for the financial benefits of key Advanced Distribution Automation ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

26

Costs and benefits of energy efficiency improvements in ceiling fans  

SciTech Connect

Ceiling fans contribute significantly to residential electricity consumption, especially in developing countries with warm climates. The paper provides analysis of costs and benefits of several options to improve the efficiency of ceiling fans to assess the global potential for electricity savings and green house gas (GHG) emission reductions. Ceiling fan efficiency can be cost-effectively improved by at least 50% using commercially available technology. If these efficiency improvements are implemented in all ceiling fans sold by 2020, 70 terawatt hours per year could be saved and 25 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) emissions per year could be avoided, globally. We assess how policies and programs such as standards, labels, and financial incentives can be used to accelerate the adoption of efficient ceiling fans in order to realize potential savings.

Shah, Nihar; Sathaye, Nakul; Phadke, Amol; Letschert, Virginie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Division

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential-type central air conditioner energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a central air conditioner and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers due to modest increases in efficiency are significant. For an efficiency increase of 20percent over the existing minimum standard (i.e., 12 SEER), 35percent of households with central air conditioners experience significant LCC savings, with an average savings of $453, while 25percent show significant LCC losses, with an average loss of $158 compared to apre-standard LCC average of $5,170. The remainder of the population (40percent) are largely unaffected.

Rosenquist, G.; Levok, A.; Chan, P.; McMahon, J.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

28

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

Economic impacts on individual consumers from possible revisions to U.S. residential-type central air conditioner energy-efficiency standards are examined using a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing a central air conditioner and operating it over its lifetime. This approach makes it possible to evaluate the economic impacts on individual consumers from the revised standards. The methodology allows an examination of groups of the population which benefit or lose from suggested efficiency standards. The results show that the economic benefits to consumers due to modest increases in efficiency are significant. For an efficiency increase of 20percent over the existing minimum standard (i.e., 12 SEER), 35percent of households with central air conditioners experience significant LCC savings, with an average savings of $453, while 25percent show significant LCC losses, with an average loss of $158 compared to apre-standard LCC average of $5,170. The remainder of the population (40percent) are largely unaffected.

Rosenquist, G.; Levok, A.; Chan, P.; McMahon, J.

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

29

Benefits and costs of increasing ventilation rates in U.S. offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and costs of increasing ventilation rates in U.S. offices Title Benefits and costs of increasing ventilation rates in U.S. offices Publication Type Conference Paper Year...

30

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Methodological Approach for Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a comprehensive framework for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects and a step-by-step approach for making these estimates. The framework identifies the basic categories of benefits, the beneficiaries of these benefits, and the Smart Grid functionalities that lead to different benefits and proposes ways to estimate these benefits, including their monetization. The report covers cost-effectiveness evaluation, uncertainty, and issues in estimating baseline conditions...

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cost-benefit analysis conducted for nutrition education in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the California Expanded Food are cost-effective and thatE, et al. 1999. Ap- plying cost-bene?t analysis to nutritionRH, Lambur M, Lewis E. 2002. Cost- bene?t analysis indicates

Block Joy, Amy; Goldman, George; Pradhan, Vijay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs and Benefits in Global Forests: A Dynamic Partial Equilibrium Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Costs of Carbon Sequestration. Presented at the and1997). “Monitoring carbon sequestration benefits associatedProduction and Carbon Sequestration in India. ” Mitigation

Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy; Dale, Larry; Chan, Peter; Andrasko, Kenneth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Exploring nonprofit accountability in Thai grassroots organization : a cost-benefit analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A cost-benefit analysis was conducted in partnership with the Foundation for Older Persons' Development (FOPDEV), a grassroots organization in Chiang Mai, Thailand that supports older… (more)

O’Leary, Dervla Mary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: 1) Describes the history of benefit-cost...

38

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis...

39

Assessing the Environmental Costs and Benefits of Households Electricity Consumption Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this study the environmental costs and benefits of smart metering technology systems installed in households in Norway have been assessed. Smart metering technology… (more)

Segtnan, Ida Lund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits (reduced petroleum consumption) of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Title Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-6349E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Therkelsen, Peter, Aimee T. McKane, Ridah Sabouni, and Tracy Evans Conference Name American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 07/2013 Keywords ACEEE Conference Paper, energy efficiency, Energy Performance Program Abstract Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE's contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEPcertified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

42

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Duleep, K.G. [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

Greene, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Duleep, K.G. (Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency. The final PAwith the “all cost- effective energy efficiency provisions”Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Framework for the Evaluation of the Cost and Benefits of Microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Framework for the Evaluation of the Cost and Benefits of Microgrids Greg Young Morris1 , Chad, The electric power system of the future - Integrating supergrids and microgrids, Bologna, Italy, 13Morris@gmail.com A Framework for the Evaluation of the Cost and Benefits of Microgrids G YOUNG MORRIS1 , GYoung

47

Benefits and costs of improved IEQ in offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they...

48

A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options September 19, 2012 Presenter: Dr. Kamiar Jamali, Senior Technical Advisor to the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Safety NA-SH Topics Covered: The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has begun an initiative to develop a methodology to perform cost-benefit analysis for some Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility applications as one potential input into nuclear safety decision-making processes. The scope, approach, precedence, and example of how it might be

49

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Focus Area: Electricity Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.nrel.gov/vehiclesandfuels/vsa/pdfs/40485.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/cost-benefit-analysis-plug-hybrid-ele Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This paper presents a comparison of the costs and benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles. A detailed simulation model is used to predict

50

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

Not Available

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Reliability and Cost-Benefit-Based Standards for Transmission Network Operation and Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................................... 143 Table C.3: Breakdown of transmission costs during t3 when considering all outages to single outages N-2 Deterministic security policy that refers to double outages O Operational cost #12. Probabilistic cost-benefit framework considered to replace historical deterministic N-k criteria. No changes

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

52

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Policy Impacts Website: eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/reports/lbnl-3833e.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/benefits-and-costs-aggressive-energy- Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Utility/Electricity Service Costs This analysis, based on the Massachusetts Green Communities Act, looks at the impact of energy efficiency targets mandated by the Act on rates and

53

Audit of health benefit costs at the Department`s Management and Operating Contractors  

SciTech Connect

The audit disclosed that the Department and certain of its contractors had initiated several positive actions to contain health benefit costs: improving data collection, increasing training, reviewing changes to health plans, improving the language in one contract, increasing the employees, share of health costs at one contractor, and initiating self-insurance at another contractor. Despite these actions, further improvements are needed in the administration of the contractor employee health benefit plans. It was found that the Department did not have the policies and procedures necessary to ensure that the health benefit costs met the tests for reasonableness. The audit of $95 million in health benefit costs incurred at six Management and Operating contractors showed that $15.4 million of these costs were excessive compared to national norms.

1994-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

54

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting a Commercial Building Energy Standard in South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of South Dakota is considering adopting a commercial building energy standard. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to South Dakota residents from requiring compliance with the most recent edition of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. These standards were developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The quantitative benefits and costs of adopting a commercial building energy code are modeled by comparing the characteristics of assumed current building practices with the most recent edition of the ASHRAE Standard, 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in this analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using results from a detailed building simulation tool (Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics [BLAST] model) combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

55

A preliminary benefit-cost study of a Sandia wind farm.  

SciTech Connect

In response to federal mandates and incentives for renewable energy, Sandia National Laboratories conducted a feasibility study of installing an on-site wind farm on Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base property. This report describes this preliminary analysis of the costs and benefits of installing and operating a 15-turbine, 30-MW-capacity wind farm that delivers an estimated 16 percent of 2010 onsite demand. The report first describes market and non-market economic costs and benefits associated with operating a wind farm, and then uses a standard life-cycle costing and benefit-cost framework to estimate the costs and benefits of a wind farm. Based on these 'best-estimates' of costs and benefits and on factor, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, the analysis results suggest that the benefits of a Sandia wind farm are greater than its costs. The analysis techniques used herein are applicable to the economic assessment of most if not all forms of renewable energy.

Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Griffin, Taylor; Loose, Verne W.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A preliminary benefit-cost study of a Sandia wind farm.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to federal mandates and incentives for renewable energy, Sandia National Laboratories conducted a feasibility study of installing an on-site wind farm on Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base property. This report describes this preliminary analysis of the costs and benefits of installing and operating a 15-turbine, 30-MW-capacity wind farm that delivers an estimated 16 percent of 2010 onsite demand. The report first describes market and non-market economic costs and benefits associated with operating a wind farm, and then uses a standard life-cycle costing and benefit-cost framework to estimate the costs and benefits of a wind farm. Based on these 'best-estimates' of costs and benefits and on factor, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, the analysis results suggest that the benefits of a Sandia wind farm are greater than its costs. The analysis techniques used herein are applicable to the economic assessment of most if not all forms of renewable energy.

Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Griffin, Taylor; Loose, Verne W.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Optimal Incentive/Disincentive Determination Between Cost and Benefit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to motivate contractors to complete construction projects early on high-impact highway pavement construction projects, state transportation agencies (STAs) including TxDOT have often used incentive/disincentive (I/D) contracts. However, determining I/D rates is extremely difficult due largely to the lack of systematic methods for helping STAs determine effective I/D rates. The primary goal of this project is to develop a novel framework for determining the most realistic and economical I/D dollar amounts for high-impact highway improvement projects. To achieve its goal, this project proposes an integration analysis including project schedule and the lower and upper bounds of the I/D contract. The lower bound is the contractor’s additional cost of acceleration, and the upper is the total savings to road users and to the agency. The study data were gathered using Construction Analysis for Pavement Rehabilitation Strategies (CA4PRS) software. These data were then grouped by four different types of pavements, namely Joint Plain Concrete Pavement (JPCP), Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement (CRCP), Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA), and Milling and Asphalt Concrete Overlay (MACO). With these data, a series of regression analyses were carried out to develop predictive models for the validation of time-cost tradeoff to determine I/D lower bound. Road user cost and agency cost savings were quantified using CA4PRS to develop lookup tables to determine I/D upper bound. Adjustment of contractors’ additional cost of acceleration with Level of Service (LOS) and total savings adjustment using Net Present Value (NPV) were incorporated in the research study to calculate point based estimates of I/D for lower and upper bound, respectively. Lastly, case studies on real world projects were conducted to evaluate robustness of the model. The research results reveal that the predictive models give appropriate results for the case studies in determining the I/D dollar amount for the lower and upper bound. This study will provide the research community with the first view and systematic estimation method that STAs can use to determine the most economical and realistic I/D dollar amount for a given project–an optimal value that allows the agency to stay within budget while effectively motivating contractors to complete projects ahead of schedule. It will also significantly reduce the agency’s expenses in the time and effort required for determining I/D dollar amounts.

Sharma, Piyush

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A practical method for incorporating Real Options analysis into US federal benefit-cost analysis procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research identifies how Real Options (RO) thinking might acceptably and effectively complement the current mandates for Benefit-Cost Analysis (BCA) defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in Circular A-94. ...

Rivey, Darren

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluating the costs and benefits of increased funding for public transportation in Chicago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) off-peak ridership, is at or slightly below break-even with respect to net benefits if the CTA cost structure and tax source of subsidy remains unchanged. In order to justify any significant additional long-term ...

Schofield, Mark L., 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Simpson, A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

Berry, G.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Benefit/cost analysis for Transportation Infrastructure: A Practitioner's Workshop:Infrastructure: A Practitioner s Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benefit/cost analysis for Transportation Infrastructure: A Practitioner's Workshop for Transportation, Policy, O i d L i iOperations, and Logistics George Mason University #12;The idea of benefit fas well as the nearer future) and a wide view (in the sense of allowing for sideeffects of many

63

COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A WASTE TO ENERGY PLANT FOR MONTEVIDEO; AND WASTE TO ENERGY IN SMALL-benefit analysis by the author of a waste to energy (WTE) plant in Montevideo, Uruguay; the second part Engineering Center of Columbia University investigated the waste management system of Montevideo, Uruguay

Columbia University

64

Health Monitoring System Technology Assessments---Cost Benefits Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of sensor-based structural health monitoring is very diverse and encompasses a wide range of activities including initiatives and innovations involving the development of advanced sensor, signal processing, data analysis, and actuation and ...

Kent Renee M.; Murphy Dennis A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Welfare Implications of Oil Privatisation: A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Norway's Statoil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.electricitypolicy.org.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract The Welfare Implications of Oil Privatisation: A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Norway's Statoil EPRG Working Paper EPRG0905 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics... , and that privatisation can be structured with state involvement at several levels, aiming to maximise the public share of benefits. Keywords Privatisation, Cost-Benefit, Welfare, Oil and Gas, Norway JEL Classification D61, H43, L33, L71, Q48 Contact christian...

Wolf, C; Pollitt, Michael G.

66

A Framework for the Evaluation of the Cost and Benefits of Microgrids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Microgrid is recognized as an innovative technology to help integrate renewables into distribution systems and to provide additional benefits to a variety of stakeholders, such as offsetting infrastructure investments and improving the reliability of the local system. However, these systems require additional investments for control infrastructure, and as such, additional costs and the anticipated benefits need to be quantified in order to determine whether the investment is economically feasible. This paper proposes a methodology for systematizing and representing benefits and their interrelationships based on the UML Use Case paradigm, which allows complex systems to be represented in a concise, elegant format. This methodology is demonstrated by determining the economic feasibility of a Microgrid and Distributed Generation installed on a typical Canadian rural distribution system model as a case study. The study attempts to minimize the cost of energy served to the community, considering the fixed costs associated with Microgrids and Distributed Generation, and suggests benefits to a variety of stakeholders.

Morris, Greg Young; Abbey, Chad; Joos, Geza; Marnay, Chris

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System Simulations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.gwec.net/index.php?id=131 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/spain-installed-wind-capacity-website Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs This website presents an overview of total installed wind energy capacity in Spain per year from 2000 to 2010. The page also presents the main market developments from 2010; a policy summary; a discussion of the revision in feed-in tariffs in 2010; and a future market outlook. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cost-Benefit_Analysis_of_Smart_Grid_Technologies_Through_System_Simulations&oldid=514355"

68

Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume I. Benefit--cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Section II follows a brief introduction and is entitled ''Benefit-Cost Analysis Framework.'' The analytical framework deals with two major steps involved in assessing the pros and cons of energy resource development (or any other type of development). The first is to identify and describe the overall tribal resource planning and decision process. The second is to develop a detailed methodological approach to the assessment of the benefits and costs of energy development alternatives within the context of the tribe's overall planning process. Sections III, IV, and V present the application of the benefit-cost analysis methodology to coal; oil and gas; and uranium, oil shale, and geothermal development, respectively. The methodology creates hypothetical examples that illustrate realistic development opportunities for the majority of tribes that have significant reserves of one or more of the resources that may be economic to develop.

Not Available

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Geothermal wells: the cost benefit of fracture stimulation estimated by the GEOCOM code. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOCOM, a computer code that provides life cycle cost/benefit analysis of completion technologies applied to geothermal wells, is used to study fracture stimulation techniques. it is estimated that stimulation must increase flow by roughly tons per $100,000 in order to be cost effective. Typically, hydraulic fracturing costs $100,000 to $500,000 per well, and the attempts at stimulation to date have generally not achieved the desired flow increases. The cost effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing is considered for several geothermal reservoirs.

Brown, G.L.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Geothermal exploration and resource assessment: R and D program benefit/cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Exploration and Resource and Reservoir Assessment (GERRA) Research and Development (R and D) Program of the Department of Energy was analyzed to evaluate its cost effectiveness and relevance to the needs of the geothermal exploration industry. This analysis was conducted in three phases. The first phase involved a review of the state-of-the-art and an identification of major R and D needs, followed by a quantitative assessment of the benefits expected from the achievement of some realistic targets for reducing the proportion of unsuccessful (non-productive) wells drilled in the course of exploration for a reservoir. In the second phase, questionnaires concerning the utility, effectiveness and need for improvement of certain commonly used exploration techniques were mailed to a set of 72 individuals active in geothermal exploration. The third phase consisted of in-person interviews with well recognized experts in geothermal exploration. The results of the quantitative analysis suggest that a benefit/cost ratio exceeding ten can be realized for the R and D expenditure by achieving a relatively modest target of improving the current weighted average exploratory drilling success ratio by 3 percentage points (i.e., from 0.24 to 0.27). The responses to the mailed questionnaires indicated that the emphasis of R and D should be on improving the data interpretation capability rather than the data collection (measurement) capability.Liquid geochemistry, seismic methods and thermal methods were identified as the techniques deserving most attention. The in-person interviews revealed that the industry is more concerned about finding buyers (utilities) for the discovered resources than about finding new resources in the near term.

Dhillon, H.; El-Sawy, A.; Goldstein, S.; Meidav, T.; Pfundstein, R.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in Iowa  

SciTech Connect

The state of Iowa is considering adpoting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropraite code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits are assessed. The energy simulation and economic results suggest that adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 would provide postitive net benefits to the state relative to the building and design requirements currently in place.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

2002-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

Activity-Based Costing for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based costing (ABC) is a cost-management approach that can help utility managers make better decisions through more-accurate process and product cost information and a better understanding of activities that either do or do not add value. This report is a primer on ABC.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Average-case active learning with costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the expected cost of a greedy active learning algorithm. Our analysis extends previous work to a more general setting in which different queries have different costs. Moreover, queries may have more than two possible responses and the distribution ...

Andrew Guillory; Jeff Bilmes

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Case studies of energy information systems and related technology: Operational practices, costs, and benefits  

SciTech Connect

Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs, and benefits of EIS, many of these descriptions are idealized and often insufficient for potential users to evaluate cost, benefit and operational usefulness. LBNL has conducted a series of case studies of existing EIS and related technology installations. This study explored the following questions: (1) How is the EIS used in day-to-day operation? (2) What are the costs and benefits of an EIS? (3) Where do the energy savings come from? This paper reviews the process of these technologies from installation through energy management practice. The study is based on interviews with operators and energy managers who use EIS. Analysis of energy data trended by EIS and utility bills was also conducted to measure the benefit. This paper explores common uses and findings to identify energy savings attributable to EIS, and discusses non-energy benefits as well. This paper also addresses technologies related to EIS that have been demonstrated and evaluated by LBNL.

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Dewey, Jim

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Environmental, economic, and energetic costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental, economic, and energetic costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels Jason for renewable transportation biofuels. To be a viable alternative, a biofuel should provide a net energy gain inputs and more efficient conversion of feed- stocks to fuel. Neither biofuel can replace much petroleum

Minnesota, University of

77

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Energy Analysis Department Weighing the Costs and Benefits of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department 3 State RPS Policies and Purchase Mandates: 21 States and D.C. WI: 10% by 2015 NV: 20% by 2015 TX Objectives · Background: State RPS policies have become major drivers of renewable energy additions, but the adoption of new state RPS policies hinges on expected costs and benefits · Objective: We review previous

78

Management of lifecycle costs and benefits: Lessons from information systems practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the economic feasibility of information systems (IS) projects and operations remains a challenge for most organizations. This research investigates lifecycle cost and benefit management practices and demonstrates that, overall, although organizations ... Keywords: IT governance, IT value, Information management, Information system evaluation, Information system value

Egon Berghout; Menno Nijland; Philip Powell

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Methodological Approaches for Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a comprehensive framework for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects and a step-by-step approach for making these estimates. The framework identifies the basic categories of benefits, the beneficiaries of these benefits, and the Smart Grid functionalities that lead to different benefits and proposes ways to estimate these benefits, including their monetization. The report covers cost-effectiveness evaluation, uncertainty, and issues in estimating baseline conditions against which a project would be compared. The report also suggests metrics suitable for describing principal characteristics of a modern Smart Grid to which a project can contribute. This first section of the report presents background information on the motivation for the report and its purpose. Section 2 introduces the methodological framework, focusing on the definition of benefits and a sequential, logical process for estimating them. Beginning with the Smart Grid technologies and functions of a project, it maps these functions to the benefits they produce. Section 3 provides a hypothetical example to illustrate the approach. Section 4 describes each of the 10 steps in the approach. Section 5 covers issues related to estimating benefits of the Smart Grid. Section 6 summarizes the next steps. The methods developed in this study will help improve future estimates - both retrospective and prospective - of the benefits of Smart Grid investments. These benefits, including those to consumers, society in general, and utilities, can then be weighed against the investments. Such methods would be useful in total resource cost tests and in societal versions of such tests. As such, the report will be of interest not only to electric utilities, but also to a broad constituency of stakeholders. Significant aspects of the methodology were used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop its methods for estimating the benefits and costs of its renewable and distributed systems integration demonstration projects as well as its Smart Grid Investment Grant projects and demonstration projects funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The goal of this report, which was cofunded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and DOE, is to present a comprehensive set of methods for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects. By publishing this report, EPRI seeks to contribute to the development of methods that will establish the benefits associated with investments in Smart Grid technologies. EPRI does not endorse the contents of this report or make any representations as to the accuracy and appropriateness of its contents. The purpose of this report is to present a methodological framework that will provide a standardized approach for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid demonstration projects. The framework also has broader application to larger projects, such as those funded under the ARRA. Moreover, with additional development, it will provide the means for extrapolating the results of pilots and trials to at-scale investments in Smart Grid technologies. The framework was developed by a panel whose members provided a broad range of expertise.

Lee, Russell [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Benefit/cost comparisons of SMES in system-specific application scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The inherently high storage efficiency, instantaneous dispatch capability and multi-function uses of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) are attributes that give it the potential for widespread application in the electric utility industry. Opportunities appear to exist where SMES at a given location could provide multiple benefits either simultaneously or sequentially as system conditions dictate. These benefits, including diurnal storage and system stability and dynamic control enhancement, increase the application potential of SMES to a larger number of opportunities than might be justified by the value of its diurnal storage capability alone. However, the benefits an individual utility may realize from SMES applications are strongly influenced by the characteristics of the utility system, the location of the SMES unit and the timing of its installation in the system. Such benefits are typically not evaluated adequately in generic studies. This paper summarizes results of case studies performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The derivation of SMES benefits and costs are described and benefit/cost (B/C) ratios are compared in system-specific scenarios of interest to BPA. Results of using the DYNASTORE production cost model show the sensitivity of B/C ratios to SMES capacity and power and to the forecast system load. Intermediate-size SMES applications which primarily provide system stability and dynamic control enhancement are reviewed. The potential for SMES to levelize the output of a wind energy complex is also assessed. Most of the cases show SMES to provide a positive net benefit with the additional, sometimes surprising indication, that B/C ratios and net present worth of intermediate-size units can exceed those of larger systems.

De Steese, J.G.; Dagle, J.E.; Kreid, D.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Haner, J.M.; Myers, W.E. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Benefits and Costs of Improved IEQ in U.S. Offices  

SciTech Connect

This paper estimates some of the benefits and costs of implementing scenarios that improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the stock of U.S. office buildings. The scenarios include increasing ventilation rates when they are below 10 or 15 L/s per person, adding outdoor-air economizers and controls when absent, eliminating winter indoor temperatures greater than 23 oC, and reducing dampness and mold problems. The estimated benefits of the scenarios analyzed are substantial in magnitude, including increased work performance, reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, reduced absence, and improved thermal comfort for millions of office workers. The combined potential annual economic benefit of a set ofnon-overlapping scenarios is approximately $20 billion. While the quantitative estimates have a high uncertainty, the opportunity for substantial benefits is clear. Some IEQ improvement measures will save energy while improving health or productivity, and implementing these measures should be the highest priority.

Fisk, William J.; Black, Douglas; Brunner, Gregory

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Preliminary benefit-cost analysis of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) power addition  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this report is to conduct a preliminary benefit-cost study for the proposed power addition to FFTF to determine whether the project is cost-effective. If the project is authorized, construction will begin in 1986 and end in 1991. Full power operation is scheduled to begin in 1991 and a project life of 20 years is assumed. The undiscounted cost during the construction period of the FFTF power addition is estimated to be approximately $117 million over the construction period (1984 dollars). An additional $3 million is estimated as the opportunity cost - or value of these resources in their most favorable alternative use - of surplus FFTF equipment and unused CRBR equipment, including materials for steam generator fabrication. The annual operating and maintenance cost of the project is estimated to be about $2.1 million in 1984 dollars. 20 references.

Callaway, J.M.; Lezberg, A.J.; Scott, M.J.; Tawil, J.J.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the savings realized by water conservation or efficiencythe benefits and costs of water conservation or efficiencycost savings from water conservation requires knowing the

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 California Water Rate Survey. 2006. Black & VeatchRegional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use in Cost-Benefit5 Calculated Marginal Rates for

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Comparison of Australian and US Cost-Benefit Approaches to MEPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Australian Greenhouse Office contracted with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP) for LBNL to compare US and Australian approaches to analyzing costs and benefits of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS). This report compares the approaches for three types of products: household refrigerators and freezers, small electric storage water heaters, and commercial/industrial air conditioners. This report presents the findings of similarities and differences between the approaches of the two countries and suggests changes to consider in the approach taken in Australia. The purpose of the Australian program is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, while the US program is intended to increase energy efficiency; each program is thus subject to specific constraints. The market and policy contexts are different, with the USA producing most of its own products and conducting pioneering engineering-economic studies to identify maximum energy efficiency levels that are technologically feasible and economically justified. In contrast, Australia imports a large share of its products and adopts MEPS already in place elsewhere. With these differences in circumstances, Australia's analysis approach could be expected to have less analytical detail and still result in MEPS levels that are appropriate for their policy and market context. In practice, the analysis required to meet these different objectives is quite similar. To date, Australia's cost-benefit analysis has served the goals and philosophies of the program well and been highly effective in successfully identifying MEPS that are significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions while providing economic benefits to consumers. In some cases, however, the experience of the USA--using more extensive data sets and more detailed analysis--suggests possible improvements to Australia's cost-benefit analysis. The principal findings of the comparison are: (1) The Technology and Market Assessments are similar; no changes are recommended. (2) The Australian approach to determining the relationship of price to energy efficiency is based on current market, while the US approach uses prospective estimates. Both approaches may benefit from increased retrospective analysis of impacts of MEPS on appliance and equipment prices. Under some circumstances, Australia may wish to consider analyzing two separate components leading to price impacts: (a) changes in manufacturing costs and (b) markups used to convert from manufacturing costs to consumer price. (3) The Life-Cycle Cost methods are similar, but the USA has statistical surveys that permit a more detailed analysis. Australia uses average values, while the US uses full distributions. If data and resources permit, Australia may benefit from greater depth here as well. If implemented, the changes will provide more information about the benefits and costs of the program, in particular identifying who benefits and who bears net costs so that programs can be designed to offset unintended negative consequences, and may assist the government in convincing affected parties of the justification for some MEPS. However, without a detailed and statistically representative national survey, such an approach may not be practical for Australia at this time. (4) The National Benefits and Costs methods are similar prospective estimates of shipments, costs and energy savings, as well as greenhouse gas emissions. Additional sensitivity studies could further illustrate the ranges in these estimates. Consideration of lower discount rates could lead to more stringent MEPS in some cases. (5) Both the Australian and US analyses of impacts on industry, competition, and trade ultimately depend upon sufficient consultation with industry experts. While the Australian analysis of financial impacts on manufacturers is less detailed than that of the US, the Australian treatment of impacts on market shares imported from different regions of the world is more detailed. No change is recommended. Implementing these changes would increase the depth o

McMahon, James E.

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

86

Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options » Options » Benefits Benefits Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Current Employees (CRYPTOCard access) Retirees Competitive pay, work-life balance options, comprehensive benefits package We attract and retain exceptional talent with our competitive pay packages that provide fair and equitable compensation. We recognize and reward outstanding contributions through our various employee award programs. We support and nurture a culture focused on a work/life balance for all of our employees. Our benefits package Employees are eligible for a variety of health and retirement benefits. Health & wellness

87

A cost/benefit model for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study provides economic justification for insertion of technological innovation into a total quality management (TQM) program in a remanufacturing environment. One of the core principles of TQM is continuous improvement. A preferred metric for measuring quality improvement is the cost of quality. Traditionally, comprehensive quality cost reports have regularly been issued in a fixed format to identify opportunities for improvement and provide guidelines for improvement over time. However, current research has shown that continuous improvement is enhanced by a quality cost approach that is much more flexible [1]. This approach is based upon exposure of the cost savings directly related to quality improvement. in many cases a process-level engineer, who may not be trained in quality costing techniques, will be responsible for the economic analysis to justify a quality improvement initiative. Research has shown that most engineers, simply do not have the training or experience to adequately cost justify quality improvement. The results of this study provide process-level engineers with a cost/benefit model template, which can be used to cost justify technological improvement based upon total quality costs.

Ratliff, William L

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A New User-Friendly Model to Reduce Cost for Headwater Benefits Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Headwater benefits at a downstream hydropower project are energy gains that are derived from the installation of upstream reservoirs. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is required by law to assess charges of such energy gains to downstream owners of non-federal hydropower projects. The high costs of determining headwater benefits prohibit the use of a complicated model in basins where the magnitude of the benefits is expected to be small. This paper presents a new user-friendly computer model, EFDAM (Enhanced Flow Duration Analysis Method), that not only improves the accuracy of the standard flow duration method but also reduces costs for determining headwater benefits. The EFDAM model includes a MS Windows-based interface module to provide tools for automating input data file preparation, linking and executing of a generic program, editing/viewing of input/output files, and application guidance. The EDFAM was applied to various river basins. An example was given to illustrate the main features of EFDAM application for creating input files and assessing headwater benefits at the Tulloch Hydropower Plant on the Stanislaus River Basin, California.

Bao, Y.S.; Cover, C.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.; Sarma, V.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Reducing emissions from the electricity sector: the costs and benefits nationwide and for the Empire State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using four models, this study looks at EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) as originally proposed, which differs in only small ways from the final rule issued in March 2005, coupled with several approaches to reducing emissions of mercury including one that differs in only small ways from the final rule also issued in March 2005. This study analyzes what costs and benefits each would incur to New York State and to the nation at large. Benefits to the nation and to New York State significantly outweigh the costs associated with reductions in SO{sub 2}, NOx and mercury, and all policies show dramatic net benefits. The manner in which mercury emissions are regulated will have important implications for the cost of the regulation and for emission levels for SO{sub 2} and NOx and where those emissions are located. Contrary to EPA's findings, CAIR as originally proposed by itself would not keep summer emissions of NOx from electricity generators in the SIP region below the current SIP seasonal NOx cap. In the final CAIR, EPA added a seasonal NOx cap to address seasonal ozone problems. The CAIR with the seasonal NOx cap produces higher net benefits. The effect of the different policies on the mix of fuels used to supply electricity is fairly modest under scenarios similar to the EPA's final rules. A maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach, compared to a trading approach as the way to achieve tighter mercury targets (beyond EPA's proposal), would preserve the role of coal in electricity generation. The evaluation of scenarios with tighter mercury emission controls shows that the net benefits of a maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach exceed the net benefits of a cap and trade approach. 39 refs., 10 figs., 30 figs., 5 apps.

Karen Palmer; Dallas Butraw; Jhih-Shyang Shih

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Benefit/cost analysis for research in geothermal log interpretation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well log interpretation, the process of inferring subsurface geology from geophysical measurements made in boreholes, is the most versatile and direct means available of assessing important physical and structural reservoir properties. Historically, well logging has been developed primarily for use in oil and gas wells, and its application in a different environment such as a geothermal reservoir creates complex problems. Present geothermal development is severely hindered by lack of data. Adaptation of well logging techniques holds the promise of reducing development costs, encouraging investment, and assisting regulatory permitting. Such benefits will translate directly into lower power costs and an increased domestic energy supply. A significant acceleration of geothermal power-on-line is possible plus cost reductions through reduction of drilling failure rate, reduction of average well cost, earlier recognition of bad wells, reduced flow testing, and savings due to provision of better data for regulatory decisions. Net undiscounted benefits in 1979 dollars from improving logging and interpretation in geothermal areas can exceed half a billion dollars in slightly more than a decade, about 300 million of this should be regarded as the potential benefit of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Log Interpretation Program or similar research.

Rigby, F.A.; Reardon, P.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

How to Evaluate the Costs and Benefits of Participating in Coordinated Transportation Services; A Coordination Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Manual focuses on the coordination of transportation resources by social service and community transportation providers. The Manual is designed to assist such providers to understand the potential benefits of coordination, to compare current cost and service patterns to those offered by other providers " to understand the costs incurred when participating in various coordination options, and to compute prices to charge to other agepcies when selling transportation services. The Manual has three messages: 1) in many coordination options there are trade-offs that can or must be made between cost and service variables; 2) in order to participate in coordination programs, agencies must understand all costs which they will continue to incur as well as those that will be experienced for the first time; 3) coordination can be a complex and complicated process which requires serlOUS attention to organizational, administrative and financial

P. Rlorming Organilo. Ion Nomo

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot project (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot project Country Slovakia Coordinates 48.669025°, 19.699024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.669025,"lon":19.699024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

Guidebook for Cost/Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a step-by-step process for estimating the costs and benefits associated with Smart Grid demonstration projects. In its entirety, the guidebook is meant to function as a standalone user’s manual for the analysis process, from the initial step of describing the project to the final step of communicating the results to all stakeholders. This revision of the Guidebook updates and supersedes the material in the original Volume 1, published in 2011, but goes further by adding ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

94

Guidebook for Cost/Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a step-by-step process for estimating the costs and benefits associated with smart grid demonstration projects. The entire guidebook is meant to function as a stand-alone user’s manual for the analysis process, from the initial step of describing the project to the final step of communicating the results to all stakeholders. This version of the guidebook presents detailed instructions for describing the project objectives, the research plan, and the technologies deployed; ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

95

SMES benefit analysis using a product cost model for Puget Sound applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is an emerging technology that is expected to provide a means of storing electrical energy for use during peak demand periods. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has estimated benefits and costs associated with the use of SMES technology and has provided insight into the overall future potential of SMES in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and on systems that connect and exchange power with BPA.

Dagle, J.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23 What Does the U.S. Department of Energy Fossil Energy R&D Mean to America's Energy and Economic Future? Methodology for Estimating Research & Development (R&D) Benefits The primary tool used to estimate future R&D benefits is the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) developed by the Energy Information Ad- ministration (EIA). Benefits are based on the differ- ence between certain parameters for NEMS runs made with and without the impacts of FE R&D. For cases with FE R&D, it is assumed that program R&D goals are met and funding is consistent with FY2004 appropriations and program plans. Multiple scenarios are used to examine the impact of se- lected regulatory and fuel energy price assump- tions. Other than inputs reflecting FE R&D goals

97

Costs and benefits from utility-funded commissioning of energy- efficiency measures in 16 buildings  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the costs and savings of commissioning of energy- efficiency measures in 16 buildings. A total of 46 EEMs were commissioned for all 16 buildings and 73 deficiencies were corrected. On average, commissioning was marginally cost effective on energy savings alone, although the results were mixed among all 16 buildings. When considered as a stand-alone measure, the median simple payback time of 6.5 years under the low energy prices in the Pacific Northwest. Under national average prices the median payback time is about three years. In estimating the present value of the energy savings from commissioning we considered low and high lifetimes for the persistence of savings from deficiency corrections. Under the low- lifetime case the average present value of the energy savings ($0. 21/ft{sup 2}) were about equal to the average commissioning costs ($0. 23/ft{sup 2}). Under the high-lifetime case the savings ($0.51/ft{sup 2}) were about twice the costs. Again, the savings would be about twice as large under national average prices. The results are subject to significant uncertainty because of the small sample size and lack of metered data in the evaluation. However, the findings suggest that investments in commissioning pay off. Building owners want buildings that work as intended, and are comfortable, healthy, and efficient. It is likely that the non-energy benefits, which are difficult to quantify, are larger than the energy-savings benefits.

Piette, M.A.; Nordman, B.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Cost benefit of caustic recycle for tank waste remediation at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites  

SciTech Connect

The potential cost savings due to the use of caustic recycle used in conjunction with remediation of radioactive underground storage tank waste, is shown in a figure for the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Two cost savings estimates for each case have been made for Hanford, and one cost savings estimate for each case have been made for Hanford, and one cost savings estimate for each case has been made for the Savannah River site. This is due to the Hanford site remediation effort being less mature than that of Savannah River; and consequently, a range of cost savings being more appropriate for Hanford. This range of cost savings (rather than a ingle value) for each case at Hanford is due to cost uncertainties related to the LAW immobilization operation. Caustic recycle Case-1 has been defined as the sodium required to meet al identified caustic needs for the entire Site. Case-2 has been defined as the maximum sodium which can be separated from the low activity waste without precipitation of Al(OH){sub 3}. It has been determined that the potential cost savings at Hanford ranges from $194 M to $215 M for Case-1, and $293 M to $324 M for Case-2. The potential cost savings at Savannah River are $186 M for Case-1 and $281 M for Case-2. A discussion of the uncertainty associated with these cost savings estimates can be found in the Discussion and Conclusions section.

DeMuth, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology and Safety Assessment Div.; Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Exploratory benefit-cost analysis of environmental controls on hydrothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the value of environmental benefits generated by environmental regulation of hydrothermal sites was initiated to compare these benefits with the estimated costs of regulation. Primary objectives were to 1) evaluate the environmental damages caused by unregulated hydrothermal resource development, 2) use existing environmental and economic data to estimate the dollar value of preventing expected environmental damages at two sites, and 3) compare the benefits and costs of preventing the damages. The sites chosen for analyses were in the Imperial Valley at Heber and Niland, California. Reasons for this choice were 1) there is a high level of commercial interest in developing the Heber known geothermal resource area (KGRA) and the Salton Sea KGRA; 2) the potential for environmental damage is high; 3) existing data bases for these two sites are more comprehensive than at other sites. The primary impacts analyzed were those related to hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions and those related to disposal of spent hydrothermal brine. (MHR)

Scott, M.J.; Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; King, M.J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Environmental mitigation at hydroelectric projects. Volume 2, Benefits and costs of fish passage and protection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study examines envirorunental mitigation practices that provide upstream and downstream fish passage and protection at hydroelectric projects. The study includes a survey of fish passage and protection mitigation practices at 1,825 hydroelectric plants regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to determine frequencies of occurrence, temporal trends, and regional practices based on FERC regions. The study also describes, in general terms, the fish passage/protection mitigation costs at 50 non-Federal hydroelectric projects. Sixteen case studies are used to examine in detail the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection. The 16 case studies include 15 FERC licensed or exempted hydroelectric projects and one Federally-owned and-operated hydroelectric project. The 16 hydroelectric projects are located in 12 states and range in capacity from 400 kilowatts to 840 megawatts. The fish passage and protection mitigation methods at the case studies include fish ladders and lifts, an Eicher screen, spill flows, airburst-cleaned inclined and cylindrical wedgewire screens, vertical barrier screens, and submerged traveling screens. The costs, benefits, monitoring methods, and operating characteristics of these and other mitigation methods used at the 16 case studies are examined.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sommers, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dauble, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hunt, R.T. [Hunt (Richard) Associates, Inc., Concord, NH (United States); Costello, R.J. [Northwest Water Resources Advisory Services (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Review of Conservation Costs and Benefits: Five Years of Experience under the Northwest Power Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). In the Act, Congress mandated that conservation (i.e., improvements in energy efficiency that result in reduced consumptions) be treated as a resource and that all resources be evaluated against uniform criteria to determine the lowest cost mix of resources to meet the Northwest’s energy needs. Since the passage of the Act, the total regional expenditure on conservation by the federal Bonneville Power Administration, public utilities, and investor-owned utilities has been approximately $800 million to $900 million. This includes research and development elements of the program. This paper describes the costs and benefits of conservation programs implemented in the Pacific Northwest and some of the lessons learned to date. The analysis indicates that conservation programs that were run to acquire energy have achieved savings at levelized costs ranging between 1.9 and 2.9 cents per kilowatt hours. Research, development and pilot projects have produced savings at costs that range from less than .10 cents to 8.9 cents per kilowatt hour. Based on the results described in this paper, the Northwest Power Planning Council has concluded that conservation is indeed a resource that the Pacific Northwest can rely on to help meet future needs for electricity. The Council also concluded the region will be able secure conservation measure and resources at a cost lower than it would otherwise have to pay for additional generating resources.

Sheets, E.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward MoreComprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity RestructuringPolicies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past three years, government and private organizations have issued more than a dozen studies of the benefits and costs of Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs). Most of these studies have focused on benefits that can be readily estimated using traditional production-cost simulation techniques, which compare the cost of centralized dispatch under an RTO to dispatch in the absence of an RTO, and on costs associated with RTO start-up and operation. Taken as a whole, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions from these studies because they have not examined potentially much larger benefits (and costs) resulting from the impacts of RTOs on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: (1) Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis of FERC electricity restructuring policies; (2)Reviews current practice by analyzing 11 RTO benefit-cost studies that were published between 2002 and 2004 and makes recommendations to improve the documentation of data and methods and the presentation of findings in future studies that focus primarily on estimating short-run economic impacts; and (3) Reviews important impacts of FERC policies that have been overlooked or incompletely treated by recent RTO benefit-cost studies and the challenges to crafting more comprehensive assessments of these impacts based on actual performance, including impacts on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation.

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Evaluating the economic costs, benefits and tradeoffs of dedicated biomass energy systems: The importance of scale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic and environmental costs, benefits and tradeoffs of bioenergy from dedicated biomass energy systems must be addressed in the context of the scale of interest. At different scales there are different economic and environmental features and processes to consider. The depth of our understanding of the processes and features that influence the potential of energy crops also varies with scale as do the quality and kinds of data that are needed and available. Finally, the appropriate models to use for predicting economic and environmental impacts change with the scale of the questions. This paper explores these issues at three scales - the individual firm, the community, and the nation.

Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Valuing Good Health in Vermont: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Health Care Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policymakers across the country are increasingly interested in ensuring that workers can earn paid time off to use when they are sick. In addition to concerns about workers ’ ability to respond to their own health needs, there is growing recognition that, with so many dual-earner and single-parent families, family members ’ health needs also sometimes require workers to take time off from their job. Allowing workers with contagious illness to avoid unnecessary contact with co-workers and customers has important public health benefits. Earned health care time also protects workers from being disciplined or fired when they are too sick to work, helps families and communities economically by preventing lost income due to illness, and offers savings to employers by reducing turnover and minimizing absenteeism. Legislators in Vermont are considering Bill H.208, “An Act Relating to Absence from Work for Health Care and Safety. ” Using the parameters of the proposed legislation and publicly available data, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) estimates the anticipated costs and some of the anticipated benefits of the law for employers providing new leave, as well as some of the benefits for employees. The briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Application of activity-based costing in a manufacturing company: a comparison with traditional costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based Costing (ABC) represents an alternative paradigm to traditional cost accounting system and has received extensive attention during the past decade. Rather than distorting the cost information by using traditional overhead allocation methods, ...

Gonca Tuncel; Derya Eren Akyol; Gunhan Mirac Bayhan; Utku Koker

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Assessing the Benefits and Costs of Intelligent Transportation Systems: The Value of Advanced Traveler Information Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Navigation, Full Cost of Transportation, Social CostsThe Social Costs of Intercity Passenger Transportation: ATransportation, Advanced Traveler Information Systems Introduction Recent literature has extensively discussed the social costs

Levinson, David; Gillen, David; Chang, Elva

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

The environmental costs and benefits of biomass energy use in California  

SciTech Connect

The California renewable energy industries have worked diligently during the past couple of years to develop public policies conducive to the future of renewable energy production within the context of electric market restructuring and the evolving competitive electric services industry. The state`s biomass power industry has organized itself as the California Biomass Energy Alliance (CBEA), and has participated vigorously in the regulatory and legislative processes. In order to reward biomass power generators for the special services they provide, CBEA has promoted the concept of providing incentives specifically targeted to biomass within the context of any renewables program enacted in the state. This concept has been embraced by the other renewables industry organizations, but resisted by the utilities. This study represents an effort to identify, characterize, ad quantify the environmental costs and benefits of biomass energy use in California, and to elucidate the future role of biomass power production within the context of the evolving deregulation of the California electricity industry. The report begins with a review of the development and growth of the California biomass power industry during the past 15 years. This is followed by an analysis of the biomass fuels market development during the same period. It examines trends in the types and costs of biomass fuels. The environmental performance of the mature California biomass energy industry is analyzed, and takes into account the environmental impacts of the industry, and the impacts that would be associated with disposing of the materials used as fuels if the biomass power industry were not in operation. The analysis is then extended to consider the environmental and economic consequences of the loss of biomass generating capacity since 1993. The report ends with a consideration of the future prospects for the industry in the context of restructuring.

Morris, G. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Examining the effectiveness of municipal solid waste management systems: An integrated cost-benefit analysis perspective with a financial cost modeling in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to develop a sound material-cycle society, cost-effective municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems are required for the municipalities in the context of the integrated accounting system for MSW management. Firstly, this paper attempts to establish an integrated cost-benefit analysis (CBA) framework for evaluating the effectiveness of MSW management systems. In this paper, detailed cost/benefit items due to waste problems are particularly clarified. The stakeholders of MSW management systems, including the decision-makers of the municipalities and the citizens, are expected to reconsider the waste problems in depth and thus take wise actions with the aid of the proposed CBA framework. Secondly, focusing on the financial cost, this study develops a generalized methodology to evaluate the financial cost-effectiveness of MSW management systems, simultaneously considering the treatment technological levels and policy effects. The impacts of the influencing factors on the annual total and average financial MSW operation and maintenance (O and M) costs are analyzed in the Taiwanese case study with a demonstrative short-term future projection of the financial costs under scenario analysis. The established methodology would contribute to the evaluation of the current policy measures and to the modification of the policy design for the municipalities.

Weng, Yu-Chi, E-mail: clyde.weng@gmail.com [Solid Waste Management Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Fujiwara, Takeshi [Solid Waste Management Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating, given the higher cost per KWh for electricity, aaverage cost of electrical energy per kilowatt-hour (kWh) is

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies: A Review of Recent Benefit-Cost Studies of RTOs  

SciTech Connect

Definitive assessment of Federal Energy Regulatory Commission policies on regional transmission organizations is not currently possible because of uncertainties in the data and methods used in recent benefit-cost studies as well as lack of investigation of key impacts of the formation of RTOs. (author)

Eto, Joseph H.; Hale, Douglas R.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Benefit/Cost Analysis of Geothermal Technology R&D. Volume III: Energy Extraction and Utilization Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the benefit/cost relationship for 44 research and development (R and D) projects being funded by the Utilization Technology Branch (UTB) of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE), Department of Energy (DOE) as a part of its Energy Extraction and Conversion Technology program. The benefits were computed in terms of the savings resulting from the reduction in the cost of electricity projected to be generated at 27 hydrothermal prospects in the US between 1978 and 2000, due to technological improvements brought about by successful R and D. The costs of various projects were estimated by referring to the actual expenditures already incurred and the projected future budgets for these projects. In certain cases, the expected future expenditures had to be estimated on the basis of the work which would need to be done to carry a project to the commercialization stage.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Pfundstein, Richard T.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Probabilistic cost-benefit analysis of enhanced safety features for strategic nuclear weapons at a representative location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carried out a demonstration analysis of the value of developing and implementing enhanced safety features for nuclear weapons in the US stockpile. We modified an approach that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed in response to a congressional directive that NRC assess the ``value-impact`` of regulatory actions for commercial nuclear power plants. Because improving weapon safety shares some basic objectives with NRC regulations, i.e., protecting public health and safety from the effects of accidents involving radioactive materials, we believe the NRC approach to be appropriate for evaluating weapons-safety cost-benefit issues. Impact analysis includes not only direct costs associated with retrofitting the weapon system, but also the expected costs (or economic risks) that are avoided by the action, i.e., the benefits.

Stephens, D.R.; Hall, C.H.; Holman, G.S.; Graham, K.F.; Harvey, T.F.; Serduke, F.J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Performance and cost benefits associated with nonimaging secondary concentrators used in point-focus dish solar thermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using nonimaging secondary concentrators in point-focus applications may permit the development of more cost-effective concentrator systems by either improving performance or reducing costs. Secondaries may also increase design flexibility. The major objective of this study was to develop as complete an understanding as possible of the quantitative performance and cost effects associated with deploying nonimaging secondary concentrators at the focal zone of point-focus solar thermal concentrators. A performance model was developed that uses a Monte Carlo ray-trace procedure to determine the focal plane distribution of a paraboloidal primary as a function of optical parameters. It then calculates the corresponding optimized concentration and thermal efficiency as a function of temperature with and without the secondary. To examine the potential cost benefits associated with secondaries, a preliminary model for the rational optimization of performance versus cost trade-offs was developed. This model suggests a possible 10% to 20% reduction in the cost of delivered energy when secondaries are used. This is a lower limit, and the benefits may even be greater if using a secondary permits the development of inexpensive primary technologies for which the performance would not otherwise be viable. 20 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

O'Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The mixed waste management facility: Cost-benefit for the Mixed Waste Management Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Waste Management Facility, or MWMF, has been proposed as a national testbed facility for the demonstration and evaluation of technologies that are alternatives to incineration for the treatment of mixed low-level waste. The facility design will enable evaluation of technologies at pilot scale, including all aspects of the processes, from receiving and feed preparation to the preparation of final forms for disposal. The MWMF will reduce the risk of deploying such technologies by addressing the following: (1) Engineering development and scale-up. (2) Process integration and activation of the treatment systems. (3) Permitting and stakeholder issues. In light of the severe financial constraints imposed on the DOE and federal programs, DOE/HQ requested a study to assess the cost benefit for the MWMF given other potential alternatives to meet waste treatment needs. The MVVMF Project was asked to consider alternatives specifically associated with commercialization and privatization of the DOE site waste treatment operations and the acceptability (or lack of acceptability) of incineration as a waste treatment process. The result of this study will be one of the key elements for a DOE decision on proceeding with the MWMF into Final Design (KD-2) vs. proceeding with other options.

Brinker, S.D.; Streit, R.D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Passive versus active mitigation cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of this task is to assess the impact of mitigation alternatives for Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103 on the Project W-236A Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. This assessment and other related tasks are part of an Action Plan Path Forward prepared by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Life Extension and Transition Program. Task 3.7 of the Action Plan for Project W-236A MWTF analyzed the comparative cost/risk of two hydrogen gas mitigation alternatives (active versus passive) to recommend the most appropriate course of action to resolve the hydrogen gas safety issue. The qualitative success of active mitigation has been demonstrated through Tank 241-SY-101 testing. Passive mitigation has not been demonstrated but will be validated by laboratory test work performed under Task 3.1 of the Action Plan. It is assumed for this assessment that the uncertainties associated with the performance of either alternative is comparable. Determining alternative specific performance measures beyond those noted are not in the scope of this effort.

Parazin, R.J.; Galbraith, J.D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Heat Watch/Warning Systems Save Lives: Estimated Costs and Benefits for Philadelphia 1995–98  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Hot Weather–Health Watch/Warning System was initiated in 1995 to alert the city's population to take precautionary actions when hot weather posed risks to health. The number of lives saved and the economic benefit ...

Kristie L. Ebi; Thomas J. Teisberg; Laurence S. Kalkstein; Lawrence Robinson; Rodney F. Weiher

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Plug-in Hybrid Modeling and Application: Cost/Benefit Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents data from a simulation of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle efficiency and cost, including baseline vehicle assumptions, powertrain technology scenarios, and component modeling.

Simpson, A.

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Valuing Rail Transit: Comparing Capital and Operating Costs to Consumer Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating the effects of light rail transit on health caredesirability of urban rail transit systems. In Journal ofcapital costs : heavy rail and busway HOV lane. Federal

Guerra, Erick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois Jurisdictions  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for energy efficienty design and construction of new commercial buildings. This report assesses the benefits and costs of adopting this standard as the building energy code in Illinois. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using BLAST combined with a Life-Cycle Cost approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.; Friedrich, Michele

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cost-benefit analysis of aircraft design for environment using a fleet perspective and real options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) approaches do not examine the costs associated with damage due to environmental factors and are usually implemented to examine one aircraft. The Environmental Design ...

Hynes, Christopher Dennis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems: Cost/Benefit Analysis and Opportunities for Improvement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To determine potential for reduction in the cost of saved energy (COSE) for cold-climate solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems, COSE was computed for three types of cold climate water heating systems. For each system, a series of cost-saving measures was considered: (1) balance of systems (BOS): tank, heat exchanger, and piping-valving measures; and (2) four alternative lower-cost collectors. Given all beneficial BOS measures in place, >50% reduction of COSE was achievable only with selective polymer collectors at half today's selective collector cost. In all three system types, today's metal-glass selective collector achieved the same COSE as the hypothesized non-selective polymer collector.

Burch, J.; Hillman, T.; Salasovich, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Electric Cable Reel Rubber-Tired Gantry Cranes: Costs and Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Port equipment manufacturers have responded to the increased focus on air quality control by creating a variety of cleaner equipment and making more electric equipment available to ports. Included in this equipment is the rubber-tired gantry (RTG) crane, which was historically available only with a diesel engine. Electric cable reel RTG cranes, relatively new to the U.S. market, may reduce port crane operating costs due to their lower energy costs, higher energy efficiencies, and longer equipment life. E...

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

125

Modeling of GE Appliances: Cost Benefit Study of Smart Appliances in Wholesale Energy, Frequency Regulation, and Spinning Reserve Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series of three reports describing the potential of GE’s DR-enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid. The first report described the modeling methodology used to represent the GE appliances in the GridLAB-D simulation environment and the estimated potential for peak demand reduction at various deployment levels. The third report will explore the technical capability of aggregated group actions to positively impact grid stability, including frequency and voltage regulation and spinning reserves, and the impacts on distribution feeder voltage regulation, including mitigation of fluctuations caused by high penetration of photovoltaic distributed generation. In this report, a series of analytical methods were presented to estimate the potential cost benefit of smart appliances while utilizing demand response. Previous work estimated the potential technical benefit (i.e., peak reduction) of smart appliances, while this report focuses on the monetary value of that participation. The effects on wholesale energy cost and possible additional revenue available by participating in frequency regulation and spinning reserve markets were explored.

Fuller, Jason C.; Parker, Graham B.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume I: Main report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 131(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) (Public Law 102-486) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the costs and benefits of federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy-intensive industries. It also requires DOE to evaluate the role of reporting and targets in improving energy efficiency. Specifically, the legislation states: Not later than one year after the data of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall, in consultation with affected industries, evaluate and report to the Congress regarding the establishment of Federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy intensive industries. Such report shall include an evaluation of the costs and benefits of such reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets, and recommendations regarding the role of such activities in improving energy efficiency in energy intensive industries. This report is DOE`s response to that directive. It is the culmination of a year-long study that included (1) analysis of documents pertaining to a previous reporting and targets effort, the industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements Program (or the CE-189 program, following the designation of the reporting form used to collect data in that program), administered by DOE from 1976 to 1985, as well as other important background information; (2) extensive consultations with government and industry officials regarding the CE-189 Program, experience with other programs that have reporting elements, and the attributes of possible alternative strategies for reporting and targets; and (3) analyses of the costs and benefits of the CE-189 Program and several alternatives to the CE-189 approach.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Distributed Generation versus Centralised Supply: a Social Cost-Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prospect of revolutionary new scenarios. In particular, the performance of the small power technologies (the reciprocating engine, gas turbine, and fuel cells) has improved remarkably over the last decade. This has aroused the interest of operators... include Stirling (1997) who provides some interesting arguments to support his thesis. However, we will try to demonstrate that such scepticism is perhaps exaggerated and that external cost methodologies can be very useful despite the considerable...

Gulli, Francesco

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

129

Cost-benefit analysis of cosolvent flushing to treat groundwater contamination source areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the zone beneath the water table can be a virtually permanent source of groundwater contamination that cannot be remediated by currently available technologies. Cosolvent flushing is a new technology that has the potential to remediate these sites and could pose a solution to the problem of DNAPL source areas. A computer model was developed to determine the cost and time to remediate an aquifer using cosolvent flushing. Included in the model is a module to calculate the costs of recycling the alcohol that is used as the cosolvent. The model was validated using site conditions to a prior study. It was determined that recycling the cosolvent allows cosolvent flushing to be a cost effective alternative to surfactant flushing, another new technology being considered for DNAPL source remediation. Sensitivity analysis of the model was conducted by varying the saturation percentage of contaminant, percentage and type of alcohol used in the cosolvent mixture, site hydraulic conductivity, and the contaminant. Five alcohols were modeled: methanol, ethanol, 1-isopropanol, 2-isopropanol, and tert-butyl-alcohol (TBA). 1-Isopropanol, 2-isopropanol, and TBA were always more expensive than methanol and ethanol.

Anason, S.L.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-494), Section 400EE, states that the Secretary of Energy ...shall study methanol plants, including the costs and practicability of such plants that are (A) capable of utilizing current domestic supplies of unutilized natural gas; (B) relocatable; or (C) suitable for natural gas to methanol conversion by natural gas distribution companies...'' The purpose of this report is to characterize unutilized gas within the lower 48 states and to perform an economic analysis of methanol plants required by the act. The approach with regard to unutilized lower 48 gas is to (1) compare the costs of converting such gas to methanol against the expected price of gasoline over the next 20 years, and (2) compare the economics of converting such gas to methanol against the economics of using the gas as a pipeline-transported fuel. This study concludes that remote gas and low-Btu gas generally cannot be converted to methanol at costs near the expected competitive value of gasoline because of the poor economies of scale of small methanol plants.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

SciTech Connect

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use inCost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating the benefits and costs of water conservation orefficiency programs requires knowing the marginal cost of the water andwastewater saved by those programs. Developing an accurate picture of thepotential cost savings from water conservation requires knowing the costof the last few units of water consumed or wastewater released, becausethose are the units that would be saved by increased water efficiency.This report describes the data we obtained on water and wastewater ratesand costs, data gaps we identified, and other issues related to using thedata to estimate the cost savings that might accrue from waterconservation programs. We identified three water and wastewater ratesources. Of these, we recommend using Raftelis Financial Corporation(RFC) because it: a) has the most comprehensive national coverage; and b)provides greatest detail on rates to calculate marginal rates. The figurebelow shows the regional variation in water rates for a range ofconsumption blocks. Figure 1A Marginal Rates of Water Blocks by Regionfrom RFC 2004Water and wastewater rates are rising faster than the rateof inflation. For example, from 1996 to 2004 the average water rateincreased 39.5 percent, average wastewater rate increased 37.8 percent,the CPI (All Urban) increased 20.1 percent, and the CPI (Water andSewerage Maintenance) increased 31.1 percent. On average, annualincreases were 4.3 percent for water and 4.1 percent for wastewater,compared to 2.3 percent for the All Urban CPI and 3.7 percent for the CPIfor water and sewerage maintenance. If trends in rates for water andwastewater rates continue, water-efficient products will become morevaluable and more cost-effective.

Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak-Load Shifting and Spinning Reserves Cost/Benefit Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we present the results of an analytical cost/benefit study of residential smart appliances from a utility/grid perspective in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the ENERGY STAR program within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the petition is in part to provide appliance manufacturers incentives to hasten the production of smart appliances. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the societal challenges, such as anthropogenic global warming, associated with increased electricity demand, and facilitate increased penetration of renewable sources of power. The appliances we consider include refrigerator/freezers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, room air-conditioners, and dishwashers. The petition requests the recognition that providing an appliance with smart grid capability, i.e., products that meet the definition of a smart appliance, is at least equivalent to a corresponding five percent in operational machine efficiencies. It is then expected that given sufficient incentives and value propositions, and suitable automation capabilities built into smart appliances, residential consumers will be adopting these smart appliances and will be willing participants in addressing the aforementioned societal challenges by more effectively managing their home electricity consumption. The analytical model we utilize in our cost/benefit analysis consists of a set of user-definable assumptions such as the definition of on-peak (hours of day, days of week, months of year), the expected percentage of normal consumer electricity consumption (also referred to as appliance loads) that can shifted from peak hours to off-peak hours, the average power rating of each appliance, etc. Based on these assumptions, we then formulate what the wholesale grid operating-cost savings, or benefits, would be if the smart capabilities of appliances were invoked, and some percentage of appliance loads were shifted away from peak hours to run during off-peak hours, and appliance loads served power-system balancing needs such as spinning reserves that would otherwise have to be provided by generators. The rationale is that appliance loads can be curtailed for about ten minutes or less in response to a grid contingency without any diminution in the quality of service to the consumer. We then estimate the wholesale grid operating-cost savings based on historical wholesale-market clearing prices (location marginal and spinning reserve) from major wholesale power markets in the United States. The savings derived from the smart grid capabilities of an appliance are then compared to the savings derived from a five percent increase in traditional operational machine efficiencies, referred to as cost in this report, to determine whether the savings in grid operating costs (benefits) are at least as high as or higher than the operational machine efficiency credit (cost).

Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.; Srivastava, Viraj; Li, Shun

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Broadening the Appeal of Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: Capturing Both Carbon Mitigation and Development Benefits of Clean Energy Technologies; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Low emission development strategies (LEDS) articulate policies and implementation plans that enable countries to advance sustainable, climate-resilient development and private sector growth while significantly reducing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions traditionally associated with economic growth. In creating a LEDS, policy makers often have access to information on abatement potential and costs for clean energy technologies, but there is a scarcity of economy-wide approaches for evaluating and presenting information on other dimensions of importance to development, such as human welfare, poverty alleviation, and energy security. To address this shortcoming, this paper proposes a new tool for communicating development benefits to policy makers as part of a LEDS process. The purpose of this tool is two-fold: 1. Communicate development benefits associated with each clean energy-related intervention; 2. Facilitate decision-making on which combination of interventions best contributes to development goals. To pilot this tool, the authors created a visual using data on developmental impacts identified through the Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) project in Montenegro. The visual will then be revised to reflect new data established through the TNA that provides information on cost, GHG mitigation, as well as the range and magnitude of developmental impacts.

Cowlin, S.; Cochran, J.; Cox, S.; Davison, C.; van der Gaast, Y.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the results of detailed monitoring completed under Program Element 6 of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's High Performance Commercial Building Systems (HPCBS) PIER program. The purpose of the Energy Simulations and Projected State-Wide Energy Savings project is to develop reasonable energy performance and cost models for high performance relocatable classrooms (RCs) across California climates. A key objective of the energy monitoring was to validate DOE2 simulations for comparison to initial DOE2 performance projections. The validated DOE2 model was then used to develop statewide savings projections by modeling base case and high performance RC operation in the 16 California climate zones. The primary objective of this phase of work was to utilize detailed field monitoring data to modify DOE2 inputs and generate performance projections based on a validated simulation model. Additional objectives include the following: (1) Obtain comparative performance data on base case and high performance HVAC systems to determine how they are operated, how they perform, and how the occupants respond to the advanced systems. This was accomplished by installing both HVAC systems side-by-side (i.e., one per module of a standard two module, 24 ft by 40 ft RC) on the study RCs and switching HVAC operating modes on a weekly basis. (2) Develop projected statewide energy and demand impacts based on the validated DOE2 model. (3) Develop cost effectiveness projections for the high performance HVAC system in the 16 California climate zones.

Rainer, Leo I.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Apte, Michael G.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, Wlliam J.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1988 the Department of Energy (DOE) undertook a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States. During the next two decades, alternative fuels such as alcohol (methanol or ethanol), compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity could become practical alternatives to oil-based fuels in the US transportation sector. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability. To keep interested parties informed about the progress of the DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment, the Department periodically publishes reports dealing with particular aspects of this complex study. This report provides an analysis of the expected costs to produce methanol from biomass feedstock.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world and in California. Successful implementation of applicable emerging technologies not only may help advance productivities, improve environmental impacts, or enhance industrial competitiveness, but also can play a significant role in climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Developing new information on costs and savings benefits of energy efficient emerging technologies applicable in California market is important for policy makers as well as the industries. Therefore, provision of timely evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to California is the focus of this report. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select a set of emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. Specifically, this report contains the results from performing Task 3 Technology Characterization for California Industries for the project titled Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, sponsored by California Energy Commission (CEC) and managed by California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE). The project purpose is to characterize energy savings, technology costs, market potential, and economic viability of newly selected technologies applicable to California. In this report, LBNL first performed technology reviews to identify new or under-utilized technologies that could offer potential in improving energy efficiency and additional benefits to California industries as well as in the U.S. industries, followed by detailed technology assessment on each targeted technology, with a focus on California applications. A total of eleven emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California were selected and characterized with detailed information in this report. The outcomes essentially include a multi-page summary profile for each of the 11 emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California industries, based on the formats used in the technology characterization reports (Xu et al. 2010; Martin et al. 2000).

Xu, Tengfang; Slaa, Jan Willem; Sathaye, Jayant

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Texas State Building Energy Code: Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Commercial Lighting Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Conservation Office of Texas has asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in the 2003 IECC as they consider adoption of this energy code. The new provisions of interest in the lighting section of IECC 2003 include new lighting power densities (LPD) and requirements for automatic lighting shutoff controls. The potential effect of the new LPD values is analyzed as a comparison with previous values in the nationally available IECC codes and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1. The basis for the analysis is a set of lighting models developed as part of the ASHRAE/IES code process, which is the basis for IECC 2003 LPD values. The use of the models allows for an effective comparison of values for various building types of interest to Texas state. Potential effects from control requirements are discussed, and available case study analysis results are provided but no comprehensive numerical evaluation is provided in this limited analysis effort.

Richman, Eric E.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Decision matrix for liquid loading in gas wells for cost/benefit analyses of lifting options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field-proven solutions already exist to reduce the loss of gas production when liquid loading begins to occur. However, the choice of remedial technique, its feasibility, and its cost, vary considerably depending on a field's location, size export route, and the individual operator's experience. The selection of the best remedial technique and the timeframe within which the remedial action is undertaken are critical to a project's profitability. Although there are literature reviews available regarding solutions to liquid loading problems in gas wells, a tool capable of helping an operator select the best remedial option for a specific field case still does not exist. This thesis proposes a newly developed decision matrix to screen the possible remedial options available to the operator. The matrix can not only provide a critical evaluation of potential solutions to the problem of liquid loading in gas wells vis-a?-vis the existing technical and economic constraints, but can also serve as a reference to operators for investment decisions and as a quick screening tool for the selection of production optimisation strategies. Under its current status of development, this new tool consists of a decision algorithm built around a decision tree. Unlike other data mining techniques, decision trees quickly allow for subdividing large initial datasets into successively smaller sets by a series of decision rules. The rules are based on information available in the public domain. The effectiveness of the matrix is now ready to be tested against real field datasets.

Park, Han-Young

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Broadening the Appeal of Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: Capturing Both Carbon Mitigation and Development Benefits of Clean Energy Technologies: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Broadening the Appeal of Broadening the Appeal of Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: Capturing Both Carbon Mitigation and Development Benefits of Clean Energy Technologies Preprint Shannon Cowlin, Jaquelin Cochran, Sadie Cox, and Carolyn Davidson National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wytze van der Gaast JI Network Presented at the 2012 World Renewable Energy Forum Denver, Colorado May 13-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-6A20-54487 August 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Benefit/cost framework for evaluating modular energy storage : a study for the DOE energy storage systems program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work documented in this report represents another step in the ongoing investigation of innovative and potentially attractive value propositions for electricity storage by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program. This study uses updated cost and performance information for modular energy storage (MES) developed for this study to evaluate four prospective value propositions for MES. The four potentially attractive value propositions are defined by a combination of well-known benefits that are associated with electricity generation, delivery, and use. The value propositions evaluated are: (1) transportable MES for electric utility transmission and distribution (T&D) equipment upgrade deferral and for improving local power quality, each in alternating years, (2) improving local power quality only, in all years, (3) electric utility T&D deferral in year 1, followed by electricity price arbitrage in following years; plus a generation capacity credit in all years, and (4) electric utility end-user cost management during times when peak and critical peak pricing prevail.

Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Schoenung, Susan M. (Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA)

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 7. Effects of Alternative Energy Efficiency Businessand Benefits of Alternative Energy Efficiency Portfolios (and Benefits of Alternative Energy Efficiency Portfolios (

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

penetration (Giebel 2005). Wind integration costs represent2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well as the cost of integrating renewable energy into largerto renewable energy in many states, but these costs arerenewable energy credits (RECs) have led to unexpected cost

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moment both costs and energy efficiency are too uncertain toW. (2008). Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Savingenergy densities, costs, cycle times and efficiencies. A

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach Karen Miller, Vice President The National Hydrogen Association 1800 M Street NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20036-5802 phone: 202-223-5547 fax: 202-223-5537 Background: The Mission of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) is to foster the development of hydrogen technologies and their use in commercial and industrial applications and to promote the role of hydrogen as a major energy carrier of the future. The basic long-term goals are determined by the greatest needs tempered by activities consistent with the role of the NHA as an association. Today these are: * To educate the public and policy makers on the benefits of hydrogen; * To assist in the development of necessary hydrogen codes and standards; and

147

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Michigan  

SciTech Connect

The state of Michigan is considering adpoting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropraite code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits are assessed. The energy simulation and economic results suggest that adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 would provide postitive net benefits to the state relative to the building and design requirements currently in place.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Halverson, Mark A.; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Membrane-Based Air Composition Control for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: A Benefit and Cost Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the methodologies and results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to assess the benefits and costs of several membrane-based technologies. The technologies evaluated will be used in automotive emissions-control and performance-enhancement systems incorporated into light-duty diesel vehicle engines. Such engines are among the technologies that are being considered to power vehicles developed under the government-industry Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from diesel engines have long been considered a barrier to use of diesels in urban areas. Recently, particulate matter (PM) emissions have also become an area of increased concern because of new regulations regarding emissions of particulate matter measuring 2.5 micrometers or less (PM{sub 2.5}). Particulates are of special concern for diesel engines in the PNGV program; the program has a research goal of 0.01 gram per mile (g/mi) of particulate matter emissions under the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) cycle. This extremely low level (one-fourth the level of the Tier II standard) could threaten the viability of using diesel engines as stand-alone powerplants or in hybrid-electric vehicles. The techniques analyzed in this study can reduce NO{sub x} and particulate emissions and even increase the power density of the diesel engines used in light-duty diesel vehicles.

K. Stork; R. Poola

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A Cost-Benefit Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining in the Kraft Pulp and Paper Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of liquid fuels and chemicals via gasification of kraft black liquor and woody residues (''biorefining'') has the potential to provide significant economic returns for kraft pulp and paper mills replacing Tomlinson boilers beginning in the 2010-2015 timeframe. Commercialization of gasification technologies is anticipated in this period, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are in most cases already commercially established today in the ''gas-to-liquids'' industry. These conclusions are supported by detailed analysis carried out in a two-year project co-funded by the American Forest and Paper Association and the Biomass Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. This work assessed the energy, environment, and economic costs and benefits of biorefineries at kraft pulp and paper mills in the United States. Seven detailed biorefinery process designs were developed for a reference freesheet pulp/paper mill in the Southeastern U.S., together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. Commercial (''Nth'') plant levels of technology performance and cost were assumed. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which would be refined to vehicle fuels at existing petroleum refineries), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or LPG substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. Compared to installing a new Tomlinson power/recovery system, a biorefinery would require larger capital investment. However, because the biorefinery would have higher energy efficiencies, lower air emissions, and a more diverse product slate (including transportation fuel), the internal rates of return (IRR) on the incremental capital investments would be attractive under many circumstances. For nearly all of the cases examined in the study, the IRR lies between 14% and 18%, assuming a 25-year levelized world oil price of $50/bbl--the US Department of Energy's 2006 reference oil price projection. The IRRs would rise to as high as 35% if positive incremental environmental benefits associated with biorefinery products are monetized (e.g., if an excise tax credit for the liquid fuel is available comparable to the one that exists for ethanol in the United States today). Moreover, if future crude oil prices are higher ($78/bbl levelized price, the US Department of Energy's 2006 high oil price scenario projection, representing an extrapolation of mid-2006 price levels), the calculated IRR exceeds 45% in some cases when environmental attributes are also monetized. In addition to the economic benefits to kraft pulp/paper producers, biorefineries widely implemented at pulp mills in the U.S. would result in nationally-significant liquid fuel production levels, petroleum savings, greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and criteria-pollutant reductions. These are quantified in this study. A fully-developed pulpmill biorefinery industry could be double or more the size of the current corn-ethanol industry in the United States in terms of annual liquid fuel production. Forest biomass resources are sufficient in the United States to sustainably support such a scale of forest biorefining in addition to the projected growth in pulp and paper production.

Eric D. Larson; Stefano Consonni; Ryan E. Katofsky; Kristiina Iisa; W. James Frederick

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 7.3 Renewable Energy Costand future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thanResource Data Renewable Energy Cost Characterization

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency and availability, and transmission capability).O&C costs) and availability. Transmission capability,O&C costs) and availability. Transmission capability,

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Busbar Cost Data 47 Windanalysis. energy (wind, in particular), as well as the costwind capital cost estimates from EPRI/DOE Renewable Energy

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC ElectricityRestructuring Policies: A Review of Recent Benefit-Cost Studies ofRTO's  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Definitive assessment of Federal Energy Regulatory Commission policies on regional transmission organizations is not currently possible because of uncertainties in the data and methods used in recent benefit-cost studies as well as lack of investigation of key impacts of the formation of RTOs.

Eto, Joseph H.; Hale, Douglas R.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Using time-driven activity-based costing to manage digital forensic readiness in large organisations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A digital forensic readiness (DFR) programme consists of a number of activities that should be chosen and managed with respect to cost constraints and risk. Traditional cost systems, however, can not provide the cost of individual activities. This makes ... Keywords: Cost management, Digital forensic readiness, Forensics management, Time-driven activity-based costing

K. Reddy; H. S. Venter; M. S. Olivier

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Benefits of Alternative Energy Efficiency Portfolios (Figure 7. Effects of Alternative Energy Efficiency BusinessMassachusetts pursues alternative energy efficiency goals: ~

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Examples of Benefits from the NEPA process for ARRA funded activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efforts to implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) include ensuring, and reporting on, timely NEPA reviews prepared in support of projects and activities funded under major provisions of ARRA. In addition to reporting on the status of the NEPA environmental reviews, agencies also report on the benefits of NEPA.

157

An R&D Project Management and Selection System for the Utilization Technology Branch, Division of Geothermal Energy, Volume III - Project Selection Procedure and Benefit/Cost Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report in three volumes describes an R and D project management and selection system developed for the Utilization Technology Branch of the Division of Geothermal Energy, Department of Energy. The proposed project management system (PMS) consists of a project data system (PDS) and a project selection procedure (PSP). The project data system consists of a series of project data forms and project status logs, and descriptions of information pathways. The PDS emphasizes timely monitoring of the technical and financial progress of projects, maintenance of the history of the project and rapid access to project information to facilitate responsive reporting to DGE and DOE Upper Management. The project selection procedure emphasizes a R and D product-oriented approach to benefit/cost analysis of individual projects. The report includes: (a) a description of the system, and recommendations for its implementation, (b) the PDS forms and explanation of their use, (c) a glossary of terms for use on the forms, (d) a description of the benefit/cost approach, (e) a data base for estimating R and D benefits, and (f) examples of test applications of the system to nine current DGE projects. This volume describes a proposed procedure for R and D project selection. The benefit/cost analysis part of the procedure estimates financial savings expected to result from the commercial use of hardware or process products of R and D. Savings are estimated with respect to the geothermal power plants expected to come on line between 1978 and 2000.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Environmental benefits and cost savings through market-based instruments : an application using state-level data from India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a methodology for estimating potential cost savings from the use of market-based instruments (MBIs) when local emissions and abatement cost data are not available. The paper provides estimates of the ...

Gupta, Shreekant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

SOM ARRA Grant Activity Proposals Submitted as of 7-15-2010 Project Costs*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOM ARRA Grant Activity Proposals Submitted as of 7-15-2010 Project Costs* Total # of Proposals 1,264 Total Project Costs $1,093,036,719 Total Direct Costs $803,739,425 Total Indirects $290,408,131 Awards Received as of 2-11-2011 Project Costs* Year 1 Costs Total # of Awards 333 Total Project Costs $186

Bushman, Frederic

160

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies. (1993a). Energy-saving roller kiln - TechnicalEnergy Savings .6  Analyses of energy savings, cost, other

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 as the Commercial Building Energy Code in Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (hereafter referred to as ASHRAE 90.1-2001 or 90.1-2001) was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The State of Tennessee is considering adopting ASHRAE 90.1-2001 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropriate code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered in this report. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) simulations combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits. Tennessee currently has ASHRAE Standard 90A-1980 as the statewide voluntary/recommended commercial energy standard; however, it is up to the local jurisdiction to adopt this code. Because 90A-1980 is the recommended standard, many of the requirements of ASHRAE 90A-1980 were used as a baseline for simulations.

Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Creation of a Single MISO-PJM-SPP Power Market. ISO-NE/Power‘s Participation in PJM. SAIC. 2004. The Benefits andDominion Virginia Power Joining PJM. Henwood. 2004. Study of

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

New benefit-cost studies of renewable and energy efficiency programs of the U.S. Department of Energy : methodology and findings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) 2009-2010 Studies (Solar, Wind, Geothermal, & Combustion Engine R&D) are to: (1) Demonstrate to investors that EERE research and technology development (R&D) programs & subprograms are 'Worth It'; (2) Develop an improved Benefit-Cost methodology for determining realized economic and other benefits of EERE R&D programs - (a) Model government additionality more thoroughly and on a case-by-case basis; (b) Move beyond economic benefits; and (c) Have each study calculate returns to a whole EERE program/subprogram; and (3) Develop a consistent, workable Methods Guide for independent contractors who will perform the evaluation studies.

Jordan, Gretchen B.; Ruegg, Rosalie T. (TIA Consulting, Inc., Emerald Isle, NC)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A project to improve the capabilities of minorities in energy fields and a cost benefit analysis of an ethyl alcohol plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project being reported in this document had three components: (1) a research project to carry out cost-benefit analysis of an ethyl alcohol plant at Tuskegee University, (2) seminars to improve the high-technology capabilities of minority persons, and (3) a class in energy management. The report provides a background on the three components listed above. The results from the research on the ethyl alcohol plant, are discussed, along with the seminars, and details of the energy management class.

Sara, T.S.; Jones, M. Jr.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration. 2004. Electricity Transmission in aInterruptions to U.S. Electricity Customers. September. (Cost Models in Electricity Planning and Pricing. ”

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Average Retail Electricity Rates.. 14Projected RPS Electricity Rate Impacts by RPS CostRPS Targets and Retail Electricity Rate Impacts 16 Typical

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project base-case retail electricity rate increases of lessimpacts on retail electricity rates, the wide range of2. Projected RPS Electricity Rate Impacts by Cost Study Wind

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Overview of Alternative Fossil Fuel Price and Carbonof renewable technology cost, fossil fuel price uncertainty,energy, including the fossil fuel hedge value of renewable

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and natural gas prices. Over half of the studiesfactors, such as the natural gas price forecast and thecapital costs and natural gas prices. Since wind is expected

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

some cases by absorption cooling (Mottal, 1995). Electricitybasis. With the absorption cooling, the project decreasedsystem (without absorption cooling) has capital costs twice

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and natural gas prices. Over half of the studiessuch as the natural gas price forecast and the presumedcapital costs and natural gas prices. Since wind is expected

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Developing an activity-based costing approach for system development and implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the use of the Activity Based Costing (ABC) approach to software estimation. Like other more traditional approaches to software estimation, ABC provides man-day estimates. In addition, it also provides detailed costing information ... Keywords: IS project planning, activity-based costing, effort estimation, organizational learning, software process measurement, time and cost estimation

Ginny Ooi; Christina Soh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

versus out-of-state renewable energy project development andbarriers to renewable energy in many states, but these costsPV technology or renewable energy generated in-state. For an

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission (FERC). 1996. Environmental Impactland-docs/rm95-8p3-000.txt FERC. 1999. Regional Transmissionfileid=9514094&trial=1 FERC. 2004. Staff Report on Cost

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental ProtectionUnlocking Energy Efficiency in the U.S. Economy. Mohebali,in material and energy costs ([DOE-OIT], U.S. Department of

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

SciTech Connect

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

Faletti, D.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Exaggerated Health Benefits of Physical Fitness and Activity dueto Self-selection.  

SciTech Connect

Background: The predicted health benefits of becomingphysically active or fit will be exaggerated if health outcomes causefitness and activity rather than the converse in prospective andcross-sectional epidemiological studies. Objective: Assess whether therelationships of adiposity to fitness and activity are explained byadiposity prior to exercising. Design: Cross-sectional study of physicalfitness (running speed during 10km foot race) and physical activity(weekly running distance) to current BMI (BMIcurrent) and BMI at thestart of running (BMIstarting) in 44,370 male and 25,252 femaleparticipants of the National Runners' Health Study. Results: BMIstartingexplained all of the association between fitness and BMIcurrent in bothsexes, but less than a third of the association between physical activityand BMIcurrent in men. In women, BMIstarting accounted for 58 percent ofthe association between BMIcurrent and activity levels. The 95thpercentile of BMIcurrent showed substantially greater declines withfitness and activity levels than the 5th percentile of BMIcurrent in men(i.e., the negative slope for 95th percentile was 2.6-fold greater thanthe 5th percentile for fitness and 3-fold greater for activity) and women(6-fold and 3.4-fold greater, respectively). At all percentiles, theregression slopes relating BMIstarting to fitness were comparable orgreater (more negative) than the slopes relating BMIcurrent to fitness,whereas the converse was true for activity. Conclusion: Self-selectionbias accounts for all of the association between fitness and adiposityand probably a portion of other health outcomes, but has less affect onassociations involving physical activity

Williams, Paul T.

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Extensive English Summary CPB Special Publication 57: Wind energy at the North Sea: A social Cost-benefit analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is preferable to co-firing biomass in coal-fired power stations One striking result is that, in the case, from an economic cost-effectiveness point of view, only onshore wind energy and, after 2010, co-firing technologies, including co-firing biomass in coal-fired power stations - a relatively much-used technology

180

NEET Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEET NEET Benefits NEET Benefits The R&D activities under the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) Program will address revolutionary improvements in safety, performance, reliability, economics, and proliferation risk reduction and promote creative solutions to the broad array of nuclear energy challenges related to reactor and fuel cycle development. The activities undertaken in this program complement those within the Reactor Concepts Research Development & Demonstration and Fuel Cycle R&D programs. The knowledge generated through these activities will allow Nuclear Energy (NE) to address key challenges affecting nuclear reactor and fuel cycle deployment (e.g., capital cost, technology risks, and proliferation concerns). Further, these activities will enable nuclear power to continue

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Impact of DOE Program Goals on Hydrogen Vehicles: Market Prospect, Costs, and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Zhenhong Lin (Primary Contact), David Greene, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1308 Email: linz@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2011 Project End Date: September 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market penetrations of hydrogen vehicles under * varied assumptions on processes of achieving the DOE program goals for fuel cells, hydrogen storage, batteries, motors, and hydrogen supply. Estimate social benefits and public costs under different *

182

Tradeoffs associated with increasing water yield from the Edwards Plateau, Texas: balancing private costs and public benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Edwards Aquifer supplies water to approximately 2 million people in central Texas and is recharged by rangelands on the Edwards Plateau, Texas. Since water yields increase from rangelands when brush is controlled, citizens of the region have a vested interest in the management of rangeland vegetation. In 1985 legislation was passed which recognized the relationship between reducing brush and increasing water yields, and encouraged brush control on private ranches to increase stream and aquifer recharge. No funds were appropriated to implement the legislation, due partially to insufficient scientific evidence needed to target rangelands where brush control was most likely to improve water yields. Data collected since 1985 have strengthened the scientific basis for estimating how water yields are likely to increase in response to incremental levels of brush removal for sites in the Edwards Plateau. An objective of this thesis was to estimate ranchers' willingness to participate in a cost-sharing program that would facilitate brush control designed to increase water yield. The cost-share offers varied according to the current ranch brush cover and were designed to enable ranchers to control brush for 10 years at no net cost. Survey data analysis addressed two issues fundamental to the design and implementation of policy to promote brush control on privately-owned Texas rangelands. First, a demographic profile of the ranchers most likely to participate in a cost-share program was developed. Second, these data were used to estimate how much land participants are likely to enroll in the brush control cost-sharing scenario examined in this study. Probit and Cragg models were used to estimate landowners' willingness to participate and the number of acres prospective participants were willing to enroll in the proposed program, respectively. Results suggest that an estimated 66% of landowner's who match the demographic profile of the survey respondents are willing to participate in a similar cost-sharing program. Landowners most likely to be willing to participate earn more than 50% of their household income from ranching, derive most of their ranch income from livestock enterprises, own ranches larger than 2,000 acres, and own ranches more than 75 miles from Austin or San Antonio.

Garriga, Matthew David

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Environmental Costs and Benefits Case Study : Nuclear Power Plant : Quantifications and Economic Valuation of Selected Environmental Impacts/Effects. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This case study is an application, to a nuclear power plant, of the methodology for quantifying environmental costs and benefits, contained in the regional energy plan, adopted in April, 1983, by the Northwest Power Planning Council, pursuant to Public Law 96-501.The study is based on plant number 2 of the Washington Public Power Supply System (WNP-2), currently nearing completion on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington State. This report describes and documents efforts to quantify and estimate monetary values for the following seven areas of environmental effects: radiation/health effects, socioeconomic/infrastructure effects, consumptive use of water, psychological/health effects (fear/stress), waste management, nuclear power plant accidents, and decommissioning costs. 103 references.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Office of Power and Resources Management.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

Increased interest by state (and federal) policymakers and regulatory agencies in pursuing aggressive energy efficiency efforts could deliver significant utility bill savings for customers while having long-term implications for ratepayers (e.g. potential rate impacts). Equity and distributional concerns associated with the authorized recovery of energy efficiency program costs may necessitate the pursuit of alternative program funding approaches. In 2008, Massachusetts passed the Green Communities Act which directed its energy efficiency (EE) program administrators to obtain all cost-effective EE resources. This goal has translated into achieving annual electric energy savings equivalent to a 2.4% reduction in retail sales from energy efficiency programs in 2012. Representatives of electricity consumer groups supported the new portfolio of EE programs (and the projected bill savings) but raised concerns about the potential rate impacts associated with achieving such aggressive EE goals, leading policymakers to seek out alternative funding sources which can potentially mitigate these effects. Utility administrators have also raised concerns about under-recovery of fixed costs when aggressive energy efficiency programs are pursued and have proposed ratemaking policies (e.g. decoupling) and business models that better align the utility's financial interests with the state's energy efficiency public policy goals. Quantifying these concerns and identifying ways they can be addressed are crucial steps in gaining the support of major stakeholder groups - lessons that can apply to other states looking to significantly increase savings targets that can be achieved from their own ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs. We use a pro-forma utility financial model to quantify the bill and rate impacts on electricity customers when very aggressive annual energy efficiency savings goals ({approx}2.4%) are achieved over the long-term and also assess the impact of different cost recovery approaches that integrate alternative revenue sources. We also analyze alternative lost fixed cost recovery approaches to better understand how to mitigate the erosion of utility shareholder returns in states that have adopted (and achieved) very aggressive savings targets.

Cappers, Peter; Satchwell, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Schlegel, Jeff

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

185

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The ``International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers`` was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. [eds.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. (eds.)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and potential of the anaerobic digestion of waste-activatedLettinga, G. (1995). Anaerobic-Digestion and Waste-Waterbacteria and this anaerobic digestion process has been

Xu, Tengfang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

BENEFIT HIGHLIGHTS BENEFIT ELIGIBILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No benefit payable under the Plan can be assigned, transferred or subject to any lien, garnishment, pledge

189

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

SciTech Connect

Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing CO2 emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Successful implementation of emerging technologies not only can help advance productivities and competitiveness but also can play a significant role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies is the focus of our work in this project. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. This report contains the results from performing Task 2"Technology evaluation" for the project titled"Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies," which was sponsored by California Energy Commission and managed by CIEE. The project purpose is to analyze market status, market potential, and economic viability of selected technologies applicable to the U.S. In this report, LBNL first performed re-assessments of all of the 33 emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies, including re-evaluation of the 26 technologies that were previously identified by Martin et al. (2000) and their potential significance to energy use in the industries, and new evaluation of additional seven technologies. The re-assessments were essentially updated with recent information that we searched and collected from literature to the extent possible. The progress of selected technologies as they diffused into the marketplace from 2000 to 2010 was then discussed in this report. The report also includes updated detailed characterizations of 15 technologies studied in 2000, with comparisons noted.

Xu, T.; Slaa, J.W.; Sathaye, J.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and maintenance support. Each product is briefly described in Appendix A. Selection of the most appropriate software package for a particular application will depend on the chosen component, system, or structure. Ongoing research will determine the most appropriate choices for a successful demonstration of PHM systems in aging NPPs.

N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thandifference between renewable energy costs and the cost ofto be the least-cost renewable energy source and, as noted

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

TECHNOLOGY TYPE: ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION SUPPORT SOFTWARE APPLICATION: VISUALIZATION, SAMPLE OPTIMIZATION, AND COST- BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ETV Program is to further environmental protection by substantially accelerating the acceptance and use of improved and cost-effective technologies. ETV seeks to achieve this goal by providing high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting, purchase, and use of environmental technologies. ETV works in partnership with recognized standards and testing organizations and stakeholder groups consisting of regulators, buyers, and vendor organizations, with the full participation of individual technology developers. The program evaluates the performance of innovative technologies by developing test plans that are responsive to the needs of stakeholders, conducting field or laboratory tests (as appropriate), collecting and analyzing data, and preparing peer-reviewed reports. All evaluations are conducted in accordance with rigorous quality assurance protocols to ensure that data of known and adequate quality are generated and that the results are defensible. The Site Characterization and Monitoring Technologies Pilot (SCMT), one of 12 technology areas under ETV, is administered by EPA’s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). With the support of the U.S.

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

194

Project Title: Compare Costs and Benefits of HESA B2G and V2G The PH&EV Research Center is funded through the California Energy Commission's Public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Title: Compare Costs and Benefits of HESA B2G and V2G Systems The PH&EV Research Center AGC-Automatic Generation Control BEV-Battery Electric Vehicle B2G-Battery-to-Grid CAISO Operator V2G-Vehicle-to-Grid ZEV-Zero Emissions Vehicle #12;Table of Contents Project Title: Compare Costs

California at Davis, University of

195

Activity: How Much Does it Cost to Light Your School? | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the electricity used for one hour of light in their classroom. Activity: How Much Does It Cost to Light Your School? More Documents & Publications Conserving Electric Energy...

196

Production structure models and applications within a Statistical Activity Cost Theory (SACT) Framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Statistical Activity Cost Theory (SACT) is an axiomatic and statistical theory of basic accounting measurement practice. The aim of the SACT analysis, among others, is… (more)

Turner, Lyle Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of costs and benefits of industrial energy efficiencyof the annual costs of an energy efficiency measure, therebyof cost- effectiveness of energy- efficiency improvement

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy in the Europeanincreases in wind costs; Transmission and integration costs

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Study Report II. Albany, New York: New York DepartmentOrder Cost Analysis. Albany, New York: New York Public

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

PESTICIDE BENEFITS PESTICIDE BENEFITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-vectoring mosquitoes) separate from the risks and benefits of other pesticides (such as those used on field crops. Similarly, analysis of other pesticides will focus on the impacts on other user groups and related effects to determine whether the pesticide will remain effective for at least five years. EPA also requires

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Assumptions Wind power is often found to be the least-cost renewable energycost studies. The capacity value of renewable energy (wind,wind costs persist. Natural Gas Price Forecasts The difference between renewable energy

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Extending Simulation Modeling to Activity-Based Costing for Clinical Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation model was developed to measure costs in an Emergency Department setting for patients presenting with possible cervical-spine injury who needed radiological imaging. Simulation, a tool widely used to account for process variability but typically ... Keywords: activity-based costing, animated simulation modeling

Noah D. Glick; C. Craig Blackmore; William N. Zelman

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and (2) monthly electricity bill impacts for a typicalinfluence consumer electricity bills. Some benefits thatconsumer’s monthly electricity bill. Figure presents

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Transport Co-benefits Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport Co-benefits Calculator Transport Co-benefits Calculator Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transport Co-benefits Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/archive/cp/activity20101108.html Cost: Free Related Tools Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool SimCLIM SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook ... further results Characterizes co-benefits in terms of accidents, emissions, travel time, and vehicle operating costs. Approach A co-benefits approach capitalizes on synergies between current local

205

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of nochanges in retail electricity rates, and (2) monthlydeployment on retail electricity rates and bills. Direct

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rates, and (2) monthly electricity bill impacts for a typical residentialElectricity Rate Impacts by RPS Cost Study Study - Incremental RPS Target % Figure 6. Typical Residential

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Method for including operation and maintenance costs in the economic analysis of active solar energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a developing technology such as solar energy, the costs for operation and maintenance (O and M) can be substantial. In the past, most economic analyses included these costs by simply assuming that an annual cost will be incurred that is proportional to the initial cost of the system. However, in assessing the economics of new systems proposed for further research and development, such a simplification can obscure the issues. For example, when the typical method for including O and M costs in an economic analysis is used, the O and M costs associated with a newly developed, more reliable, and slightly more expensive controller will be assumed to increase - an obvious inconsistency. The method presented in this report replaces this simplistic approach with a representation of the O and M costs that explicitly accounts for the uncertainties and risks inherent in the operation of any equipment. A detailed description of the data inputs required by the method is included as well as a summary of data sources and an example of the method as applied to an active solar heating system.

Short, W.D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Impact of common completion and workover activities on the effective costs of geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impacts of completion practices on production and maintenance costs are considered. To evaluate alternative completion and workover technologies, a simple model has been developed that compares total well cost to total production or injection. The model is discussed briefly and results from its application to different completion and workover strategies are emphasized. The model development project had three aspects: (1) the establishment of a data base for the cost and effectiveness of various geothermal completion and workover activities; (2) the development of a computer model to specific cases. The data collected include geothermal production characteristics; initial costs and completion practices for representatives wells; estimated costs and effectiveness of common workover equipment and operations; the frequencies of and times required to perform workovers; etc. The model facilitates comparisons of completion and workover alternatives. The results discussed include an analysis of the impact of variations in well lifetime. A comparison of mechanical descaling of geothermal wells to chemical scale inhibition indicates that for certain conditions chemical inhibition is more cost effective. Results of an analysis of injectivity decline are also presented, as are studies of original well cost, initial flow, and productivity decline for production wells. Other results involving underreaming, changing casing profiles, perforating, and hydraulic fracturing are also discussed.

Carson, C.C.; Mansure, A.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

Rennich, M.J. [comp.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates that electricity rates in the state could increasethe state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rateelectricity rate impacts in percentage and ¢/kWh terms, for each individual state

Chen, Cliff

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic, risk reduction, and environmental effects. This article synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 31 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost-impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 20 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the projected costs of state RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, evaluate the reasonableness of key input assumptions, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analyses. We conclude that while there is considerable uncertainty in the study results, the majority of the studies project modest cost impacts. Seventy percent of the state RPS cost studies project retail electricity rate increases of no greater than one percent. Nonetheless, there is considerable room for improving the analytic methods, and therefore accuracy, of these estimates.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

212

Personal Nonmonetary Costs of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bythe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. byTransportation Crashes,” in Measuring the Full Social Costs

Delucchi, Mark A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

External Costs of Transport in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The social costs of intercity transportation: a review andthe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation,in full social cost-benefit analyses of transportation

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Benefits of Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Research Benefits of Research Benefits of Research Return on Investment Since its creation in 1977, FE has established a legacy of achievement, return-of-value, and tangible benefits for the taxpayer dollars invested. Read more Natural Gas from Shale Office of Fossil Energy research helped refine cost-effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, making hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of natural gas technically recoverable. Read more Methane Hydrate R&D FE has played a major role in developing technologies to help tap new, unconventional sources of natural gas. Read more Carbon Capture & Storage Through FE R&D, the United States has become a world leader in carbon capture and storage science and technology. Read more Research and development activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's

215

Quantitative Assessment of Distributed Energy Resource Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources (DER) offer many benefits, some of which are readily quantified. Other benefits, however, are less easily quantifiable because they may require site-specific information about the DER project or analysis of the electrical system to which the DER is connected. The purpose of this study is to provide analytical insight into several of the more difficult calculations, using the PJM power pool as an example. This power pool contains most of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. The techniques used here could be applied elsewhere, and the insights from this work may encourage various stakeholders to more actively pursue DER markets or to reduce obstacles that prevent the full realization of its benefits. This report describes methodologies used to quantify each of the benefits listed in Table ES-1. These methodologies include bulk power pool analyses, regional and national marginal cost evaluations, as well as a more traditional cost-benefit approach for DER owners. The methodologies cannot however determine which stakeholder will receive the benefits; that must be determined by regulators and legislators, and can vary from one location to another.

Hadley, S.W.

2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

216

White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume III, Appendix B, Fisheries Report; Appendix C, Engineering Alternative Evaluation; Appendix D, Benefit/Cost Analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developd to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. This volume contains appendices of habitat survey data, potential production, resident fish population data, upstream passage designs, and benefit/cost calculations. (ACR)

Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

NREL: Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rooms Credit union and banking benefits Flexible schedules Business casual dress Free RTD Eco Pass A Great Location Our main campus in Golden, Colorado, located in the foothills...

218

Sensing from the basement: a feasibility study of unobtrusive and low-cost home activity recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The home deployment of sensor-based systems offers many opportunities, particularly in the area of using sensor-based systems to support aging in place by monitoring an elder’s activities of daily living. But existing approaches to home activity recognition are typically expensive, difficult to install, or intrude into the living space. This paper considers the feasibility of a new approach that “reaches into the home ” via the existing infrastructure. Specifically, we deploy a small number of low-cost sensors at critical locations in a home’s water distribution infrastructure. Based on water usage patterns, we can then infer activities in the home. To examine the feasibility of this approach, we deployed real sensors into a real home for six weeks. Among other findings, we show that a model built on microphone-based sensors that are placed away from systematic noise sources can identify 100 % of clothes washer usage, 95 % of dishwasher usage, 94 % of showers, 88 % of toilet flushes, 73 % of bathroom sink activity lasting ten seconds or longer, and 81 % of kitchen sink activity lasting ten seconds or longer. While there are clear limits to what activities can be detected when analyzing water usage, our new approach represents a sweet spot in the tradeoff between what information is collected at what cost.

James Fogarty

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Sensitivity analysis of mobile home space conditioning energy requirements to selection of U-values in twelve climates and cost/benefit analysis of U-values proposed for the federal manufactured housing construction (FMHC) and safety standards (SS)  

SciTech Connect

This study determines the sensitivity of four suggested and existing building thermal performance standards to mobile home heating and cooling loads and to the seasonal energy consumption of the equipment meeting these loads. It also evaluates the net costs and benefits of an Office of Mobile Home Standards proposal to increase the level of stringency of the present regulation. Three mobile homes, each representing typical single - wide and double - wide homes, were selected to be simulated for 12 cities. The thermal resistance of the wall, roof, floor, door, and window components of the thermal envelope were chosen to reflect both common or potential construction methods and to obtain the overall U - value levels required by each standard level. The ''Hot House'' program was selected to determine seasonal energy consumption. Results indicate that seasonal loads decrease with decreasing U - values, although in some cases a decrease U - value resulted in a slight increase in the seasonal cooling load. The best standards for thermal performance and U - values are noted, as are sults of the cost - benefit analysis. Tables, eight references, and a ''Hot House'' program listing are included.

1981-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

COST REVIEW and ESTIMATING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Guide. OMB Circular A-94, Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs, dated October 29, 1992 Page | 41 APPENDIX A ICRICE...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Business Case Slide 9: High-Volume: Repository - Potential Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repository - Potential Benefits Potential benefits EM Any of the four applications could use most or all of the DU inventory which could avoid transportation and disposal cost No...

222

Performance and cost of a hybrid passive/active solar house  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, construction, cost, and initial operation of a hybrid passive/active solar-heated house in Los Alamos, New Mexico, is described. The system is dominated by a two-story Trombe wall, constructed of 0.3-m-thick (1-ft) slump block, that can be operated in either a passive or active mode. In the active mode, a blower circulates air through the Trombe wall air space and into a rock bed. A three-zone forced-air distribution system is connected to the rock bed. A separate flat-plate collector array heats a preheater tank for domestic hot water. Operating results of the system, which is being monitored by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), are reported for just over the first year of operation (1977 and part of 1978). In addition, system cost, occupant observations, and conclusions are presented. Energy consumption records for 1977 indicate that approximately 60% of the net space heating load was provided by solar energy.

Hunn, B.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Lignin-based Active Anode Materials Synthesized from Low-Cost ...  

cost battery material obtained from a renewable resource. This material can be made binder-free, eliminating a major cost in battery materials.

224

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Critical analysis of the Hanford spent nuclear fuel project activity based cost estimate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, the SNFP developed a baseline change request (BCR) and submitted it to DOE-RL for approval. The schedule was formally evaluated to have a 19% probability of success [Williams, 1998]. In December 1997, DOE-RL Manager John Wagoner approved the BCR contingent upon a subsequent independent review of the new baseline. The SNFP took several actions during the first quarter of 1998 to prepare for the independent review. The project developed the Estimating Requirements and Implementation Guide [DESH, 1998] and trained cost account managers (CAMS) and other personnel involved in the estimating process in activity-based cost (ABC) estimating techniques. The SNFP then applied ABC estimating techniques to develop the basis for the December Baseline (DB) and documented that basis in Basis of Estimate (BOE) books. These BOEs were provided to DOE in April 1998. DOE commissioned Professional Analysis, Inc. (PAI) to perform a critical analysis (CA) of the DB. PAI`s review formally began on April 13. PAI performed the CA, provided three sets of findings to the SNFP contractor, and initiated reconciliation meetings. During the course of PAI`s review, DOE directed the SNFP to develop a new baseline with a higher probability of success. The contractor transmitted the new baseline, which is referred to as the High Probability Baseline (HPB), to DOE on April 15, 1998 [Williams, 1998]. The HPB was estimated to approach a 90% confidence level on the start of fuel movement [Williams, 1998]. This high probability resulted in an increased cost and a schedule extension. To implement the new baseline, the contractor initiated 26 BCRs with supporting BOES. PAI`s scope was revised on April 28 to add reviewing the HPB and the associated BCRs and BOES.

Warren, R.N.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

NETL: Global Environmental Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Environmental Benefits Global Environmental Benefits Gasification Systems Global Environmental Benefits Environmental performance for future energy production systems is a much greater factor as emission standards tighten in the United States and worldwide. The outstanding environmental performance of gasification systems makes it an excellent technology for the clean production of electricity and other products. In addition, the reduction of CO2 emissions is one of the major challenges facing industry in response to global climate change. Other countries with coal reserves might potentially import technologies developed in the United States to enable low-cost gasification with carbon capture and EOR or sequestration. Not only will this benefit the U.S. gasification technology industry, but it will also result in a global environmental benefit through more affordable control of greenhouse gases (GHGs). See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) link below for a summary of the impact of fossil fuels without carbon capture on CO2 emissions, on the GHG contributions of different countries, and of the projected impact of developing countries to 2030:

227

Benefits and Costs of Hydrogen Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Processor Herbaceous Biomass Woody Biomass Petroleum Natural Gas Flared Gas Natural Gas #12;Production/Compression Pathways Gaseous H2 Liquid H2 Centralized Decentralized Electricity Methanol Flared Gas Landfill Gas Are Key Steps for Gaseous H2 NA NG Recovery (97.5%) Compressed G.H2 at Refueling Stations LNG Gasification

Argonne National Laboratory

228

Residential Duct Sealing Cost-Benefit Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential air duct leakage can account for as much as 15 percent of a utility bill. Research has shown that houses with supply leakage fractions of 10 percent or greater are viable candidates for air duct sealing or retrofit. This report details the development of a regional program designed to measure and improve residential heating system distribution efficiency via air duct sealing and retrofits. The program consolidates the efforts of several utilities and coordinates a region-wide assessment of th...

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Definition: Reduced Restoration Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Restoration Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Restoration Cost The functions that provide this benefit lead to fewer outages andor help restore power quicker...

230

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

231

Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities  

SciTech Connect

Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A Review of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor Vehicle Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. 1997. Full Social Costs of Transportation in Europe.the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation.the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation. Edited

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Cost of Debt ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate firm-specific marginal cost of debt functions for a large panel of companies between 1980 and 2007. The marginal cost curves are identified by exogenous variation in the marginal tax benefits of debt. The location of a given company’s cost of debt function varies with characteristics such as asset collateral, size, book-to-market, asset tangibility, cash flows, and whether the firm pays dividends. By integrating the area between benefit and cost functions we estimate that the equilibrium net benefit of debt is 3.5 % of asset value, resulting from an estimated gross benefit of debt of 10.4 % of asset value and an estimated cost of debt of 6.9%. We find that the cost of being overlevered is asymmetrically higher than the cost of being underlevered and that expected default costs constitute approximately half of the total ex ante cost of debt. We thank Rick Green (the Acting Editor), and an anonymous referee, Heitor Almeida, Ravi Bansal,

Jules H. Van Binsbergen; John R. Graham; Jie Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Cost-Sensitive top-down/bottom-up inference for multiscale activity recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses a new problem, that of multiscale activity recognition. Our goal is to detect and localize a wide range of activities, including individual actions and group activities, which may simultaneously co-occur in high-resolution video. ...

Mohamed R. Amer; Dan Xie; Mingtian Zhao; Sinisa Todorovic; Song-Chun Zhu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Universal System Benefits Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Universal System Benefits Program Universal System Benefits Program Universal System Benefits Program < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider Montana Public Service Commission Montana established the Universal System Benefits Program (USBP) in 1997 as part of its restructuring legislation. The USBP supports cost-effective energy conservation, low-income customer weatherization, renewable-energy projects and applications, research and development programs related to energy conservation and renewables, market transformation designed to encourage competitive markets for public purpose programs, and low-income

236

Microscopic calculation of the free energy cost for activated transport in glass-forming liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activated transport in liquids—supercooled liquids in particular—occurs via mutual nucleation of alternative

Pyotr Rabochiy; Vassiliy Lubchenko

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Business Case Slide 17: High-Volume: Casks - Potential Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Casks - Potential Benefits Potential benefits EM Use most or all of the DU inventory which could avoid transportation and disposal cost OCRWM Plans to acquire use of a fleet of...

238

A cost-based analysis of intrusion detection system configuration under active or passive response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the joint decisions of IDS configuration and alarm investigation capacity under active and passive responses. In active response, alarm events are blocked immediately, whereas alarm events are allowed to access the information assets ... Keywords: IDS configuration, Information security, Intrusion response, Investigation capacity

Wei T. Yue; Metin Çakany?ld?r?m

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Post-Closure Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Post-Closure Benefits Post-Closure Benefits Post-Closure Benefits The Legacy Management Post-Closure Benefits (PCB) Program includes the development, implementation, and oversight of the Department's policy concerning the continuation of contractor pension and medical benefits after the closure of applicable DOE sites/facilities. This includes oversight of the administration and management of legacy contractor benefits in a fiscally responsible and effective manner. The primary program objective is to ensure a seamless transition of benefits administration after closure. The Benefit Continuity Team (BCT) within Legacy Management is responsible for this program. Legacy PCBs are benefits earned and accrued by contractor employees while in active employment at DOE facilities and are payable after their

240

Fossil Energy R&D Returns Significant National Benefit in More Than Three  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy R&D Returns Significant National Benefit in More Than Fossil Energy R&D Returns Significant National Benefit in More Than Three Decades of Achievement Fossil Energy R&D Returns Significant National Benefit in More Than Three Decades of Achievement July 27, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research and development (R&D) activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) have helped increase domestic energy supplies and security, lowered costs, improved efficiencies, and enhanced environmental protection over the past 30 years, according to newly released informational materials. "This newly released information emphatically underscores the historic benefit and future role of FE research in developing and commercially deploying new technologies that provide sustainable benefits to the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DOE Announces New Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements DOE Announces New Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements April 27, 2006 - 10:32am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced new policy measures for the reimbursement of contractor pension and medical benefit plan costs that are based on sound business practices and market-based benchmarks for cost management. The Department will continue to reimburse contractors for costs for current and retired contractor employees' defined benefit pension plans and medical benefit plans under existing contract requirements. For new contractor employees, the Department will reimburse contractors for the costs of their market-based defined contribution pension plans (similar to 401(k)) and market-based medical benefit plans.

242

SRS - Active Employee Benefits Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Service Center at 803-725-7772 or 800-368-7333 or via email at service-center@srs.gov * DOE * DOE-EM * DOE-SR * NNSA * ARRA * FSSR * SRNL * SREL * SRNS * SRR * MOX Services * WSI...

243

Low Cost, High Performance, 50-year Electrode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

this ARPA-E project, Primus Power will develop an this ARPA-E project, Primus Power will develop an extremely durable, highly active, conductive, and inexpensive electrode for flow batteries. Flow batteries offer one of the most exciting opportunities for affordable grid storage, however electrodes are costly and are the single largest cost component in a well integrated design. Grid storage can yield numerous benefits in utility and customer- owned applications:  renewable firming  peak load reduction  load shifting  capital deferral  frequency regulation By incorporating volume production practices from the chlorine, filter media, and electroplating industries, Primus Power will effectively reduce electrode costs to exceed GRIDS cost targets while providing the durability essential for widespread grid-scale adoption.

244

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit fromutilize an iterative projection process involving historicalto determine whether projections of future costs are

Wiser, Ryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Transportation Agency Tool to Analyze Benefits of Living Snow Fences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Agency Tool to Analyze Benefits of Living Snow Fences 5/31/12 Transportation Agency/31/12 Transportation Agency Tool to Analyze Benefits of Living Snow Fences Center for Integrated Natural Resources, Mobility, & Transportation Authority Benefits, Farmer Costs, & Carbon Impacts Focus Groups and Surveys

Minnesota, University of

246

Wind Energy Benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy provides many benefits, including economic and environmental. This two-sided fact sheet succinctly outlines the top ten wind energy benefits and is especially well suited for general audiences.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working Here » Benefits Working Here » Benefits Benefits Enjoy First Rate Federal Career Benefits As a DOE employee, you'll have access to exceptional Federal benefits with a variety of plan options that often exceed those offered in the private sector. In addition, you'll have competitive remuneration, continuous learning opportunities, and paid time off to help you construct an enjoyable work-life balance. You'll benefit from: Great salary Recruitment incentives Personal leave (vacation) Sick leave Student loan repayments Matching 401(k) retirement contribution Career development Possibility of opportunities to see the world Training Work-Life balance Flexible work schedules Retirement plan Health/Vision/Dental plans Flexible spending account Specifically, Federal career benefits for DOE employees include:

248

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Benefits of Sustainable Building Design | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Sustainable Building Design Benefits of Sustainable Building Design Benefits of Sustainable Building Design October 4, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis Photo of an air-intake structure outside a Federal facility. An air-intake structure outside of this Federal facility lowers energy costs by taking in chilly night air to cool the building's data center. The application of sustainable building design not only helps Federal facilities meet laws and regulations, it also provides them with many other benefits. These benefits include: Lower energy costs Reduction in operating and maintenance costs Increase in productivity of building occupants Improvement health and psychological well-being of building occupants Reduction in pollutants Opportunity to foster a positive public image. Sustainable building design can reduce annual energy costs anywhere from

250

System Benefits Charge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New York's system benefits charge (SBC), established in 1996 by the New York Public Service Commission (PSC), supports energy efficiency, education and outreach, research and development, and low...

251

A Legacy of Benefit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Over more than three decades, FE research and development has established a legacy of significant achievement and return of value and benefits for the public funds invested.

252

Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economic benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to operate fans cost 0.10 € per kWh, the daily energy costdata, and energy costs of 0.04 € per kWh for heat and 0.1 €0.05 and 0.15 € per kWh, the benefit-cost ratios are 80 and

Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Benefits | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apply for a Job Apply for a Job Connect with Argonne LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube Google+ More Social Media » Benefits With outstanding benefits, competitive pay, wellness programs and a stimulating and attractive work environment, Argonne is a tremendous place to pursue your career. Employee benefits are a key factor when evaluating a career opportunity. At Argonne, you'll find a comprehensive array of benefits to meet a variety of needs. In addition to medical, dental, life and disability coverage, you'll have access to paid time off, a retirement plan with a generous match and a number of other benefits, such as adoption assistance, an on-site child care center and auto and homeowners' insurance. Wellness plays an important role in life at Argonne. We offer a variety of

255

Pennsylvania life cycle costing manual  

SciTech Connect

Until the 1970s, it was commonplace for institutions and governments to purchase equipment based on lowest initial (first) costs. Recurring costs such as operational, maintenance, and energy costs often were not considered in the purchase decision. If an agency wanted to buy something, it published specifications and requested bids from several manufacturers. Often, the lowest bidder who met the specifications won the job, with no consideration given to the economic life of the equipment or yearly recurring costs such as energy and maintenance costs. The practice of purchasing based on lowest initial costs probably did not make good economic sense prior to 1970, and it certainly does not make good sense now. The wise person will consider all costs and benefits associated with a purchase, both initial and post-purchase, in order to make procurement decisions that are valid for the life of the equipment. This describes a method of financial analysis that considers all pertinent costs: life cycle costing (LCC).

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Public Benefit Funds | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Benefit Funds Public Benefit Funds Jump to: navigation, search Public benefit funds (PBF) are state-level programs typically developed during electric utility restructuring by some states in the late 1990s to ensure continued support for renewable energy resources, energy efficiency initiatives and low-income energy programs. These funds are most commonly supported through a very small surcharge on electricity consumption (e.g., $0.002/kWh). This charge is sometimes referred to as a system benefits charge (SBC). PBFs commonly support rebate programs for renewable energy systems, loan programs, research and development, and energy education programs. [1] Contents 1 Public Benefits Fund Incentives 2 References Public Benefits Fund Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 51) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

257

SRS - Retiree Benefits - Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts Benefits Solutions Service Center Health Insurance including: Medical, Dental, Life Insurance, Retirement Services and Pension Plan, Savings and Investment Plan (SIP). Benefits Solutions Service Center 803.725.7772 (locally) or 800.368.7333 Benefit Related Customer Service Numbers 1.866.288.3257, website: www.ibenefitcenter.com Representatives M-F 9:00 - 5:00 EST System available 24 hours a day Monday - Saturday, and Sunday after 1 p.m. 1.800.325.6596 (Prime,Standard, Basic, Dental and Flexible Spending Accounts: Option 5 for COBRA and 3161 Benefits) M-F 8:30 - 4:30 1.800.868.-1032 (Mental Health and Substance Abuse Assistance) 1.800.521.3606, Vision Plan 1.800.581.4222, Westinghouse Corporate Pension 1.800.581.3366, Westinghouse Corporate Savings Plan

258

Comprehensive Evaluation of Rail Transit Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report evaluates rail transit benefits based on a comprehensive analysis of urban transportation system performance in major U.S. cities. It discusses best practices for evaluating transit benefits. It finds that cities with larger, well-established rail systems have significantly higher per capita transit ridership, lower average per capita vehicle ownership and mileage, less traffic congestion, lower traffic death rates and lower consumer transportation expenditures than otherwise comparable cities. This indicates that rail transit systems can provide a variety of economic, social and environmental benefits, and benefits tend to increase as a system expands and matures. This analysis indicates that rail investments can be a cost effective way to improve urban transport. Parking, vehicle and congestion cost savings from rail transit are estimated to exceed total U.S. public transit subsidies. It critiques Great Rail Disasters (O’Toole, 2004), a report which argued that rail transit systems fail to achieve their objectives and are not cost effective. It finds that many claims in Great Rail Disasters are inaccurate, based on

Todd Litman; Todd Alexander Litman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Production Cost Optimization Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved thermal performance of coal-fired power plants continue to grow, as the costs of fuel rise and the prospect of a carbon dioxide cap and trade program looms on the horizon. This report summarizes the efforts to date of utilities committed to reducing their heat rate by 1.0% in the Production Cost Optimization (PCO) Project. The process includes benchmarking of plant thermal performance using existing plant data and a site-specific performance appraisal. The appraisal determines po...

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

Employee Book of Benefits | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employee Book of Benefits Employee Book of Benefits Employee Book of Benefits Print version "Your Book of Benefits" is now available for active employees. Review specific sections of the book (linked below). You may also view a PDF file of the entire book, with its table of contents linked to its various sections. The "Retiree Book of Benefits" is now available. About Your Benefits Administrative Information Contact Information Dental Plan Disability Coverage Employee Assistance Program Flexible Spending Accounts Glossary Life and Accident Coverage Long Term Care Medical Plan Pension Plan Prescription Drugs Savings Plan Severance Plan Vision Care About Your Benefits › Print version Employees & Retirees Benefits Employee Book of Benefits About Your Benefits Administrative Information

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Estimating the Economic Benefits of Forward-Engaged Naval Forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In preparing for the 1997 quadrennial defense review, US Navy leaders asked us if we could quantify the economic benefits of forward-engaged naval forces and communicate them to policy makers. Until this point, the only evidence of such benefits was ... Keywords: INDUSTRIES--PETROLEUM-NATURAL GAS, MILITARY--COST EFFECTIVENESS

Robert E. Looney; David A. Schrady; Ronald L. Brown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AECL has developed a suite of technologies for Candu{sup R} reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and construction costs through more efficient work planning and use of materials, through reduced re-work and through more precise configuration management. Full-scale exploitation of AECL's electronic engineering and project management tools enables further reductions in cost. The Candu fuel-channel reactor type offers inherent manufacturing and construction advantages through the application of a simple, low-pressure low-temperature reactor vessel along with modular fuel channel technology. This leads to cost benefits and total project schedule benefits. As a result, the targets which AECL has set for replication units - overnight capital cost of $1000 US/kW and total project schedule (engineering/manufacturing/construction/commissioning) of 48 months, have been shown to be achievable for the reference NG Candu design. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Yu, S.; Pakan, M.; Soulard, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Public Benefits Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Public Benefits Fund Public Benefits Fund Jump to: navigation, search Public benefit funds (PBF) are state-level programs typically developed during electric utility restructuring by some states in the late 1990s to ensure continued support for renewable energy resources, energy efficiency initiatives and low-income energy programs. These funds are most commonly supported through a very small surcharge on electricity consumption (e.g., $0.002/kWh). This charge is sometimes referred to as a system benefits charge (SBC). PBFs commonly support rebate programs for renewable energy systems, loan programs, research and development, and energy education programs. [1] Public Benefits Fund Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 51) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

264

Eligibility for Retiree Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eligibility, Enrollment Eligibility, Enrollment Eligibility, Enrollment for Retiree Benefits Age + years of service determines eligibility for retiree healthcare benefits. Contact Retiree Insurance Providers Healthcare insurance eligibility upon retirement To be eligible for retiree healthcare insurance, TCP1 and TCP2 employees must: be at least age 50 with at least 10 years of applicable service credits; or have at least 5 years of applicable service credits and meet the "Rule of 75" (age + service credits equal at least 75). LANS Health & Welfare Benefit Plan for Retirees (pdf) - see additional eligiblity requirements Note: TCP1 and TCP2 employees with less than 20 years of service are subject to graduated eligibilty. Transitioning employees who were hired in a career position with UC before January 1, 1990 receive 100% of the LANS

265

SRS - Retiree Benefits - Forms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forms Forms Medical Forms Return completed forms to: 5-200 Health Care Programs Enrollment Change Benefits Solutions Service Center Bldg 703-47A, Aiken, SC 29808 5-340 Medical Claim Form Claims Processing Center P.O. Box 100300, Columbia, SC 29202 -- Pharmacy Claim Form Caremark Prescription Drug Claim Processing Center, P.O. Box 52059, Phoenix, AZ 85072-2059 Dental Forms Return completed forms to: 5-200 Health Care Programs Enrollment Change Benefits Solutions Service Center Bldg 703-47A, Aiken, SC 29808 5-342 Dental Claim Form Claims Processing Center P.O. Box 100300, Columbia, SC 29202 Life Insurance Return completed forms to: 5-171 Contributory Group Life Application and Deduction Authorization Benefits Solutions Service Center Bldg 703-47A, Aiken, SC 29808

266

Benefits and Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits and Challenges Benefits and Challenges Benefits Photo: Fuel cell exhaust emits no harmful pollutants Less Greenhouse Gas Emissions Gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles emit greenhouse gases (GHGs), mostly carbon dioxide (CO2), that contribute to global climate change. Fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) powered by pure hydrogen emit no GHGs from their tailpipe, only heat and water. Producing the hydrogen to power FCVs can generate GHGs, depending on the production method, but much less than that emitted by conventional gasoline and diesel vehicles. more... The chart below shows the GHGs generated by various vehicle types and considers all steps of the energy chain from fuel extraction or production to fuel use by the vehicle, not just tailpipe emissions. Even when accounting for the GHGs emitted during hydrogen production, conventional

267

Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs  

SciTech Connect

Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

Approach for Calculating OE Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Customer Choices Improving Reliability, Resilency, Survivability of an Aging Infrastructure Annual Benefit ( millions) Custom er Utility Society Annual Benefit of Achieved...

269

BSA Benefits Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of coverage? A: The current cost of coverage is as follows each pay period. (The Base Salary category for eligible part-time employees is based on their full-time equivalent...

270

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: icecalculator.com/ Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: [1] Logo: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are interested in estimating interruption costs and/or the benefits associated with reliability improvements. About The Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator is an electric reliability

271

DYNASTORE - A Computer Model for Quantifying Dynamic Energy Storage Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Now in development, the DYNASTORE computer model is the first production cost model designed to accurately represent changes in the utility daily load. By quantifying the dynamic benefits of energy storage, it highlights the significant cost savings linked with this technology.

1987-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Mitigation potential and cost in tropical forestry - relative role for agroforestry  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes studies of carbon mitigation potential (MP) and costs of forestry options in seven developing countries with a focus on the role of agroforestry. A common methodological approach known as comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) was used in each study to estimate the potential and costs between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios derived from the demand for forest products and forestland for other uses such as agriculture and pasture. By using data on estimated carbon sequestration, emission avoidance, costs and benefits, the model enables one to estimate cost effectiveness indicators based on monetary benefit per t C, as well as estimates of total mitigation costs and potential when the activities are implemented at equilibrium level. The results show that about half the MP of 6.9 Gt C (an average of 223 Mt C per year) between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries could be achieved at a negative cost, and the other half at costs not exceeding $100 per t C. Negative cost indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of about half of the options. The agroforestry options analyzed bear a significant proportion of the potential at medium to low cost per t C when compared to other options. The role of agroforestry in these countries varied between 6% and 21% of the MP, though the options are much more cost effective than most due to the low wage or opportunity cost of rural labor. Agroforestry options are attractive due to the large number of people and potential area currently engaged in agriculture, but they pose unique challenges for carbon and cost accounting due to the dispersed nature of agricultural activities in the tropics, as well as specific difficulties arising from requirements for monitoring, verification, leakage assessment and the establishment of credible baselines.

Makundi, Willy R.; Sathaye, Jayant A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities March 27, 2007 - 12:10pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced in the Federal Register that it is seeking public comment on how to address the increasing costs and liabilities of contractor employee pension and medical benefits. Under the Department of Energy's unique Management and Operating and other site management contracts, DOE reimburses its contractors for allowable costs incurred in providing contractor employee pension and medical benefits to current employees and retirees. In FY2006, these costs reached approximately $1.1 billion - a more than 226 percent increase since FY2000 - and are expected to grow in future years.

274

Estimating the Costs and Benefits of the Smart Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present electric power delivery infrastructure was not designed to meet the increased demands of a restructured electricity marketplace, the energy needs of a digital society, or the increased use and variability of renewable power production. As a result, there is a national imperative to upgrade the current power delivery system to the higher performance levels required to support continued economic growth and to improve productivity to compete internationally. To these ends, the Smart Grid integra...

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

275

Quantifying the Energy-Related Costs and Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning Phillip N. Price, Johanna L. Mathieu, Sila Kiliccote, Mary Ann Piette Environmental Energy Technologies Division July 2011 This work was conducted at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. It was partially funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC) under Contract No. 500-03-026 and the CEC's Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program's Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) and the Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E). Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

276

Quantifying the Energy-Related Costs and Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

24E 24E Preliminary Findings from an Analysis of Building Energy Information System Technologies J. Granderson, M.A. Piette, G. Ghatikar, P. Price Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2009 2009 National Conference on Building Commissioning, Seattle, WA, June 3-5, 2009, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

277

Benefits and Costs of Research: A Case Study of Construction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These procedures are derived and ... construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning. ... and Maintain Facility Decommission Facility ...

2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

Benefits and Costs of Research: A Case Study of Construction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to statutory documents or procedures. ... construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning. ... and Maintain Facility Decommission Facility ...

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

032007 Institution LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract State renewables portfolio...

280

The Thermodynamic and Cost Benefits of Floating Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, a fixed cooling concept is used in the design of evaporative heat rejection systems for process and power plants. In the fixed cooling mode, a plant is designed for maximum output at the design summer wet bulb temperature. The application of a floating cooling concept to evaporative heat rejection systems can have significant impact on improving plant performance. The floating cooling concept refers to the optimization of yearly plant output and energy consumption by taking advantage of seasonal wet bulb temperature fluctuations. The maximum plant output occurs at the average winter wet bulb temperature. Floating cooling is especially suited to base load power plants located in regions with large daily and seasonal wet bulb temperature variations. An example for a geothermal power plant is included in this paper.

Svoboda, K. J.; Klooster, H. J.; Johnnie, D. H., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF A PUBLIC OPTION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY ongress is debating fundamental changes to the health care system in the United States fundamental changes to the health care system in the United States, with the overarching aim of reducing: A Review of Alternative Approaches" In Orley Ashenfelter and David Card, eds., Handbook of Labour Economics

Kammen, Daniel M.

282

The costs and benefits of combining different IP mobility standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several IP mobility support protocols have been standardized. Each solution provides a specific functionality and/or requires operations of particular nodes. The current trend is towards the co-existence of these solutions, though the impact of doing ... Keywords: Distributed mobility management, Host mobility, IP mobility, Network mobility, Network-based localized mobility

Antonio De La Oliva; Ignacio Soto; Maria Calderon; Carlos J. Bernardos; M. Isabel Sanchez

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Costs and Benefits of Home-Based Telecommuting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bulb Microwave Oven Cooling – Air Conditioning Heating – GasOven Rangetop Burner – Electric Rangetop Burner – Gas Cooling – Fan Cooling – Window System Cooling – Air Conditioning (3-ton) Portable Heater Heating –

Shafizadeh, Kevan R.; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.; Niemeier, Debbie A.; Salomon, Ilan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy, DRAFT Marginal Energy Prices Report, July, 1999.energy use by the energy price paid by the household.energy consumption, energy price, discount rate, and central

Rosenquist, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richland, WA. Report No. PNNL- 7. U.S. Department of Energy,National Laboratory (PNNL) using the Building Loads andADL), and David Winiarski (PNNL). This work was supported by

Rosenquist, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Costs and Benefits of Home-Based Telecommuting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts must be made to estimate “physical flows” (such as the number of telecommuters) and future values (such as the price

Shafizadeh, Kevan R.; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.; Niemeier, Debbie A.; Salomon, Ilan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

own starting numbers and inflation estimates for each of the fuels. Battery and Charger Efficiencies-To handle the various efficiencies of batteries and charger systems, the...

288

The Direct Costs and Benefits of US Electric Utility Divestitures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. We find that divestiture reduces distribution efficiency but increases power sourcing efficiency. Both effects depend on the amount of own nuclear generation output but not fossil-fuel or hydro output. The net present value for all divestitures in our...

Triebs, Thomas P.; Pollitt, Michael G.; Kwoka, John E.

289

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TOOL Name: Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.gwec.netindex.php?id131 Equivalent URI:...

290

Benefits and Costs of ATP Investments in Component-Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in incompatible formats and semantic models, which means that ... application integration, comparison shopping, and agent-based process invocation ...

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

Determining benefits and costs of improved central air conditioner efficiencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for major household appliances. Any new or amended standardcosts), lifetime of the appliance, and a discount rate. LCCconsumers use in purchasing appliances. Consumers purchase

Rosenquist, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Community Wind Benefits (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet explores the benefits of community wind projects, including citations to published research.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

295

Quantifying the cost uncertainty of climate stabilization policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change researchers are often asked to evaluate potential economic effects of climate stabilization policies. Policy costs are particularly important because policymakers use a cost/benefit framework to analyze ...

Franck, Travis Read

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA Review The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement or environmental assessment). I believe that this information will help program and field offices prepare their annual NEPA planning summaries and their overall NEPA compliance strategies. Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and the public, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents Benefits of Site-wide NEPA Review More Documents & Publications Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)

297

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maintaining Activity-based Cost Estimates with Feature-Based2004). “Effective Cost Estimate and Construction Processesof new designs. These cost estimates are inflated by the

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts Title Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2012 Authors Larsen, Peter H., Charles A. Goldman, Donald Gilligan, and Terry E. Singer Conference Name 2012 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 2012 Publisher ACEEE Conference Location Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California Abstract This paper evaluates the issue of non-energy benefits within the context of the U.S. energy services company (ESCO) industry-a growing industry comprised of companies that provide energy savings and other benefits to customers through the use of performance-based contracting. Recent analysis has found that ESCO projects in the public/institutional sector, especially at K-12 schools, are using performance-based contracting, at the behest of the customers, to partially -- but not fully -- offset substantial accumulated deferred maintenance needs (e.g., asbestos removal, wiring) and measures that have very long paybacks (roof replacement). This trend is affecting the traditional economic measures policymakers use to evaluate success on a benefit to cost basis. Moreover, the value of non-energy benefits which can offset some or all of the cost of the non-energy measures -- including operations and maintenance (O&M) savings, avoided capital costs, and tradable pollution emissions allowances -- are not always incorporated into a formal cost-effectiveness analysis of ESCO projects. Non- energy benefits are clearly important to customers, but state and federal laws that govern the acceptance of these types of benefits for ESCO projects vary widely (i.e., 0-100% of allowable savings can come from one or more non-energy categories). Clear and consistent guidance on what types of savings are recognized in Energy Savings Agreements under performance contracts is necessary, particularly where customers are searching for deep energy efficiency gains in the building sector.

299

USA oilgas production cost : recent changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During 1984-1989, oil development investment cost in the USA fell, but only because of lower activity. The whole cost curve shifted unfavorably (leftward). In contrast, natural gas cost substantially decreased, the curve ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Cost Sensitive Conditional Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While POMDPs provide a general platform for conditional planning under a wide range of quality metrics they have limited scalability. On the other hand, uniform probability conditional planners scale very well, but many lack the ability to optimize plan quality metrics. We present an innovation to planning graph based heuristics that helps uniform probability conditional planners both scale and generate high quality plans when using actions with non uniform costs. We make empirical comparisons with two state of the art planners to show the benefit of our techniques.

Daniel Bryce; Subbarao Kambhampati

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

302

Achieving the Benefits of Safeguards by Design  

SciTech Connect

The overarching driver for developing a formalized process to achieve safeguards by design is to support the global growth of nuclear power while reducing ‘nuclear security’ risks. This paper discusses an institutional approach to the design process for a nuclear facility, for designing proliferation resistance, international safeguards and U.S. national safeguards and security into new nuclear facilities. In the United States, the need exists to develop a simple, concise, formalized, and integrated approach for incorporating international safeguards and other non-proliferation considerations into the facility design process. An effective and efficient design process is one which clearly defines the functional requirements at the beginning of the project and provides for the execution of the project to achieve a reasonable balance among competing objectives in a cost effective manner. Safeguards by Design is defined as “the integration of international and national safeguards, physical security and non-proliferation features as full and equal partners in the design process of a nuclear energy system or facility,” with the objective to achieve facilities that are intrinsically more robust while being less expensive to safeguard and protect. This Safeguards by Design process has been developed such that it: • Provides improved safeguards, security, and stronger proliferation barriers, while reducing the life cycle costs to the operator and regulatory agencies, • Can be translated to any international context as a model for nuclear facility design, • Fosters a culture change to ensure the treatment of ‘nuclear security’ considerations as “full and equal” partners in the design process, • Provides a useful tool for the project manager responsible for the design, construction, and start-up of nuclear facilities, and • Addresses the key integration activities necessary to efficiently incorporate International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards into the design of nuclear facilities. This paper describes the work that has been completed in the development of a Safeguards by Design process for a project, illustrated by flow diagrams based upon the project phases described in U.S. Department of Energy Order 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. The institutionalization of the Safeguards by Design process directly supports the goals of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative and also aligns with goals and objectives of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Other benefits from institutionalizing this Safeguards by Design process are discussed within this paper.

Trond Bjornard; Robert Bean; David Hebditch; Jim Morgan; Bruce Meppen; Scott DeMuth; Michael Ehinger; John Hockert

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Characterizing and Quantifying the Societal Benefits Attributable to Smart Metering Investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smart Metering can reduce labor requirements and other costs inherent in non-automated processes, but it can also produce benefits that accrue directly or indirectly to electricity consumers and societal in general, which is why they are referred to as societal benefits. Because they accrue to consumers, rather than show up as cost savings on the utility ledger, identifying and monetizing these benefits in a business case can be a challenging task. This report reviews how utilities have estimated societa...

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

THE SOCIAL-COST CALCULATOR (SCC): DOCUMENTATION OF METHODS AND DATA, AND CASE STUDY OF SACRAMENTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ICEV energy-use and lifecycle-cost model (8 pp. ) (M. A.and N. I. Tishchcishyna, Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000An Assessment of Benefits and Costs, ORNL-6851, Oak Ridge

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Social-Cost Calculator (SCC): Documentation of Methods and Data, and Case Study of Sacramento  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ICEV energy-use and lifecycle-cost model (8 pp. ) (M. A.and N. I. Tishchcishyna, Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000An Assessment of Benefits and Costs, ORNL-6851, Oak Ridge

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

An economic model of software quality costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As of today there is very little knowledge is available about the economics of software quality. The costs incurred and benefits of implementing different quality practices over the software development life cycle are not well understood. There are some ... Keywords: TQM, quality cost model, software quality

Amel Kolašinac; Ljubomir Lazic; Dženan Avdic

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits Benefits Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) VFP Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Benefits Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Selected faculty and participating students spend 10 weeks (Summer Term) at a DOE national laboratory engaged in a research project under the guidance of a laboratory scientist. Faculty members build collaborative relationships with DOE research scientists, become familiar with DOE sponsored research programs, scientific user facilities, and potential funding opportunities. Students participate in enrichment activities, including career professional development workshops (e.g. technical and scientific writing skills development, poster, or oral presentation activities, etc.),

308

Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE's thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a supply side'' limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a demand side'' limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

Spanner, G E; Daellenbach, K K; Hughes, K R; Brown, D R; Drost, M K

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE`s thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a ``supply side`` limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a ``demand side`` limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

Spanner, G.E.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Business benefits of wellhead protection. Case studies: Dayton, Ohio; Xenia, Ohio; and Pekin, Illinois. Source water protection business and economic series No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Business participation is a critical factor for three succesful local wellhead and ground water protection programs in Dayton and Xenia, Ohio and Pekin, Illinois. They offer three different wellhead and ground water protection models but show common themes for business involvement and benefits. Bottom-line benefits highlighted by several companies include: process changes that saved operating costs not previously anticipated; maintaining water quality that keep industrial water treatment costs down; and knowing the exact storage location of chemicals which keep emergency response costs down and allowed better management of existing chemical stocks. All companies indicated that being within the wellhead protection area (WHPA) caused them to be conscious of chemical use and thereby reduced liability from releases through better chemical management. Early involvement by business minimized local regulatory burden and promoted education and protective activities at the same time.

Job, C.A.

1995-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies Title International Experience with Quantifying the Co-Benefits of Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Programs and Policies Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Christopher J., Ali Hasanbeigi, Lynn K. Price, and Grace Wu Date Published 11/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords co-benefits, energy efficiency, ghg emissions, quantification Abstract Improving the efficiency of energy production and consumption and switching to lower carbon energy sources can significantly decrease carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and reduce climate change impacts. A growing body of research has found that these measures can also directly mitigate many non-climate change related human health hazards and environmental damage. Positive impacts of policies and programs that occur in addition to the intended primary policy goal are called co-benefits. Policy analysis relies on forecasting and comparing the costs of policy and program implementation and the benefits that accrue to society from implementation. GHG reduction and energy efficiency policies and programs face political resistance in part because of the difficulty of quantifying their benefits. On the one hand, climate change mitigation policy benefits are often global, long-term, and subject to large uncertainties, and subsidized energy pricing can reduce the direct monetary benefits of energy efficiency policies to below their cost. On the other hand, the co-benefits that accrue from these efforts' resultant reductions in conventional air pollution (such as improved health, agricultural productivity, reduced damage to infrastructure, and local ecosystem improvements) are generally near term, local, and more certain than climate change mitigation benefits and larger than the monetary value of energy savings. The incorporation of co-benefits into energy efficiency and climate mitigation policy and program analysis therefore might significantly increase the uptake of these policies. Faster policy uptake is especially important in developing countries because ongoing development efforts that do not consider co-benefits may lock in suboptimal technologies and infrastructure and result in high costs in future years.

313

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Benefits Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Benefits Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play a vital role in demonstrating the Federal government and NNSA's

314

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Benefits Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Benefits Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play a vital role in demonstrating the Federal government and NNSA's

315

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Community Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Benefits Essential to the lab's sustainability efforts is helping sustain the community by supporting economic development and sharing knowledge and resources with the...

316

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

G:\Corplan\!MbrMaterials\PROD-NM\CUSTOM\LANS\2013\plan compare_ACTIVE EE_ppo epo cdhp_2013_DRAFT.wpd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES ONLY 3 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES ONLY At-A-Glance Comparison of 2013 Non-Medicare Medical Program Benefits At-A-Glance: Comparing the 2013 PPO, EPO, and CDHP Medical Programs ï‚Ž Medical Program Benefit Comparison PPO Benefits & Cost-Sharing CDHP + HRA Benefits & Cost-Sharing EPO Benefits & Cost-Sharing Preferred Provider (In-Network) Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) Preferred Provider (In-Network) Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) Preferred Provider (Only limited coverage for out-of-network care) Calendar Year Deductible - All services are subject to deductible unless otherwise indicated below. $250 Individual $750 Family $500 Individual $1500 Family $1500/Individual $2250/Employee + Adult OR $2250/Employee + Child(ren)

318

State-Level Benefits of Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

This report describes benefits attributable to state-level energy efficiency programs. Nationwide, state-level energy efficiency programs have targeted all sectors of the economy and have employed a wide range of methods to promote energy efficiency. Standard residential and industrial programs typically identify between 20 to 30% energy savings in homes and plants, respectively. Over a 20 year period of time, an average state that aggressively pursues even a limited array of energy efficiency programs can potentially reduce total state energy use by as much as 20%. Benefit-cost ratios of effective energy efficiency programs typically exceed 3 to 1 and are much higher when non-energy and macroeconomic benefits are included. Indeed, energy efficiency and associated programs and investments can create significant numbers of new jobs and enhance state tax revenues. Several states have incorporated energy efficiency into their economic development programs. It should also be noted that increasing amounts of venture capital are being invested in the energy sector in general and in specific technologies like solar power in particular. Well-designed energy efficiency programs can be expected to help overcome numerous barriers to the market penetration of energy efficient technologies and accelerate the market penetration of the technologies.

Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bythe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bytransportation infrastructure and services, then we should set prices on the infrastructure and services equal to marginal social costs.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes  

SciTech Connect

Commissioning California's houses can result in better performing systems and houses. In turn, this will result in more efficient use of energy, carbon emission reductions, and improved occupant comfort. In particular, commissioning houses can save a significant amount of HVAC-related energy (15 to 30% in existing houses, 10 to 20% in new conventional houses, and up to 8% in advanced energy efficiency houses). The process that we considered includes corrective measures that could be implemented together during construction or during a single site visit (e.g., air tightening, duct sealing, and refrigerant and air handler airflow corrections in a new or existing house). Taking advantage of additional, more complex opportunities (e.g., installing new windows in an existing house, replacing the heating and air conditioning system in a new or existing house) can result in additional HVAC-related energy savings (60 to 75% in existing houses, and 50 to 60% in new conventional houses). The commissioning-related system and house performance improvements and energy savings translate to additional benefits throughout California and beyond. By applying commissioning principles to their work, the building community (builders and contractors) benefit from reduced callbacks and lower warranty costs. HERS raters and inspectors will have access to an expanded market sector. As the commissioning process rectifies construction defects and code problems, building code officials benefit from better compliance with codes. The utilities benefit from reduced peak demand, which can translate into lower energy acquisition costs. As houses perform closer to expectations, governmental bodies (e.g., the California Energy Commission and the Air Resources Board) benefit from greater assurance that actual energy consumption and carbon emissions are closer to the levels mandated in codes and standards, resulting in better achievement of state energy conservation and environmental goals. California residents' quality of life is improved through better indoor environmental comfort and lower energy bills. Lower energy bills free up money for residents to spend on other needs or goals, such as additional education and health and welfare. With an expansion of existing industries and the development of new commissioning-related industries, related jobs and tax revenues will increase, further increasing the quality of life for California.

Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes  

SciTech Connect

Commissioning California's houses can result in better performing systems and houses. In turn, this will result in more efficient use of energy, carbon emission reductions, and improved occupant comfort. In particular, commissioning houses can save a significant amount of HVAC-related energy (15 to 30% in existing houses, 10 to 20% in new conventional houses, and up to 8% in advanced energy efficiency houses). The process that we considered includes corrective measures that could be implemented together during construction or during a single site visit (e.g., air tightening, duct sealing, and refrigerant and air handler airflow corrections in a new or existing house). Taking advantage of additional, more complex opportunities (e.g., installing new windows in an existing house, replacing the heating and air conditioning system in a new or existing house) can result in additional HVAC-related energy savings (60 to 75% in existing houses, and 50 to 60% in new conventional houses). The commissioning-related system and house performance improvements and energy savings translate to additional benefits throughout California and beyond. By applying commissioning principles to their work, the building community (builders and contractors) benefit from reduced callbacks and lower warranty costs. HERS raters and inspectors will have access to an expanded market sector. As the commissioning process rectifies construction defects and code problems, building code officials benefit from better compliance with codes. The utilities benefit from reduced peak demand, which can translate into lower energy acquisition costs. As houses perform closer to expectations, governmental bodies (e.g., the California Energy Commission and the Air Resources Board) benefit from greater assurance that actual energy consumption and carbon emissions are closer to the levels mandated in codes and standards, resulting in better achievement of state energy conservation and environmental goals. California residents' quality of life is improved through better indoor environmental comfort and lower energy bills. Lower energy bills free up money for residents to spend on other needs or goals, such as additional education and health and welfare. With an expansion of existing industries and the development of new commissioning-related industries, related jobs and tax revenues will increase, further increasing the quality of life for California.

Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Utility Benefits of SMES in the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is an emerging technology expected to have wide-spread asset value in the electric utility industry. This project updates an earlier assessment of SMES benefits in the Pacific Northwest by estimating net present values of several system-specific application scenarios with the SMES cost model developed by EPRI.

1996-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Benefit Forms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Employee Orientation » Benefit Forms New Employee Orientation » Benefit Forms Benefit Forms The employment and benefits forms that you will be asked to complete as part of this orientation program can be numerous. Each, however, serves an important purpose in ensuring proper recording of your employment and benefit elections. This online program is designed to make the task a little easier. Each set of forms that you will work with has been compiled to ensure that you are only completing the essential documentation for your individual employment circumstance. Also, each set begins with an Employee Information Form that, upon completion, will auto-populate applicable data throughout the entire package. All of the forms are in PDF format and require Acrobat Reader to view and fill-in. When you open the form "Packages," it will load in a separate

324

FSM Research Administrators' Workshop Series Cost Principles for Sponsored Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FSM Research Administrators' Workshop Series Cost Principles for Sponsored Projects October 4, 2012 degree of accuracy #12;Examples of Direct Costs · Salaries and fringe benefits of project personnel, unallowable. Other factors affecting allowability of costs: · Reasonable · Allocable to the proposed project

Chisholm, Rex L.

325

Benefits of explosive cutting for nuclear-facility applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study discussed in this report was a cost/benefit analysis to determine: (1) whether explosive cutting is cost effective in comparison with alternative metal sectioning methods and (2) whether explosive cutting would reduce radiation exposure or provide other benefits. Two separate approaches were pursued. The first was to qualitatively assess cutting methods and factors involved in typical sectioning cases and then compare the results for the cutting methods. The second was to prepare estimates of work schedules and potential radiation exposures for candidate sectioning methods for two hypothetical, but typical, sectioning tasks. The analysis shows that explosive cutting would be cost effective and would also reduce radiation exposure when used for typical nuclear facility sectioning tasks. These results indicate that explosive cutting should be one of the principal cutting methods considered whenever steel or similar metal structures or equipment in a nuclear facility are to be sectioned for repair or decommissioning. 13 figures, 7 tables. (DLC)

Hazelton, R.F.; Lundgren, R.A.; Allen, R.P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Sponsor a student project Businesses looking for innovative, cost-effective solutions to their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sponsor a student project Businesses looking for innovative, cost-effective solutions with academic supervision. Benefit from cost effective project work Sponsoring organisations benefit from on the project in June. Costs and project scope are discussed on a project by project basis. MSc by Research

327

NEPA Success Stories and Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Success Stories and Benefits NEPA Success Stories and Benefits NEPA Success Stories and Benefits September 16, 2013 Examples of Benefits from the NEPA process for ARRA funded activities Efforts to implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) include ensuring, and reporting on, timely NEPA reviews prepared in support of projects and activities funded under major provisions of ARRA. In addition to reporting on the status of the NEPA environmental reviews, agencies also report on the benefits of NEPA. September 16, 2013 NEPA Success Stories: Celebrating 40 Years of Transparency and Open Government NEPA Success Stories: Celebrating 40 Years of Transparency and Open Government, Environmental Law Institute, 2010. February 27, 2013 NEPA Success Stories from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports

328

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

329

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Benefits and Considerations Compressed and liquefied natural gas are clean, domestically produced alternative fuels. Using these fuels in natural gas vehicles increases

330

A fresh look at cost estimation, process models and risk analysis”, EDSER-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable cost estimation is indispensable for industrial software development. A detailed analysis shows why the existing cost models are unreliable. Cost estimation should integrate software process modelling and risk analysis. A novel approach based on probability theory is proposed. A probabilistic cost model could provide a solid basis for cost-benefit analyses. 1

Frank Padberg

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Approach for Calculating OE Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reliability Reliability U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 2007 Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Joe Paladino October 29, 2007 Approach for Calculating OE Benefits Challenges * Established benefits methodologies (e.g., NEMS and MARKAL) do not address some of the major benefits that OE's program will provide (e.g. reliability). * Much of OE's program is about transforming the way the T&D infrastructure operates rather than replacing components: - Some technologies need a high penetration or must be deployed as an entire system to yield benefits (e.g. PMUs or Distribution Automation). - Some programs within OE are not developing "widgets" that can be easily counted. - OE is developing tools/methodologies or funding demonstrations that

332

Impacts of Motor Vehicle Operation on Water Quality in the United States - Clean-up Costs and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil and oil filter reimbursement checks, so check processing costsCosts of remediating underground storage tank leaks exceed benefits. Oil andOil Companies Pay US EPA to Settle Santa Monica MTBE Cleanup Costs,

Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009, Appendix 7: Methodology for Technology Tracking and Assessment of Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

191 DOE Industrial Technologies Program 191 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 7: Methodology for Technology Tracking and Assessment of Benefits u Technology Tracking............................................................................................................................................ 192 u Methods of Estimating Benefits.............................................................................................................................. 192 u Deriving the ITP Cost/Benefit Curve ...................................................................................................................... 193 Methodology for Technology Tracking and Assessment of Benefits

334

Real-Time Jetstream Tracking: National Benefit from an ST Radar Network for Measuring Atmospheric Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attention is directed to a wind measurement system that could be of significant cost benefit to the airline industry and the nation. A network of Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radars can provide continuous wind measurements through the ...

Herbert C. Carlson Jr.; N. Sundararaman

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 2:27pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 4 For greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, once a Federal agency identifies the employee commute alternatives and supporting strategies that will most effectively reduce trips to the worksite, costs of encouraging adoption of those methods can be estimated. The annual costs of commute trip reduction programs can vary greatly by worksite. This section outlines types of costs that might be incurred by an agency as well as savings and other benefits of commute trip reduction to an agency, its employees, and the communities surrounding its major worksites. It includes: Employer costs and benefits Employee costs and benefits

337

On the Accuracy of Regulatory Cost Estimates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Accuracy of Regulatory Cost Estimates On the Accuracy of Regulatory Cost Estimates Speaker(s): Richard Morgenstern Date: December 10, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Alan Sanstad Margaret Taylor Over the past several decades, the U.S. has seen a gradual reduction in economic regulation and a simultaneous increase in safety, health, environmental, and other social regulations. Especially with the prospect of regulation on greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act, there is growing concern about the costs, effectiveness, and benefits of federal rules. While prospective or ex ante analyses of the benefits and costs of major federal regulations are now a standard part of government operations, retrospective or ex post analyses, focusing on measurements of actual

338

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

339

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

User's Guide to DYNASTORE: A Computer Model for Quantifying Dynamic Energy Storage Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DYNASTORE model's unique new capabilities enable it to quantify certain disaggregated benefits of energy storage technologies via a chronological production cost model. Because of this, it can provide a useful tool for proper evaluation and operation of such technologies, as well as knowledge of associated dynamic benefits.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Benefits of stimulating geothermal energy development with tax and research subsidies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique is demonstrated for evaluating benefits of subsidies and examples are given for using it to determine the cost-benefit ratio. Examples use two preferential tax treatments as opposed to direct research grants for the high-temperature, low-salinity hydrothermal resources. Results are compared and some conclusions are given. (PCS)

Knutsen, C.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Data Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collection and Reporting for Collection and Reporting for Metrics and Benefits Smart Grid Investment Grant Program Joe Paladino November 19, 2009 Investments Transformation Results * Equipment Manufacturing * Customer Systems * Advanced Metering Infrastructure * Electric Distribution Systems * Electric Transmission Systems * Integrated and/or Crosscutting Systems Customer Empowerment * Job Creation and Marketplace Innovation * Reduced Peak Load and Consumption * Operational Efficiency * Grid Reliability and Resilience * More Distributed and Renewable Energy * Lower Carbon Dioxide Emissions Advanced Grid Functionality An Opportunity for Transformation Primary Intent Is to Determine SGIG Program Impact Secondary Intent Is to Learn (to Address Uncertainty) Project-Based Cost/Benefit Analysis SGIG Program - Building the

343

Loss of benefits resulting from mandated nuclear plant shutdowns  

SciTech Connect

This paper identifies and discusses some of the important consequences of nuclear power plant unavailability, and quantifies a number of technical measures of loss of benefits that result from regulatory actions such as licensing delays and mandated nuclear plant outages. The loss of benefits that accompany such regulatory actions include increased costs of systems generation, increased demand for nonnuclear and often scarce fuels, and reduced system reliability. This paper is based on a series of case studies, supplemented by sensitivity studies, on hypothetical nuclear plant shutdowns. These studies were developed by Argonne in cooperation with four electric utilities.

Peerenboom, J.P.; Buehring, W.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Ampulse Raises $8 Million to Develop Low-Cost Solar Cells I  

Low-Cost Solar Cells In November 2009 Ampulse ... For consumers the benefits of using this appliance will vary depending on family size and hot

345

NETL: News Release -Fossil Energy R&D Returns Significant National Benefit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2011 6, 2011 Fossil Energy R&D Returns Significant National Benefit in More Than Three Decades of Achievement Innovative Technologies Help Increase Domestic Energy Supplies and Security, Enhance Environmental Protection Washington, D.C. - Research and development (R&D) activities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) have helped increase domestic energy supplies and security, lowered costs, improved efficiencies, and enhanced environmental protection over the past 30 years, according to newly released informational materials. "This newly released information emphatically underscores the historic benefit and future role of FE research in developing and commercially deploying new technologies that provide sustainable benefits to the environment and industry and for U.S. citizens and people everywhere," said Charles D. McConnell, FE's Chief Operating Officer. "FE's scientists, engineers and all our employees have an ongoing mission to enable a significant return on investment for the nation's public funds that support this R&D. It is a legacy and a future of which we can all be proud."

346

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of  ...

347

Health benefits of particle filtration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health benefits of particle filtration Health benefits of particle filtration Title Health benefits of particle filtration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fisk, William J. Journal Indoor Air Date Published 02/12/2013 Abstract The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

348

Facilities & Administrative (F&A) Costs at NIU F&A costs at NIU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project, instructional or public service activity. Such costs include utilities, buildings and facilities accrue only as projects dollars are expended. As a result, F&A costs are collected and allocatedFacilities & Administrative (F&A) Costs at NIU #12;F&A costs at NIU What are Facilities

Karonis, Nicholas T.

349

Cost Maps for Fossil Assets Management: Based on a Case Study With Minnesota Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key to effective management of utility assets is determining the benefits and costs of options over various timeframes. This report describes and illustrates a structured approach to asset management decision making using cost maps.

1995-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

350

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Title Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48258 Year of...

351

Tax and Fee Payments by Motor-Vehicle Users for the Use of Highways, Fuels, and Vehicles: Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bythe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bytransportation infrastructure and services, then we should set prices on the infrastructure and services equal to marginal social costs.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Marginal Abatement Costs and Marginal Welfare Costs for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Results from the EPPA Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves, relationships between tons of emissions abated and the CO2 (or GHG) price, have been widely used as pedagogic devices to illustrate simple economic concepts such as the benefits of ...

Morris, Jennifer

353

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% oncommissioning project costs and savings. Commissioning isproportional to total project cost. The nature of activities

Mills, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benefits Benefits Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) SULI Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Benefits Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Research interns spend 10 weeks (summer term) or 16 weeks (semester term) at a DOE laboratory engaged in a research project under the guidance of a laboratory scientist or engineer. Host laboratories provide enrichment activities, including career professional development workshops (e.g. technical and scientific writing skills development, poster, or oral presentation activities, etc.), laboratory tours, scientific lectures and seminars. Host laboratories provide all required site specific training. Beginning with the 2013 Summer Term, selected students receive a

355

Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the coke battery Saves equipment/handling costs; reducesand material cost savings at the coke battery Decreases cokeand material cost savings at the coke battery Decreases coke

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs December 9, 2013 - 4:13pm Addthis A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic Jim Brodrick Lighting Program Manager MORE RESOURCES Find out how LED lighting works Get project planning and analysis tools Subscribe to Solid-State Lighting's email distribution list Increasingly, light emitting diode (LED) screw-based lamps are providing consumers a cost-effective and energy efficient alternative to compact

357

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Co-benefits Risk Assessment (COBRA) Screening Model Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.epa.gov/statelocalclimate/resources/cobra.html Cost: Free Related Tools Tool for Selecting CDM Methods & Technologies Modular Applied General Equilibrium Tool (MAGNET) COMMUTER Model ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS Automated tool that can be downloaded from the website. Converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, estimates annual adverse health impacts avoided, and monetizes the value of these. Approach COBRA converts emissions reductions into air quality improvements, and

358

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs December 9, 2013 - 4:13pm Addthis A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic Jim Brodrick Lighting Program Manager MORE RESOURCES Find out how LED lighting works Get project planning and analysis tools Subscribe to Solid-State Lighting's email distribution list Increasingly, light emitting diode (LED) screw-based lamps are providing consumers a cost-effective and energy efficient alternative to compact

359

Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act April 1, 2010 - 6:58pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this mean for me? LED lights emit more light, have a longer life and provide anywhere from 50 to 70 percent in energy savings. Rudd Lighting has seen a boost from cities tapping Recovery Act funds and seeking energy efficient lighting that will reduce costs. The BetalLED facility, which produced hundreds of thousands of LED products last year, employs about 600 people, and for every job in the plant, eight to 10 more are created outside the company. Workers at a Racine, Wis., manufacturing company are busy filling orders for American cities seeking to brighten their communities with energy

360

Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy Ohio Homeowner Reaps Benefits of Saving Energy December 18, 2009 - 3:06pm Addthis Joshua DeLung When it comes to energy-efficient homes, Carol Bintz's Ohio house is a gleaming model of sustainability. She first was inspired by her own energy efficiency and renewable energy research done as part of her job to reduce operating costs at the Toledo Museum of Art. There she saw how quickly the savings could stack up. Carol took a leap toward her energy-efficiency goals for her new home by choosing a homebuilder with expertise in residential efficiency and renewable energy technologies and strategies, many of which were developed through the Energy Department's Building America program. Today, she's thrilled with her high-performance home, she says, and she's passionate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act April 1, 2010 - 6:58pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this mean for me? LED lights emit more light, have a longer life and provide anywhere from 50 to 70 percent in energy savings. Rudd Lighting has seen a boost from cities tapping Recovery Act funds and seeking energy efficient lighting that will reduce costs. The BetalLED facility, which produced hundreds of thousands of LED products last year, employs about 600 people, and for every job in the plant, eight to 10 more are created outside the company. Workers at a Racine, Wis., manufacturing company are busy filling orders for American cities seeking to brighten their communities with energy

362

WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Welfare Impact of Rural Electrification: A Reassessment of the Costs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Welfare Impact of Rural Electrification: A Reassessment of the Costs The Welfare Impact of Rural Electrification: A Reassessment of the Costs and Benefits Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Welfare Impact of Rural Electrification: A Reassessment of the Costs and Benefits Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Publications, Technical report Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/EXTRURELECT/Resources/full_doc.pdf Cost: Free Language: English The Welfare Impact of Rural Electrification: A Reassessment of the Costs and Benefits Screenshot References: The Welfare Impact of Rural Electrification: A Reassessment of the Costs and Benefits[1] This report reviews recent methodological advances made in measuring the

364

Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Title Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2011 Authors Stadler, Michael, Chris Marnay, Ratnesh Sharma, Gonçalo Mendes, Maximillian Kloess, Gonçalo Cardoso, Olivier Mégel, and Afzal S. Siddiqui Conference Name 7th IEEE Vehicle Power and Propulsion Conference Date Published 09/2011 Publisher LBNL Conference Location Chicago, IL Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

366

Lifecycle Costs of Ultracapacitors in Electric Vehicle Applications A. G. Simpson G. R. Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cost of the battery under consideration. However, it is likely that the lifecycle cost benefits that examines the lifecycle costs of ultracapacitors in battery electric vehicle applications. The lifecycle). · The high capital cost and relatively short lifetime (commonly 3 years) of electrochemical batteries, which

Walker, Geoff

367

Prospects for improvement in geothermal well technology and their expected benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance restrictions on current geothermal drilling technology and their impact on drilling costs are reviewed, with the impact on electric power costs. Sensitivities of drilling costs to changes in drilling performance are analyzed. A programmatic goal for improving drilling performance is offered. The likely cost savings to the nation if the goal is attained are estimated though the use of a geothermal well drilling scenario for the 1978 to 1990 period, which was derived from DOE's geothermal power on-line scenario. The present worth of the expectd savings stream (benefit) is offered as a point of departure for justifying programmatic costs for improving drilling technology.

Not Available

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Benefits and Considerations Also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), propane is a domestically produced, well-established, clean-burning fuel. Using propane as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, provides convenience and performance

369

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Benefits and Considerations Biodiesel is a domestically produced, clean-burning, renewable substitute for petroleum diesel. Using biodiesel as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, improves public health and the environment, and provides safety

370

Environmental Benefits of Smart Meters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Today, consumers and utility companies can agree that smart meters provide benefits such as time-of-use billing, accurate measurement, and elimination of a meter reader's monthly visit. But do smart meters provide tangible benefits for the environment? Not all agree on this. This article discusses how a smart meter helps a utility to monitor energy usage. That monitoring data then allows the utility to work with consumers to reduce energy usage and integrate various sources of renewable energy. When that happens, the environment wins. A similar version of this article was published in Electronic Products on November 15, 2011. An Awakening "I don't understand the environmental benefits of the smart grid, " my cousin Chris said after I told him about my involvement in the smart grid effort at Maxim. "I think it is just a ploy by the utilities to raise rates, " he added. Ordinarily, I would have interrupted him with comments about intelligent management of energy and resources, but my cousin worked for the northern California utility for 15 years. He was not speaking from an uninformed standpoint, so I listened further. "Electricity flows like water, " he continued. "It flows from the source to all points of consumption. Installing a smart meter does not save energy, it just counts when you are consuming it. " These are all valid points. Here I was, convinced that smart meters were a good thing, something that could benefit both the economy and the environment, something that brought a better technical solution to an old problem. But in fact, I did not really know how the smart grid could

David Andeen; Segment Manager

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

without improvements in battery costs and performance. HEVsrecharge the battery, you could take advantage of lower cost

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

AvAilAble for licensing Higher-performance, more cost-effective batteries for PHEVs and HEVs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AvAilAble for licensing Higher-performance, more cost-effective batteries for PHEVs and HEVs. Benefits Higher-performance, more cost-effective batteries for PHEVs and HEVs. Reduced costs by lowering cost is easier, faster, and more cost-effective. Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Li-ion Batteries

Kemner, Ken

373

Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.S., 1990-1991: Summary of Theory, Data, Methods, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specific transportation projects, the social-cost analysisold analyses of the social costs of transportation in the U.the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. by

Delucchi, Mark A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Standardized Cost Structure for the Environmental Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underlying key to developing successful estimates, tracking project costs, and utilizing historical project cost information is the development of standardized and well-defined hierarchical listing of cost categories. Committees within the U.S. Federal agencies have pioneered efforts toward developing the Environmental Cost Element Structure (ECES), which is key in achieving these goals. The ECES was developed using an iterative process with input from federal agencies and industry. Experts from several disciplines participated including engineers, cost estimators, project/program managers, and contract personnel. The ECES benefits from an intense analytical effort, the knowledge gained from the maturation of the environmental industry, and incorporation of past user's experiences. Building upon this foundation, the E06 committee of the ASTM International has now fully developed and published a standard (ASTM 2150-04) that provides standardized cost categories with complete cost category definitions. This standard affords environmental and nuclear D and D project managers the opportunity to have a well defined hierarchical listing of their estimates and actual costs, readily adapted to performing summations and roll-ups, supported by a multi-level dictionary specifically defining the content of the cost elements as well as the summations. Owing to the dynamic nature of the environmental technologies, efforts need to be made to continue to update this standard by adding new technologies and methods as they are developed and employed in the field. Lastly, the Environmental Cost Element Structure that is embodied in this standard also presents opportunities to develop historical cost databases and comprehensive life cycle cost estimates and standardized cost estimating tools. (authors)

Skokan, B.; Melamed, D.; Guevara, K. [US DOE, Office of Project Planning and Controls, EM-32, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Mallick, P. [US DOE, Office of Performance Assessment, EM-43, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Bierman, G. [Legin Group, Inc., P.O. Box 3788, Gaithersburg, MD 20885-3788 (United States); Marshall, H.E. [Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8603, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8603 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Daylighting in schools: Energy costs reduced, student performance improved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ordinarily, architectural-engineering firms are only indirectly concerned with psychological and physical benefits to the occupants of the buildings they design. However, a firm in North Carolina, Innovative Design, is not ordinary. Their use of daylighting in schools yields considerable economic benefits: energy costs reduced up to 64%, cooling and electrical equipment costs reduced, long-term mechanical and lighting equipment maintenance costs reduced. But equally impressive are the benefits of daylighting on student performance. Students in schools using daylighting have higher achievement scores in reading and math tests. Further, as shown in a related study, because of additional vitamin D received by students via daylighting, they will have less dental decay--and grow taller. In the two performance reports which follow, authors Nicklas and Bailey analyze specific win-win benefits of daylighting. Their findings are startling.

Nicklas, M.H.; Bailey, G.B. [Innovative Design, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

378

Methodologies for Determining Persistence of Commissioning Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies on the persistence of commissioning benefits to date have used a variety of methods to evaluate this persistence. This paper proposes a consistent framework for describing and evaluating the persistence of commissioning benefits. It begins by splitting commissioning benefits into two broad categories: 1) benefits that inherently persist; and 2) benefits that may not persist. The study of persistence then considers only the benefits that may not persist. These benefits are critical, since the top five reasons cited for performing commissioning in both new buildings and existing buildings are benefits that may not persist. These benefits are then further divided into benefits that may be quantified and benefits that are generally difficult to quantify. This paper proposes that benefits that may be quantified should generally be evaluated for persistence using approaches that are already widely accepted and used for other purposes, with adaptations where needed. Specifically, it proposes that energy and water savings be evaluated using methods consistent with the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol (adapted with additional weather normalization), that comfort and indoor air quality improvements be evaluated using relevant standards, specifically ASHRAE Standard 55 and ASHRAE Standard 62, but goes further and proposes a methodology for economic quantification of these benefits as well. Finally, it is proposed that the persistence of measures whose benefit is difficult to quantify be evaluated simply by determining whether the measure is still in place or performing.

Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

380

Well cost estimates in various geothermal regions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project to estimate well costs in regions of current geothermal activity has been initiated. Costs associated with commonly encountered drilling problems will be included. Activity-based costing techniques will be employed to allow the identification of cost drivers and the evaluation of the economic effects of new technologies and operational procedures on well costs. The sensitivity of well costs to a number of parameters such as rate-of-penetration and daily operating costs will be examined. Additional sensitivity analyses and trade-off studies will evaluate the efficiency of various operational practices and preventive, as well as remedial, actions. These efforts should help provide an understanding of the consumption of resources in geothermal drilling.

Pierce, K.G.; Bomber, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, Encinitas, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

382

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

383

Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of fish consumption outweigh the risks, according to a joint expert consultation released in October 2011 by two United Nations agencies. Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption News Inform Magazine Inform Archives Health Nutrition Omega

384

Quantifying the benefits of hybrid vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Emergence of Hybrid Vehicles: Ending oil’s strangleholdthe benefits of hybrid vehicles Dr. Thomas Turrentine Dr.the benefits of hybrid vehicles Report prepared for CSAA Dr.

Turrentine, Tom; Delucchi, Mark; Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Sun, Yongling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Renewable Energy Benefits | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Benefits Renewable Energy Benefits October 16, 2013 - 5:16pm Addthis Photo of a row of PV panels on the roof of a building surrounded by skyscrapers. The General...

386

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

387

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

388

Growing Nanowires Horizontally Yields New Benefit: 'Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing Nanowires Horizontally Yields New Benefit: 'Nano-LEDs'. ... Optical microscope image of “nano LEDs” emitting light. ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

389

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Definition: Reduced Congestion Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Congestion Cost Transmission congestion is a phenomenon that occurs in electric power markets. It happens when scheduled market transactions (generation and load) result in power flow over a transmission element that exceeds the available capacity for that element. Since grid operators must ensure that physical overloads do not occur, they will dispatch generation so as to prevent them. The functions that provide this benefit provide lower cost energy, decrease loading on system elements, shift load to off-peak, or allow the grid operator to manage the flow of electricity around constrained interfaces (i.e. dynamic line capability or power flow control).[1] Related Terms power, transmission lines, load, element, electricity

391

Societal Benefits Charge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Societal Benefits Charge Societal Benefits Charge Societal Benefits Charge < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider New Jersey Board of Public Utilities New Jersey's 1999 electric-utility restructuring legislation created a "societal benefits charge" (SBC) to support investments in energy efficiency and "Class I" renewable energy. The SBC funds New Jersey's Clean Energy Program (NJCEP), a statewide initiative administered by the

392

Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents  

SciTech Connect

Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

Watson, B. (Global Marine Drilling Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, R. (Randy Smith Drilling School, Lafayette, LA (United States))

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF INCREASING ELECTRIC GRID RESILIENCE TO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF INCREASING ELECTRIC GRID RESILIENCE TO WEATHER OUTAGES Executive Office of the President August 2013 2 This report was prepared by the President's Council of Economic Advisers and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, with assistance from the White House Office of Science and Technology 3 Executive Summary Severe weather is the leading cause of power outages in the United States. Between 2003 and 2012, an estimated 679 widespread power outages occurred due to severe weather. Power outages close schools, shut down businesses and impede emergency services, costing the economy billions of dollars and disrupting the lives of millions of Americans. The resilience of

394

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8254 8254 Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India Michael McNeil, Maithili Iyer, Stephen Meyers, Virginie Letschert, James E. McMahon Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA December 2005 This work was supported by the International Copper Association through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. 2 ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to estimate the net benefits that cost-effective improvements in energy efficiency can bring to developing countries. The study focused on four major electrical products in the world's second largest developing country, India. These

395

Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Health Benefits Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Benefits > Health Benefits Health Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play

396

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

397

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Comparison of high-speed rail and maglev system costs  

SciTech Connect

This paper compares the two modes of transportation, and notes important similarities and differences in the technologies and in how they can be implemented to their best advantage. Problems with making fair comparisons of the costs and benefits are discussed and cost breakdowns based on data reported in the literature are presented and discussed in detail. Cost data from proposed and actual construction projects around the world are summarized and discussed. Results from the National Maglev Initiative and the recently-published Commercial Feasibility Study are included in the discussion. Finally, estimates will be given of the expected cost differences between HSR and maglev systems implemented under simple and complex terrain conditions. The extent to which the added benefits of maglev technology offset the added costs is examined.

Rote, D.M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fuel-cycle cost comparisons with oxide and silicide fuels  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses fuel cycle cost comparisons for a generic 10 MW reactor with HEU aluminide fuel and with LEU oxide and silicide fuels in several fuel element geometries. The intention of this study is to provide a consistent assessment of various design options from a cost point of view. Fuel cycle cost benefits could result if a number of reactors were to utilize fuel elements with the same number or different numbers of the same standard fuel plate. Data are presented to quantify these potential cost benefits. This analysis shows that there are a number of fuel element designs using LEU oxide or silicide fuels that have either the same or lower total fuel cycle costs than the HEU design. Use of these fuels with the uranium densities considered requires that they are successfully demonstrated and licensed.

Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

BENEFIT ELIGIBILITY Benefits under the CHEIBA Trust Plan are available to Eligible Employees and Dependents of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to any lien, garnishment, pledge or bankruptcy. However, a Participant may assign benefits payable under

403

Benefits Valuation Studies Under &316(b) of the Clean Water Act: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benefits valuation is a key component of the cost-benefit assessment required to qualify for a site-specific determination of best technology available (BTA) under the Phase II Rule of 316(b) of the Clean Water Act. If a facility chooses to pursue site-specific compliance options to meet Phase II requirements, a benefits valuation of alternatives at the facility must be submitted to regulatory agencies as part of the Comprehensive Demonstration Study. This report provides an overview of the technical con...

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports, Dec. 1994 to Sept. 2005 "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations

405

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994) The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents. Benefits of Site-wide National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly Reports, Dec. 1994 to Sept. 2005 "Frequently Asked Questions" on the Department of Energy's NEPA Regulations

406

Potential cost savings from investments in energy-conserving irrigation systems  

SciTech Connect

A comparative analysis is presented of the levelized costs of selected irrigation systems, with an emphasis on the costs and benefits of energy savings. The net economic benefits are evaluated, measured as energy cost savings minus additional capital and operating costs, of some energy-conserving systems. Energy use in irrigation and descriptions of both the conventional and the energy-saving technologies involved in the analysis are discussed. The approach used in the analysis is outlined, and comparative analysis results are discussed. Detailed cost information is presented by state. (LEW)

Patton, W.P.; Wilfert, G.L.; Harrer, B.J.; Clark, M.A.; Sherman, K.L.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

408

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

409

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

410

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

411

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

412

Handbook for cost estimating. A method for developing estimates of costs for generic actions for nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides overall guidance to assist the NRC in preparing the types of cost estimates required by the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines and to assist in the assignment of priorities in resolving generic safety issues. The Handbook presents an overall cost model that allows the cost analyst to develop a chronological series of activities needed to implement a specific regulatory requirement throughout all applicable commercial LWR power plants and to identify the significant cost elements for each activity. References to available cost data are provided along with rules of thumb and cost factors to assist in evaluating each cost element. A suitable code-of-accounts data base is presented to assist in organizing and aggregating costs. Rudimentary cost analysis methods are described to allow the analyst to produce a constant-dollar, lifetime cost for the requirement. A step-by-step example cost estimate is included to demonstrate the overall use of the Handbook.

Ball, J.R.; Cohen, S.; Ziegler, E.Z.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

LANL/LANS 2014 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES 4 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES At-A-Glance: Comparing the 2014 PPO & HDHP Medical Programs ÂŽ Medical Program Benefit Comparison PPO Benefits & Cost-Sharing HDHP + HSA Benefits & Cost-Sharing Preferred Provider (In-Network) Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) Preferred Provider (In-Network) Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) Calen dar Y ear D educ tible - All services are subject to deductible unless otherwise indicated below. $300 Individual $900 Fam ily $500 Individual $1,500 F amily $1,500/Individual $3,00 0/Fam ily $3,000/Individual $6,000/F amily Family deductible is an ag gregate of three times the Individual amo unt. PPO and non-PPO deductibles do NOT cross-apply. Family deductible is an ag

414

LANL/LANS 2014 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL/LANS 2014 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES LANL/LANS 2014 BCBSNM-Administered Medical Programs: ACTIVE EMPLOYEES & NON-MEDICARE RETIREES At-A-Glance: Comparing the 2014 PPO & HDHP Medical Programs ÂŽ Medical Program Benefit Comparison PPO Benefits & Cost-Sharing HDHP + HSA Benefits & Cost-Sharing Preferred Provider (In-Network) Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) Preferred Provider (In-Network) Nonpreferred Provider (Out-of-Network) Calen dar Y ear D educ tible - All services are subject to deductible unless otherwise indicated below. $300 Individual $900 Fam ily $500 Individual $1,500 F amily $1,500/Individual $3,00 0/Fam ily $3,000/Individual $6,000/F amily Family deductible is an ag gregate of three times the Individual amo unt. PPO and non-PPO deductibles do NOT cross-apply. Family deductible is an ag

415

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

416

Cost reduction of the Sun Challenger batch solar water heater: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A variety of materials and methods were investigated as a means to reduce the cost of the Sun Challenger Solar Collector. Three prototypes were constructed and tested using lower-cost methods. Test results are summarized, including heat gain, heat loss, and collection efficiency. Costs and benefits are also presented and summarized.

Stickney, B.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Benefits of Integrating PWR and RTI Advanced Gasification Technologies for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Benefits of Integrating PWR and RTI Advanced Gasification Technologies for Hydrogen-Rich Syngas Production Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Project Number: FE0012066 Project Description The project will assess the potential for integrated advanced technologies to substantially reduce capital and production costs for hydrogen-rich syngas with near-zero emissions from coal gasification for power production with carbon capture and for coal-to-liquids (specifically methanol) with carbon capture. These integrated technologies include those already tested successfully at pilot-scale with a new and innovative water-gas-shift technology, to show how multiple advanced technologies will leverage each other for significant cost and efficiency gains.

419

Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006) Most electricity customers see electricity rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand response is a tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use customers in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to give

420

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Kloess, Maximillian; Cardoso, Goncalo; Mégel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy, Economic, and Environmental Benefits of the Solar America Initiative  

SciTech Connect

The President's Solar America Initiative (SAI) was launched in January 2006 as part of the administration's Advanced Energy Initiative. The SAI is being led by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP), with NREL providing analytical and technical support. The SAI has a goal of installing 5-10 GW of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States by 2015 and 70-100 GW of PV systems in the United States by 2030. To make PV cost-competitive with other energy resources, this requires that the installed cost of PV fall from approximately $8/Wdc in 2005 to $3.3/Wdc in 2015 and $2.5/Wdc in 2030. This report presents estimates of the potential energy, economic, and environmental benefits that could result should the SAI PV installation goals be achieved.

Grover, S.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

NETL: Gasification Systems - Evaluation of the Benefits of Advanced Dry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Evaluation of the Benefits of Advanced Dry Feed System for Low Rank Coal Project Number: DE-FE0007902 General Electric Company (GE) is evaluating and demonstrating the benefits of novel dry feed technologies to effectively, reliably, and economically provide feeding of low-cost, low-rank coals into commercial Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. GE is completing comparative techno-economic studies of two IGCC power plant cases, one without and one with advanced dry feed technologies. A common basis of design is being developed so that overall assumptions and methodologies are common in the two cases for both technical and economic areas. The baseline case, without advanced dry feed technologies, will use operational data from the Eastman Chemical Company Kingsport gasification facility in combination with DOE/NETL's Cost and Performance Baseline Low-Rank Coal to Electricity IGCC study for both cost and performance comparisons. Advanced dry feed technologies, based upon the Posimetric® pump currently under development by GE, will be developed to match the proposed plant conditions and configuration, and will be analyzed to provide comparative performance and cost information to the baseline plant case. The scope of this analysis will cover the feed system from the raw coal silo up to, and including, the gasifier injector. Test data from previous and current testing will be summarized in a report to support the assumptions used to evaluate the advanced technologies and the potential value for future applications. This study focuses primarily on IGCC systems with 90 percent carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), but the dry feed system will be applicable to all IGCC power generating plants, as well as other industries requiring pressurized syngas.

423

Microsoft Word - Benefits Guidance 3-5-10Murray  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Options for Reservists Called to Active Duty Options for Reservists Called to Active Duty In Support of Contingency Operations (Updated 3-10) Benefit Options What Action HR Needs To Take Additional Guidance or Policy Employee on Military Furlough Employee Using Intermittent Leave Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Employee may retain coverage for up to 24 months; DOE pays for employee's share of the FEHB premium. Employee needs to notify HR of continued coverage or cancellation. If continued coverage, HR sends a memo to DFAS imaging to stop FEHB deductions giving effective date and stating the employee is on active duty in support of contingency operations. No CHRIS action required. HR will process a termination if employee reaches 24 months while on miltary furlogh (Absent-Uniformed Service;

424

Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Benefits Community College Internships (CCI) CCI Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Benefits...

425

Public Benefits Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Benefits Programs Public Benefits Programs Public Benefits Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Savings Category Other Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission '''''Note: Currently, the four funds are not collecting revenue. The funds are transitioning toward a revolving loan and investment fund model in order to sustain their capital. ''''' Although Pennsylvania's December 1996 electricity restructuring law did not establish a clean-energy fund, four renewable and sustainable-energy

426

Office of Human Resources Services - Benefits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BENEFITS BENEFITS Federal employees enjoy a very comprehensive benefits package and access to programs that encourage work life balance: Sick leave - up to 13 days earned annually Annual (vacation) leave Holidays - 10 days each year Flexible work schedules and telecommuting Family and medical leave for special circumstances Leave donation program Training and development opportunities Student loan repayment (as funds are available) Tuition assistance (as funds are available) Payment of professional credentials (as funds are available) Choice of several health benefit plans Supplemental dental and vision coverage Life insurance (including additional self and family options) Employee Assistance Program Flexible Spending Accounts Traditional pension plans and the Thrift Savings Plan (similar to a 401(k))

427

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell ...  

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell Power Industry (ANL-IN-00-030) Argonne National Laboratory. Contact ANL About This ...

428

UNLV HUMAN RESOURCES Benefit Provider Listing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) 464-6832 TIAA-CREF (RPA & Supplemental 403B) www.tiaa-cref.org (800) 842-2776 SUPPLEMENTAL BENEFIT

Hemmers, Oliver

429

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rocky Benefits  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Flats Benefits Center P.O Box 9735 Providence, RI 02940 (866) 296-5036 Medical and Life Insurance Administration Pension Administration Death Reporting Address Changes General...

430

5. Consumer Prices Reflect Benefits of Restructuring  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 99 5. Consumer Prices Reflect Benefits of Restructuring The restructuring of the natural gas ...

431

Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Benefits and Perks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perks Bioscience Working at Sandia has its benefits From health and compensation to diversity programs, flexible career tracks, community outreach, and more, Sandians receive...

432

Argonne-China collaborations benefit both nations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne-China collaborations benefit both nations Scientists and engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory often work with Chinese colleagues...

433

Cost effectiveness of the 1993 Model Energy Code in Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an analysis of the cost effectiveness of the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family homes in Colorado. The goal of this analysis was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to current construction practice in Colorado based on an objective methodology that determined the total life-cycle cost associated with complying with the 1993 MEC. This analysis was performed for the range of Colorado climates. The costs and benefits of complying with the 1993 NIEC were estimated from the consumer`s perspective. The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for homes built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to vary from 0.9 year in Steamboat Springs to 2.4 years in Denver. Compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1190 to $2274, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $119 to $227 (at 10% down). The net present value of all costs and benefits to the home buyer, accounting for the mortgage and taxes, varied from a savings of $1772 in Springfield to a savings of $6614 in Steamboat Springs. The ratio of benefits to costs ranged from 2.3 in Denver to 3.8 in Steamboat Springs.

Lucas, R.G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Heliostat manufacturing cost analysis. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study has two primary objectives. The first is to provide a detailed cost evaluation of the second generation of DOE heliostats, from which repowering heliostat designs are likely to be derived. A second objective is to provide an analytical foundation for the evaluation of futue heliostat designs. The approach taken for this study was to produce a cost estimate for the production of the McDonnell Douglas prototype design by generating estimates of the materials, labor, overhead, and facilities costs for two different production scenarios, 25,000 heliostats per year and 250,000 heliostats per year. The primary conclusion of this study is that the second generation of heliostat designs should cost approximately $100/m/sup 2/ at volumes of 25,000 units/year. This price falls to approximately $80/m/sup 2/ at volumes of 250,000 units/year. A second conclusion is that cost reduction begins at relatively low production volumes and that many production benefits can be obtained at production rates of 5,000 to 15,000 units/year. A third conclusion is that the SAMICS model and the SAMIS III program can be useful tools in heliostat manufacturing, costing, and economic studies.

Drumheller, K; Schulte, S C; Dilbeck, R A; Long, L W

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Benefits of fish passage and protection measures at hydroelectric projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s Hydropower Program is engaged in a multi-year study of the costs and benefits of environmental mitigation measures at nonfederal hydroelectric power plants. An initial report (Volume 1) reviewed and surveyed the status of mitigation methods for fish passage, instream flows, and water quality; this paper focuses on the fish passage/protection aspects of the study. Fish ladders were found to be the most common means of passing fish upstream; elevators/lifts were less common, but their use appears to be increasing. A variety of mitigative measures is employed to prevent fish from being drawn into turbine intakes, including spill flows, narrow-mesh intake screens, angled bar racks, and lightor sound-based guidance measures. Performance monitoring and detailed, quantifiable performance criteria were frequently lacking at non-federal hydroelectric projects. Volume 2 considers the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection measures, as illustrated by case studies for which performance monitoring has been conducted. The report estimates the effectiveness of particular measures, the consequent impacts on the fish populations that are being maintained or restored, and the resulting use and non-use values of the maintained or restored fish populations.

Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Biofuels—At What Cost? A review of costs and benefits of U.K. biofuel policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) contributes to sustainable development by advancing policy recommendations on international trade and investment, economic policy, climate change and energy, and management of natural and social capital, as well as the enabling role of communication technologies in these areas. We report on international negotiations and disseminate knowledge gained through collaborative projects, resulting in more rigorous research, capacity building in developing countries, better networks spanning the North and the South, and better global connections among researchers, practitioners, citizens and policy-makers. IISD’s vision is better living for all—sustainably; its mission is to champion innovation, enabling societies to live sustainably. IISD is registered as a charitable organization in Canada and has 501(c)(3) status in the United States. IISD

Chris Charles; Richard Bridle; Tom Moerenhout; Head Office

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Low-Cost Options for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control ADA- Environmental Solutions will test two new technologies for mercury control. The TOXECON II(tm) technology injects activated carbon directly into the downstream collecting fields of an electrostatic precipitator. The benefit of this technology is that the majority of the fly ash is collected in the upstream collecting fields which results in only a small portion of carbon-contaminated ash. Additionally, the TOXECON II(tm) technology requires minimal capital investment as only minor retrofits to the electrostatic precipitator are needed. The second technology is injection of novel sorbents for mercury removal on units with hot-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Mercury removal from hot-side electrostatic precipitators is difficult as their high operating temperature range keeps the mercury in the vapor phase and prevents the mercury from adsorbing onto sorbents. The TOXECON II(tm) technology will be tested at Entergy's Independence Station which burns PRB coal. The novel sorbents for hot-side ESPs technology will be tested at MidAmerican's Council Bluffs Energy Center and MidAmerican's Louisa Station, both of which burn PRB coal. Additional project partners include EPRI, MidAmerican, Entergy, Alliant, ATCO Power, DTE Energy, Oglethorpe Power, Norit Americas Inc., Xcel Energy, Southern Company, Arch Coal, and EPCOR.

439

Energy storage systems cost update : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports the methodology for calculating present worth of system and operating costs for a number of energy storage technologies for representative electric utility applications. The values are an update from earlier reports, categorized by application use parameters. This work presents an update of energy storage system costs assessed previously and separately by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program. The primary objective of the series of studies has been to express electricity storage benefits and costs using consistent assumptions, so that helpful benefit/cost comparisons can be made. Costs of energy storage systems depend not only on the type of technology, but also on the planned operation and especially the hours of storage needed. Calculating the present worth of life-cycle costs makes it possible to compare benefit values estimated on the same basis.

Schoenung, Susan M. (Longitude 122 West, Menlo Park, CA)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Potential benefits of geothermal electrical production from hydrothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential national benefits of geothermal electric energy development from the hydrothermal resources in the West are estimated for several different scenarios. The U.S. electrical economy is simulated by computer using a linear programming optimization technique. Under most of the scenarios, benefits are estimated at $2 to $4 billion over the next 50 years on a discounted present value basis. The electricity production from hydrothermal plants reaches 2 to 4 percent of the national total, which will represent 10 to 20 percent of the installed capacity in the West. Installed geothermal capacity in 1990 is estimated to be 9,000 to 17,000 Mw(e). The geothermal capacity should reach 28,000 to 65,000 Mw(e) by year 2015. The ''most likely'' scenario yields the lower values in the above ranges. Under this scenario geothermal development would save the utility industry $11 billion in capital costs (undiscounted); 32 million separative work units; 64,000 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/; and 700 million barrels of oil. The most favorable scenario for geothermal energy occurs when fossil fuel prices are projected to increase at 5 percent/year. The benefits of geothermal energy then exceed $8 billion on a discounted present value basis. Supply curves were developed for hydrothermal resources based on the recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment, resource characteristics, and projected power conversion technology and costs. Geothermal plants were selected by the optimizing technique to fill a need for ''light load'' plants. This infers that geothermal plants may be used in the future primarily for load-following purposes.

Bloomster, C.H.; Engel, R.L.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

442

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marginal electricity rates for the residential, commercial,residential and agricultural tariffs in line with the cost of electricity production. In particular, agricultural ratesresidential consumers would see a present (discounted) benefit of 1.9 billion dollars over the forecast period, based on a marginal electricity rate

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Financing U.S. Renewable Energy Projects Through Public Capital Vehicles: Qualitative and Quantitative Benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores the possibility of financing renewable energy projects through raising capital in the public markets. It gives an overview of the size, structure, and benefits of public capital markets, as well as showing how renewable energy projects might take advantage of this source of new funds to lower the cost of electricity.

Mendelsohn, M.; Feldman, D.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Climate change mitigation and co-benefits of feasible transport demand policies in Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change mitigation and co-benefits of feasible transport demand policies in Beijing Felix Creutzig a,*, Dongquan He b a Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley, USA b Energy i n f o Keywords: Climate change mitigation Transport demand management External costs Urban

Kammen, Daniel M.

445

System Benefits Charge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Benefits Charge System Benefits Charge System Benefits Charge < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Schools Utility Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Public Benefits Fund Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission New Hampshire's 1996 electric-industry restructuring legislation authorized the creation of a system benefits charge (SBC) to support energy-efficiency programs and energy-assistance programs for low-income residents. The efficiency fund, which took effect in 2002, is funded by a non-bypassable surcharge of 1.8 mills per kilowatt-hour ($0.0018/kWh) on electric bills. A separate surcharge of 1.5 mills per kWh ($0.0015/kWh) supports low-income energy assistance programs. Approximately $19 million is collected annually to support the efficiency fund, although the annual sum collected has

446

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

448

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

449

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Cost Affordable Titanium IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Enhancing the Cost Effectiveness of High Performance Titanium Alloy Component Production by Powder Metallurgy · Evolution of Texture in ...

451

Cost Effective Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

three relevant technologies, namely casting, alloy development and orientation measurement, developed by Rolls-Royce to enable the cost effective production.

452

Sharing Supermodular Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs collectively incurred by a group of cooperating agents. ..... Mixed integer programming formulations for production planning and scheduling prob- lems.

453

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial… (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

455

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

456

Dehumidification: A Review of EPRI Activities and Research Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a PDF of PowerPointslides presented during the webcast 147Dehumidification: Review of EPRI Activities and Research Results,conducted on October 6, 2009. The information presented emphasizes how dehumidification technologies affect the energy efficiency of space conditioning in buildings. The topics discussed in the webcast include the following: 149The value of dehumidification in enhancing energy efficiency general cost/benefit analysis review of current and advanced dehumidification technologie...

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

457

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

Ruth, M.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

459

Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cp/activity20101108.html UN Region: Eastern Asia Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications Screenshot References: Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications[1] "The workshop has two objectives. The first is to examine methodological

460

Load-curve responsiveness to weather and the cost-effectiveness of conservation  

SciTech Connect

A cost-benefit analysis of home-weatherization projects using average incremental power costs instead of peak or off-peak costs shows that some programs are no longer cost-effective. Weatherization improves the energy efficiency of houses and reduces demand on the utility, but a study of how monthly load curves at a Pacific Northwest utility responded to weather over a 12-month period indicates that abnormal weather shifts the entire load curve. 1 figure. (DCK)

Hellman, M.M.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity cost benefit" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SYSPLAN. Load Leveling Battery System Costs  

SciTech Connect

SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer`s monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer`s peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer`s side of the meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer`s load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.

Hostick, C.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

462

Benefits of the IEA Wind Co-operation Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy is changing the generation mix 1. Wind energy development brings national benefits 2. IEA Wind activities support national programs by sharing information and joint research resultsWind energy is part of the global economy 1. Worldwide, new wind energy installations in 2010 represented an investment of 47.3 billion € (65 billion USD) 2. More than 500,000 people are currently employed in the wind industry Source: GWEC1995

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Strategies to address transition costs in the electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Transition costs are the potential monetary losses that electric- utility shareholders, ratepayers, or other parties might experience because of structural changes in the electricity industry. Regulators, policy analysts, utilities, and consumer groups have proposed a number of strategies to address transition costs, such as immediately opening retail electricity markets or delaying retail competition. This report has 3 objectives: identify a wide range of strategies available to regulators and utilities; systematically examine effects of strategies; and identify potentially promising strategies that may provide benefits to more than one set of stakeholders. The many individual strategies are grouped into 6 major categories: market actions, depreciation options, rate-making actions, utility cost reductions, tax measures, and other options. Of the 34 individual strategies, retail ratepayers have primary or secondary responsibility for paying transition costs in 19 of the strategies, shareholders in 12, wheeling customers in 11, taxpayers in 8, and nonutility suppliers in 4. Most of the strategies shift costs among different segments of the economy, although utility cost reductions can be used to offset transition costs. Most of the strategies require cooperation of other parties, including regulators, to be implemented successfully; financial stakeholders must be engages in negotiations that hold the promise of shared benefits. Only by rejecting ``winner-take-all`` strategies will the transition-cost issue be expeditiously resolved.

Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.