National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for activity cost benefit

  1. Renewable Portfolio Standards: Costs and Benefits (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Weaver, S.; Flores, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes state-level RPS costs to date, and considers how those costs may evolve going forward given scheduled increases in RPS targets and cost containment mechanisms. The report also summarizes RPS benefits estimates, based on published studies for individual states and discusses key methodological considerations.

  2. SEP 2015 Cost Benefit Analysis Paper

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) paper analyzes previously reported and newly collected data of costs and benefits associated with the implementation of an ISO 50001 and SEP certification.

  3. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltai...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltaic Energy Systems Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltaic Energy Systems This ...

  4. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and Summary Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop -...

  5. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and Summary Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and ...

  6. Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle ...

  7. Activity Based Costing

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  8. Measuring the Costs & Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battocletti, Elizabeth C.; Glassley, William E.

    2013-02-28

    Recovery Act: Measuring the Costs & Economic, Social, Environmental Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Deployment & the Potential Employment

  9. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop - Agenda and Summary | Department of Energy Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and Summary Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop - Agenda and Summary On September 30 and October 1, 2014, the Department of Energy hosted a 2-day workshop on "Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies." The purpose of the workshop was to foster discussion about the analytic challenges

  10. SEP Voluntary Cost/Benefit Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    After achieving SEP certification, the certified facility may elect to submit additional information about the costs and benefits of SEP to the SEP Administrator using the SEP ...

  11. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investments in Photovolta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Investments in Photovoltaic Energy Systems Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investments in Photovoltaic Energy Systems This study is a retrospective analysis of net ...

  12. Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with pilot project (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Cost benefit analysis for the implementation of smart metering with pilot project Country...

  13. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltai...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... useful in a variety of energy conversion applications, and light harvesting rods for regenerative solar ... costs. 56 Because of the linear relationship between benefits ...

  14. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high performance relocatable classrooms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy savings ...

  15. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This paper focuses on the business value of Superior Energy Performance (SEP(tm)) and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP ...

  16. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Lab (NREL) Avoided Transmission & Distribution: Steven Fine, ICF International Social Costs & Benefits: Anne Hoskins, Maryland Public Service Commission PDF icon ...

  17. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PDF icon Presentation - Robert Jeffers, Sandia PDF icon Presentation - Carl Imhoff, PNNL More Documents & Publications Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy ...

  18. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Presentation Superior Energy Performance logo Nine companies certified under the U.S. ...

  19. CIGNA Study Uncovers Relationship of Disabilities to Total Benefits Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The findings of a new study reveal an interesting trend. Integrating disability programs with health care programs can potentially lower employers' total benefits costs and help disabled employees get back to work sooner and stay at work.

  20. Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Evaluation of Realized Impacts...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Geothermal Technologies R&D Program Investments Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Vehicle Combustion Engine R&D Program: Impacts of a Cluster of Energy Technologies...

  1. Summary and Presentations from "Estimating the Benefits and Costs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy hosted a two-day workshop on "Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies" in Washington DC. The purpose of the workshop was to foster discussion...

  2. Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, William W.

    2010-11-15

    FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

  3. The cost effectiveness of NEPA: Are the benefits worth the costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangi, J.I. )

    1993-01-01

    NEPA is much loved, and much hated; too often ignored, and even more often ill-used. NEPA's framers intended the Act to have some substantive effects on Government actions, but they did not foresee the regulatory process and organizational structures that have accreted around the Act. Compliance with NEPA and its regulations may cost the US taxpayer, directly and indirectly, on the order of $1 billion a year. The benefits of NEPA compliance are obvious in some cases, not so in others. NEPA has success stories, but also boondoggles in its current and recent practice. Yet the taxpayer is entitled to know whether NEPA's non-trivial costs yield sufficient benefit to make compliance efforts a worthwhile investment. This paper will analyze the issue of the costs of NEPA compliance, and the issue of its benefits, and will suggest an answer as to the question of NEPA's cost effectiveness.

  4. Costs and benefits of energy efficiency improvements in ceiling fans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Nihar; Sathaye, Nakul; Phadke, Amol; Letschert, Virginie

    2013-10-15

    Ceiling fans contribute significantly to residential electricity consumption, especially in developing countries with warm climates. The paper provides analysis of costs and benefits of several options to improve the efficiency of ceiling fans to assess the global potential for electricity savings and green house gas (GHG) emission reductions. Ceiling fan efficiency can be cost-effectively improved by at least 50% using commercially available technology. If these efficiency improvements are implemented in all ceiling fans sold by 2020, 70 terawatt hours per year could be saved and 25 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e) emissions per year could be avoided, globally. We assess how policies and programs such as standards, labels, and financial incentives can be used to accelerate the adoption of efficient ceiling fans in order to realize potential savings.

  5. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Technology (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Markel, T.; Simpson, A.

    2006-10-01

    Presents a cost-benefit of analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology, including potential petroleum use reduction.

  6. Cost/benefit analysis for video security systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    Dr. Don Hush and Scott Chapman, in conjunction with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of the University of New Mexico (UNM), have been contracted by Los Alamos National Laboratories to perform research in the area of high security video analysis. The first phase of this research, presented in this report, is a cost/benefit analysis of various approaches to the problem in question. This discussion begins with a description of three architectures that have been used as solutions to the problem of high security surveillance. An overview of the relative merits and weaknesses of each of the proposed systems is included. These descriptions are followed directly by a discussion of the criteria chosen in evaluating the systems and the techniques used to perform the comparisons. The results are then given in graphical and tabular form, and their implications discussed. The project to this point has involved assessing hardware and software issues in image acquisition, processing and change detection. Future work is to leave these questions behind to consider the issues of change analysis - particularly the detection of human motion - and alarm decision criteria. The criteria for analysis in this report include: cost; speed; tradeoff issues in moving primative operations from software to hardware; real time operation considerations; change image resolution; and computational requirements.

  7. Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

  8. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

    2004-04-30

    The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

  9. Energy conservation and cost benefits in the dairy processing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01

    Guidance is given on measuring energy consumption in the plant and pinpointing areas where energy-conservation activities can return the most favorable economics. General energy-conservation techniques applicable to most or all segments of the dairy processing industry, including the fluid milk segment, are emphasized. These general techniques include waste heat recovery, improvements in electric motor efficiency, added insulation, refrigeration improvements, upgrading of evaporators, and increases in boiler efficiency. Specific examples are given in which these techniques are applied to dairy processing plants. The potential for energy savings by cogeneration of process steam and electricity in the dairy industry is also discussed. Process changes primarily applicable to specific milk products which have resulted in significant energy cost savings at some facilities or which promise significant contributions in the future are examined. A summary checklist of plant housekeeping measures for energy conservation and guidelines for economic evaluation of conservation alternatives are provided. (MHR)

  10. Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovolta...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... benefits, such as avoided water use or land impacts. ... generators and natural gas producers, respectively. xi ... generation mix and system stability requirements. ...

  11. Report Reviews Estimates of Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portfolio Standards to Date - News Releases | NREL Report Reviews Estimates of Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards to Date May 30, 2014 A new report, prepared by analysts from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), reviews estimates of the costs and benefits of compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) in the United States and explores how costs and benefits may evolve

  12. Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Investment in Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This benefit-cost evaluation analyzes the Vehicle Technology Office's (VTO's) research and ... (Li-ion) battery technologies-the two chemistry families that power all hybrid and ...

  13. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Geothermal Technologies R&D Program Investments: Impacts of a Cluster of Energy Technologies, August 2010. PDF icon ...

  14. Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vehicles decreases with time. * Manufacturing costs associated with batteries and electric machines fall faster than those of conventional technologies (i.e., engine,...

  15. Evaluating Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    tranben.pdf Web Application Link: www.vtpi.orgtranben.pdf Cost: Free Language: English Related Tools Assessment of the type of cycling infrastructure required to attract...

  16. Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH...

  17. Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-05-01

    Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

  18. Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Duleep, K.G.

    1992-03-01

    This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer`s surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer`s surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

  19. Costs and benefits of automotive fuel economy improvement: A partial analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L. ); Duleep, K.G. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper is an exercise in estimating the costs and benefits of technology-based fuel economy improvements for automobiles and light trucks. Benefits quantified include vehicle cots, fuel savings, consumer's surplus effects, the effect of reduced weight on vehicle safety, impacts on emissions of CO{sub 2} and criteria pollutants, world oil market and energy security benefits, and the transfer of wealth from US consumes to oil producers. A vehicle stock model is used to capture sales, scrappage, and vehicle use effects under three fuel price scenarios. Three alternative fuel economy levels for 2001 are considered, ranging from 32.9 to 36.5 MPG for cars and 24.2 to 27.5 MPG for light trucks. Fuel economy improvements of this size are probably cost-effective. The size of the benefit, and whether there is a benefit, strongly depends on the financial costs of fuel economy improvement and judgments about the values of energy security, emissions, safety, etc. Three sets of values for eight parameters are used to define the sensitivity of costs and benefits to key assumptions. The net present social value (1989$) of costs and benefits ranges from a cost of $11 billion to a benefit of $286 billion. The critical parameters being the discount rate (10% vs. 3%) and the values attached to externalities. The two largest components are always the direct vehicle costs and fuel savings, but these tend to counterbalance each other for the fuel economy levels examined here. Other components are the wealth transfer, oil cost savings, CO{sub 2} emissions reductions, and energy security benefits. Safety impacts, emissions of criteria pollutants, and consumer's surplus effects are relatively minor components. The critical issues for automotive fuel economy are therefore: (1) the value of present versus future costs and benefits, (2) the values of external costs and benefits, and (3) the financially cost-effective level of MPG achievable by available technology. 53 refs.

  20. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelsen, Peter; McKane, Aimee; Sabouini, Ridah; Evans, Tracy

    2013-07-01

    Industrial companies are seeking to manage energy consumption and costs, mitigate risks associated with energy, and introduce transparency into reports of their energy performance achievements. Forty industrial facilities are participating in the U.S. DOE supported Superior Energy Performance (SEP) program in which facilities implement an energy management system based on the ISO 50001 standard, and pursue third-party verification of their energy performance improvements. SEP certification provides industrial facilities recognition for implementing a consistent, rigorous, internationally recognized business process for continually improving energy performance and achievement of established energy performance improvement targets. This paper focuses on the business value of SEP and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors. These cost-benefit analyses are part of the U.S. DOE?s contribution to the Global Superior Energy Performance (GSEP) partnership, a multi-country effort to demonstrate, using facility data, that energy management system implementation enables companies to improve their energy performance with a greater return on investment than business-as-usual (BAU) activity. To examine the business value of SEP certification, interviews were conducted with SEP-certified facilities. The costs of implementing the SEP program, including internal facility staff time, are described and a marginal payback of SEP certification has been determined. Additionally, more qualitative factors with regard to the business value and challenges related to SEP and ISO 50001 implementation are summarized.

  1. Thermal benefits and cost effectiveness of earth berming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speltz, J.; Haves, P.

    1980-01-01

    A number of advantages are claimed for earth sheltered buildings; the earth provides both insulation and thermal storage and also serves to reduce infiltration and noise. This paper seeks to quantify the thermal advantages of both earth sheltering and perimeter insulation by comparing the simulated thermal performance of an earth sheltered house, a house with perimeter insulation and a house with neither. The fuel savings are then compared to the estimated construction costs to determine cost-effectiveness. The major saving from an earth sheltered building is obtained in colder climates where the effective elevation of the frost line due to the earth berms considerably reduces the cost of the foundation.

  2. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report surveys and summarizes existing state-level RPS cost and benefit estimates and examines the various methods used to calculate such estimates. The report relies largely upon data or results reported directly by electric utilities and state regulators. As such, the estimated costs and benefits itemized in this document do not result from the application of a standardized approach or the use of a consistent set of underlying assumptions. Because the reported values may differ from those derived through a more consistent analytical treatment, we do not provide an aggregate national estimate of RPS costs and benefits, nor do we attempt to quantify net RPS benefits at national or state levels.

  3. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In Encyclopedia of Energy, edited by J. Cleveland Editor-in-Chief: Cutler, 383-393. New York: Elsevier. Enkvist, P.A., T. Naucler, and J. Rosander. 2007. A Cost Curve for ...

  4. Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Evaluation of Realized Impacts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... These are not included in Table II-6 for greater ease in exposition, but they are included ... risk and changes in health incidents that lead to health care costs andor lost workdays. ...

  5. A preliminary benefit-cost study of a Sandia wind farm.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Griffin, Taylor; Loose, Verne W.

    2011-03-01

    In response to federal mandates and incentives for renewable energy, Sandia National Laboratories conducted a feasibility study of installing an on-site wind farm on Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base property. This report describes this preliminary analysis of the costs and benefits of installing and operating a 15-turbine, 30-MW-capacity wind farm that delivers an estimated 16 percent of 2010 onsite demand. The report first describes market and non-market economic costs and benefits associated with operating a wind farm, and then uses a standard life-cycle costing and benefit-cost framework to estimate the costs and benefits of a wind farm. Based on these 'best-estimates' of costs and benefits and on factor, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, the analysis results suggest that the benefits of a Sandia wind farm are greater than its costs. The analysis techniques used herein are applicable to the economic assessment of most if not all forms of renewable energy.

  6. Cost benefit analysis of waste compaction alternatives at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This report presents a cost benefit analysis of the potential procurement and operation of various solid waste compactors, or, of the use of commercial compaction services, for compaction of solid transuranic (TRU), low-level radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities. The cost benefit analysis was conducted to determine if increased compaction capacity at HWM might afford the potential for significant waste volume reduction and annual savings in material, shipping, labor, and disposal costs. In the following cost benefit analysis, capital costs and recurring costs of increased HWM compaction capabilities are considered. Recurring costs such as operating and maintenance costs are estimated based upon detailed knowledge of system parameters. When analyzing the economic benefits of enhancing compaction capabilities, continued use of the existing HWM compaction units is included for comparative purposes. In addition, the benefits of using commercial compaction services instead of procuring a new compactor system are evaluated. 31 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  7. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop- Day 2 Presentations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 30 and October 1, 2014, the Department of Energy hosted a 2-day workshop on “Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies.” Presentations from Day 2 are available here.

  8. Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop- Day 1 Presentations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 30 and October 1, 2014, the Department of Energy hosted a 2-day workshop on “Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies.” Presentations from Day 1 are available here.

  9. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, A.

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

  10. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Vehicle Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts of a Cluster of Energy Technologies Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Vehicle Combustion Engine R&D Program: Impacts of a Cluster of Energy ...

  11. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Analysis of U.S. DOE's Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of U.S. DOE's Geothermal Technologies R&D Program Investments Retrospective Benefit-Cost Analysis of U.S. DOE's Geothermal Technologies R&D Program Investments This report ...

  12. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Wind Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Technologies R&D Program Investments Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Vehicle Combustion Engine R&D Program: Impacts of a Cluster of Energy Technologies

  13. Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Evaluation of Realized Impacts of Public R&D Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Evaluation of Realized Impacts of Public R&D Programs, prepared by Rosalie Ruegg, TIA Consulting Inc. and Gretchen B. Jordan, Sandia National Laboratories, for...

  14. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltaic Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltaic Energy Systems, a report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  15. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investments in Photovoltaic Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltaic Energy Systems, a report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  16. A Framework for the Evaluation of the Cost and Benefits of Microgrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Greg Young; Abbey, Chad; Joos, Geza; Marnay, Chris

    2011-07-15

    A Microgrid is recognized as an innovative technology to help integrate renewables into distribution systems and to provide additional benefits to a variety of stakeholders, such as offsetting infrastructure investments and improving the reliability of the local system. However, these systems require additional investments for control infrastructure, and as such, additional costs and the anticipated benefits need to be quantified in order to determine whether the investment is economically feasible. This paper proposes a methodology for systematizing and representing benefits and their interrelationships based on the UML Use Case paradigm, which allows complex systems to be represented in a concise, elegant format. This methodology is demonstrated by determining the economic feasibility of a Microgrid and Distributed Generation installed on a typical Canadian rural distribution system model as a case study. The study attempts to minimize the cost of energy served to the community, considering the fixed costs associated with Microgrids and Distributed Generation, and suggests benefits to a variety of stakeholders.

  17. Rights and Benefits of Reservists Called to Active Duty

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Detailed description of USERRA benefits and rights for Military employees called to active duty and the HR actions which need to occur.

  18. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, Jenny; Barbose, Galen; Bird, Lori; Weaver, Samantha; Flores, Francisco; Kuskova-Burns, Ksenia; Wiser, Ryan

    2014-03-12

    More than half of U.S. states have renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in place and have collectively deployed approximately 46,000 MW of new renewable energy capacity through year-end 2012. Most of these policies have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS benefits and costs is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. A key aspect of this study is the comprehensive review of existing RPS cost and benefit estimates, in addition to an examination of the variety of methods used to calculate such estimates. Based on available data and estimates reported by utilities and regulators, this study summarizes RPS costs to date. The study considers how those costs may evolve going forward, given scheduled increases in RPS targets and cost containment mechanisms incorporated into existing policies. The report also summarizes RPS benefits estimates, based on published studies for individual states, and discusses key methodological considerations.

  19. Multi-Year Analysis Examines Costs, Benefits, and Impacts of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2016-01-01

    As states consider revising renewable portfolio standard (RPS) programs or developing new ones, careful assessments of the costs, benefits, and other impacts of existing policies will be critical. RPS programs currently exist in 29 states and Washington, D.C. Many of these policies, which were enacted largely during the late 1990s and 2000s, will reach their terminal targets by the end of this decade. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) are engaged in a multi-year project to examine the costs, benefits, and other impacts of state RPS polices both retrospectively and prospectively. This fact sheet overviews this work.

  20. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper focuses on the business value of Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) and ISO 50001, providing an assessment of the costs and benefits associated with SEP implementation at nine SEP-certified facilities across a variety of industrial sectors.

  1. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

  2. Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Evaluation of Realized Impacts of Public R&D Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruegg, Rosalie; Jordan, Gretchen B.

    2011-08-01

    This document provides guidance for evaluators who conduct impact assessments to determine the “realized” economic benefits and costs, energy, environmental benefits, and other impacts of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) R&D programs. The focus of this Guide is on realized outcomes or impacts of R&D programs actually experienced by American citizens, industry, and others. Retrospective evaluations may be contrasted to prospective evaluations that reflect expected or potential outcomes only if assumptions hold. The retrospective approach described in this Guide is based on realized results only and the extent they can be attributed to the efforts of an R&D program. While it has been prepared specifically to guide retrospective benefit-cost analysis of EERE R&D Programs, this report may be used for similar analysis of other public R&D organizations.

  3. Methodological Approaches for Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Russell

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a comprehensive framework for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects and a step-by-step approach for making these estimates. The framework identifies the basic categories of benefits, the beneficiaries of these benefits, and the Smart Grid functionalities that lead to different benefits and proposes ways to estimate these benefits, including their monetization. The report covers cost-effectiveness evaluation, uncertainty, and issues in estimating baseline conditions against which a project would be compared. The report also suggests metrics suitable for describing principal characteristics of a modern Smart Grid to which a project can contribute. This first section of the report presents background information on the motivation for the report and its purpose. Section 2 introduces the methodological framework, focusing on the definition of benefits and a sequential, logical process for estimating them. Beginning with the Smart Grid technologies and functions of a project, it maps these functions to the benefits they produce. Section 3 provides a hypothetical example to illustrate the approach. Section 4 describes each of the 10 steps in the approach. Section 5 covers issues related to estimating benefits of the Smart Grid. Section 6 summarizes the next steps. The methods developed in this study will help improve future estimates - both retrospective and prospective - of the benefits of Smart Grid investments. These benefits, including those to consumers, society in general, and utilities, can then be weighed against the investments. Such methods would be useful in total resource cost tests and in societal versions of such tests. As such, the report will be of interest not only to electric utilities, but also to a broad constituency of stakeholders. Significant aspects of the methodology were used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop its methods for estimating the benefits and costs of its renewable and distributed systems integration demonstration projects as well as its Smart Grid Investment Grant projects and demonstration projects funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The goal of this report, which was cofunded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and DOE, is to present a comprehensive set of methods for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects. By publishing this report, EPRI seeks to contribute to the development of methods that will establish the benefits associated with investments in Smart Grid technologies. EPRI does not endorse the contents of this report or make any representations as to the accuracy and appropriateness of its contents. The purpose of this report is to present a methodological framework that will provide a standardized approach for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid demonstration projects. The framework also has broader application to larger projects, such as those funded under the ARRA. Moreover, with additional development, it will provide the means for extrapolating the results of pilots and trials to at-scale investments in Smart Grid technologies. The framework was developed by a panel whose members provided a broad range of expertise.

  4. Benefits and costs of load management: a technical assistance and resource material handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Ronald; Ackerman, Gary; Lau, Ronald; Patmore, James; Ma, Fred; Sechan, Neil; Schoor, Alan; Simon, Lois; Bleiweis, Bruce; Lloyd, Kevin

    1980-06-01

    This handbook will assist state regulatory authorities and electric utilities in complying with the Load Management Standard of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. The handbook has two major sections. The first discusses load-management techniques in terms of equipment, customer applications, combinations of techniques, etc. Key steps for evaluating the costs and benefits of load management options also are presented. These steps are intended to sequentially eliminate ineffective load-management options as the cost-benefit calculation becomes more detailed. The second section includes up-to-date information on available load-management technologies, models for utility costing, load-management data transfer, prescreening of load-management options, and the load-management literature.

  5. Payment of Health Benefit Expenses for Reservists Called to Active...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Payment of Health Benefit Expenses for Reservists Called to Active Duty Responsible Contacts Bruce Murray HR Policy Advisor E-mail bruce.murray@hq.doe.gov Phone ...

  6. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Geothermal Technologies R&D Program Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Geothermal Technologies R&D Program Investments: Impacts of a Cluster of Energy Technologies, August 2010.

  7. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Analysis of U.S. DOE's Geothermal Technologies R&D Program Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Geothermal Technologies R&D Program Investments: Impacts of a Cluster of Energy Technologies, August 2010.

  8. Reducing emissions from the electricity sector: the costs and benefits nationwide and for the Empire State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Palmer; Dallas Butraw; Jhih-Shyang Shih

    2005-06-15

    Using four models, this study looks at EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) as originally proposed, which differs in only small ways from the final rule issued in March 2005, coupled with several approaches to reducing emissions of mercury including one that differs in only small ways from the final rule also issued in March 2005. This study analyzes what costs and benefits each would incur to New York State and to the nation at large. Benefits to the nation and to New York State significantly outweigh the costs associated with reductions in SO{sub 2}, NOx and mercury, and all policies show dramatic net benefits. The manner in which mercury emissions are regulated will have important implications for the cost of the regulation and for emission levels for SO{sub 2} and NOx and where those emissions are located. Contrary to EPA's findings, CAIR as originally proposed by itself would not keep summer emissions of NOx from electricity generators in the SIP region below the current SIP seasonal NOx cap. In the final CAIR, EPA added a seasonal NOx cap to address seasonal ozone problems. The CAIR with the seasonal NOx cap produces higher net benefits. The effect of the different policies on the mix of fuels used to supply electricity is fairly modest under scenarios similar to the EPA's final rules. A maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach, compared to a trading approach as the way to achieve tighter mercury targets (beyond EPA's proposal), would preserve the role of coal in electricity generation. The evaluation of scenarios with tighter mercury emission controls shows that the net benefits of a maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach exceed the net benefits of a cap and trade approach. 39 refs., 10 figs., 30 figs., 5 apps.

  9. Benefits and Costs of Brine Extraction for Increasing Injection Efficiency In geologic CO2 Sequestration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Watson, David J.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2014-12-31

    Pressure increases attendant with CO2 injection into the subsurface drive many of the risk factors associated with commercial-scale CCS projects, impacting project costs and liabilities in a number of ways. The area of elevated pressure defines the area that must be characterized and monitored; pressure drives fluid flow out of the storage reservoir along higher-permeability pathways that might exist through the caprock into overlying aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs; and pressure drives geomechanical changes that could potentially impact subsurface infrastructure or the integrity of the storage system itself. Pressure also limits injectivity, which can increase capital costs associated with installing additionalmore » wells to meet a given target injection rate. The ability to mitigate pressure increases in storage reservoirs could have significant value to a CCS project, but these benefits are offset by the costs of the pressure mitigation technique itself. Of particular interest for CO2 storage operators is the lifetime cost of implementing brine extraction at a CCS project site, and the relative value of benefits derived from the extraction process. This is expected to vary from site to site and from one implementation scenario to the next. Indeed, quantifying benefits against costs could allow operators to optimize their return on project investment by calculating the most effective scenario for pressure mitigation. This work builds on research recently submitted for publication by the authors examining the costs and benefits of brine extraction across operational scenarios to evaluate the effects of fluid extraction on injection rate to assess the cost effectiveness of several options for reducing the number of injection wells required. Modeling suggests that extracting at 90% of the volumetric equivalent of injection rate resulted in a 1.8% improvement in rate over a non-extraction base case; a four-fold increase in extraction rate results in a 7.6% increase in injection rate over the no-extraction base case. However, the practical impacts on capital costs suggest that this strategy is fiscally ineffective when evaluated solely on this metric, with extraction reducing injection well needs by only one per 56 (1x case) or one per 13 (4x case).« less

  10. Benefits and Costs of Brine Extraction for Increasing Injection Efficiency In geologic CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Watson, David J.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2014-12-31

    Pressure increases attendant with CO2 injection into the subsurface drive many of the risk factors associated with commercial-scale CCS projects, impacting project costs and liabilities in a number of ways. The area of elevated pressure defines the area that must be characterized and monitored; pressure drives fluid flow out of the storage reservoir along higher-permeability pathways that might exist through the caprock into overlying aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs; and pressure drives geomechanical changes that could potentially impact subsurface infrastructure or the integrity of the storage system itself. Pressure also limits injectivity, which can increase capital costs associated with installing additional wells to meet a given target injection rate. The ability to mitigate pressure increases in storage reservoirs could have significant value to a CCS project, but these benefits are offset by the costs of the pressure mitigation technique itself. Of particular interest for CO2 storage operators is the lifetime cost of implementing brine extraction at a CCS project site, and the relative value of benefits derived from the extraction process. This is expected to vary from site to site and from one implementation scenario to the next. Indeed, quantifying benefits against costs could allow operators to optimize their return on project investment by calculating the most effective scenario for pressure mitigation. This work builds on research recently submitted for publication by the authors examining the costs and benefits of brine extraction across operational scenarios to evaluate the effects of fluid extraction on injection rate to assess the cost effectiveness of several options for reducing the number of injection wells required. Modeling suggests that extracting at 90% of the volumetric equivalent of injection rate resulted in a 1.8% improvement in rate over a non-extraction base case; a four-fold increase in extraction rate results in a 7.6% increase in injection rate over the no-extraction base case. However, the practical impacts on capital costs suggest that this strategy is fiscally ineffective when evaluated solely on this metric, with extraction reducing injection well needs by only one per 56 (1x case) or one per 13 (4x case).

  11. A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward MoreComprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity RestructuringPolicies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

    2005-12-01

    During the past three years, government and private organizations have issued more than a dozen studies of the benefits and costs of Regional Transmission Organizations (RTOs). Most of these studies have focused on benefits that can be readily estimated using traditional production-cost simulation techniques, which compare the cost of centralized dispatch under an RTO to dispatch in the absence of an RTO, and on costs associated with RTO start-up and operation. Taken as a whole, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions from these studies because they have not examined potentially much larger benefits (and costs) resulting from the impacts of RTOs on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation. This report: (1) Describes the history of benefit-cost analysis of FERC electricity restructuring policies; (2)Reviews current practice by analyzing 11 RTO benefit-cost studies that were published between 2002 and 2004 and makes recommendations to improve the documentation of data and methods and the presentation of findings in future studies that focus primarily on estimating short-run economic impacts; and (3) Reviews important impacts of FERC policies that have been overlooked or incompletely treated by recent RTO benefit-cost studies and the challenges to crafting more comprehensive assessments of these impacts based on actual performance, including impacts on reliability management, generation and transmission investment and operation, and wholesale electricity market operation.

  12. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Lin, Guanjing; Piette, Mary Ann

    2013-11-26

    Energy information systems are the web-based software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems used to store, analyze, and display building energy data. They often include analysis methods such as baselining, benchmarking, load profiling, and energy anomaly detection. This report documents a large-scale assessment of energy information system (EIS) uses, costs, and energy benefits, based on a series of focused case study investigations that are synthesized into generalizable findings. The overall objective is to provide organizational decision makers with the information they need to make informed choices as to whether or not to invest in an EIS--a promising technology that can enable up to 20 percent site energy savings, quick payback, and persistent low-energy performance when implemented as part of best-practice energy management programs.

  13. Improved cost-benefit techniques in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronin, F.J.; Nesse, R.J.; Vaeth, M.; Wusterbarth, A.R.; Currie, J.W.

    1983-06-01

    The major objective of this report is to help the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory mission, particularly with respect to improving the use of cost-benefit analysis and the economic evaluation of resources within the NRC. The objectives of this effort are: (1) to identify current and future NRC requirements (e.g., licensing) for valuing nonmarket goods; (2) to identify, highlight, and present the relevant efforts of selected federal agencies, some with over two decades of experience in valuing nonmarket goods, in this area; and (3) to review methods for valuing nonmarket impacts and to provide estimats of their magnitudes. Recently proposed legislation may result in a requirement for not only more sophisticated valuation analyses, but more extensive applications of these techniques to issues of concern to the NRC. This paper is intended to provide the NRC with information to more efficiently meet such requirements.

  14. Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-09-01

    This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

  15. An Analysis of the Costs, Benefits, and Implications of Different Approaches to Capturing the Value of Renewable Energy Tax Incentives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark

    2014-04-09

    This report compares the relative costs, benefits, and implications of capturing the value of renewable energy tax benefits in these three different ways – applying them against outside income , carrying them forward in time until they can be fully absorbed internally, or monetizing them through third-party tax equity investors – to see which method is most competitive under various scenarios. It finds that under current law and late-2013 market conditions, monetization makes sense for all but the most tax-efficient project sponsors. In other words, for most project sponsors, bringing in third-party tax equity currently provides net benefits to a project.

  16. Examining the effectiveness of municipal solid waste management systems: An integrated cost-benefit analysis perspective with a financial cost modeling in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Yu-Chi; Fujiwara, Takeshi

    2011-06-15

    In order to develop a sound material-cycle society, cost-effective municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems are required for the municipalities in the context of the integrated accounting system for MSW management. Firstly, this paper attempts to establish an integrated cost-benefit analysis (CBA) framework for evaluating the effectiveness of MSW management systems. In this paper, detailed cost/benefit items due to waste problems are particularly clarified. The stakeholders of MSW management systems, including the decision-makers of the municipalities and the citizens, are expected to reconsider the waste problems in depth and thus take wise actions with the aid of the proposed CBA framework. Secondly, focusing on the financial cost, this study develops a generalized methodology to evaluate the financial cost-effectiveness of MSW management systems, simultaneously considering the treatment technological levels and policy effects. The impacts of the influencing factors on the annual total and average financial MSW operation and maintenance (O and M) costs are analyzed in the Taiwanese case study with a demonstrative short-term future projection of the financial costs under scenario analysis. The established methodology would contribute to the evaluation of the current policy measures and to the modification of the policy design for the municipalities.

  17. A modified cost benefit analysis of coastal development (tourism) with special reference to Longbay Beach--Negril, Jamaica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinds, P.W.; Ngandu, M.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the cost and benefits of the Tourist Industry in Negril over the period 1970-93, including its impact on the environment. Traditional cost benefit analysis will be used with appropriate modifications. The Long Bay stretch has been an area of rapid expansion over the last ten to twenty years. This expansion has rapidly outgrown infrastructure development and this, the potential environmental problems are already showing up in marine pollution and other forms of environmental degradation. Although there is numerous evidence of environmental impacts on tourism, there has not been a lot of work done on quantifying these impacts, and policy makers have not been ensuring that these externalities are internalized by these hotels, in an effort to make them better stewards of the environment. This study will not only look at the economic cost and benefit of the industry from the point of view of revenue and expenditure, but also the environment cost, benefit and policy recommendations necessary to accomplish this.

  18. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Flexibility Retrofits for Coal and Gas-Fueled Power Plants: August 2012 - December 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkataraman, S.; Jordan, G.; O'Connor, M.; Kumar, N.; Lefton, S.; Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Palchak, D.; Cochran, J.

    2013-12-01

    High penetrations of wind and solar power plants can induce on/off cycling and ramping of fossil-fueled generators. This can lead to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions for fossil-fueled generators. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) determined these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations to investigate the full impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This report studies the costs and benefits of retrofitting existing units for improved operational flexibility (i.e., capability to turndown lower, start and stop faster, and ramp faster between load set-points).

  19. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentcost-benefit-analysis-plug-hybrid-ele Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible...

  20. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Flexibility Retrofits for Coal and Gas...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study. ... (such as peak firing) which have a tendency to increase variable operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. ...

  1. Performance and cost benefits associated with nonimaging secondary concentrators used in point-focus dish solar thermal applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

    1987-09-01

    Using nonimaging secondary concentrators in point-focus applications may permit the development of more cost-effective concentrator systems by either improving performance or reducing costs. Secondaries may also increase design flexibility. The major objective of this study was to develop as complete an understanding as possible of the quantitative performance and cost effects associated with deploying nonimaging secondary concentrators at the focal zone of point-focus solar thermal concentrators. A performance model was developed that uses a Monte Carlo ray-trace procedure to determine the focal plane distribution of a paraboloidal primary as a function of optical parameters. It then calculates the corresponding optimized concentration and thermal efficiency as a function of temperature with and without the secondary. To examine the potential cost benefits associated with secondaries, a preliminary model for the rational optimization of performance versus cost trade-offs was developed. This model suggests a possible 10% to 20% reduction in the cost of delivered energy when secondaries are used. This is a lower limit, and the benefits may even be greater if using a secondary permits the development of inexpensive primary technologies for which the performance would not otherwise be viable. 20 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Project Benefits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Benefits of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project including reducing energy upgrade costs for consumers, employers, and program administrators.

  3. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Vehicle Combustion Engine R&D Program: Impacts of a Cluster of Energy Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Vehicle Combustion Engine R&D Investments: Impacts of a Cluster of Energy Technologies, May 2010.

  4. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Wind Energy R&D Program: Impact of Selected Energy Technology Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Wind Energy R&D Program: Impact of Selected Energy Technology Investments, June 2010.

  5. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this report is to provide estimates of volumes and development costs of known nonassociated gas reserves in selected, potentially important supplier nations, using a standard set of costing algorithms and conventions. Estimates of undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves and the cost of drilling development wells, production equipment, gas processing facilities, and pipeline construction are made at the individual field level. A discounted cash-flow model of production, investment, and expenses is used to estimate the present value cost of developing each field on a per-thousand-cubic-foot (Mcf) basis. These gas resource cost estimates for individual accumulations (that is, fields or groups of fields) then were aggregated into country-specific price-quantity curves. These curves represent the cost of developing and transporting natural gas to an export point suitable for tanker shipments or to a junction with a transmission line. The additional costs of LNG or methanol conversion are not included. A brief summary of the cost of conversion to methanol and transportation to the United States is contained in Appendix D: Implications of Gas Development Costs for Methanol Conversion.

  6. Plug-in Hybrid Modeling and Application: Cost/Benefit Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, A.

    2006-08-24

    Presents data from a simulation of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle efficiency and cost, including baseline vehicle assumptions, powertrain technology scenarios, and component modeling.

  7. Summary and Presentations from “Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies” Workshop Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beginning on September 30, 2014, the Department of Energy hosted a two-day workshop on “Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies” in Washington DC. The purpose of the workshop was to foster discussion about the analytic challenges associated with valuing the diverse impacts of deploying distributed energy technologies. Many valuation studies have been published in recent years, using different methods and assumptions.

  8. Multi-Year Analysis Examines Costs, Benefits, and Impacts of Renewable Portfolio Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    states consider revising renewable portfolio standard (RPS) programs or developing new ones, careful assessments of the costs, benefits, and other impacts of existing policies will be critical. RPS programs currently exist in 29 states and Washington, D.C. Many of these policies, which were enacted largely during the late 1990s and 2000s, will reach their terminal targets by the end of this decade. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

  9. An Analysis of the Costs, Benefits, and Implications of Different Approaches to Capturing the Value of Renewable Energy Tax Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report compares the costs, benefits, and implications of capturing the value of renewable energy tax incentives in three different ways – applying them against outside income, carrying them forward in time until they can be absorbed internally, or monetizing them through third-party tax equity investors – to see which method is most competitive under various scenarios. It finds that under late-2013 market conditions, monetization makes sense for all but the most tax-efficient project sponsors. Under a variety of plausible future policy scenarios relevant to wind and solar projects, however, the benefit of monetization no longer outweighs the high cost of tax equity, and it makes more sense for sponsors – even those without tax appetite – to use tax benefits internally rather than to monetize them. These findings have implications for how wind and solar projects are likely to be financed in the future, which, in turn, influences their LCOE. For example, under these scenarios, many wind and solar projects would likely forego tax equity in favor of cheaper sources of capital. This shift to lower-cost capital would, in turn, partially mitigate any negative impact on LCOE resulting from the policy change itself (e.g., in the case of tax credit expiration).

  10. Modeling of GE Appliances: Cost Benefit Study of Smart Appliances in Wholesale Energy, Frequency Regulation, and Spinning Reserve Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Parker, Graham B.

    2012-12-31

    This report is the second in a series of three reports describing the potential of GE’s DR-enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid. The first report described the modeling methodology used to represent the GE appliances in the GridLAB-D simulation environment and the estimated potential for peak demand reduction at various deployment levels. The third report will explore the technical capability of aggregated group actions to positively impact grid stability, including frequency and voltage regulation and spinning reserves, and the impacts on distribution feeder voltage regulation, including mitigation of fluctuations caused by high penetration of photovoltaic distributed generation. In this report, a series of analytical methods were presented to estimate the potential cost benefit of smart appliances while utilizing demand response. Previous work estimated the potential technical benefit (i.e., peak reduction) of smart appliances, while this report focuses on the monetary value of that participation. The effects on wholesale energy cost and possible additional revenue available by participating in frequency regulation and spinning reserve markets were explored.

  11. Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

  12. Three-Stage Production Cost Modeling Approach for Evaluating the Benefits of Intra-Hour Scheduling between Balancing Authorities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Hunsaker, Matthew; Guo, Tao

    2015-07-30

    This paper introduces a Production Cost Modeling (PCM) approach to evaluate the benefits of intra-hour scheduling between Balancing Authorities (BAs). The system operation is modeled in a three-stage sequential manner: day ahead (DA)-hour ahead (HA)-real time (RT). In addition to contingency reserve, each BA will need to carry out “up” and “down” load following and regulation reserve capacity requirements in the DA and HA time frames. In the real-time simulation, only contingency and regulation reserves are carried out as load following is deployed. To model current real-time operation with hourly schedules, a new constraint was introduced to force each BA net exchange schedule deviation from HA schedules to be within NERC ACE limits. Case studies that investigate the benefits of moving from hourly exchange schedules between WECC BAs into 10-min exchange schedules under two different levels of wind and solar penetration (11% and 33%) are presented.

  13. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-16

    State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

  14. Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume I: Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Section 131(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) (Public Law 102-486) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the costs and benefits of federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy-intensive industries. It also requires DOE to evaluate the role of reporting and targets in improving energy efficiency. Specifically, the legislation states: Not later than one year after the data of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall, in consultation with affected industries, evaluate and report to the Congress regarding the establishment of Federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy intensive industries. Such report shall include an evaluation of the costs and benefits of such reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets, and recommendations regarding the role of such activities in improving energy efficiency in energy intensive industries. This report is DOE`s response to that directive. It is the culmination of a year-long study that included (1) analysis of documents pertaining to a previous reporting and targets effort, the industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements Program (or the CE-189 program, following the designation of the reporting form used to collect data in that program), administered by DOE from 1976 to 1985, as well as other important background information; (2) extensive consultations with government and industry officials regarding the CE-189 Program, experience with other programs that have reporting elements, and the attributes of possible alternative strategies for reporting and targets; and (3) analyses of the costs and benefits of the CE-189 Program and several alternatives to the CE-189 approach.

  15. National and Regional Water and Wastewater Rates For Use inCost-Benefit Models and Evaluations of Water Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Diane C.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Melody, Moya

    2006-09-01

    Calculating the benefits and costs of water conservation orefficiency programs requires knowing the marginal cost of the water andwastewater saved by those programs. Developing an accurate picture of thepotential cost savings from water conservation requires knowing the costof the last few units of water consumed or wastewater released, becausethose are the units that would be saved by increased water efficiency.This report describes the data we obtained on water and wastewater ratesand costs, data gaps we identified, and other issues related to using thedata to estimate the cost savings that might accrue from waterconservation programs. We identified three water and wastewater ratesources. Of these, we recommend using Raftelis Financial Corporation(RFC) because it: a) has the most comprehensive national coverage; and b)provides greatest detail on rates to calculate marginal rates. The figurebelow shows the regional variation in water rates for a range ofconsumption blocks. Figure 1A Marginal Rates of Water Blocks by Regionfrom RFC 2004Water and wastewater rates are rising faster than the rateof inflation. For example, from 1996 to 2004 the average water rateincreased 39.5 percent, average wastewater rate increased 37.8 percent,the CPI (All Urban) increased 20.1 percent, and the CPI (Water andSewerage Maintenance) increased 31.1 percent. On average, annualincreases were 4.3 percent for water and 4.1 percent for wastewater,compared to 2.3 percent for the All Urban CPI and 3.7 percent for the CPIfor water and sewerage maintenance. If trends in rates for water andwastewater rates continue, water-efficient products will become morevaluable and more cost-effective.

  16. Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak-Load Shifting and Spinning Reserves Cost/Benefit Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.; Srivastava, Viraj; Li, Shun

    2010-12-01

    In this report, we present the results of an analytical cost/benefit study of residential smart appliances from a utility/grid perspective in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the ENERGY STAR program within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the petition is in part to provide appliance manufacturers incentives to hasten the production of smart appliances. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the societal challenges, such as anthropogenic global warming, associated with increased electricity demand, and facilitate increased penetration of renewable sources of power. The appliances we consider include refrigerator/freezers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, room air-conditioners, and dishwashers. The petition requests the recognition that providing an appliance with smart grid capability, i.e., products that meet the definition of a smart appliance, is at least equivalent to a corresponding five percent in operational machine efficiencies. It is then expected that given sufficient incentives and value propositions, and suitable automation capabilities built into smart appliances, residential consumers will be adopting these smart appliances and will be willing participants in addressing the aforementioned societal challenges by more effectively managing their home electricity consumption. The analytical model we utilize in our cost/benefit analysis consists of a set of user-definable assumptions such as the definition of on-peak (hours of day, days of week, months of year), the expected percentage of normal consumer electricity consumption (also referred to as appliance loads) that can shifted from peak hours to off-peak hours, the average power rating of each appliance, etc. Based on these assumptions, we then formulate what the wholesale grid operating-cost savings, or benefits, would be if the smart capabilities of appliances were invoked, and some percentage of appliance loads were shifted away from peak hours to run during off-peak hours, and appliance loads served power-system balancing needs such as spinning reserves that would otherwise have to be provided by generators. The rationale is that appliance loads can be curtailed for about ten minutes or less in response to a grid contingency without any diminution in the quality of service to the consumer. We then estimate the wholesale grid operating-cost savings based on historical wholesale-market clearing prices (location marginal and spinning reserve) from major wholesale power markets in the United States. The savings derived from the smart grid capabilities of an appliance are then compared to the savings derived from a five percent increase in traditional operational machine efficiencies, referred to as cost in this report, to determine whether the savings in grid operating costs (benefits) are at least as high as or higher than the operational machine efficiency credit (cost).

  17. Broadening the Appeal of Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: Capturing Both Carbon Mitigation and Development Benefits of Clean Energy Technologies; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowlin, S.; Cochran, J.; Cox, S.; Davison, C.; van der Gaast, Y.

    2012-08-01

    Low emission development strategies (LEDS) articulate policies and implementation plans that enable countries to advance sustainable, climate-resilient development and private sector growth while significantly reducing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions traditionally associated with economic growth. In creating a LEDS, policy makers often have access to information on abatement potential and costs for clean energy technologies, but there is a scarcity of economy-wide approaches for evaluating and presenting information on other dimensions of importance to development, such as human welfare, poverty alleviation, and energy security. To address this shortcoming, this paper proposes a new tool for communicating development benefits to policy makers as part of a LEDS process. The purpose of this tool is two-fold: 1. Communicate development benefits associated with each clean energy-related intervention; 2. Facilitate decision-making on which combination of interventions best contributes to development goals. To pilot this tool, the authors created a visual using data on developmental impacts identified through the Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) project in Montenegro. The visual will then be revised to reflect new data established through the TNA that provides information on cost, GHG mitigation, as well as the range and magnitude of developmental impacts.

  18. Best Practices in Determining the Impacts of Municipal Programs on Energy Use, Air Quality, and Other Ancillary Costs and Benefits (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.; Mosey, G.

    2006-10-03

    This poster, submitted for the CU Energy Initiative/NREL Symposium on October 3, 2006 held in Boulder, Colorado, discusses best practices for determining the impacts of municipal programs on energy use, air quality, and other costs and benefits.

  19. Measuring the Costs and Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump Deployment and The Potential Employment, Energy, and Environmental Impacts of Direct Use Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: To measure the costs and economic; social; and environmental benefits of nationwide geothermal heat pump (GHP) deployment; and To survey selected states as to their potential employment; energy use and savings; and environmental impact for direct use applications.

  20. Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Investment in Energy Storage Technologies for Hybrid and Electric Cars and Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Investment in Energy Storage Technologies for Hybrid and Electric Cars and Trucks, Final Report, Prepared for Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang; Slaa, Jan Willem; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-12-15

    Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world and in California. Successful implementation of applicable emerging technologies not only may help advance productivities, improve environmental impacts, or enhance industrial competitiveness, but also can play a significant role in climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Developing new information on costs and savings benefits of energy efficient emerging technologies applicable in California market is important for policy makers as well as the industries. Therefore, provision of timely evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to California is the focus of this report. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select a set of emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. Specifically, this report contains the results from performing Task 3 Technology Characterization for California Industries for the project titled Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, sponsored by California Energy Commission (CEC) and managed by California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE). The project purpose is to characterize energy savings, technology costs, market potential, and economic viability of newly selected technologies applicable to California. In this report, LBNL first performed technology reviews to identify new or under-utilized technologies that could offer potential in improving energy efficiency and additional benefits to California industries as well as in the U.S. industries, followed by detailed technology assessment on each targeted technology, with a focus on California applications. A total of eleven emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California were selected and characterized with detailed information in this report. The outcomes essentially include a multi-page summary profile for each of the 11 emerging or underutilized technologies applicable to California industries, based on the formats used in the technology characterization reports (Xu et al. 2010; Martin et al. 2000).

  2. Membrane-Based Air Composition Control for Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: A Benefit and Cost Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Stork; R. Poola

    1998-10-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to assess the benefits and costs of several membrane-based technologies. The technologies evaluated will be used in automotive emissions-control and performance-enhancement systems incorporated into light-duty diesel vehicle engines. Such engines are among the technologies that are being considered to power vehicles developed under the government-industry Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from diesel engines have long been considered a barrier to use of diesels in urban areas. Recently, particulate matter (PM) emissions have also become an area of increased concern because of new regulations regarding emissions of particulate matter measuring 2.5 micrometers or less (PM{sub 2.5}). Particulates are of special concern for diesel engines in the PNGV program; the program has a research goal of 0.01 gram per mile (g/mi) of particulate matter emissions under the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) cycle. This extremely low level (one-fourth the level of the Tier II standard) could threaten the viability of using diesel engines as stand-alone powerplants or in hybrid-electric vehicles. The techniques analyzed in this study can reduce NO{sub x} and particulate emissions and even increase the power density of the diesel engines used in light-duty diesel vehicles.

  3. A Cost-Benefit Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining in the Kraft Pulp and Paper Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Larson; Stefano Consonni; Ryan E. Katofsky; Kristiina Iisa; W. James Frederick

    2007-03-31

    Production of liquid fuels and chemicals via gasification of kraft black liquor and woody residues (''biorefining'') has the potential to provide significant economic returns for kraft pulp and paper mills replacing Tomlinson boilers beginning in the 2010-2015 timeframe. Commercialization of gasification technologies is anticipated in this period, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are in most cases already commercially established today in the ''gas-to-liquids'' industry. These conclusions are supported by detailed analysis carried out in a two-year project co-funded by the American Forest and Paper Association and the Biomass Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. This work assessed the energy, environment, and economic costs and benefits of biorefineries at kraft pulp and paper mills in the United States. Seven detailed biorefinery process designs were developed for a reference freesheet pulp/paper mill in the Southeastern U.S., together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. Commercial (''Nth'') plant levels of technology performance and cost were assumed. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which would be refined to vehicle fuels at existing petroleum refineries), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or LPG substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. Compared to installing a new Tomlinson power/recovery system, a biorefinery would require larger capital investment. However, because the biorefinery would have higher energy efficiencies, lower air emissions, and a more diverse product slate (including transportation fuel), the internal rates of return (IRR) on the incremental capital investments would be attractive under many circumstances. For nearly all of the cases examined in the study, the IRR lies between 14% and 18%, assuming a 25-year levelized world oil price of $50/bbl--the US Department of Energy's 2006 reference oil price projection. The IRRs would rise to as high as 35% if positive incremental environmental benefits associated with biorefinery products are monetized (e.g., if an excise tax credit for the liquid fuel is available comparable to the one that exists for ethanol in the United States today). Moreover, if future crude oil prices are higher ($78/bbl levelized price, the US Department of Energy's 2006 high oil price scenario projection, representing an extrapolation of mid-2006 price levels), the calculated IRR exceeds 45% in some cases when environmental attributes are also monetized. In addition to the economic benefits to kraft pulp/paper producers, biorefineries widely implemented at pulp mills in the U.S. would result in nationally-significant liquid fuel production levels, petroleum savings, greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and criteria-pollutant reductions. These are quantified in this study. A fully-developed pulpmill biorefinery industry could be double or more the size of the current corn-ethanol industry in the United States in terms of annual liquid fuel production. Forest biomass resources are sufficient in the United States to sustainably support such a scale of forest biorefining in addition to the projected growth in pulp and paper production.

  4. Examples of Benefits from the NEPA process for ARRA funded activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efforts to implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) include ensuring, and reporting on, timely NEPA reviews prepared in support of projects and activities funded under major provisions of ARRA. In addition to reporting on the status of the NEPA environmental reviews, agencies also report on the benefits of NEPA.

  5. Project Functions and Activities Definitions for Total Project Cost

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides guidelines developed to define the obvious disparity of opinions and practices with regard to what exactly is included in total estimated cost (TEC) and total project cost (TPC).

  6. Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Investment in Energy Storage Technologies for Hybrid and Electric Cars and Trucks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    December 2013 Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Investment in Energy Storage Technologies for Hybrid and Electric Cars and Trucks Final Report Prepared for Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 20585 Prepared by Albert N. Link Alan C. O'Connor Troy J. Scott Sara E. Casey Ross J. Loomis J. Lynn Davis RTI International 3040 Cornwallis Road Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 RTI Project Number 0213238

  7. Lifecycle Prognostics Architecture for Selected High-Cost Active Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Lybeck; B. Pham; M. Tawfik; J. B. Coble; R. M. Meyer; P. Ramuhalli; L. J. Bond

    2011-08-01

    There are an extensive body of knowledge and some commercial products available for calculating prognostics, remaining useful life, and damage index parameters. The application of these technologies within the nuclear power community is still in its infancy. Online monitoring and condition-based maintenance is seeing increasing acceptance and deployment, and these activities provide the technological bases for expanding to add predictive/prognostics capabilities. In looking to deploy prognostics there are three key aspects of systems that are presented and discussed: (1) component/system/structure selection, (2) prognostic algorithms, and (3) prognostics architectures. Criteria are presented for component selection: feasibility, failure probability, consequences of failure, and benefits of the prognostics and health management (PHM) system. The basis and methods commonly used for prognostics algorithms are reviewed and summarized. Criteria for evaluating PHM architectures are presented: open, modular architecture; platform independence; graphical user interface for system development and/or results viewing; web enabled tools; scalability; and standards compatibility. Thirteen software products were identified and discussed in the context of being potentially useful for deployment in a PHM program applied to systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These products were evaluated by using information available from company websites, product brochures, fact sheets, scholarly publications, and direct communication with vendors. The thirteen products were classified into four groups of software: (1) research tools, (2) PHM system development tools, (3) deployable architectures, and (4) peripheral tools. Eight software tools fell into the deployable architectures category. Of those eight, only two employ all six modules of a full PHM system. Five systems did not offer prognostic estimates, and one system employed the full health monitoring suite but lacked operations and maintenance support. Each product is briefly described in Appendix A. Selection of the most appropriate software package for a particular application will depend on the chosen component, system, or structure. Ongoing research will determine the most appropriate choices for a successful demonstration of PHM systems in aging NPPs.

  8. Investing in International Information Exchange Activities to Improve the Safety, Cost Effectiveness and Schedule of Cleanup - 13281

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seed, Ian; James, Paula; Mathieson, John; Judd, Laurie; Elmetti-Ramirez, Rosa; Han, Ana

    2013-07-01

    With decreasing budgets and increasing pressure on completing cleanup missions as quickly, safely and cost-effectively as possible, there is significant benefit to be gained from collaboration and joint efforts between organizations facing similar issues. With this in mind, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) have formally agreed to share information on lessons learned on the development and application of new technologies and approaches to improve the safety, cost effectiveness and schedule of the cleanup legacy wastes. To facilitate information exchange a range of tools and methodologies were established. These included tacit knowledge exchange through facilitated meetings, conference calls and Site visits as well as explicit knowledge exchange through document sharing and newsletters. A DOE web-based portal has been established to capture these exchanges and add to them via discussion boards. The information exchange is operating at the Government-to-Government strategic level as well as at the Site Contractor level to address both technical and managerial topic areas. This effort has resulted in opening a dialogue and building working relationships. In some areas joint programs of work have been initiated thus saving resource and enabling the parties to leverage off one another activities. The potential benefits of high quality information exchange are significant, ranging from cost avoidance through identification of an approach to a problem that has been proven elsewhere to cost sharing and joint development of a new technology to address a common problem. The benefits in outcomes significantly outweigh the costs of the process. The applicability of the tools and methods along with the lessons learned regarding some key issues is of use to any organization that wants to improve value for money. In the waste management marketplace, there are a multitude of challenges being addressed by multiple organizations and the effective pooling and exchange of knowledge and experience can only be of benefit to all participants to help complete the cleanup mission more quickly and more cost effectively. This paper examines in detail the tools and processes used to promote information exchange and the progress made to date. It also discusses the challenges and issues involved and proposes recommendations to others who are involved in similar activities. (authors)

  9. Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Satchwell, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Schlegel, Jeff

    2010-08-06

    Increased interest by state (and federal) policymakers and regulatory agencies in pursuing aggressive energy efficiency efforts could deliver significant utility bill savings for customers while having long-term implications for ratepayers (e.g. potential rate impacts). Equity and distributional concerns associated with the authorized recovery of energy efficiency program costs may necessitate the pursuit of alternative program funding approaches. In 2008, Massachusetts passed the Green Communities Act which directed its energy efficiency (EE) program administrators to obtain all cost-effective EE resources. This goal has translated into achieving annual electric energy savings equivalent to a 2.4% reduction in retail sales from energy efficiency programs in 2012. Representatives of electricity consumer groups supported the new portfolio of EE programs (and the projected bill savings) but raised concerns about the potential rate impacts associated with achieving such aggressive EE goals, leading policymakers to seek out alternative funding sources which can potentially mitigate these effects. Utility administrators have also raised concerns about under-recovery of fixed costs when aggressive energy efficiency programs are pursued and have proposed ratemaking policies (e.g. decoupling) and business models that better align the utility's financial interests with the state's energy efficiency public policy goals. Quantifying these concerns and identifying ways they can be addressed are crucial steps in gaining the support of major stakeholder groups - lessons that can apply to other states looking to significantly increase savings targets that can be achieved from their own ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs. We use a pro-forma utility financial model to quantify the bill and rate impacts on electricity customers when very aggressive annual energy efficiency savings goals ({approx}2.4%) are achieved over the long-term and also assess the impact of different cost recovery approaches that integrate alternative revenue sources. We also analyze alternative lost fixed cost recovery approaches to better understand how to mitigate the erosion of utility shareholder returns in states that have adopted (and achieved) very aggressive savings targets.

  10. Further development of the cleanable steel HEPA filter, cost/benefit analysis, and comparison with competing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.; Witherell, C.; McGregor, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have made further progress in developing a cleanable steel fiber HEPA filter. We fabricated a pleated cylindrical cartridge using commercially available steel fiber media that is made with 1 {mu}m stainless steel fibers and sintered into a sheet form. Test results at the Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Station at Oak Ridge show the prototype filter cartridge has 99.99% efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols and a pressure drop of 1.5 inches. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned using reverse air pulses. Our analysis of commercially optimized filters suggest that cleanable steel HEPA filters need to be made from steel fibers less than 1 {mu}m, and preferably 0.5 {mu}m, to meet the standard HEPA filter requirements in production units. We have demonstrated that 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers can be produced using the fiber bundling and drawing process. The 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers are then sintered into small filter samples and tested for efficiency and pressure drop. Test results on the sample showed a penetration of 0.0015% at 0.3 {mu}m and a pressure drop of 1.15 inches at 6.9 ft/min (3.5 cm/s) velocity. Based on these results, steel fiber media can easily meet the requirements of 0.03% penetration and 1.0 inch of pressure drop by using less fibers in the media. A cost analysis of the cleanable steel HEPA filter shows that, although the steel HEPA filter costs much more than the standard glass fiber HEPA filter, it has the potential to be very cost effective because of the high disposal costs of contaminated HEPA filters. We estimate that the steel HEPA filter will save an average of $16,000 over its 30 year life. The additional savings from the clean-up costs resulting from ruptured glass HEPA filters during accidents was not included but makes the steel HEPA filter even more cost effective. We also present the results of our evaluation of competing technologies with metallic and ceramic powder filters, ceramic fiber falters, and reinforced glass fiber filters. In general, the metallic and ceramic powder filters have pressure drops in excess of 25 inches of water for HEPA grade efficiencies and are therefore not viable candidates. The ceramic fiber filters cannot meet the HEPA efficiency because the fiber diameters are too large. The reinforced glass fiber filter is a promising candidate for the cleanable HEPA filter but requires additional development and testing to confirm its potential to be repeatedly cleaned. This report is based upon material extracted from a DOE technical review of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program and from the final report of a systems analysis of cleanable steel HEPA filters.

  11. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.; Slaa, J.W.; Sathaye, J.

    2010-12-15

    Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing CO2 emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Successful implementation of emerging technologies not only can help advance productivities and competitiveness but also can play a significant role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies is the focus of our work in this project. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. This report contains the results from performing Task 2"Technology evaluation" for the project titled"Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies," which was sponsored by California Energy Commission and managed by CIEE. The project purpose is to analyze market status, market potential, and economic viability of selected technologies applicable to the U.S. In this report, LBNL first performed re-assessments of all of the 33 emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies, including re-evaluation of the 26 technologies that were previously identified by Martin et al. (2000) and their potential significance to energy use in the industries, and new evaluation of additional seven technologies. The re-assessments were essentially updated with recent information that we searched and collected from literature to the extent possible. The progress of selected technologies as they diffused into the marketplace from 2000 to 2010 was then discussed in this report. The report also includes updated detailed characterizations of 15 technologies studied in 2000, with comparisons noted.

  12. Activity: How Much Does it Cost to Light Your School? | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Activity: How Much Does it Cost to Light Your School? Activity: How Much Does it Cost to Light Your School? Students compute the cost of electricity used to light their classroom and their school for various lengths of time. They then compute the amount of coal needed to produce the electricity used for one hour of light in their classroom. PDF icon Activity: How Much Does It Cost to Light Your School? More Documents & Publications Energy Basics Comparing Light Bulbs Energy

  13. Wind Energy Benefits (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

  14. A wedge-based approach to estimating health co-benefits of climate change mitigation activities in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balbus, John M.; Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Chari, Ramya; Millstein, Dev; Ebi, Kristie L.

    2015-02-01

    While it has been recognized that actions reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can have significant positive and negative impacts on human health through reductions in ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations, these impacts are rarely taken into account when analyzing specific policies. This study presents a new framework for estimating the change in health outcomes resulting from implementation of specific carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction activities, allowing comparison of different sectors and options for climate mitigation activities. Our estimates suggest that in the year 2020, the reductions in adverse health outcomes from lessened exposure to PM2.5 would yield economic benefits in the range of $6 to $14 billion (in 2008 USD), depending on the specific activity. This equates to between $40 and $93 per metric ton of CO2 in health benefits. Specific climate interventions will vary in the health co-benefits they provide as well as in potential harms that may result from their implementation. Rigorous assessment of these health impacts is essential for guiding policy decisions as efforts to reduce GHG emissions increase in scope and intensity.

  15. IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rennich, M.J. [comp.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

  16. CHAPTER V. BENEFITS V-1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 350.1 9-30-96 CHAPTER V. BENEFITS V-1 1. OBJECTIVE. To ensure that contractors that perform work under cost reimbursement contracts develop employee benefit programs that will ...

  17. Quantitative Assessment of Distributed Energy Resource Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, S.W.

    2003-05-22

    Distributed energy resources (DER) offer many benefits, some of which are readily quantified. Other benefits, however, are less easily quantifiable because they may require site-specific information about the DER project or analysis of the electrical system to which the DER is connected. The purpose of this study is to provide analytical insight into several of the more difficult calculations, using the PJM power pool as an example. This power pool contains most of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. The techniques used here could be applied elsewhere, and the insights from this work may encourage various stakeholders to more actively pursue DER markets or to reduce obstacles that prevent the full realization of its benefits. This report describes methodologies used to quantify each of the benefits listed in Table ES-1. These methodologies include bulk power pool analyses, regional and national marginal cost evaluations, as well as a more traditional cost-benefit approach for DER owners. The methodologies cannot however determine which stakeholder will receive the benefits; that must be determined by regulators and legislators, and can vary from one location to another.

  18. Public Benefit Funds Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State and/or local financial incentives and programs help building owners execute energy efficiency projects by lowering cost burdens through public benefits funds, grants, loans, or property-assessed clean energy financing; personal, corporate, property, and sales tax incentives; or assistance with permitting fee reduction or elimination.

  19. Benefit Forms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The employment and benefits forms that you will be asked to complete as part of this orientation program can be numerous. Each, however, serves an important purpose in ensuring proper recording of...

  20. Retiree Benefits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Retiree Benefits /about/_assets/images/icon-70th.jpg Retiree Benefits Employees and retirees are the building blocks of the Lab's success. Our employees get to contribute to the most pressing issues facing the nation. Eligibility, Enrollment» AD&D Insurance» Medicare Coordination» Non-Medicare Medical» Behavioral Health» Pension Plan (TCP1)» Medicare-Eligible Medical» Prescription Drugs» 401(k) Options» Dental, Vision, Legal» Non-Medicare retirees Plan options Insurance providers

  1. Microsoft Word - Clean Line Plains & Eastern Benefits 7January2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results summarizing key benefits to Tennessee and Arkansas. From our detailed nodal production cost simulation of the power system, we estimate benefits to Tennessee and Arkansas ...

  2. Wind Energy Benefits: Slides

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    1. Wind energy is cost competitive. *Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M. (2015). 2014 Wind Technologies Market Report. U.S. Department of Energy. Wind Energy Benefits Photo from DOE Flickr. 465 020 003 In 2014, the average levelized price of signed wind power purchase agreements was about 2.35 cents per kilowatt-hour. This price is cost competitive with new gas-fired power plants and projects compare favorably through 2040.* 2. Wind energy creates jobs. American Wind Energy Association. (2015). U.S. Wind

  3. SEP Voluntary Cost/Benefit Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE maintains documentation of Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) certifications as the SEP Administrator.

  4. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01

    This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and low operating costs.

  5. NEPA Success Stories and Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEPA Success Stories and Benefits NEPA Success Stories and Benefits September 16, 2013 Examples of Benefits from the NEPA process for ARRA funded activities Efforts to implement ...

  6. Incorporating psychological influences in probabilistic cost analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kujawski, Edouard; Alvaro, Mariana; Edwards, William

    2004-01-08

    Today's typical probabilistic cost analysis assumes an ''ideal'' project that is devoid of the human and organizational considerations that heavily influence the success and cost of real-world projects. In the real world ''Money Allocated Is Money Spent'' (MAIMS principle); cost underruns are rarely available to protect against cost overruns while task overruns are passed on to the total project cost. Realistic cost estimates therefore require a modified probabilistic cost analysis that simultaneously models the cost management strategy including budget allocation. Psychological influences such as overconfidence in assessing uncertainties and dependencies among cost elements and risks are other important considerations that are generally not addressed. It should then be no surprise that actual project costs often exceed the initial estimates and are delivered late and/or with a reduced scope. This paper presents a practical probabilistic cost analysis model that incorporates recent findings in human behavior and judgment under uncertainty, dependencies among cost elements, the MAIMS principle, and project management practices. Uncertain cost elements are elicited from experts using the direct fractile assessment method and fitted with three-parameter Weibull distributions. The full correlation matrix is specified in terms of two parameters that characterize correlations among cost elements in the same and in different subsystems. The analysis is readily implemented using standard Monte Carlo simulation tools such as {at}Risk and Crystal Ball{reg_sign}. The analysis of a representative design and engineering project substantiates that today's typical probabilistic cost analysis is likely to severely underestimate project cost for probability of success values of importance to contractors and procuring activities. The proposed approach provides a framework for developing a viable cost management strategy for allocating baseline budgets and contingencies. Given the scope and magnitude of the cost-overrun problem, the benefits are likely to be significant.

  7. Benefits of a Miniaturized Approach

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits of a Miniaturized Approach Sandia's microsystems-enabled photovoltaics (MEPV) uses microdesign and microfabrication techniques to produce solar cells as small as 3-20 microns thick and 100-1000 microns wide. These PV cells are then placed or 'printed' onto a low-cost substrate with embedded contacts and microlenses for focusing sunlight onto the cells. Moving to micro-scale PV cell sizes results in distinct benefits at cell, module, and system levels, including reducing the amount of

  8. Evolving Utility Cost-Effectiveness Test Criteria

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents an overview of tests done to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency program benefits.

  9. Factors Affecting PMU Installation Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... throughout the industry, resulting in widespread cost and project efficiency benefits. ... support staff on all of the above. Traveling to and from the installation sites, ...

  10. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #24 Reemployed Annuitant Benefits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Responsible Contacts Lynette Johnson HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST (EMPLOYEE BENEFITS) ... Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act Training National Service Activation ...

  11. Smart Grid Environmental Benefits … Part 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smart Grid Environmental Benefits Toolkit Can a Smart Grid deliver real environmental benefits in a time when they are sorely needed? Yes! According to recent studies, it can even reduce emissions at a lower cost than many of the newest clean energy technologies. In this article, we give you four tools to help inform your utility, ratepayers, regulators, or legislators that a Smart Grid offers huge environmental benefits: * An outline of where these benefits are likely to come from * An

  12. NEET Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NEET Benefits NEET Benefits The R&D activities under the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) Program will address revolutionary improvements in safety, performance, reliability, economics, and proliferation risk reduction and promote creative solutions to the broad array of nuclear energy challenges related to reactor and fuel cycle development. The activities undertaken in this program complement those within the Reactor Concepts Research Development & Demonstration and Fuel Cycle

  13. Defined Benefit Eligible Disability Benefit Program Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a long-term disability program for certain members in the LANS Defined Benefit Pension Plan (Pension Plan). Please note that the benefits described in this booklet are not...

  14. Startup Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

  15. Benefits of Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits of Research Benefits of Research Return on Investment Return on Investment Since its creation in 1977, FE has established a legacy of achievement, return-of-value, and tangible benefits for the taxpayer dollars invested. Read more Natural Gas from Shale Natural Gas from Shale Office of Fossil Energy research helped refine cost-effective horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies, making hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of natural gas technically recoverable. Read more

  16. Benefits & New Employees

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expand Doing Business Skip navigation links Careers Find & Apply Benefits & New Employees Labor Relations Benefits & New Employees BPA understands the importance of worklife...

  17. DOE Announces New Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements DOE Announces New Policy for Contractor Benefit Reimbursements April 27, 2006 - 10:32am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced new policy measures for the reimbursement of contractor pension and medical benefit plan costs that are based on sound business practices and market-based benchmarks for cost management. The Department will continue to reimburse contractors for costs for current and retired

  18. Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Careers » Working Here » Benefits Benefits Enjoy First Rate Federal Career Benefits As a DOE employee, you'll have access to exceptional Federal benefits with a variety of plan options that often exceed those offered in the private sector. In addition, you'll have competitive remuneration, continuous learning opportunities, and paid time off to help you construct an enjoyable work-life balance. You'll benefit from: Great salary Recruitment incentives Personal leave (vacation) Sick leave

  19. Benefits | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits Jefferson Lab provides a comprehensive, balanced, and competitive benefits package to employees. The lab offers a variety of benefit options, including medical, dental, health and dependent care reimbursement accounts, and a defined contribution plan and other inclusive offerings. Jefferson Lab remains committed to providing a quality and affordable benefit programs. Detailed information of the options provided by the lab can be found by browsing the benefits webpage. You will find

  20. WINDExchange Wind Energy Benefits Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WINDExchange Wind Energy Benefits Fact Sheet WINDExchange Wind Energy Benefits Fact Sheet Learn more about wind energy! This fact sheet outlines the top 10 benefits of wind energy, including cost, water savings, job creation, indigenous resource, and pervasive deployment. PDF icon WINDExchange Wind Energy Benefits Fact Sheet More Documents & Publications Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) 2014 Distributed Wind Market Report

  1. Microsoft Word - cost study manual final 06 25 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The subcommittee developed a contractors' Cost Study template that contractors could elect to use to prepare spreadsheets for the annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison. ...

  2. Benefits | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for a Job Connect with Argonne LinkedIn Facebook Twitter YouTube Google+ More Social Media Benefits With outstanding benefits, competitive pay, wellness programs and a...

  3. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

  4. Transmission line capital costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

  5. CMI Program Benefits | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Benefits CMI Participation Benefits Affiliate Associate Team Provides cost share or has a contract for CMI project work optional required ● CMI bi-weekly newsletters and CMI monthly webinars ● ● ● Opportunities to expand engagement under appropriate contractual terms ● ● ● Representation on Industry Council ● ● Priority notification of inventions available for licensing, to the extent allowed by Fairness of Opportunity requirements ● ● CMI Annual Meetings and

  6. Response model and activity analysis of the revenue reconciliation problem in the marginal cost pricing of electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassig, N.L.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the research was to determine if feasible reconciliation procedures exist that meet the multiple (and sometimes competing) goals of the electricity pricing problem while staying within the constraints of the problem. The answer was that such procedures do exist. Selection among the alternative, feasible procedures depends on the weighting factors placed on the goals. One procedure did not universally satisfy all the goals; the various procedures satisfied the alternative goals to varying degrees. The selection process was sensitive to the initial conditions of the model and to the band width of the constraint boundary conditions. Discriminate analysis was used to identify the variables that contribute the most to the optimal selection process. The results of the research indicated that the variables that are the most effective in selecting among the various procedures were the following: the ratio of peak to off-peak prices, the amount of revenue adjustment required, the constraint on equity, the constraint on peak price stability, and the constraint on meeting the revenue requirement. The poicy recommendations that can be derived from this research are very relevant in light of today's energy problems. Time-of-use pricing of electricity is needed in order to signal to the consumer the true cost of electricity by season and by time of day. Marginal costs capture such costs and rates should be based on such costs. Revenue reconciliation procedures make marginal cost-based rates feasible from a regulatory requirement perspective. This research showed that such procedures are available and selection among alternative procedures depends on the preference rankings placed on the multiple, and sometimes competing goals of electricity pricing.

  7. Capturing the benefits of distributed generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, L.R.

    1999-11-01

    Existing and future distributed generation (DG) can provide significant benefits to customers, utilities and other service providers. For the customer, these benefits could include improved reliability, better power quality and lower costs. For the utility distribution company, these benefits could include deferral of costly distribution upgrades and local voltage support. For the region`s generation and transmission suppliers, DG can provide dependable capacity supply, relief from transmission constraints, and ancillary transmission services such as reactive supply and supplemental reserves. The promise of DG technologies is strong. The technical hurdles to capturing these benefits are being met with improved generators and with enhanced command, control, and communications technologies. However, institutional and regulatory hurdles to capturing these distributed generation benefits appear to be significant. Restructuring for retail access and the delamination of utilities into wires companies and generation companies may make it difficult to capture many of the multiple benefits of DG. Policy-makers should be aware of these factors and strive to craft policies and rules that give DG a fair change to deliver these strong benefits.

  8. Soft Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Costs Soft Costs The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SunShot Initiative's soft costs program works to lower the non-hardware costs of solar and accelerate the adoption of solar energy technologies throughout the United States. In support of the SunShot Initiative goals, the soft costs program works in the following strategic areas: networking and technical assistance, data analysis, business innovation, and training. Soft Costs Activity Areas, Business Innovation, Networking and Technical

  9. Page 8, Benefit Forms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits Registration Form - 853 Kb - Allows an employee to enroll or waive health insurance coverage. SF-2817 - Life Insurance Election Form (Federal Employee Group Life...

  10. Employee Benefit Options

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    working with you. ELIGIBILITY Eligibility Requirements BENEFIT OPTIONS Medical Plans Dental Plan Vision Plan Legal Plan Life Insurance Disability Accidental Death & Dismemberment...

  11. System Benefits Charge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire's 1996 electric-industry restructuring legislation authorized the creation of a system benefits charge (SBC) to support energy efficiency programs and energy assistance programs for...

  12. Operating Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

  13. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by ?-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nault, Rance; Abdul-Fattah, Hiba; Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Moon, Thomas W.

    2013-08-15

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist ?-naphthoflavone (?NF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 ?M ?NF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: Energetic costs of AhR activation by ?NF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. Exposure to ?NF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism.

  14. GTT Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activities GTT Activities GTT Activities Activities To receive input and feedback on the development of the future grid vision and other GTT documents, the GTT hosts targeted workshops and meetings to inform its deliberations. 2014 Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Energy Technologies Workshop, September 30-October1 2013 HVDC Workshop, April 22 2013 ARPA-E Summit, February 25-27 2012 Transmission Workshop, November 1-2 Distribution Workshop, September 24-25 2012 ARPA-E Summit,

  15. Contractor Employee Pension and Medical Benefits Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-19

    To ensure that reimbursement of costs incurred by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors' pension and medical benefits are reasonable in accordance with applicable laws, regulations and contract requirements and reflect prudent business practices. This directive has been suspended as of June 19, 2006, for 1 year. For more information, see DOE N 251.66.

  16. Eligibility for Retiree Benefits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eligibility, Enrollment Eligibility, Enrollment for Retiree Benefits Age + years of service determines eligibility for retiree healthcare benefits. Contact Retiree Insurance Providers Healthcare insurance eligibility upon retirement To be eligible for retiree healthcare insurance, TCP1 and TCP2 employees must: be at least age 50 with at least 10 years of applicable service credits; or have at least 5 years of applicable service credits and meet the "Rule of 75" (age + service credits

  17. Studies Highlight Biodiesel's Benefits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies Highlight Biodiesel's Benefits For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., July 6, 1998 — Two new studies highlight the benefits of biodiesel in reducing overall air pollution and in helping to reduce the United States' dependence on imported oil. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted both studies: An Overview of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel Life Cycles and Biodiesel Research Progress, 1992-1997. Biodiesel is a

  18. BPA's Costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    links Financial Information Financial Public Processes Asset Management Cost Verification Process Rate Cases BP-18 Rate Case Related Publications Meetings and Workshops Customer...

  19. Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

    2011-04-11

    Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

  20. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

    2002-02-26

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for decommissioning at other facilities with similar equipment and labor costs. It also provides techniques for extracting information from limited data using extrapolation and interpolation techniques.

  1. Energy savings estimates and cost benefit calculations for high...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; CALIFORNIA; CLIMATES; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; HVAC SYSTEMS; ...

  2. Benefit/cost analysis of RDF process in Taiwan (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Association, Washington, DC (United States); National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Yonkers, NY (United States). ...

  3. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of DOE Investment in Photovoltai...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... devices, and detailed assessment of crystallography, ... without PVMaT, the most common comment made by ... of the foundational role of FSA. Before the early ...

  4. Engineered alternatives cost/benefit study. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a United States Department of Energy (DOE) project designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of Transuranic (TRU) waste in deep, geologic, bedded salt. The WIPP site is located in southeastern New Mexico. By law the WIPP site has been withdrawn from public use and has been set aside for use in the safe disposal of TRU waste. Also by law, disposal of TRU waste must comply with rules and regulations promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The disposal system design consists of multiple barriers, both natural and man-made, located in a geologic salt deposit, 2,150 feet (655.3 meters) below ground. These barriers were selected because of their ability to permanently isolate the waste from the accessible environment as required to comply with subparts B and C of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 (40 CFR 191). As a part of the assurance requirements, 40 CFR {section}191.14 requires that barriers of different types shall be used to isolate the waste. The WIPP design uses both a geologic (natural) and engineered barriers for waste isolation as specified by these regulations. However, to provide additional confidence in containment prediction calculations used to demonstrate compliance with the containment requirements, Engineered Alternatives (EA) could be used as additional assurance measures beyond those used to meet the containment requirements. This report uses the term EA to represent engineered barriers that are technically feasible processes, technologies, methods, repository designs, or waste from modifications which make a significant positive impact on the disposal system in terms of reducing uncertainty in performance calculations or improving long-term performance. These EAs, if used, function as barriers to the release of radioactive material.

  5. Benefit/cost analysis of RDF process in Taiwan (Conference) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Chang, Ni-Bin ; Chang, Y.H. 1 + Show Author Affiliations National Cheng-Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China) Publication Date: 1997-12-01 OSTI Identifier: ...

  6. Improving the Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in Transport...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from the LEDS Global Partnership. When to Use This Tool While building a low emission strategy for your country's transportation system, this tool is most useful during these...

  7. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Smart Grid Technologies Through System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentspain-installed-wind-capacity-website Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs This website presents an...

  8. Microsoft Word - Smart Grid Benefits Outway Costs_open.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been a lot of claims about the value of smart grid," said Lee Hall, BPA Smart Grid and Demand Response manager. "When we looked under the hood, there often wasn't enough...

  9. The Practice of Cost Benefit Analysis in the Transport Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the use of CBA for the social and economic evaluation of transport infrastructure in Mexico and is made from the point of view of the role of the Ministry of Finance's...

  10. Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy 12 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss077_shidore_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Government Performance Result Act (GPRA) / Portfolio Decision Support (PDS) Support for Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA)

  11. Mitigation potential and cost in tropical forestry - relative role for agroforestry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of carbon mitigation potential (MP) and costs of forestry options in seven developing countries with a focus on the role of agroforestry. A common methodological approach known as comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) was used in each study to estimate the potential and costs between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios derived from the demand for forest products and forestland for other uses such as agriculture and pasture. By using data on estimated carbon sequestration, emission avoidance, costs and benefits, the model enables one to estimate cost effectiveness indicators based on monetary benefit per t C, as well as estimates of total mitigation costs and potential when the activities are implemented at equilibrium level. The results show that about half the MP of 6.9 Gt C (an average of 223 Mt C per year) between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries could be achieved at a negative cost, and the other half at costs not exceeding $100 per t C. Negative cost indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of about half of the options. The agroforestry options analyzed bear a significant proportion of the potential at medium to low cost per t C when compared to other options. The role of agroforestry in these countries varied between 6% and 21% of the MP, though the options are much more cost effective than most due to the low wage or opportunity cost of rural labor. Agroforestry options are attractive due to the large number of people and potential area currently engaged in agriculture, but they pose unique challenges for carbon and cost accounting due to the dispersed nature of agricultural activities in the tropics, as well as specific difficulties arising from requirements for monitoring, verification, leakage assessment and the establishment of credible baselines.

  12. DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liabilities | Department of Energy Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities March 27, 2007 - 12:10pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced in the Federal Register that it is seeking public comment on how to address the increasing costs and liabilities of contractor employee pension and medical benefits. Under the Department of Energy's unique

  13. Benefits Forms & Required Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits Forms & Required Notices Benefits Forms & Required Notices A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contacts Benefits Office (505) 667-1806 Email Benefits Forms & Required Notices Forms Benefits Enrollment Form, 1751a (pdf) Declaration of Domestic Partnership, 1925a (pdf) Declaration of Legal Ward as Eligible Dependent, 3028 (pdf) Declaration that Enrolled Dependent Meets IRS

  14. Quality Guidline for Cost Estimation Methodology for NETL Assessments...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Benefits 2 Power Plant Cost Estimation Methodology Quality Guidelines for Energy System Studies April 2011 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work...

  15. Community Wind Benefits (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    This fact sheet explores the benefits of community wind projects, including citations to published research.

  16. TO: Procurement Directors Heads of Contracting Activities

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 DATE: January 15, 2016 TO: Procurement Directors Heads of Contracting Activities FROM: Chief Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition Management SUBJECT: Streamlining DOE's Oversight of Compensation and Benefits SUMMARY: The purpose of Acquisition Letter (AL) 2016-01 is to provide guidance regarding required actions to move from DOE traditional transactional approach for approving certain costs relating to compensation and benefits, to a risk

  17. Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    useful for evaluating the costs and benefits of energy and water conservation and renewable energy projects. The life-cycle cost (LCC) of two or more alternative designs are...

  18. Benefits Plan Reports & Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits Plan Reports & Notices Benefits Plan Reports & Notices Employees and retirees are the building blocks of the Lab's success. Our employees get to contribute to the most pressing issues facing the nation.Retiree health and welfare benefits are managed by AonHewitt and Associates. Contact Benefits Office As an employer offering ERISA compliant benefit plans, LANS is required to provide notices and reports to employees throughout the course of the year. Generally, the reports are

  19. Valuing the Environmental Benefits of Urban WaterConservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Chan, Peter T.; Dunham-Whitehead, C.; Van Buskirk, R.D.

    2007-05-01

    This report documents a project undertaken for theCalifornia Urban Water Conservation Council (the Council) to create a newmethod of accounting for the diverse environmental benefits of raw watersavings. The environmental benefits (EB) model was designed to providewater utilities with a practical tool that they can use to assign amonetary value to the benefits that may accrue from implementing any ofthe Council-recommended Best Management Practices. The model treats onlyenvironmental services associated directly with water, and is intended tocover miscellaneous impacts that are not currently accounted for in anyother cost-benefit analysis.

  20. LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anklam, T

    2011-04-14

    Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

  1. Incorporating Non-energy Benefits into Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Gilligan, Donald; Singer, Terry

    2012-06-01

    This paper evaluates the issue of non-energy benefits within the context of the U.S. energy services company (ESCO) industry?a growing industry comprised of companies that provide energy savings and other benefits to customers through the use of performance-based contracting. Recent analysis has found that ESCO projects in the public/institutional sector, especially at K-12 schools, are using performance-based contracting, at the behest of the customers, to partially -- but not fully -- offset substantial accumulated deferred maintenance needs (e.g., asbestos removal, wiring) and measures that have very long paybacks (roof replacement). This trend is affecting the traditional economic measures policymakers use to evaluate success on a benefit to cost basis. Moreover, the value of non-energy benefits which can offset some or all of the cost of the non-energy measures -- including operations and maintenance (O&M) savings, avoided capital costs, and tradable pollution emissions allowances-- are not always incorporated into a formal cost-effectiveness analysis of ESCO projects. Nonenergy benefits are clearly important to customers, but state and federal laws that govern the acceptance of these types of benefits for ESCO projects vary widely (i.e., 0-100percent of allowable savings can come from one or more non-energy categories). Clear and consistent guidance on what types of savings are recognized in Energy Savings agreements under performance contracts is necessary, particularly where customers are searching for deep energy efficiency gains in the building sector.

  2. Extending cost–benefit analysis for the sustainability impact of inter-urban Intelligent Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolosz, Ben Grant-Muller, Susan

    2015-01-15

    The paper reports research involving three cost–benefit analyses performed on different ITS schemes (Active Traffic Management, Intelligent Speed Adaptation and the Automated Highway System) on one of the UK's busiest highways — the M42. The environmental scope of the assets involved is widened to take into account the possibility of new technology linked by ICT and located within multiple spatial regions. The areas focused on in the study were data centre energy emissions, the embedded emissions of the road-side infrastructure, vehicle tailpipe emissions, additional hardware required by the vehicles (if applicable) and safety, and all aspects of sustainability. Dual discounting is applied which aims to provide a separate discount rate for environmental elements. For ATM, despite the energy costs of the data centre, the initial implementation costs and mitigation costs of its embedded emissions, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved, although the scheme becomes less effective later on its lifecycle due to rising costs of energy. ISA and AHS generate a negative result, mainly due to the cost of getting the vehicle on the road. In order to negate these costs, the pricing of the vehicle should be scaled depending upon the technology that is outfitted. Retrofitting on vehicles without the technology should be paid for by the driver. ATM will offset greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over a 25 year lifespan. This reduction has taken into account the expected improvement in vehicle technology. AHS is anticipated to save 280 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 15 years of operational usage. However, this offset is largely dependent on assumptions such as the level of market penetration. - Highlights: • Three cost–benefit analyses are applied to inter-urban intelligent transport. • For ATM, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved. • ATM offsets greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 25 years. • ISA and AHS generate a negative result due to vehicle implementation costs. • AHS is anticipated to save 280 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 15 years.

  3. Estimating Specialty Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

  4. Factory Cost Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-12-17

    The Factory Cost Model (FCM) is an economic analysis tool intended to provide flat panel display (FPD) and other similar discrete component manufacturers with the ability to make first-order estimates of the cost of unit production. This software has several intended uses. Primary among these is the ability to provide first-order economic analysis for future factories. Consequently, the model requires a minimal level of input detail, and accomodates situations where actual production data are notmore » available. This software is designed to be activity based such that most of the calculated direct costs are associated with the steps of a manufacturibg process. The FCM architecture has the ability to accomodate the analysis of existing manufacturing facilities. The FCM can provide assistance with strategic economic decisions surrounding production related matters. For instance, the program can project the effect on costs and resources of a new product''s introduction, or it can assess the potential cost reduction produced by step yield improvements in the manufacturing process.« less

  5. Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play a vital role in demonstrating the Federal government and NNSA's commitment to its employees. In addition, most NNSA facilities offer onsite daycare, fitness centers, wellness programs and telecommuting arrangements. The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive

  6. BENEFIT Funding Opportunity- Webinar 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is webinar 2 for the Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2015 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number: DE-FOA-0001166.

  7. BENEFIT Funding Opportunity- Webinar 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is webinar 1 for the Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2015 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Number: DE-FOA-0001166.

  8. Federal Employee Health Benefits (FEHB)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) program is the largest employer-sponsored health insurance program in the world, covering more than 8 million Federal employees, retirees, former...

  9. Webinar: BENEFIT 2016 FOA- Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. DOE Building Technologies Office (BTO) has announced the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Buildings Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) 2016. This FOA...

  10. NREL: Sustainable NREL - Community Benefits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community Benefits Essential to the lab's sustainability efforts is helping sustain the ... to help them replicate the lab's sustainability model Educating learners at all ...

  11. Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship (AEF) Program Einstein Fellowship Home Eligibility Benefits Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Fellows Central Contact WDTS Home Benefits Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Einstein Fellows spend 11 months in a Federal agency or U.S. Congressional office engaged in education policy and/or program related activities, bringing their experience as an educator to the offices in which they serve. The AEF

  12. Benefits of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification Benefits of Evaluation, Measurement, and Verification This document provides information about the benefits of performing ...

  13. Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2002-01-01

    Commissioning California's houses can result in better performing systems and houses. In turn, this will result in more efficient use of energy, carbon emission reductions, and improved occupant comfort. In particular, commissioning houses can save a significant amount of HVAC-related energy (15 to 30% in existing houses, 10 to 20% in new conventional houses, and up to 8% in advanced energy efficiency houses). The process that we considered includes corrective measures that could be implemented together during construction or during a single site visit (e.g., air tightening, duct sealing, and refrigerant and air handler airflow corrections in a new or existing house). Taking advantage of additional, more complex opportunities (e.g., installing new windows in an existing house, replacing the heating and air conditioning system in a new or existing house) can result in additional HVAC-related energy savings (60 to 75% in existing houses, and 50 to 60% in new conventional houses). The commissioning-related system and house performance improvements and energy savings translate to additional benefits throughout California and beyond. By applying commissioning principles to their work, the building community (builders and contractors) benefit from reduced callbacks and lower warranty costs. HERS raters and inspectors will have access to an expanded market sector. As the commissioning process rectifies construction defects and code problems, building code officials benefit from better compliance with codes. The utilities benefit from reduced peak demand, which can translate into lower energy acquisition costs. As houses perform closer to expectations, governmental bodies (e.g., the California Energy Commission and the Air Resources Board) benefit from greater assurance that actual energy consumption and carbon emissions are closer to the levels mandated in codes and standards, resulting in better achievement of state energy conservation and environmental goals. California residents' quality of life is improved through better indoor environmental comfort and lower energy bills. Lower energy bills free up money for residents to spend on other needs or goals, such as additional education and health and welfare. With an expansion of existing industries and the development of new commissioning-related industries, related jobs and tax revenues will increase, further increasing the quality of life for California.

  14. Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, Commercial, and Industrial Customers Honeywell Demonstrates Automated Demand Response Benefits for Utility, ...

  15. Load Leveling Battery System Costs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-10-12

    SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer's monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer's peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer's side of themore » meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer's load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.« less

  16. Geothermal Heat Pump Benefits Webinar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pump Benefits Webinar Geothermal Heat Pump Benefits Webinar

  17. Optimizing Benefits of Testing Efforts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    This presentation explores the need to prioritize testing efforts in order to achieve the highest confidence in PV reliability at the lowest cost.

  18. SEP Benefits to Program Administrators

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE 50% Lower Cost Using 75% ... Institute for Advanced Composite Materials Innovation US Manufacturers, Industry Partners, ...

  19. Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics

  2. DOE Fact Sheet: Cost-Effectiveness of Deep Green Alterations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... PV or solar thermal hot water panels. As the installed cost of solar PV continues to fall and renewable ... transition, along with further benefits as the market shifts, and ...

  3. Workers' Compensation Costs Rising Across the Nation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the first time since 1992, benefits paid to workers and employers' costs for workers' compensation rose faster than wages by James L Nash (jnash@penton.com) The National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) study, which provides the only comprehensive national data on the largely state-run program, states that premiums charged by insurers rose by eight percent in 2001.

  4. Using Cost-Effectiveness Tests to Design CHP Incentive Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, Rick

    2014-11-01

    This paper examines the structure of cost-effectiveness tests to illustrate how they can accurately reflect the costs and benefits of CHP systems. This paper begins with a general background discussion on cost-effectiveness analysis of DER and then describes how cost-effectiveness tests can be applied to CHP. Cost-effectiveness results are then calculated and analyzed for CHP projects in five states: Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Maryland, and North Carolina. Based on the results obtained for these five states, this paper offers four considerations to inform regulators in the application of cost-effectiveness tests in developing CHP programs.

  5. A Legacy of Benefit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Legacy of Benefit A Legacy of Benefit Over more than three decades, FE research and development has established a legacy of significant achievement and return of value and benefits for the public funds invested. PDF icon Fossil Energy Research Benefits - A Legacy of Benefit More Documents & Publications Carbon Capture and Storage Return on Investment Fossil Energy Today - Fourth Quarter, 2011

  6. WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL,; Wiser, Ryan; Lantz, Eric; Hand, Maureen

    2012-03-26

    The future of wind power will depend on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost reductions. To better understand the potential for cost reductions, this report provides a review of historical costs, evaluates near-term market trends, and summarizes the range of projected costs. It also notes potential sources of future cost reductions. Our findings indicate that steady cost reductions were interrupted between 2004 and 2010, but falling turbine prices and improved turbine performance are expected to drive a historically low LCOE for current installations. In addition, the majority of studies indicate continued cost reductions on the order of 20%-30% through 2030. Moreover, useful cost projections are likely to benefit from stronger consideration of the interactions between capital cost and performance as well as trends in the quality of the wind resource where projects are located, transmission, grid integration, and other cost variables.

  7. Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

    1996-03-31

    This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

  8. Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Hydrogen Program Record number11007, Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation, documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost.

  9. BENEFIT: A New Hybrid Approach to Energy Modeling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BENEFIT: A New Hybrid Approach to Energy Modeling BENEFIT: A New Hybrid Approach to Energy Modeling Lead Performer: Lawrence Berkeley National Lab - Berkeley, CA DOE Funding: $600,000 Cost Share: $67,000 (California Energy Commission) Project Term: October 1, 2014 - September 30, 2016 Funding Opportunity: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Incubator Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2014 (DE-FOA-0001027) Project Objective Modeling the energy consumption of existing buildings can be challenging due

  10. Environmental Emissions Nonenergy Benefits Working Paper: ARRA Period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, David; Bausch, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Weatherization reduces energy usage by low-income households, and thereby reduces the environmental impacts of the production and consumption of energy and reduces the social costs associated with those environmental impacts. The nonenergy benefits study conducted as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) evaluation focused on measuring the emissions reductions resulting from WAP program energy usage reductions and estimating the societal value of those emission reductions. While there are other environmental impacts associated with the WAP program, this study focused on emissions impacts because the 2010 National Research Council (NRC) report Hidden Costs of Energy: The Unpriced Consequences of Energy Production and Use recommended that Congress focus on emissions costs because they have the highest documented social impact costs

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rocky Benefits

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Colorado > Rocky Benefits Rocky Flats Site, Colorado Benefits Administration Rocky Flats Benefits Administration Rocky Flats Benefits Center P.O. Box 10361 Des Moines, IA 50306-0361 Phone - (866) 296-5036 Fax - (888) 501-9768 Medical and Life Insurance Administration Pension Administration General Benefits Questions Death Reporting Address Changes Benefits Issue Resolutions Leanna Nighswonger (509) 373-1419 Leanna_c_Nighswonger@rl.gov Last Updated: 4/11

  12. Geothermal Exploration Cost and Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, Scott

    2013-02-13

    The Department of Energys Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was tasked with developing a metric in 2012 to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this cost and time metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration cost and time improvements can be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway: Geothermal). This paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open Energy Information website (OpenEI, http://en.openei.org) for public access. - Published 01/01/2013 by US National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL.

  13. Proposed methodologies for evaluating grid benefits of distributed generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skowronski, M.J.

    1999-11-01

    As new Distributed Generation technologies are brought to the market, new hurdles to successful commercialization of these promising forms of on-site generation are becoming apparent. The impetus to commercialize these technologies has, up to now, been the value and benefits that the end user derives from the installation of Distributed Generation. These benefits are primarily economic as Distributed Generation is normally installed to reduce the customer utility bill. There are, however, other benefits of Distributed Generation other than the reduction in the cost of electric service, and these benefits normally accrue to the system or system operator. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and suggest methodologies to quantify these ancillary benefits that the grid and/or connecting utility derive from customer on-site generation. Specifically, the following are discussed: reliability in service; transmission loss reduction; spinning and non-spinning reserve margin; peak shaving and interruptible loads; transmission and distribution deferral; VAR support/power quality; cogeneration capability; improvement in utility load factor fuel diversity; emission reductions; and qualitative factors -- reduced energy congestion, less societal disruption, faster response time, black start capability, system operation benefits.

  14. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can ...

  15. HMO Benefit Summary | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HMO Benefit Summary Download a summary of benefits offered in our HMO health insurance option. PDF icon 2015 BlueAdvantage HMO Summary...

  16. Retiree Benefits: Frequently Asked Questions | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a benefit eligible position. Will the Argonne Retiree Healthcare Plan be a supplemental plan to Medicare Part A & B? The Argonne Retiree Healthcare Plan will coordinate benefits...

  17. 'Lollachilipalooza' benefits Feds Feed Families effort | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    'Lollachilipalooza' benefits Feds Feed Families effort Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman led his band, "Yellow Cake," at "Lollachilipalooza" today to benefit DOE's 2014 ...

  18. Economic, Energy, and Environmental Benefits of Concentrating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic, Energy, and Environmental Benefits of Concentrating Solar Power in California L. ... NRELSR-550-39291 April 2006 Economic, Energy, and Environmental Benefits of ...

  19. Benefits for SES Positions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Resources Senior Executive Service (SES) Benefits for SES Positions Benefits for SES Positions Leave SES members are entitled to accrue annual leave at the rate of ...

  20. Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting Better Buildings Residential Network All-Member Peer Exchange ...

  1. A chronicle of costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elioff, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains the history of all estimated costs associated with the superconducting super collider.

  2. Life Cycle Cost Estimate

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

  3. Cost Estimation Package

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

  4. Microsoft Word - Benefits Guidance 3-5-10Murray

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Options for Reservists Called to Active Duty In Support of Contingency Operations (Updated 3-10) Benefit Options What Action HR Needs To Take Additional Guidance or Policy Employee on Military Furlough Employee Using Intermittent Leave Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Employee may retain coverage for up to 24 months; DOE pays for employee's share of the FEHB premium. Employee needs to notify HR of continued coverage or cancellation. If continued coverage, HR sends a memo to DFAS imaging

  5. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Benefits of Workplace Charging |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Benefits of Workplace Charging Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Benefits of Workplace Charging Reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from employees' commutes, also known as Scope 3 emissions, is a top priority for many organizations interested in minimizing their carbon footprint. Scope 3 emissions are indirect GHG emissions from sources not owned or directly controlled by the organization but are related to their activities,

  6. OOTW COST TOOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

    1998-09-01

    This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

  7. Operational Benefits of Meeting California's Energy Storage Targets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Operational Benefits of Meeting California's Energy Storage Targets Josh Eichman, Paul Denholm, and Jennie Jorgenson National Renewable Energy Laboratory Udi Helman Helman Analytics Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-65061 December 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable

  8. A Retrospective Analysis of the Benefits and Impacts of U.S. Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the second in a series of reports exploring the costs, benefits, and other impacts of state renewable portfolio standards (RPS), both retrospectively and prospectively. This report focuses on the benefits and impacts of all state RPS programs, in aggregate, for the year 2013 (the most-recent year for which the requisite data were available). Relying on a well-vetted set of methods, the study evaluates a number of important benefits and impacts in both physical and monetary terms, where possible, and characterizes key uncertainties. The prior study in this series focused on historical RPS compliance costs, and future work will evaluate costs, benefits, and other impacts of RPS policies prospectively.

  9. Alaska Energy in Action: Akiak Reaps Benefits of PCE Technical Assistance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State of Alaska’s Power Cost Equalization (PCE) Program is intended to “equalize” the cost of power for rural Alaskans through rate balancing that takes into account both the amount of funding spent on large energy infrastructure projects that benefit the urban “Railbelt” and Juneau electric utility customers and the procurement costs incurred by the 184 isolated diesel microgrid utilities scattered across rural Alaska.

  10. Post-Closure Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post-Closure Benefits Post-Closure Benefits The Legacy Management Post-Closure Benefits (PCB) Program includes the development, implementation, and oversight of the Department's policy concerning the continuation of contractor pension and medical benefits after the closure of applicable DOE sites/facilities. This includes oversight of the administration and management of legacy contractor benefits in a fiscally responsible and effective manner. The primary program objective is to ensure a

  11. Strategic supply system design - a holistic evaluation of operational and production cost for a biorefinery supply chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamers, Patrick; Tan, Eric C.D.; Searcy, Erin M.; Scarlata, Christopher J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2015-08-20

    Pioneer cellulosic biorefineries across the United States rely on a conventional feedstock supply system based on one-year contracts with local growers, who harvest, locally store, and deliver feed-stock in low-density format to the conversion facility. While the conventional system is designed for high biomass yield areas, pilot scale operations have experienced feedstock supply shortages and price volatilities due to reduced harvests and competition from other industries. Regional supply dependency and the inability to actively manage feedstock stability and quality, provide operational risks to the biorefinery, which translate into higher investment risk. The advanced feedstock supply system based on a network of depots can mitigate many of these risks and enable wider supply system benefits. This paper compares the two concepts from a system-level perspective beyond mere logistic costs. It shows that while processing operations at the depot increase feedstock supply costs initially, they enable wider system benefits including supply risk reduction (leading to lower interest rates on loans), industry scale-up, conversion yield improvements, and reduced handling equipment and storage costs at the biorefinery. When translating these benefits into cost reductions per liter of gasoline equivalent (LGE), we find that total cost reductions between -$0.46 to -$0.21 per LGE for biochemical and -$0.32 to -$0.12 per LGE for thermochemical conversion pathways are possible. Naturally, these system level benefits will differ between individual actors along the feedstock supply chain. Further research is required with respect to depot sizing, location, and ownership structures.

  12. Strategic supply system design - a holistic evaluation of operational and production cost for a biorefinery supply chain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamers, Patrick; Tan, Eric C.D.; Searcy, Erin M.; Scarlata, Christopher J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2015-08-20

    Pioneer cellulosic biorefineries across the United States rely on a conventional feedstock supply system based on one-year contracts with local growers, who harvest, locally store, and deliver feed-stock in low-density format to the conversion facility. While the conventional system is designed for high biomass yield areas, pilot scale operations have experienced feedstock supply shortages and price volatilities due to reduced harvests and competition from other industries. Regional supply dependency and the inability to actively manage feedstock stability and quality, provide operational risks to the biorefinery, which translate into higher investment risk. The advanced feedstock supply system based on a networkmore » of depots can mitigate many of these risks and enable wider supply system benefits. This paper compares the two concepts from a system-level perspective beyond mere logistic costs. It shows that while processing operations at the depot increase feedstock supply costs initially, they enable wider system benefits including supply risk reduction (leading to lower interest rates on loans), industry scale-up, conversion yield improvements, and reduced handling equipment and storage costs at the biorefinery. When translating these benefits into cost reductions per liter of gasoline equivalent (LGE), we find that total cost reductions between -$0.46 to -$0.21 per LGE for biochemical and -$0.32 to -$0.12 per LGE for thermochemical conversion pathways are possible. Naturally, these system level benefits will differ between individual actors along the feedstock supply chain. Further research is required with respect to depot sizing, location, and ownership structures.« less

  13. Activation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Response Services Activated At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CARLSBAD, N.M., 252014, 11:43 a.m. (MDT) - Emergency response services have been activated at the Waste...

  14. Direct/Indirect Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

  15. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Annual Fuel Cost gal Annual GHG Emissions (lbs of CO2) Vehicle Cost Calculator See Assumptions and Methodology Back Next U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and ...

  16. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  17. Handbook for cost estimating. A method for developing estimates of costs for generic actions for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, J.R.; Cohen, S.; Ziegler, E.Z.

    1984-10-01

    This document provides overall guidance to assist the NRC in preparing the types of cost estimates required by the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines and to assist in the assignment of priorities in resolving generic safety issues. The Handbook presents an overall cost model that allows the cost analyst to develop a chronological series of activities needed to implement a specific regulatory requirement throughout all applicable commercial LWR power plants and to identify the significant cost elements for each activity. References to available cost data are provided along with rules of thumb and cost factors to assist in evaluating each cost element. A suitable code-of-accounts data base is presented to assist in organizing and aggregating costs. Rudimentary cost analysis methods are described to allow the analyst to produce a constant-dollar, lifetime cost for the requirement. A step-by-step example cost estimate is included to demonstrate the overall use of the Handbook.

  18. Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Activities and events provide Residential Network members the opportunity to discuss similar needs and challenges, and to collectively identify effective strategies and useful resources.

  19. Comparison of high-speed rail and maglev system costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rote, D.M.

    1998-07-01

    This paper compares the two modes of transportation, and notes important similarities and differences in the technologies and in how they can be implemented to their best advantage. Problems with making fair comparisons of the costs and benefits are discussed and cost breakdowns based on data reported in the literature are presented and discussed in detail. Cost data from proposed and actual construction projects around the world are summarized and discussed. Results from the National Maglev Initiative and the recently-published Commercial Feasibility Study are included in the discussion. Finally, estimates will be given of the expected cost differences between HSR and maglev systems implemented under simple and complex terrain conditions. The extent to which the added benefits of maglev technology offset the added costs is examined.

  20. EERE Employment Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EERE Employment Benefits EERE Employment Benefits A photo of a young Asian female working on her laptop in an outdoor setting, near an office building. The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) staffs enjoy all of the great rewards of being a government employee. Learn more at these pages at the Office of Personnel Management website: Benefits for New Federal Employees Retirement Benefits Insurance Programs Work/Life Enrichments

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Benefits and Perks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits and Perks Bioscience Working at Sandia has its benefits From health and compensation to diversity programs, flexible career tracks, community outreach, and more, Sandians receive great rewards for their great work. The benefits of working at Sandia extend far beyond the traditional packages advertised by other companies. Yes, we offer competitive salaries and great benefits. But more importantly, Sandia is the kind of workplace that exists in your dreams - giving you opportunities to

  2. PPO Benefit Summary | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary Download a summary of benefits offered in our PPO health insurance option. PDF icon 2015 PPO Summary...

  3. Benefits of Hydropower | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources » Hydropower Basics » Benefits of Hydropower Benefits of Hydropower Benefits of Hydropower Water power offers a number of advantages to the communities that they serve. Below are just some of the benefits that hydropower has over other methods of providing energy. Advantages of Hydropower: Hydropower is fueled by water, so it's a clean fuel source, meaning it won't pollute the air like power plants that burn fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas. Hydroelectric power

  4. Bio-Benefits Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Education & Workforce Development » Resources » Biomass Basics » Bio-Benefits Basics Bio-Benefits Basics Biomass is an important commodity for the future of the United States. Increased production and use of biofuels will result in a variety of benefits to the nation, including: Improved national energy security Increased economic growth Broad-based environmental benefits. Biomass and U.S. Energy Security The U.S. economy is heavily dependent on oil imports-containing 4% of the world's

  5. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Benefits

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Objective Background Methods Indian Canyons Trading Post History Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency Comparisons Conclusion 2 Objective Benefits of ...

  6. Definition of GPRA08 benefits metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Background information for the FY 2007 GPRA methodology review on the definitions of GPRA08 benefits metrics.

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.5 Public Benefit Funds/System Benefit Funds

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Funding Levels of Top 6 and Bottom 5 States with Active Public Benefit Efficiency Programs Total EE Budget ($million) Total EE Budget per Capita ($) 2009 2010 2009 2010 Vermont 33 36 52 58 Massachusetts 222 386 34 58 Rhode Island 37 37 35 35 Minnesota 134 200 25 38 California 1,377 1,497 37 40 New York 421 632 22 32 Kansas 4 5 4 5 Mississippi 9 13 9 13 Alabama 0 0 0 0 North Dakota 0 1 0 1 West Virginia 0 0 0 0 Source(s): American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, A National Survey of

  8. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corn Can Save the Earth | Department of Energy Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Benefits of Bioenergy Corn Can Save the Earth This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY

  9. Benefit Value Studies and Benefit Trends 11-3-15 Final.pptx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | MTG DATE | 2015 Introduction to BIv1 2 Agenda What is a Benefit Value Study? Benefit Value Study ... as well as other work-life programs and perks ...

  10. Post-Closure Benefits: DOE Complex vs Closure Sites | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post-Closure Benefits » Post-Closure Benefits: DOE Complex vs Closure Sites Post-Closure Benefits: DOE Complex vs Closure Sites Status of Contractor Pension and PRB Benefit Programs - September 30, 2013 DOE Wide Closure Sites Defined Benefit Pension Plans 36 6 Defined Contribution Plans 13 0 PRB Plans >100 7 Active Participants 61,400 0 Retirees/Survivors 75,300 6,400 Terminated Vested Participants 39,500 2,900 FY 2013 Pension Unfunded Liability 10,616 Million 0 Million FY 2013 PRB Unfunded

  11. Cost analysis guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strait, R.S.

    1996-01-10

    The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

  12. ''Measuring the Costs of Climate Change Policies''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, W. D.; Smith, A. E.; Biggar, S. L.; Bernstein, P.M.

    2003-05-09

    Studies of the costs of climate change policies have utilized a variety of measures or metrics for summarizing costs. The leading economic models have utilized GNP, GDP, the ''area under a marginal cost curve,'' the discounted present value of consumption, and a welfare measure taken directly from the utility function of the model's representative agent (the ''Equivalent Variation''). Even when calculated using a single model, these metrics do not necessarily give similar magnitudes of costs or even rank policies consistently. This paper discusses in non-technical terms the economic concepts lying behind each concept, the theoretical basis for expecting each measure to provide a consistent ranking of policies, and the reasons why different measures provide different rankings. It identifies a method of calculating the ''Equivalent Variation'' as theoretically superior to the other cost metrics in ranking policies. When regulators put forward new economic or regulatory policies, there is a need to compare the costs and benefits of these new policies to existing policies and other alternatives to determine which policy is most cost-effective. For command and control policies, it is quite difficult to compute costs, but for more market-based policies, economists have had a great deal of success employing general equilibrium models to assess a policy's costs. Not all cost measures, however, arrive at the same ranking. Furthermore, cost measures can produce contradictory results for a specific policy. These problems make it difficult for a policy-maker to determine the best policy. For a cost measures to be of value, one would like to be confident of two things. First one wants to be sure whether the policy is a winner or loser. Second, one wants to be confident that a measure produces the correct policy ranking. That is, one wants to have confidence in a policy measure's ability to correctly rank policies from most beneficial to most harmful. This paper analyzes empirically these two properties of different costs measures as they pertain to assessing the costs of the carbon abatement policies, especially the Kyoto Protocol, under alternative assumptions about implementation.

  13. substantially reduced production costs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production costs - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy ...

  14. SOFT COST GRAND CHALLENGE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energycenter.org California Center for Sustainable Energy Soft Cost Grand Challenge May 22, 2014 Accelerating the transition to a sustainable world powered by clean energy 2...

  15. Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... cost of maintenance, tires, repairs, insurance, registration, taxes, and fees, the ... FreedomCar & Fuel Partnership * Industrial gas companies, energy companies, automobile ...

  16. Workplace Charging Installation Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installation costs and services vary considerably, so employers are encouraged to obtain a number of quotes before moving forward with any installation. An initial site investigation should include:

  17. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, which focuses on low cost, durable seals, was given by George Roberts of UTC Power at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects.

  18. Cost reduction of the Sun Challenger batch solar water heater: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickney, B.L.

    1987-05-01

    A variety of materials and methods were investigated as a means to reduce the cost of the Sun Challenger Solar Collector. Three prototypes were constructed and tested using lower-cost methods. Test results are summarized, including heat gain, heat loss, and collection efficiency. Costs and benefits are also presented and summarized.

  19. Cost Contributors to Geothermal Power Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathwani, Jay; Mines, Greg

    2011-07-01

    The US Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Office (DOE-GTO) has developed the tool Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model (GETEM) to assess the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of power produced from geothermal resources. Recently modifications to GETEM allow the DOE-GTO to better assess how different factors impact the generation costs, including initial project risk, time required to complete a development, and development size. The model characterizes the costs associated with project risk by including the costs to evaluate and drill those sites that are considered but not developed for commercial power generation, as well as to assign higher costs to finance those activities having more risk. This paper discusses how the important parameters impact the magnitude project costs for different project scenarios. The cost distributions presented include capital cost recovery for the exploration, confirmation, well field completion and power plant construction, as well as the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. The paper will present these cost distributions for both EGS and hydrothermal resources.

  20. CBERD: Cost Optimization of Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Optimization of Energy Efficiency CBERD: Cost Optimization of Energy Efficiency Triple bottomline framework being utilized for the CBERD Cost Optimization of Energy Efficiency cross-cutting activity. Triple bottomline framework being utilized for the CBERD Cost Optimization of Energy Efficiency cross-cutting activity. Lead performer: Carnegie Mellon University - Pittsburgh PA Partner: --Centre for Environmental Planning and Technology - Ahmedabad, India FY16 DOE Funding: $50,000 per year

  1. Pollution prevention cost savings potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Celeste, J.

    1994-12-01

    The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

  2. The concerns and benefits of standardization on the Heidrun subsea water injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, R.R.; Turner, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the process of standardizing the Heidrun subsea water injection system. The layout, basis of design and equipment utilized are presented, along with exploring the benefits and concerns of adopting a standard subsea system. Realized by this approach were: the interchangeability of equipment between Heidrun and other licenses, the lowering of development costs, the capturing of key-learnings and the sharing of resources. By identifying and weighing the benefits versus the concerns, standardization can be successfully utilized between petroleum companies with different project parameters, thus saving significant costs for all parties.

  3. Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

    2009-10-16

    A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost models assume a natural gas cost of $5/MMBtu (HHV). Praxair has, in Phases I and II of this program, shown that significant improvements in cost, plant layout, system integration and overall system optimization are achievable. Phase III of the program, submitted in January 2007, was to focus on demonstrating both the technical feasibility and economic viability of the design developed in Phases I and II through a full-scale prototype design, construction, installation, analysis and operation at a hydrogen fueling station. Due to funding limitations, Phase III of the program was not approved by the DOE.

  4. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Kloess, Maximillian; Cardoso, Goncalo; Mégel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2011-07-01

    Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

  5. Quantifying the Operational Benefits of Conventional and Advanced Pumped Storage Hydro on Reliability and Efficiency: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krad, I.; Ela, E.; Koritarov, V.

    2014-07-01

    Pumped storage hydro (PSH) plants have significant potential to provide reliability and efficiency benefits in future electric power systems with high penetrations of variable generation. New PSH technologies, such as adjustable-speed PSH, have been introduced that can also present further benefits. This paper demonstrates and quantifies some of the reliability and efficiency benefits afforded by PSH plants by utilizing the Flexible Energy Scheduling Tool for the Integration of Variable generation (FESTIV), an integrated power system operations tool that evaluates both reliability and production costs.

  6. Operational Benefits of Meeting California's Energy Storage Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichman, Josh; Denholm, Paul; Jorgenson, Jennie; Helman, Udi

    2015-12-18

    In October 2013, the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) finalized procurement targets and other requirements to its jurisdictional utilities for a minimum of 1,325 MW of 'viable and cost-effective' energy storage systems by 2020. The goal of this study is to explore several aspects of grid operations in California and the Western Interconnection resulting from meeting the CPUC storage targets. We perform this analysis using a set of databases and grid simulation tools developed and implemented by the CPUC, the California Independent System Operator (CAISO), and the California Energy Commission (CEC) for the CPUC's Long-term Procurement Plan (LTPP). The 2014 version of this database contains information about generators, storage, transmission, and electrical demand, for California in the year 2024 for both 33% and 40% renewable energy portfolios. We examine the value of various services provided by energy storage in these scenarios. Sensitivities were performed relating to the services energy storage can provide, the capacity and duration of storage devices, export limitations, and negative price floor variations. Results show that a storage portfolio, as outlined by the CPUC, can reduce curtailment and system-wide production costs for 33% and 40% renewable scenarios. A storage device that can participate in energy and ancillary service markets provides the grid with the greatest benefit; the mandated storage requirement of 1,325 MW was estimated to reduce the total cost of production by about 78 million per year in the 33% scenario and 144 million per year in the 40% scenario. Much of this value is derived from the avoided start and stop costs of thermal generators and provision of ancillary services. A device on the 2024 California grid and participating in only ancillary service markets can provide the system with over 90% of the value as the energy and ancillary service device. The analysis points to the challenge of new storage providing regulation reserve, as the added storage could provide about 75% of the regulation up requirement for all of California, which would likely greatly reduce regulation prices and potential revenue. The addition of storage in California decreases renewable curtailment, particularly in the 40% RPS case. Following previous analysis, storage has a mixed impact on emissions, generally reducing emissions, but also creating additional incentives for increased emissions from out-of-state coal generations. Overall, storage shows significant system cost savings, but analysis also points to additional challenges associated with full valuation of energy storage, including capturing the operational benefits calculated here, but also recovering additional benefits associated avoided generation, transmission, and distribution capacity, and avoided losses.

  7. Rocky Flats Closure Unit Cost Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P.C.; Skokan, B.

    2007-07-01

    The Rocky Flats Closure Project has completed the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating environmental media and closing the Rocky Flats Site (Site). The project cost approximately $4.1 B and included the decommissioning of over 700 structures including 5 major plutonium facilities and 5 major uranium facilities, shipping over 14,600 cubic meters of transuranic and 565,000 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste, and remediating a 385-acre industrial area and the surrounding land. Actual costs were collected for a large variety of closure activities. These costs can be correlated with metrics associated with the facilities and environmental media to capture cost factors from the project that could be applicable to a variety of other closure projects both within and outside of the Department of Energy's weapons complex. The paper covers four general topics: the process to correlate the actual costs and metrics, an example of the correlated data for one large sub-project, a discussion of the results, and the additional activities that are planned to correlate and make this data available to the public. The process to collect and arrange the project control data of the Closure Project relied on the actual Closure Project cost information. It was used to correlate these actual costs with the metrics for the physical work, such as building area or waste generated, to support the development of parametric cost factors. The example provides cost factors for the Industrial Sites Project. The discussion addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the data, followed by a section identifying future activities to improve and extend the analyses and integrate it within the Department's Environmental Cost Analysis System. (authors)

  8. Page 4, Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 of 11 Previous Page Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Initial Election Period As a new employee, you have 60 days from your date of appointment to make an election for the health benefits program. Your completed Health Benefits Election Form, SF-2809, must be submitted to your servicing Human Resources Office in a timely manner. If you fail to make an election within the required deadline, you are considered to have declined coverage. You will not have another opportunity to enroll

  9. Benefits Forms and Information | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Employee Orientation » Benefits Forms and Information Benefits Forms and Information As a Federal employee, you may have the opportunity to participate in a number of employee benefit and family-friendly programs. If your appointment to Federal employment confers eligibility, you may elect to participate in health, dental, and life insurance programs; retirement savings plans; flexible spending accounts; long-term care insurance; and vacation and sick leave. In addition, there are a number

  10. Hydraulic Institute Member Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Member Benefits Hydraulic Institute Member Benefits As the developer of the universally acclaimed ANSI/HI Pump Standards, a key reference for pump knowledge and end-user specifications, the Hydraulic nstitute (HI) provides its members with timely and essential resources for the advancement of their pump industry businesses. PDF icon E_Membership_Benefits_Overview_HI_&_PSM.pdf More Documents & Publications Summary of 2011 Accomplishments HI & PSM Course Overview Pump Systems Matter

  11. Health Benefits | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Health Benefits The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play a vital role in demonstrating the Federal government and NNSA's commitment to its employees. The great jobs we have at NNSA also come with comprehensive benefits packages. They are among the best and most comprehensive available and play a vital role in demonstrating the Federal government and NNSA's commitment to its employees. Health

  12. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Benefits of Particle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    physics has contributed to many other areas of benefit to the nation's well-being. Food sterilization Medical isotope production Simulation of cancer treatments Reliability...

  13. Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis W. F. Feltz, D. D. Turner, R. O. ... Madison, Wisconsin D. D. Turner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ...

  14. Three Sustainability Tools are Enhancing Environmental Benefits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    developers enhance the environmental benefits of biofuels. 1. WATER As with most ... amount of water intake than biofuel produced from grasses or from fast-growing trees. ...

  15. Chapter 1: FY 2007 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2007 Budget Request.

  16. Students benefit the Laboratory and the region

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Students benefit the Laboratory and the region Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: Dec. 2015-Jan. 2016 all...

  17. Wind Energy Benefits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Energy Benefits Jump to: navigation, search Photo from Todd Spink, NREL 14821 Wind energy development is associated with a variety of positive impacts for surrounding...

  18. Benefits Summary - Temporary Job Classification | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temporary Job Classification Download a summary of benefits offered to employees in the temporary job classification (at least 6 months term and 20 hoursweek). PDF icon 2015 Long...

  19. Webinar: BENEFIT 2016 FOA – Full Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. DOE Building Technologies Office (BTO) has announced the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Buildings Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) 2016. This FOA...

  20. Using life-cycle cost management to cut costs and reduce waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gess, D.; Cohan, D.; McLearn, M.

    1995-12-01

    Increasing competition is forcing electric utility companies to reduce costs and improve efficiency. At the same time, increasing costs for waste disposal and emissions control and growing environmental regulatory pressure are providing powerful incentives for firms in virtually every industry to investigate opportunities to reduce or even eliminate the adverse environmental impacts associated with their operations. companies are also striving toward environmental stewardship to realize the potential benefits to the firms`s public image, employees, an shareholders. Motivated by these cost and environmental concerns, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Decision Focus Inc. (DFI), and a consortium of electric utility companies have developed techniques and tools to help electric utility companies to make purchase and operating decisions based on their full life-cycle costs, which explicitly include environmental, health, and safety costs. The process, called Life-Cycle Cost Management (LCCM), helps utilities to efficiently assemble the appropriate life-cycle information and bring it to bear on their business decisions. To date, several utilities have used LCCM to evaluate a range of product substitution and process improvement decisions and to implement cost-savings actions. This paper summarizes some of these applications.

  1. Energy storage systems cost update : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, Susan M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports the methodology for calculating present worth of system and operating costs for a number of energy storage technologies for representative electric utility applications. The values are an update from earlier reports, categorized by application use parameters. This work presents an update of energy storage system costs assessed previously and separately by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program. The primary objective of the series of studies has been to express electricity storage benefits and costs using consistent assumptions, so that helpful benefit/cost comparisons can be made. Costs of energy storage systems depend not only on the type of technology, but also on the planned operation and especially the hours of storage needed. Calculating the present worth of life-cycle costs makes it possible to compare benefit values estimated on the same basis.

  2. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    The objective of this Guide is to improve the quality of cost estimates and further strengthen the DOE program/project management system. The original 25 separate chapters and three appendices have been combined to create a single document.

  3. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates.

  4. Estimating Renewable Energy Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Some renewable energy measures, such as daylighting, passive solar heating, and cooling load avoidance, do not add much to the cost of a building. However, renewable energy technologies typically...

  5. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Annual GHG Emissions (lbs of CO2) Vehicle Cost Calculator See Assumptions and Methodology Back Next U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Get Widget Code

  6. Cost Estimating Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-09

    This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

  7. INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Report SOP Standard Operating Procedure TEC Total Estimated Cost TIPR Technical ... FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 Total PED Construction TEC OPC TPC Note: above values include MR...

  8. System Cost Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-03-27

    SCM is used for estimation of the life-cycle impacts (costs, health and safety risks) of waste management facilities for mixed low-level, low-level, and transuranic waste. SCM uses parametric cost functions to estimate life-cycle costs for various treatment, storage, and disposal modules which reflect planned and existing waste management facilities at Department of Energy (DOE) installations. SCM also provides transportation costs for intersite transfer of DOE wastes. SCM covers the entire DOE waste management complex tomore » allow system sensitivity analysis including: treatment, storage, and disposal configuration options; treatment technology selection; scheduling options; transportation options; waste stream and volume changes; and site specific conditions.« less

  9. Workplace Charging Equipment Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Charging stations are available from a variety of manufacturers in a range of models for all charging applications. For a single port charging station, Level 1 hardware costs range from $300-$1,500...

  10. Webinar: Genetically Modified Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment Webinar: Genetically Modified Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment Genetically Modified (GM) Algae: A Risk-Benefit Assessment PDF icon...

  11. Annual Benefits Statement, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Benefits Statement, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Annual Benefits Statement, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Annual Benefits Statement, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC ...

  12. Quantify the energy and environmental benefits of implementing energy-efficiency measures in China’s iron and steel production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Ding; Chen, Wenying; Xu, Tengfang

    2015-08-21

    As one of the most energy-, emission- and pollution-intensive industries, iron and steel production is responsible for significant emissions of greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutants. Although many energy-efficiency measures have been proposed by the Chinese government to mitigate GHG emissions and to improve air quality, lacking full understanding of the costs and benefits has created barriers against implementing these measures widely. This paper sets out to advance the understanding by addressing the knowledge gap in costs, benefits, and cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures in iron and steel production. Specifically, we build a new evaluation framework to quantify energy benefits andmore » environmental benefits (i.e., CO2 emission reduction, air-pollutants emission reduction and water savings) associated with 36 energy-efficiency measures. Results show that inclusion of benefits from CO2 and air-pollutants emission reduction affects the cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures significantly, while impacts from water-savings benefits are moderate but notable when compared to the effects by considering energy benefits alone. The new information resulted from this study should be used to augment future programs and efforts in reducing energy use and environmental impacts associated with steel production.« less

  13. Quantify the energy and environmental benefits of implementing energy-efficiency measures in China’s iron and steel production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Ding; Chen, Wenying; Xu, Tengfang

    2015-08-21

    As one of the most energy-, emission- and pollution-intensive industries, iron and steel production is responsible for significant emissions of greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutants. Although many energy-efficiency measures have been proposed by the Chinese government to mitigate GHG emissions and to improve air quality, lacking full understanding of the costs and benefits has created barriers against implementing these measures widely. This paper sets out to advance the understanding by addressing the knowledge gap in costs, benefits, and cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures in iron and steel production. Specifically, we build a new evaluation framework to quantify energy benefits and environmental benefits (i.e., CO2 emission reduction, air-pollutants emission reduction and water savings) associated with 36 energy-efficiency measures. Results show that inclusion of benefits from CO2 and air-pollutants emission reduction affects the cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures significantly, while impacts from water-savings benefits are moderate but notable when compared to the effects by considering energy benefits alone. The new information resulted from this study should be used to augment future programs and efforts in reducing energy use and environmental impacts associated with steel production.

  14. New Cost Tool Helps Fleet Managers Evaluate Hybrid Vehicles - News Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL New Cost Tool Helps Fleet Managers Evaluate Hybrid Vehicles August 3, 2005 Golden, Colo. - A new software tool that compares the costs and emissions of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) to conventional vehicles is now available for government and business fleet managers interested in reducing fuel costs and protecting air quality. The tool, called the Hybrid Electric Vehicle Fleet Cost and Benefits Calculator Tool, was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National

  15. Potential benefits of superconductivity to transportation in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rote, D.M.; Johnson, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Research in US transportation applications of superconductors is strongly motivated by a number of potential national benefits. These include the reduction of dependence on petroleum-based fuels, energy savings, substantially reduced air and noise pollution, increased customer convenience, and reduced maintenance costs. Current transportation technology offers little flexibility to switch to alternative fuels, and efforts to achieve the other benefits are confounded by growing congestion at airports and on urban roadways. A program has been undertaken to identify possible applications of the emerging superconducting applications to transportation and to evaluate potential national benefits. The current phase of the program will select the most promising applications for a more detailed subsequent study. Transportation modes being examined include highway and industrial vehicles, as well as rail, sea, air transport and pipelines. Three strategies are being considered: (1) replacing present components with those employing superconductors, (2) substituting new combinations of components or systems for present systems, and (3) developing completely new technologies. Distinctions are made between low-, medium-, and near-room-temperature superconductors. The most promising applications include magnetically levitated passenger and freight vehicles; replacement of drive systems in locomotives, self-propelled rail cars, and ships; and electric vehicles inductively coupled to electrified roadways.

  16. Financing U.S. Renewable Energy Projects Through Public Capital Vehicles: Qualitative and Quantitative Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Feldman, D.

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores the possibility of financing renewable energy projects through raising capital in the public markets. It gives an overview of the size, structure, and benefits of public capital markets, as well as showing how renewable energy projects might take advantage of this source of new funds to lower the cost of electricity.

  17. EECBG Success Story: Resourceful Kansas Puts Energy Efficient Technology on Display, Demonstrates Cost-Saving Benefits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As one of the windiest states in the country, Kansas is a great place to harness wind and solar power. Through the Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program, the Resourceful Kansas team is teaching the rest of the state about all the technologies that are out there. Learn more.

  18. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Wind Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Boveri ABB); two aerospace companies (Hamilton Sundstrand and Honeywell); three ... Siemens VDO Automotive Voith J.M. Honda Denso Honeywell Ford Hamilton Sundstrand ABB Asea ...

  19. Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of Reducing It

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  20. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of the Superior Energy Performance Program Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nine companies certified under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) program have shown an average energy performance improvement of 10% in the first 18 months of implementing SEP with an average payback of 1.7 years. These findings and other results were presented at the July 2013 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry hosted by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy

  1. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Vehicle Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The formula for the program was... half of the research dedicated to fundamentals ... 2-6 Purdue University in the area of heat and mass transfer; Princeton University in the area of ...

  2. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... use of lower temperature resources through the use of a closed loop heat transfer system. ... Industry experts interviewed as part of the study indicated that the fundamentals of ...

  3. Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    exporters operating as OPEC." Prof. M. Adelman, MIT, 2004. Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia UAE Venezuela 0 20 40 60 80 100 120...

  4. A Proposed Cost-Benefit Analysis Approach for Evaluating DOE Nuclear Facility Design Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Dr. Kamiar Jamali, Senior Technical Advisor to the Chief of Defense Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Safety NA-SH

  5. Resourceful Kansas Puts Energy Efficient Technology on Display, Demonstrates Cost-Saving Benefits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As one of the windiest states in the country, Kansas is a great place to harness wind and solar power. And through the Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program, the Resourceful Kansas team is teaching the rest of the state about all the technologies that are out there.

  6. Aqueous-stream uranium-removal technology cost/benefit and market analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-03-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to present information that was gathered by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. (KEI) in order to help the Department of Energy (DOE) determine the merit of continued biosorption research funding. However, in the event that funding is continued, it is also intended to help the researchers in their efforts to develop a better uranium-removal process. This report (1) provides a comparison of DOE sites that may utilize aqueous-stream, uranium-removal biosorption technology, (2) presents a comparison of the biosorption and ion exchange processes, and (3) establishes performance criteria by which the project can be measured. It also attempts to provide focus for biosorbent ground-water-remediation research and to ask questions that need to be answered. This report is primarily a study of the US market for technologies that remove uranium from aqueous streams, but it also addresses the international market-particularly for Germany. Because KEI`s access to international market information is extremely limited, the material presented in this report represents a best effort to obtain this data. Although uranium-contaminated aqueous streams are a problem in other countries as well, the scope of this report is primarily limited to the US and Germany for two reasons: (1) Germany is the country of the biosorbent-CRADA partner and (2) time constraints.

  7. GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs and Benefits in Global Forests: ADynamic Partial Equilibrium Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy; Dale, Larry; Chan, Peter; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2005-03-22

    This paper reports on the global potential for carbonsequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbonemissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenariosfrom 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typicallyseen in global integrated assessment models. The world forest sector wasdisaggregated into tenregions, four largely temperate, developedregions: the European Union, Oceania, Russia, and the United States; andsix developing, mostly tropical, regions: Africa, Central America, China,India, Rest of Asia, and South America. Three mitigation options -- long-and short-rotation forestry, and the reduction of deforestation -- wereanalyzed using a global dynamic partial equilibrium model (GCOMAP). Keyfindings of this work are that cumulative carbon gain ranges from 50.9 to113.2 Gt C by 2100, higher carbon prices early lead to earlier carbongain and vice versa, and avoided deforestation accounts for 51 to 78percent of modeled carbon gains by 2100. The estimated present value ofcumulative welfare change in the sector ranges from a decline of $158billion to a gain of $81 billion by 2100. The decline is associated witha decrease in deforestation.

  8. Benefits to BPA will equal or exceed costs for the Extended Block...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    does not sell to them - all of BPA's surplus sales realize increased revenues because the mean value of prices for electricity in Western power markets are higher than they would...

  9. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The DOE is conducting a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States -- that is, a system that could easily switch between petroleum and another fuel, depending on price and availability. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues. This report examines environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with a switch to alternative- and flexible-fuel vehicles. Three potential alternatives to oil-based fuels in the transportation sector are considered: methanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity. The objective is to describe and discuss qualitatively potential environmental, health, and safety issues that would accompany widespread use of these three fuels. This report presents the results of exhaustive literature reviews; discussions with specialists in the vehicular and fuel-production industries and with Federal, State, and local officials; and recent information from in-use fleet tests. Each chapter deals with the end-use and process emissions of air pollutants, presenting an overview of the potential air pollution contribution of the fuel --relative to that of gasoline and diesel fuel -- in various applications. Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, ozone precursors, and carbon dioxide are emphasized. 67 refs., 6 figs. , 8 tabs.

  10. Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment Development and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

    2007-02-01

    This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a users manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

  11. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... for Multiple Methods Compare to a proxy non- renewable ... offer an upfront rebate per watt in exchange for the RECs ... generating units, fuel usage, utility revenues, ...

  12. Retrospective Benefit-Cost Evaluation of U.S. DOE Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... by the U.S. Environmental Protection ... as pneumonia and asthma) and cardiovascular (such as heart failure, ischemic heart disease). ... separate risk factors for hospital ...

  13. Post-Closure Benefits: DOE Complex vs Closure Sites | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post-Closure Benefits Post-Closure Benefits: DOE Complex vs Closure Sites Post-Closure Benefits: DOE Complex vs Closure Sites Status of Contractor Pension and PRB Benefit ...

  14. Hydrogen Pathways. Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, Mark; Laffen, Melissa; Timbario, Thomas A.

    2009-09-01

    Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  15. Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

    2009-09-01

    Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  16. Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Report of levelized cost in 2005 U.S. dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  17. Hydrogen Pathways: Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Seven Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report of levelized cost in 2005 US dollars, energy use, and GHG emission benefits of seven hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways.

  18. R&D program benefits estimation: DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2006-12-04

    The overall mission of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance the security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply. In support of this mission, OE conducts a portfolio of research and development (R&D) activities to advance technologies to enhance electric power delivery. Multiple benefits are anticipated to result from the deployment of these technologies, including higher quality and more reliable power, energy savings, and lower cost electricity. In addition, OE engages State and local government decision-makers and the private sector to address issues related to the reliability and security of the grid, including responding to national emergencies that affect energy delivery. The OE R&D activities are comprised of four R&D lines: High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS), Visualization and Controls (V&C), Energy Storage and Power Electronics (ES&PE), and Distributed Systems Integration (DSI).

  19. Levelized Cost and Levelized Avoided Cost of New Generation Resources...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    For technologies such as solar and wind generation that have no fuel costs and relatively ... costs, the inherent uncertainty about future fuel prices and future policies may cause ...

  20. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  1. QGESS: Capital Cost Scaling Methodology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the tonnes of CO2 utilized. The costs of the process are to include infrastructure, raw materials, processing, byproduct disposal, and utilities costs, as well as any other costs....

  2. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  3. Soft Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Learn more about SunShot's soft costs funding programs. Soft Costs Success Stories February 9, 2016 EERE Success Story-Sowing Seeds for Success: Interdisciplinary Research Blossoms ...

  4. Integrated Cost and Schedule using Monte Carlo Simulation of a CPM Model - 12419

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulett, David T.; Nosbisch, Michael R.

    2012-07-01

    This discussion of the recommended practice (RP) 57R-09 of AACE International defines the integrated analysis of schedule and cost risk to estimate the appropriate level of cost and schedule contingency reserve on projects. The main contribution of this RP is to include the impact of schedule risk on cost risk and hence on the need for cost contingency reserves. Additional benefits include the prioritizing of the risks to cost, some of which are risks to schedule, so that risk mitigation may be conducted in a cost-effective way, scatter diagrams of time-cost pairs for developing joint targets of time and cost, and probabilistic cash flow which shows cash flow at different levels of certainty. Integrating cost and schedule risk into one analysis based on the project schedule loaded with costed resources from the cost estimate provides both: (1) more accurate cost estimates than if the schedule risk were ignored or incorporated only partially, and (2) illustrates the importance of schedule risk to cost risk when the durations of activities using labor-type (time-dependent) resources are risky. Many activities such as detailed engineering, construction or software development are mainly conducted by people who need to be paid even if their work takes longer than scheduled. Level-of-effort resources, such as the project management team, are extreme examples of time-dependent resources, since if the project duration exceeds its planned duration the cost of these resources will increase over their budgeted amount. The integrated cost-schedule risk analysis is based on: - A high quality CPM schedule with logic tight enough so that it will provide the correct dates and critical paths during simulation automatically without manual intervention. - A contingency-free estimate of project costs that is loaded on the activities of the schedule. - Resolves inconsistencies between cost estimate and schedule that often creep into those documents as project execution proceeds. - Good-quality risk data that are usually collected in risk interviews of the project team, management and others knowledgeable in the risk of the project. The risks from the risk register are used as the basis of the risk data in the risk driver method. The risk driver method is based in the fundamental principle that identifiable risks drive overall cost and schedule risk. - A Monte Carlo simulation software program that can simulate schedule risk, burn WM2012 rate risk and time-independent resource risk. The results include the standard histograms and cumulative distributions of possible cost and time results for the project. However, by simulating both cost and time simultaneously we can collect the cost-time pairs of results and hence show the scatter diagram ('football chart') that indicates the joint probability of finishing on time and on budget. Also, we can derive the probabilistic cash flow for comparison with the time-phased project budget. Finally the risks to schedule completion and to cost can be prioritized, say at the P-80 level of confidence, to help focus the risk mitigation efforts. If the cost and schedule estimates including contingency reserves are not acceptable to the project stakeholders the project team should conduct risk mitigation workshops and studies, deciding which risk mitigation actions to take, and re-run the Monte Carlo simulation to determine the possible improvement to the project's objectives. Finally, it is recommended that the contingency reserves of cost and of time, calculated at a level that represents an acceptable degree of certainty and uncertainty for the project stakeholders, be added as a resource-loaded activity to the project schedule for strategic planning purposes. The risk analysis described in this paper is correct only for the current plan, represented by the schedule. The project contingency reserve of time and cost that are the main results of this analysis apply if that plan is to be followed. Of course project managers have the option of re-planning and re-scheduling in the face of new facts, in part by m

  5. Heliostat cost reduction study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

    2007-06-01

    Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

  6. Integration of Variable Generation and Cost-Causation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Variable renewable energy generation sources, such as wind and solar energy, provide benefits such as reduced environmental impact, zero fuel consumption, and low and stable costs. Advances in both technologies can reduce capital costs and provide significant control capabilities. However, their variability and uncertainty - which change with weather conditions, time of day, and season - can cause an increase in power system operating costs compared to a fully controllable power plant. Although a number of studies have assessed integration costs, calculating them correctly is challenging because it is difficult to accurately develop a baseline scenario without variable generation that properly accounts for the energy value. It is also difficult to appropriately allocate costs given the complex, nonlinear interactions between resources and loads.

  7. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Benefits of Particle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits of Particle Physics photo Each generation of particle accelerators and detectors ... From the earliest days of high-energy physics in the 1930s to the latest 21st-century ...

  8. Benefits of Thermoelectric Technology for the Automobile

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses improved fuel efficiency and other benefits of automotive application of thermoelectric (power generation and heating/cooling) and the need for production quantities of high-efficiency thermoelectric modules

  9. Page 3, Benefits and Pay Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 of 11 Previous Page Benefits and Pay Information As a Federal employee, you may have the opportunity to participate in a number of employee benefit and family-friendly programs. If your appointment to Federal employment confers eligibility, you may elect to participate in health, dental, and life insurance programs; retirement savings plans; flexible spending accounts; long-term care insurance; and vacation and sick leave. In addition, there are a number of family-friendly programs that the

  10. Chapter 3: FY 2005 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) estimates expected benefits for its overall portfolio and for each of its 11 programs. Benefits for the FY 2005 budget request are estimated for the midterm (2010-2025) and long term (2030-2050). Two separate models suited to these periods are employed—NEMS-GPRA05 for the midterm and MARKAL-GPRA05 for the long term.

  11. TCP1 Defined Benefit Pension Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pension Plan (TCP1) TCP1 Defined Benefit Pension Plan Retirement income is based on your age, service credit, and highest-average salary at retirement. Contact Your Pension Resources (YPR) TCP1 Retirement Benefit Programs Pension Plan Retirement income is based on your age, service credit, and the average of your highest 36 consecutive month salaries calculated on your retirement date. In general, the older you are and the more service credit you have, the higher your retirement income will be.

  12. Chapter 3: FY 2006 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) estimates expected benefits for its overall portfolio and for each of its 11 programs. Benefits for the FY 2006 budget request are estimated for the midterm (2010-2025) and long term (2030-2050). Two separate models suited to these periods are employed–NEMS-GPRA06 for the midterm and MARKAL-GPRA06 for the long term.

  13. The cost of silicon nitride powder: What must it be to compete?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.

    1992-02-01

    The ability of advanced ceramic components to compete with similar metallic parts will depend in part on current and future efforts to reduce the cost of ceramic parts. This paper examines the potential reductions in part cost that could result from the development of less expensive advanced ceramic powders. The analysis focuses specifically on two silicon nitride engine components -- roller followers and turbocharger rotors. The results of the process-cost models developed for this work suggest that reductions in the cost of advanced silicon nitride powder from its current level of about $20 per pound to about $5 per pound will not in itself be sufficient to lower the cost of ceramic parts below the current cost of similar metallic components. This work also examines if combinations of lower-cost powders and further improvements in other key technical parameters to which costs are most sensitive could push the cost of ceramics below the cost of metallics. Although these sensitivity analyses are reflective of technical improvements that are very optimistic, the resulting part costs are estimated to remain higher than similar metallic parts. Our findings call into question the widely-held notion that the cost of ceramic components must not exceed the cost of similar metallic parts if ceramics are to be competitive. Economic viability will ultimately be decided not on the basis of which part is less costly, but on an assessment of the marginal costs and benefits provided by ceramics and metallics. This analysis does not consider the benefits side of the equation. Our findings on the cost side of the equation suggest that the competitiveness of advanced ceramics will ultimately be decided by our ability to evaluate and communicate the higher benefits that advanced ceramic parts may offer.

  14. The cost of silicon nitride powder: What must it be to compete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.

    1992-02-01

    The ability of advanced ceramic components to compete with similar metallic parts will depend in part on current and future efforts to reduce the cost of ceramic parts. This paper examines the potential reductions in part cost that could result from the development of less expensive advanced ceramic powders. The analysis focuses specifically on two silicon nitride engine components -- roller followers and turbocharger rotors. The results of the process-cost models developed for this work suggest that reductions in the cost of advanced silicon nitride powder from its current level of about $20 per pound to about $5 per pound will not in itself be sufficient to lower the cost of ceramic parts below the current cost of similar metallic components. This work also examines if combinations of lower-cost powders and further improvements in other key technical parameters to which costs are most sensitive could push the cost of ceramics below the cost of metallics. Although these sensitivity analyses are reflective of technical improvements that are very optimistic, the resulting part costs are estimated to remain higher than similar metallic parts. Our findings call into question the widely-held notion that the cost of ceramic components must not exceed the cost of similar metallic parts if ceramics are to be competitive. Economic viability will ultimately be decided not on the basis of which part is less costly, but on an assessment of the marginal costs and benefits provided by ceramics and metallics. This analysis does not consider the benefits side of the equation. Our findings on the cost side of the equation suggest that the competitiveness of advanced ceramics will ultimately be decided by our ability to evaluate and communicate the higher benefits that advanced ceramic parts may offer.

  15. Lightweighting Impacts on Fuel Economy, Cost, and Component Losses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A. D.; Ward, J.; Wang, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is the U.S. Department of Energy's high-level vehicle powertrain model developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It uses a time versus speed drive cycle to estimate the powertrain forces required to meet the cycle. It simulates the major vehicle powertrain components and their losses. It includes a cost model based on component sizing and fuel prices. FASTSim simulated different levels of lightweighting for four different powertrains: a conventional gasoline engine vehicle, a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), and a battery electric vehicle (EV). Weight reductions impacted the conventional vehicle's efficiency more than the HEV, PHEV and EV. Although lightweighting impacted the advanced vehicles' efficiency less, it reduced component cost and overall costs more. The PHEV and EV are less cost effective than the conventional vehicle and HEV using current battery costs. Assuming the DOE's battery cost target of $100/kWh, however, the PHEV attained similar cost and lightweighting benefits. Generally, lightweighting was cost effective when it costs less than $6/kg of mass eliminated.

  16. Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-11-02

    To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

  17. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

  18. Levelized Power Generation Cost Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-04-30

    LPGC is a set of nine microcomputer programs for estimating power generation costs for large steam-electric power plants. These programs permit rapid evaluation using various sets of economic and technical ground rules. The levelized power generation costs calculated may be used to compare the relative economics of nuclear and coal-fired plants based on life-cycle costs. Cost calculations include capital investment cost, operation and maintenance cost, fuel cycle cost, decommissioning cost, and total levelized power generationmore » cost. These programs can be used for quick analyses of power generation costs using alternative economic parameters, such as interest rate, escalation rate, inflation rate, plant lead times, capacity factor, fuel prices, etc. The two major types of electric generating plants considered are pressurized water reactor (PWR) and pulverized coal-fired plants. Data are also provided for the Large Scale Prototype Breeder (LSPB) type liquid metal reactor.« less

  19. Assessing the benefits of OHER (Office of Health and Environmental Research) research: Three case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesse, R.J.; Callaway, J.M.; Englin, J.E.; Klan, M.S.; Nicholls, A.K.; Serot, D.E.

    1987-09-01

    This research was undertaken to estimate the societal benefits and costs of selected past research performed for the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Three case studies of representative OHER and DOE research were performed. One of these, the acid rain case study, includes research conducted elsewhere in DOE. The other two cases were the OHER marine research program and the development of high-purity germanium that is used in radiation detectors. The acid rain case study looked at the research benefits and costs of furnace sorbent injection and duct injection, technologies that might reduce acid deposition precursors. Both appear to show benefits in excess of costs. We examined in detail one of the OHER marine research program's accomplishments - the increase in environmental information used by the Outer Continental Shelf leasing program to manage bidding for off-shore oil drilling. The results of an econometric model show that environmental information of the type supported by OHER is unequivocally linked to government and industry leasing decisions. The germanium case study indicated that the benefits of germanium radiation detectors were significant.

  20. Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2013-10-01

    Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.50.2, 1.30.6, and 2.21.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

  1. On the benefits of an integrated nuclear complex for Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blink, J.A.; Halsey, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated nuclear complex is proposed for location at the Nevada Test Site. In addition to solving the nuclear waste disposal problem, this complex would tremendously enhance the southern Nevada economy, and it would provide low cost electricity to each resident and business in the affected counties. Nuclear industry and the national economy would benefit because the complex would demonstrate the new generation of safer nuclear power plants and revitalize the industry. Many spin-offs of the complex would be possible, including research into nuclear fusion and a world class medical facility for southern Nevada. For such a complex to become a reality, the cycle of distrust between the federal government and the State of Nevada must be broken. The paper concludes with a discussion of implementation through a public process led by state officials and culminating in a voter referendum.

  2. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought by the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO₂ emissions by 10,686 tonnes.

  3. DC Microgrids Scoping Study. Estimate of Technical and Economic Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backhaus, Scott N.; Swift, Gregory William; Chatzivasileiadis, Spyridon; Tschudi, William; Glover, Steven; Starke, Michael; Wang, Jianhui; Yue, Meng; Hammerstrom, Donald

    2015-03-23

    Microgrid demonstrations and deployments are expanding in US power systems and around the world. Although goals are specific to each site, these microgrids have demonstrated the ability to provide higher reliability and higher power quality than utility power systems and improved energy utilization. The vast majority of these microgrids are based on AC power transfer because this has been the traditionally dominant power delivery scheme. Independently, manufacturers, power system designers and researchers are demonstrating and deploying DC power distribution systems for applications where the end-use loads are natively DC, e.g., computers, solid-state lighting, and building networks. These early DC applications may provide higher efficiency, added flexibility, reduced capital costs over their AC counterparts. Further, when onsite renewable generation, electric vehicles and storage systems are present, DC-based microgrids may offer additional benefits. Early successes from these efforts raises a question - can a combination of microgrid concepts and DC distribution systems provide added benefits beyond what has been achieved individually?

  4. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought bymore » the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO₂ emissions by 10,686 tonnes.« less

  5. Cost Study Manual | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Study Manual Cost Study Manual Update 62912. PDF icon Memo regarding Cost Study Manual PDF icon Cost Study Manual More Documents & Publications Contractor Human Resources ...

  6. Scaling of economic benefits from Green Roof implementation in Washington, DC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, H.; Clark, C. E.; Zhou, J.; Adriaens, P.; Environmental Science Division; Dalian Univ. of Technology; Univ. of Michigan

    2010-06-01

    Green roof technology is recognized for mitigating stormwater runoff and energy consumption. Methods to overcome the cost gap between green roofs and conventional roofs were recently quantified by incorporating air quality benefits. This study investigates the impact of scaling on these benefits at the city-wide scale using Washington, DC as a test bed because of the proposed targets in the 20-20-20 vision (20 million ft{sup 2} by 2020) articulated by Casey Trees, a nonprofit organization. Building-specific stormwater benefits were analyzed assuming two proposed policy scenarios for stormwater fees ranging from 35 to 50% reduction for green roof implementation. Heat flux calculations were used to estimate building-specific energy savings for commercial buildings. To assess benefits at the city scale, stormwater infrastructure savings were based on operational savings and size reduction due to reduced stormwater volume generation. Scaled energy infrastructure benefits were calculated using two size reductions methods for air conditioners. Avoided carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide (NOx), and sulfur dioxide emissions were based on reductions in electricity and natural gas consumption. Lastly, experimental and fugacity-based estimates were used to quantify the NOx uptake by green roofs, which was translated to health benefits using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency models. The results of the net present value (NPV) analysis showed that stormwater infrastructure benefits totaled $1.04 million (M), while fee-based stormwater benefits were $0.22-0.32 M/y. Energy savings were $0.87 M/y, while air conditioner resizing benefits were estimated at $0.02 to $0.04 M/y and avoided emissions benefits (based on current emission trading values) were $0.09 M-0.41 M/y. Over the lifetime of the green roof (40 years), the NPV is about 30-40% less than that of conventional roofs (not including green roof maintenance costs). These considerable benefits, in concert with current and emerging policy frameworks, may facilitate future adoption of this technology.

  7. Fact Sheet: Soft Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Soft costs can vary significantly as a result of a fragmented energy marketplace. In the U.S., there are 18,000 jurisdictions and 3,000 utilities with different rules and regulations for how to go solar. The same solar equipment may vary widely in its final installation price due to process and market variations across jurisdictions, creating barriers to rapid industry growth. SunShot supports the development of innovative solutions that enable communities to build their local economies and establish clean energy initiatives that meet their needs, while at the same time creating sustainable solar market conditions.

  8. Levelized cost and levelized avoided cost of new generation resources...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 The importance of the factors varies among the technologies. For technologies such as solar and wind generation that have no fuel costs and relatively small variable O&M costs,...

  9. Prospects for reducing the processing cost of lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood III, David L.; Li, Jianlin; Daniel, Claus

    2014-11-06

    A detailed processing cost breakdown is given for lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrodes, which focuses on: elimination of toxic, costly N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) dispersion chemistry; doubling the thicknesses of the anode and cathode to raise energy density; and, reduction of the anode electrolyte wetting and SEI-layer formation time. These processing cost reduction technologies generically adaptable to any anode or cathode cell chemistry and are being implemented at ORNL. This paper shows step by step how these cost savings can be realized in existing or new LIB manufacturing plants using a baseline case of thin (power) electrodes produced with NMP processing and a standard 10-14-day wetting and formation process. In particular, it is shown that aqueous electrode processing can cut the electrode processing cost and energy consumption by an order of magnitude. Doubling the thickness of the electrodes allows for using half of the inactive current collectors and separators, contributing even further to the processing cost savings. Finally wetting and SEI-layer formation cost savings are discussed in the context of a protocol with significantly reduced time. These three benefits collectively offer the possibility of reducing LIB pack cost from $502.8 kWh-1-usable to $370.3 kWh-1-usable, a savings of $132.5/kWh (or 26.4%).

  10. Prospects for reducing the processing cost of lithium ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wood III, David L.; Li, Jianlin; Daniel, Claus

    2014-11-06

    A detailed processing cost breakdown is given for lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrodes, which focuses on: elimination of toxic, costly N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) dispersion chemistry; doubling the thicknesses of the anode and cathode to raise energy density; and, reduction of the anode electrolyte wetting and SEI-layer formation time. These processing cost reduction technologies generically adaptable to any anode or cathode cell chemistry and are being implemented at ORNL. This paper shows step by step how these cost savings can be realized in existing or new LIB manufacturing plants using a baseline case of thin (power) electrodes produced with NMP processing and amore » standard 10-14-day wetting and formation process. In particular, it is shown that aqueous electrode processing can cut the electrode processing cost and energy consumption by an order of magnitude. Doubling the thickness of the electrodes allows for using half of the inactive current collectors and separators, contributing even further to the processing cost savings. Finally wetting and SEI-layer formation cost savings are discussed in the context of a protocol with significantly reduced time. These three benefits collectively offer the possibility of reducing LIB pack cost from $502.8 kWh-1-usable to $370.3 kWh-1-usable, a savings of $132.5/kWh (or 26.4%).« less

  11. Innovative Feed-In Tariff Designs that Limit Policy Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreycik, C.; Couture, T. D.; Cory, K. S.

    2011-06-01

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most prevalent renewable energy policy used globally to date, and there are many benefits to the certainty offered in the marketplace to reduce development risks and associated financing costs and to grow the renewable energy industry. However, concerns over escalating costs in jurisdictions with FIT policies have led to increased attention on cost control in renewable energy policy design. In recent years, policy mechanisms for containing FIT costs have become more refined, allowing policymakers to exert greater control on policy outcomes and on the resulting costs to ratepayers. As policymakers and regulators in the United States begin to explore the use of FITs, careful consideration must be given to the ways in which policy design can be used to balance the policies' advantages while bounding its costs. This report explores mechanisms that policymakers have implemented to limit FIT policy costs. If designed clearly and transparently, such mechanisms can align policymaker and market expectations for project deployment. Three different policy tools are evaluated: (1) caps, (2) payment level adjustment mechanisms, and (3) auction-based designs. The report employs case studies to explore the strengths and weaknesses of these three cost containment tools. These tools are then evaluated with a set of criteria including predictability for policymakers and the marketplace and the potential for unintended consequences.

  12. Prospects for Reducing the Processing Cost of Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood III, David L; Li, Jianlin; Daniel, Claus

    2014-01-01

    A detailed processing cost breakdown is given for lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrodes, which focuses on: 1) elimination of toxic, costly N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) dispersion chemistry; 2) doubling the thicknesses of the anode and cathode to raise energy density; and 3) reduction of the anode electrolyte wetting and SEI-layer formation time. These processing cost reduction technologies generically adaptable to any anode or cathode cell chemistry and are being implemented at ORNL. This paper shows step by step how these cost savings can be realized in existing or new LIB manufacturing plants using a baseline case of thin (power) electrodes produced with NMP processing and a standard 10-14-day wetting and formation process. In particular, it is shown that aqueous electrode processing can cut the electrode processing cost and energy consumption by an order of magnitude. Doubling the thickness of the electrodes allows for using half of the inactive current collectors and separators, contributing even further to the processing cost savings. Finally wetting and SEI-layer formation cost savings are discussed in the context of a protocol with significantly reduced time. These three benefits collectively offer the possibility of reducing LIB pack cost from $502.8 kWh-1-usable to $370.3 kWh-1-usable, a savings of $132.5/kWh (or 26.4%).

  13. Projected Benefits of EERE's Portfolio - FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-17

    This collection of data tables and charts shows the benefits metrics related to energy security, environmental impacts, and economic impacts for the entire EERE portfolio of renewable energy technologies. Data are presented for the years 2015, 2020, 2030, and 2050, for both the NEMS and MARKAL models.

  14. Societal Benefits of smart metering investments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neenan, Bernard; Hemphill, Ross C.

    2008-10-15

    Implementing smart metering involves complex interactions that may generate many new sources of benefits. It is a potentially powerful enabler, one with considerable - but still speculative - potential that is highly dependent on how the technology is utilized by utilities and supported by their regulators. (author)

  15. Renewable Portfolio Standards Benefits and Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please join us for a free webinar summarizing key findings from a recent report published jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that evaluates the benefits and impacts of state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies.

  16. BENEFIT 2015 Funding Opportunity Webinar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Funding Opportunity Webinar BENEFIT 2015 Funding Opportunity Webinar View the BENEFIT Funding Opportunity Webinar #2 or see the presentation slides below. View the BENEFIT Funding Opportunity Webinar #1 or see the presentation slides below. BENEFIT FOA-0001166 Informational Webinar #2 BENEFIT FOA-0001166 Informational Webinar #1 These webinars provide an overview of the BENEFIT 2015 Funding Opportunity. You also can read the text version of the first webinar and the second webinar. The

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More places

  19. BENEFIT 2014 Funding Opportunity Webinar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BENEFIT 2014 Funding Opportunity Webinar BENEFIT 2014 Funding Opportunity Webinar View the BENEFIT Funding Opportunity Webinar #2 or see the presentation slides below. View the BENEFIT Funding Opportunity Webinar #1 or see the presentation slides below. These webinars provides an overview of the recently announced BENEFIT Funding Opportunity. Final applications for this Funding Opportunity are due on April 21, 2014. The Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Incubator Technologies (BENEFIT)

  20. Cost estimation for solid waste management in industrialising regions - Precedents, problems and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthan, Shantha R.; Milke, Mark W.; Wilson, David C.; Cocks, John H.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We review cost estimation approaches for solid waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit cost method and benchmarking techniques used in industrialising regions (IR). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variety in scope, quality and stakeholders makes cost estimation challenging in IR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrate waste flow and cost models using cost functions to improve cost planning. - Abstract: The importance of cost planning for solid waste management (SWM) in industrialising regions (IR) is not well recognised. The approaches used to estimate costs of SWM can broadly be classified into three categories - the unit cost method, benchmarking techniques and developing cost models using sub-approaches such as cost and production function analysis. These methods have been developed into computer programmes with varying functionality and utility. IR mostly use the unit cost and benchmarking approach to estimate their SWM costs. The models for cost estimation, on the other hand, are used at times in industrialised countries, but not in IR. Taken together, these approaches could be viewed as precedents that can be modified appropriately to suit waste management systems in IR. The main challenges (or problems) one might face while attempting to do so are a lack of cost data, and a lack of quality for what data do exist. There are practical benefits to planners in IR where solid waste problems are critical and budgets are limited.

  1. Valuing the ozone-related health benefits of methane emission controls

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarofim, Marcus C.; Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Anenberg, Susan C.

    2015-06-29

    Methane is a greenhouse gas that oxidizes to form ground-level ozone, itself a greenhouse gas and a health-harmful air pollutant. Reducing methane emissions will both slow anthropogenic climate change and reduce ozone-related mortality. We estimate the benefits of reducing methane emissions anywhere in the world for ozone-related premature mortality globally and for eight geographic regions. Our methods are consistent with those used by the US Government to estimate the social cost of carbon (SCC). We find that the global short- and long-term premature mortality benefits due to reduced ozone production from methane mitigation are (2011) $790 and $1775 per tonnemore » methane, respectively. These correspond to approximately 70 and 150 % of the valuation of methane’s global climate impacts using the SCC after extrapolating from carbon dioxide to methane using global warming potential estimates. Results for monetized benefits are sensitive to a number of factors, particularly the choice of elasticity to income growth used when calculating the value of a statistical life. The benefits increase for emission years further in the future. Regionally, most of the global mortality benefits accrue in Asia, but 10 % accrue in the United States. As a result, this methodology can be used to assess the benefits of methane emission reductions anywhere in the world, including those achieved by national and multinational policies.« less

  2. Cost | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cost Home Ocop's picture Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To...

  3. Evaluating the risk-reduction benefits of wind energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, M.C.; Bell, K.; Spinney, P.

    1997-05-01

    The question of uncertainty and risk in electric utility resource planning has received considerable attention in recent years. During the 1980s, many utilities suffered financial losses because of unexpectedly high plant construction costs and low growth in electricity demand. In addition, the introduction of competition to the electric industry is creating new risks for power companies. No longer will utilities be able to count on regulatory protections and a base of captive consumers to provide a stable market and adequate return on their investments. Alternative risk management strategies will have to be considered instead. One approach to managing risk is for a utility company to invest in diverse power sources such as wind power plants. Since wind plants consume no fuel, can be built in relatively small increments with short construction lead times, and generate no pollutants, it is often said that they offer significant protection from risks associated with conventional fossil-fuel power plants. So far there have been few efforts to quantify these benefits, however. The study compares the costs and risks of two competing resource options, a gas-fired combined cycle plant and a wind plant, both utility-owned, through decision analysis. The case study utility is Texas Utilities Electric, a very large investor-owned company serving an area with substantial, high-quality wind resources. The authors chose a specific moment in the future - the year 2003 - when the utility currently plans to build a large fossil-fueled power plant, and examined the implications for the utility`s expected revenues, costs, and profits if a wind plant were to be built instead.

  4. Hiring Our Heroes Transition and Benefits Career Fair- Baltimore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hiring Our Heroes Transition and Benefits Career Fair- Baltimore, MD part of the 97th Annual American Legion National Convention Hiring Our Heroes Transition and Benefits Career...

  5. Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Initial Election ... health plans available under FEHB, and to make fast, easy, personalized plan comparisons. ...

  6. Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power Programs. 36 pp Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Renewable Energy Price-Stability Benefits in Utility Green Power ...

  7. DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers February 24, 2012 - ...

  8. The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits of Integrated Resource Management for Water & Electricity Utilities and their Partners The Water-Energy Nexus: Capturing the Benefits ...

  9. The Health Benefits of Tackling Climate Change: An Executive...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Health Benefits of Tackling Climate Change: An Executive Summary for The Lancet Series Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Health Benefits of Tackling...

  10. Benefits of Biofuel Production and Use in Missouri

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental benefit 60% greenhouse gas reduction ... For more information on the economic benefits of biofuels for Missouri, ... the greatest chance of impact on commercial biofuel ...

  11. The National Opportunity for Interoperability and its Benefits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interoperability and its Benefits for a Reliable, Robust, and Future Grid Realized through Buildings The National Opportunity for Interoperability and its Benefits for a ...

  12. The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits ...

  13. Revenues From Employee Benefit Programs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Employee Benefit Programs, Call Slides and Summary, July 25, 2013, This financing and revenue peer exchange call discussed revenues from employee benefit programs. Call Slides and...

  14. Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits Analysis, April 2002 In this paper, an analysis was performed ...

  15. Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

    2013-10-01

    The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

  16. Check Estimates and Independent Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

  17. Hydropower Baseline Cost Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, Patrick W.; Zhang, Qin Fen; DeNeale, Scott T.; Chalise, Dol Raj; Centurion, Emma E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent resource assessments conducted by the United States Department of Energy have identified significant opportunities for expanding hydropower generation through the addition of power to non-powered dams and on undeveloped stream-reaches. Additional interest exists in the powering of existing water resource infrastructure such as conduits and canals, upgrading and expanding existing hydropower facilities, and the construction new pumped storage hydropower. Understanding the potential future role of these hydropower resources in the nation’s energy system requires an assessment of the environmental and techno-economic issues associated with expanding hydropower generation. To facilitate these assessments, this report seeks to fill the current gaps in publically available hydropower cost-estimating tools that can support the national-scale evaluation of hydropower resources.

  18. Economic benefits of an economizer system: Energy savings and reduced sick leave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

    2004-02-01

    This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, D.C. with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The annual financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modeling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized.

  19. Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binh T. Pham; Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J Lybeck; Magdy S Tawfik

    2012-05-01

    Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

  20. Technical Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Zoe Kant; Patrick Gonzalez

    2009-01-07

    The Nature Conservancy participated in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project was 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration'. The objectives of the project were to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Final Technical Report discusses the results of the six tasks that The Nature Conservancy undertook to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between July 1st 2001 and July 10th 2008. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. The project occurred in two phases. The first was a focused exploration of specific carbon measurement and monitoring methodologies and pre-selected carbon sequestration opportunities. The second was a more systematic and comprehensive approach to compare various competing measurement and monitoring methodologies, and assessment of a variety of carbon sequestration opportunities in order to find those that are the lowest cost with the greatest combined carbon and other environmental benefits. In the first phase we worked in the U.S., Brazil, Belize, Bolivia, Peru, and Chile to develop and refine specific carbon inventory methods, pioneering a new remote-sensing method for cost-effectively measuring and monitoring terrestrial carbon sequestration and system for developing carbon baselines for both avoided deforestation and afforestation/reforestation projects. We evaluated the costs and carbon benefits of a number of specific terrestrial carbon sequestration activities throughout the U.S., including reforestation of abandoned mined lands in southwest Virginia, grassland restoration in Arizona and Indiana, and reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. The most cost-effective U.S. terrestrial sequestration opportunity we found through these studies was reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. In Phase II we conducted a more systematic assessment and comparison of several different measurement and monitoring approaches in the Northern Cascades of California, and a broad 11-state Northeast regional assessment, rather than pre-selected and targeted, analysis of terrestrial sequestration costs and benefits. Work was carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA. Partners include the Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, The Sampson Group, Programme for Belize, Society for Wildlife Conservation (SPVS), Universidad Austral de Chile, Michael Lefsky, Colorado State University, UC Berkeley, the Carnegie Institution of Washington, ProNaturaleza, Ohio State University, Stephen F. Austin University, Geographical Modeling Services, Inc., WestWater, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Century Ecosystem Services, Mirant Corporation, General Motors, American Electric Power, Salt River Project, Applied Energy Systems, KeySpan, NiSource, and PSEG. This project, 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration', has resulted in over 50 presentations and reports, available publicly through the Department of Energy or by visiting the links listed in Appendix 1. More important than the reports, the project has helped to lead to the development of on-the-ground projects in Southwestern Virginia, Louisiana, and Chile while informing policy development in Virginia, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, the California Climate Action Registry and U.S. and international programs.

  1. Report Now Available: DC Microgrids Scoping Study--Estimate of Technical and Economic Benefits (March 2015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has released a report titled DC Microgrids Scoping Study: Estimate of Technical and Economic Benefits, which presents the results of a study by several national labs and funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability. The study provides a preliminary examination of the benefits and drawbacks of potential DC microgrid applications relative to their AC counterparts, using several metrics for comparison, and offers recommendations for potential future research and deployment activities.

  2. Integrated Smart Grid Provides Wide Range of Benefits in Ohio and the Carolinas

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Department of Energy |September 2014 Integrated Smart Grid Provides Wide Range of Benefits in Ohio and the Carolinas Page 2 Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy and the electricity industry have jointly invested over $7.9 billion in 99 cost- shared Smart Grid Investment Grant projects to modernize the electric grid, strengthen cybersecurity, improve interoperability, and collect an unprecedented level of data on smart grid and customer

  3. Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (1994)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this guidance memorandum is to describe potential benefits of conducting a site-wide NEPA review (environmental impact statement orenvironmental assessment). Site-wide reviews can aid the Department of Energy (DOE) in meeting its goals to streamline the NEPA process, to make that process more useful to decision makers and thepublic, and to reduce the time and cost required to prepare NEPA documents.

  4. Realistic costs of carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al Juaied, Mohammed . Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam )

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

  5. Residential Building Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building...

  6. Employee Benefits | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits NETL is an employee-friendly workplace. To help employees deal effectively with personal or family-related pressures while minimizing the disruptions such pressures can cause at the work site, NETL provides: Flexible Work Schedules Annual Leave Sick Leave Family and Medical Leave Holidays Promotions Awards Retirement Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) Life Insurance Health Insurance Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program Dental and Vision Insurance Training Opportunities Child Care Physical

  7. PPO Benefit Summary for Retirees | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPO Benefit Summary for Retirees PDF icon 2015 PPO Summary updated 06052014

  8. Revenues From Employee Benefit Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revenues From Employee Benefit Programs Revenues From Employee Benefit Programs Better Buildings Residential Network Financing and Revenue Peer Exchange Call: Revenues from Employee Benefit Programs, Call Slides and Summary, July 25, 2013, This financing and revenue peer exchange call discussed revenues from employee benefit programs. PDF icon Call Slides and Summary More Documents & Publications Home Energy Affordability Loan (HEAL)

  9. Comprehensive Benefit Summary for Retirees | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comprehensive Benefit Summary for Retirees PDF icon 2015 Comp Retiree Comparison updated 06052014

  10. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2009-12-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  11. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2008-03-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  12. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

    2007-04-01

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    as a Vehicle Fuel Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and Considerations of Electricity as a Vehicle Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Benefits and

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction

  15. BENEFIT Funding Opportunity 2016 Webinar #1 (Text Version) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Funding Opportunity 2016 Webinar #1 (Text Version) BENEFIT Funding Opportunity 2016 Webinar #1 (Text Version) Below is the text version of the BENEFIT Funding Opportunity 2016 Webinar #1, presented in December 2015. Watch the presentation. Karma Sawyer: Presentation cover slide: We are here today for a webinar regarding the 2016 BENEFIT FOA. "BENEFIT" stands for Buildings Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Innovation Technologies. The BENEFIT FOA was released by the Emerging

  16. TOWARD LOW-COST FABRICATION OF MICROCHANNEL PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES - COST MODELING FOR MANUFACTURING DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leith, Steven D.; King, Dale A.; Paul, Brian

    2010-11-07

    Chemical and energy conversion systems based on microchannel process technology (MPT) demonstrate high performance in applications in which rates are controlled by diffusive heat and mass transfer flux. The performance of MPT-based heat exchangers, absorbers/desorbers and chemical reactors all benefit from process intensification and have been used in a variety of mobile energy conversion systems including fuel reformers/converters, heat pumps and waste heat scavenging technologies. The service environments typical of MPTs often require the devices to be fabricated from metals such as aluminum, titanium, stainless steel or high temperature super alloys. Flow channels and associated critical dimensions in these devices can be as small as 50 um, but generally range from 100 to 1000 um in width and height with characteristic flow channel lengths normally in the mm to cm range. High surface area architectures (e.g. wicks or textured surfaces) are often included in the flow channels as well for enhanced mass transfer and/or catalytic functionality. Fabrication of MPT devices has historically been performed using a stacked-shim approach in which individual metal sheets are first patterned with micro- and meso-scale flow channels and subsequently bonded in a stack to create an array of miniaturized, parallel flow paths. Typical proof-of-concept fabrication efforts have utilized photo chemical machining (PCM) for shim patterning and diffusion bonding or diffusion brazing for joining of shim stacks. While flexible and capable of supporting technology demonstration, however, these techniques can be expensive at prototyping volumes. The high fabrication cost associated with these prototyping processes has contributed to a perception that MPT technology is expensive and will be relegated to a small application space. Recent work at the Microproducts Breakthrough Institute (MBI) has focused on exploring the cost structure of high volume manufacturing of MPT devices in effort to identify new paths to lower cost fabrication. Through systematic exploration of fabrication process capabilities and associated cost structures, the MBI is developing volume-sensitive cost estimation models for predicting manufacturing costs of MPT devices fabricated using different processing technologies. The process-based cost models are used to develop an understanding of the economic trade-offs between candidate processes and are utilized in a design for manufacturing approach to MPT device fabrication. In this paper we present results and analysis of the cost modeling effort to date and apply the methodology in case study of a stainless steel MPT device designed, built and tested by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Extensions of the model to adjacent material sets and the interaction of device designs with fabrication processes will be discussed.

  17. NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, L.; Schell, D.; Davis, R.; Tan, E.; Elander, R.; Bratis, A.

    2014-04-01

    For the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, the annual State of Technology (SOT) assessment is an essential activity for quantifying the benefits of biochemical platform research. This assessment has historically allowed the impact of research progress achieved through targeted Bioenergy Technologies Office funding to be quantified in terms of economic improvements within the context of a fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production process. As such, progress toward the ultimate 2012 goal of demonstrating cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol technology can be tracked. With an assumed feedstock cost for corn stover of $58.50/ton this target has historically been set at $1.41/gal ethanol for conversion costs only (exclusive of feedstock) and $2.15/gal total production cost (inclusive of feedstock) or minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). This year, fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production data generated by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers in their Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) successfully demonstrated performance commensurate with both the FY 2012 SOT MESP target of $2.15/gal (2007$, $58.50/ton feedstock cost) and the conversion target of $1.41/gal through core research and process improvements in pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation.

  18. Forage Harvest and Transport Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, J.; Downing, M.; Turhollow, A.

    1998-12-01

    An engineering-economic approach is used to calculate harvest, in-field transport, and over-the-road transport costs for hay as bales and modules, silage, and crop residues as bales and modules. Costs included are equipment depreciation interest; fuel, lube, and oil; repairs; insurance, housing, and taxes; and labor. Field preparation, pest control, fertilizer, land, and overhead are excluded from the costs calculated Equipment is constrained by power available, throughput or carrying capacity, and field speed.

  19. Syngas Mixed Alcohol Cost Validation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1, 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office: Project Peer Review Syngas Mixed Alcohol Cost Validation Abhijit Dutta, NREL This presentation does not contain any proprietary, ...

  20. Support for Cost Analyses on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... process conditions, major capital equipment, materials and utilities usage rates, and to estimate equipment sizes. A combination of capital equipment cost databases and ...

  1. HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

  2. Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-AC36-08GO28308 Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization Genevieve Saur, Todd ......... 4 3.2 Wind Farm ......

  3. Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pathway Cost Distributions Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions Presentation on hydrogen pathway cost distributions presented January 25, 2006. PDF icon wkshpstorageuihlein.pdf...

  4. Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet File Project Cost Profile Spreadsheet.xlsx More Documents & Publications Statement of Work (SOW) Template ...

  5. Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the City of Houston's 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA's Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

  6. Connecting Distributed Energy Resources to the Grid: Their Benefits to the DER Owner etc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poore, WP

    2003-07-09

    The vision of the Distributed Energy Research Program (DER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is that the United States will have the cleanest and most efficient and reliable energy system in the world by maximizing the use of affordable distributed energy resources. Electricity consumers will be able to choose from a diverse number of efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly distributed energy options and easily connect them into the nation's energy infrastructure while providing benefits to their owners and other stakeholders. The long-term goal of this vision is that DER will achieve a 20% share of new electric capacity additions in the United States by 2010, thereby helping to make the nation's electric power generation and delivery system more efficient, reliable, secure, clean, economical, and diverse in terms of fuel use (oil, natural gas, solar, hydroelectric, etc.) and prime mover resource (solar, wind, gas turbines, etc.). Near- and mid-term goals are to develop new technologies for implementing and operating DER and address barriers associated with DER usage and then to reduce costs and emissions and improve the efficiency and reliability of DER. Numerous strategies for meeting these goals have been developed into a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports generation and delivery systems architecture, including modeling and simulation tools. The benefits associated with DER installations are often significant and numerous. They almost always provide tangible economic benefits, such as energy savings or transmission and distribution upgrade deferrals, as well as intangible benefits, such as power quality improvements that lengthen maintenance or repair intervals for power equipment. Also, the benefits routinely are dispersed among end users, utilities, and the public. For instance, an end user may use the DER to reduce their peak demand and save money due to lower demand charges. Reduced end user peak demand, in turn, may lower a distribution system peak load such that upgrades are deferred or avoided. This could benefit other consumers by providing them with higher reliability and power quality as well as avoiding their cost share of a distribution system upgrade. In this example, the costs of the DER may be born by the end user, but that user reaps only a share of the benefits. This report, the first product of a study to quantify the value of DER, documents initial project efforts to develop an assessment methodology. The focus of currently available site-specific DER assessment techniques are typically limited to two parties, the owner/user and the local utility. Rarely are the impacts on other stakeholders, including interconnected distribution utilities, transmission system operators, generating system operators, other local utility customers, local and regional industry and business, various levels of government, and the environment considered. The goal of this assessment is to quantify benefits and cost savings that accrue broadly across a region, recognizing that DER installations may have local, regional, or national benefits.

  7. Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

    1989-12-31

    This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state`s citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a ``How-To`` manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

  8. Least-cost utility planning consumer participation manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, C.; Wellinghoff, J.; Goldberg, F.

    1989-01-01

    This manual is designed to provide guidance to state consumer advocates and other state consumer groups interested in either initiating and/or participating in an Least-Cost Utility Planning (LCUP) process in their state. Least cost utility planning examined primarily as a regulatory framework to be implemented by an appropriate state authority -- usually the public utility commission -- for the benefit of the state's citizens and electric utility customers. LCUP is also a planning process to be used by investor owned and public utilities to select, support and justify future expenditures in resource additions. This manual is designed as a How-To'' manual for implementing and participating in a statewide LCUP process. Its goal is to guide the reader through the LCUP maze so that meaningful, forward-looking, and cost minimizing electric utility planning can be initiated and sustained in your state.

  9. Cost reduction of the Sun Challenger (trade mark) batch solar water heater. Final report, 31 March 1986-30 April 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickney, B.L.

    1987-05-01

    A variety of materials and methods were investigated as a means to reduce the cost of the Sun Challenger Solar Collector. Three prototypes were constructed and tested using lower-cost methods. Test results are summarized, including heat gain, heat loss, and collection efficiency. Costs and benefits are also presented and summarized.

  10. Commercial GSHPs: Benefits Belie Lack of Popularity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooperman, Alissa; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

    2012-05-31

    This article discusses ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for commercial building application as an alternative to conventional HVAC systems. A technology overview is presented as there are several types of GSHP and each has features making them better suited for certain building and lot types in addition to location climate. The article concludes with potential energy and cost savings offered by GSHPs and a brief market overview.

  11. Alternative methods to determine headwater benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Y.S.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.

    1997-11-10

    In 1992, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) began using a Flow Duration Analysis (FDA) methodology to assess headwater benefits in river basins where use of the Headwater Benefits Energy Gains (HWBEG) model may not result in significant improvements in modeling accuracy. The purpose of this study is to validate the accuracy and appropriateness of the FDA method for determining energy gains in less complex basins. This report presents the results of Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) validation of the FDA method. The validation is based on a comparison of energy gains using the FDA method with energy gains calculated using the MWBEG model. Comparisons of energy gains are made on a daily and monthly basis for a complex river basin (the Alabama River Basin) and a basin that is considered relatively simple hydrologically (the Stanislaus River Basin). In addition to validating the FDA method, ORNL was asked to suggest refinements and improvements to the FDA method. Refinements and improvements to the FDA method were carried out using the James River Basin as a test case.

  12. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRAWFORD TW

    2008-07-17

    This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

  13. Use of Cost Estimating Relationships

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) are an important tool in an estimator's kit, and in many cases, they are the only tool. Thus, it is important to understand their limitations and characteristics. This chapter discusses considerations of which the estimator must be aware so the Cost Estimating Relationships can be properly used.

  14. Renewable Energy Cost Optimization Spreadsheet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-12-31

    The Software allow users to determine the optimum combination of renewable energy technologies to minimize life cycle cost for a facility by employing various algorithms which calculate initial and operating cost, energy delivery, and other attributes associated with each technology as a function of size.

  15. Replacement Cost of Domestic Crude

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    The DEEPWATER model forecasts the replacement cost of domestic crude oil for 13 offshore regions in the lower 48 states. The replacement cost of domestic crude oil is the constant or levelized selling price that will recover the full expense of exploration, development, and productions with a reasonable return on capital.

  16. Analysis of Benefits of an Energy Imbalance Market in the NWPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samaan, Nader A.; Bayless, Rich; Symonds, Mark; Nguyen, Tony B.; Jin, Chunlian; Wu, Di; Diao, Ruisheng; Makarov, Yuri V.; Kannberg, Landis D.; Guo, Tao; Dennison-Leonard , Sarah; Goodenough, Mike; Schellberg, Ron; Conger, Sid; Harris, Kevin; Rarity, Matt; Wallace, Steven; Austin, Jamie; Noteboom, Rod; Van Blaricom , Tim; McRunnel, Kim; Apperson, John; Empey, Marshall; Etingov, Pavel V.; Warady, Debra; Brush, Ray; Newkirk, Joshua; Williams, Peter; Landauer, Marv; Owen, Hugh; Morter, Wayne; Haraguchi, Keli; Portouw, Jim; Downey, kathryn; Sorey, Steve; Williams, Stan; Gossa, Teyent; Kalich, Clint; Damiano, Patrick; Macarthur, Clay; Martin, Tom; Hoerner, Joe; Knudsen, Steve; Johnson, Anders; Link, Rick; Holcomb, Dennis

    2013-10-18

    The Northwest Power Pool (NWPP) Market Assessment Committee (MC) Initiative, which was officially launched on March 19, 2012, set out to explore a range of alternatives that could help the Balancing Authorities and scheduling utilities in the NWPP area address growing operational and commercial challenges affecting the regional power system. The MC formed an Analytical Team with technical representatives from each of the member Balancing Areas in the NWPP and with staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This Analytical Team was instructed to conduct extensive studies of intra-hour operation of the NWPP system in the year 2020 and of the NWPP region with 14,671 MW of wind penetration. The effort utilized a sub-hourly production cost model (the PLEXOS® computer model) that inputs data from the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC)-wide Production Cost Model (PCM) to evaluate potential production cost savings. The Analytical Team was given two general options to evaluate: •Energy Imbalance Market (EIM): establishment of an automated, organized NWPP area market for economically supplying energy imbalance within the hour. •Enhanced Market-Operational Tools (EMT) that might augment or replace an EIM. The Analytical The Analytical Team built on the WECC-wide PCM data from prior work done in the WECC and carried forward the evolution of the original WECC Transmission Expansion Planning Policy Committee (TEPPC) 2020 PC0 data base. A large number of modifications and improvements were made to this case and the data were subjected to extensive review by the team members to improve the model representation of the Northwest (NW). MC meetings that were open to the public were held for interested parties to review and provide input to the study. Results for the test, base, and sensitivity case studies performed by the MC Initiative Analytical Team indicate that there are a wide range of benefits that could be obtained from the operation of an EIM in the NWPP depending on what assumptions are made. The instructions from the MC were to determine a "minimum high confidence" range of potential benefits. The results for the Base Case indicate that the EIM benefits ranged from approximately $40 million to $70 million in annual savings from the operation of an EIM in the NWPP footprint. A number of additional relevant sensitivity cases were performed, including low and high water conditions, low and high natural gas prices, and various flex reserve requirements, resource operations, and amounts of resource capability held back during the preschedule period. Along with the results for the Base Case, the results for these studies yielded EIM benefits that clustered within the range of $70 to $80 million dollars per year with potential benefits ranging from approximately $125 million to as little as $17 million per year. Because the design and operation of an EIM could enable participating Balancing Authorities (BAs) to collectively lower the quantity of resources they must carry to meet within-hour balancing needs, a sensitivity case was also performed to analyze the impact that such reductions might have on the benefits from an EIM. The results for this sensitivity case indicate that such reductions could increase the benefits from the operation of an EIM in the NWPP into the range of approximately $130 million to $160 million per year. Also, a sensitivity case for a WECC-wide EIM was performed with the results indicating that the potential benefits to the NWPP could increase into the range of $197 million to $233 million per year. While there may be potential reliability benefits from the coordinated dispatch process underlying the operation of an EIM, reliability benefits from an EIM were out of the scope of this study. The EIM benefit analyses that were performed by the Analytical Team are provided in this report.

  17. Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An analysis was performed to estimate the costs associated with storing and transporting hydrogen. These costs can be added to a hydrogen production cost to determine the total delivered cost of hydrogen.

  18. Microgrid Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microgrids » Microgrid Activities Microgrid Activities Federal programs, institutions, and the private sector are increasing microgrid development and deployment. The number of successfully deployed microgrids will verify the benefits and decrease implementation risks further expanding the market for microgrids. Federal programs, institutions, and the private sector are increasing microgrid development and deployment. The number of successfully deployed microgrids will verify the benefits and

  19. Unreasonable Cost Waivers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unreasonable Cost Waivers Unreasonable Cost Waivers unreasonablecost10-03-2012.pdf cnmidecision.pdf eaglepassdecision.pdf...

  20. Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities ...

  1. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  2. Appendix C: Biomass Program inputs for FY 2008 benefits estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  3. Chapter 1: Estimating prospective benefits of EERE's portfolio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  4. State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State-level Benefits of Renewable Energy AgencyCompany Organization: Oak Ridge...

  5. Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San Jos Convention Center Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a ...

  6. RFI Released to Compile Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RFI Released to Compile Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT FOA RFI Released to Compile Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT FOA September 29, 2015 - 10:43am Addthis...

  7. Carbon Supply and Co-Benefits Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carbon Supply and Co-Benefits Analysis Jump to: navigation, search TODO: find a link to a carbon supplyco-benefits analysis Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  8. Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (DOE, 1994) Benefits of Site-wide NEPA National Environmental Policy Act Review (DOE, 1994) The purpose of this ...

  9. Going with the flow: Life cycle costing for industrial pumpingsystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tutterow, Vestal; Hovstadius, Gunnar; McKane, Aimee

    2002-07-08

    Industries worldwide depend upon pumping systems for theirdaily operation. These systems account for nearly 20 percent of theworld's industrial electrical energy demand and range from 25-50 percentof the energy usage in certain industrial plant operations. Purchasedecisions for a pump and its related system components are typicallybased upon a low bid, rather than the cost to operate the system over itslifetime. Additionally, plant facilities personnel are typically focussedon maintaining existing pumping system reliability rather than optimizingthe systems for best energy efficiency. To ensure the lowest energy andmaintenance costs, equipment life, and other benefits, the systemcomponents must be carefully matched to each other, and remain sothroughout their working lives. Life Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis is a toolthat can help companies minimize costs and maximize energy efficiency formany types of systems, including pumping systems. Increasing industryawareness of the total cost of pumping system ownership through lifecycle cost analysis is a goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Thispaper will discuss what DOE and its industry partners are doing to createthis awareness. A guide book, Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCCAnalysis for Pumping Systems, developed by the Hydraulic Institute (HI)and Europump (two pump manufacturer trade associations) with DOEinvolvement, will be overviewed. This guide book is the result of thediligent efforts of many members of both associations, and has beenreviewed by a group of industrial end-users. The HI/Europump Guideprovides detailed guidance on the design and maintenance of pumpingsystems to minimize the cost of ownership, as well as LCC analysis. DOE,Hydraulic Institute, and other organizations' efforts to promote LCCanalysis, such as pump manufacturers adopting LCC analysis as a marketingstrategy, will be highlighted and a relevant case studyprovided.

  10. Cost guide. Volume 2. Standard procedures for determining revenue requirements (product cost)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The DOE has conducted economic analyses of alternative energy projects over the past several years which compared emerging technologies to conventional technologies and also to competing emerging technologies. The method used was to determine and compare the product costs of the technologies being assessed. A review of the application of this product cost technique over the past few years revealed that slightly different financial assumptions, economic factors, and scope were used. Therefore, it is not meaningful to compare results. Consistent comparison of the economic benefits of programs and projects being evaluated by DOE is essential to accomplish the assigned missions and functions. The process of reviewing much of the work accomplished by DOE and its support contractors failed to disclose a single source document or methodology which had potential application across the full range of DOE interests. However, the 1981 version of the Technical Assessment Guide published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) appears to have all of the necessary elements, economic factors, assumptions, and cost performance information necessary to meet the DOE's needs. A review of the document indicates that the methodology described by EPRI can be applied to almost any energy project so long as appropriate business and financial assumptions are made.The financial and business assumptions presented in EPRI technical report P-2410-SR are typical of the electric utility industry. Moreover, using a methodology already widely accepted by the utility industry, DOE can help reduce proliferation of different methods and promote the adoption of a standard. This guide presents a summary of the methodology, data on fuel price projections, and cost and performance information for transmission and generation technologies, and reflects an explanation of the economic methodology to include sample problems.

  11. Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Resources » Hydropower Basics » Benefits of Hydropower Benefits of Hydropower Benefits of Hydropower Water power offers a number of advantages to the communities that they serve. Below are just some of the benefits that hydropower has over other methods of providing energy. Advantages of Hydropower: Hydropower is fueled by water, so it's a clean fuel source, meaning it won't pollute the air like power plants that burn fossil fuels, such as coal or natural gas. Hydroelectric power

  12. Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits Template, from the U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Residential Network.

  13. Rural Communities Benefit from Wind Energy's Continued Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    John Stulp, Colorado Interbasin Compact Committee chairman, discusses how wind energy benefits rural communities, farms, and ranches.

  14. Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits FAQ

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting and Benefits FAQ, from the U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Residential Network.

  15. Public Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits of ASCR » Public Benefits Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Public Benefits Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory & Experiement (INCITE) SBIR/STTR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW

  16. Benefits Analysis for DOE Energy Technology Portfolio Assessment: Background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beschen, Darrell

    2006-12-20

    A presentation for the FY 2007 GPRA methodology review on benefits analysis for the DOE energy technology portfolio assessment.

  17. Cost Effective Water Heating Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question"Are high-efficiency hot water heating systems worth the cost?"

  18. Yearly Energy Costs for Buildings

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-03-20

    COSTSAFR3.0 generates a set of compliance forms which will be attached to housing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) issued by Departments or Agencies of the Federal Government. The compliance forms provide a uniform method for estimating the total yearly energy cost for each proposal. COSTSAFR3.0 analyzes specific housing projects at a given site, using alternative fuel types, and considering alternative housing types. The program is designed around the concept of minimizing overall costs through energy conservationmore » design, including first cost and future utility costs, and estabilishes a standard design to which proposed housing designs are compared. It provides a point table for each housing type that can be used to determine whether a proposed design meets the standard and how a design can be modified to meet the standard.« less

  19. Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop Tuesday, November 27, 2012 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. National Renewable Energy Lab Offices - Suite 930 901 D Street, SW, Washington, DC 20585 AGENDA ...

  20. Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Conghua

    2013-05-30

    Bipolar plate is an important component in fuel cell stacks and accounts for more than 75% of stack weight and volume. The technology development of metal bipolar plates can effectively reduce the fuel cells stack weight and volume over 50%. The challenge is the metal plate corrosion protection at low cost for the broad commercial applications. This project is aimed to develop innovative technological solutions to overcome the corrosion barrier of low cost metal plates. The feasibility of has been demonstrated and patented (US Patent 7,309,540). The plan is to further reduce the cost, and scale up the technology. The project is built on three pillars: 1) robust experimental evidence demonstrating the feasibility of our technology, 2) a team that consists of industrial leaders in fuel cell stack application, design, and manufactures; 3) a low-risk, significant-milestone driven program that proves the feasibility of meeting program objectives The implementation of this project will reduce the fuel cell stack metal bipolar separator plate cost which accounts 15-21% of the overall stack cost. It will contribute to the market adoption of fuel cell technologies. In addition, this corrosion protection technology can be used similar energy devices, such as batteries and electrolyzers. Therefore, the success of the project will be benefit in broad markets.

  1. Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-25

    The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GENSIM) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration ofmore » a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emission trade-offs. The base case results using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8 cents/kwhr.« less

  2. A Research Framework for Demonstrating Benefits of Advanced Control Room Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Blanc, Katya; Boring, Ronald; Joe, Jeffrey; Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    Control Room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. A full-scale modernization might, for example, entail replacement of all analog panels with digital workstations. Such modernizations have been undertaken successfully in upgrades in Europe and Asia, but the U.S. has yet to undertake a control room upgrade of this magnitude. Instead, nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Previous research under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program has helped establish a systematic process for control room upgrades that support the transition to a hybrid control. While the guidance developed to date helps streamline the process of modernization and reduce costs and uncertainty associated with introducing digital control technologies into an existing control room, these upgrades do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The aim of the control room benefits research presented here is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report serves as an outline for planned research on the benefits of greater modernization in the main control rooms of nuclear power plants.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound_Benefits

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ohio > Mound_Benefits Mound, Ohio, Site Former Workers' Employment Verification and Benefits Administration Contractor Employment Verification Mercer, Mound Benefits Center (866) 296-5036 Medical and Life Insurance for Former EG&G, BWXTO, and CH2M HILL Employees For questions about health insurance coverage and/or dependent information, life insurance and/or beneficiaries, etc.: Mound Benefits Center P.O. Box 10361 Des Moines, IA 50306-0361 Benefit Center Website (866) 296-5036 9:00 a.m.

  4. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 7. Low-Cost Carbon Fiber

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

  5. Environmental cost principle: Gone but not forgotten. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb, J.L.

    1995-09-30

    This thesis has not focused on the myriad of environmental laws generating costs for government contractors. Compliance with such laws is not beyond the experience of government cost-reimbursement contracting. This thesis has not detailed the alternative to cost reimbursement; i.e., a contribution action against the United States for cleanup costs. Potential contribution action remains an issue when the contamination is related to the performance of a government contract. At the center of this analysis is the efficacy of the draft environmental cost principle. The draft cost principle forced the consideration of the many prickly issues that must someday be resolved. The draft cost principle is unlikely to return in present form. It may be gone, but it should not be forgotten. The environmental cost issues will resurface. Future attempts to address these issues will benefit from the careful consideration of the latest draft environmental cost principle. The core questions to be answered are what would be the impact of the cost principle on the treatment of various environmental costs, and whether such impact is for the good.

  6. Transportation system benefits of early deployment of a 75-ton multipurpose canister system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wankerl, M.W.; Schmid, S.P.

    1995-12-31

    In 1993 the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) began developing two multipurpose canister (MPC) systems to provide a standardized method for interim storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at commercial nuclear power plants. One is a 75-ton concept with an estimated payload of about 6 metric tons (t) of SNF, and the other is a 125-ton concept with an estimated payload of nearly 11 t of SNF. These payloads are two to three times the payloads of the largest currently certified US rail transport casks, the IF-300. Although is it recognized that a fully developed 125-ton MPC system is likely to provide a greater cost benefit, and radiation exposure benefit than the lower-capacity 75-ton MPC, the authors of this paper suggest that development and deployment of the 75-ton MPC prior to developing and deploying a 125-ton MPC is a desirable strategy. Reasons that support this are discussed in this paper.

  7. Energy Efficiency Learning Activity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website Website: learn.kidwind.orgsitesdefaultfilesenergyefficiency.pdf Cost: Free Language: English Logo: Energy Efficiency Learning Activity This lesson covers topics...

  8. Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

  9. NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energys Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative Island approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this islands used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an islands cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

  10. Energy Conservation Projects to Benefit the Railroad Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

    2009-12-31

    The Energy Conservation Projects to benefit the railroad industry using the Norfolk Southern Company as a model for the railroad industry has five unique tasks which are in areas of importance within the rail industry, and specifically in the area of energy conservation. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team looked at five significant areas in which research and development work can provide unique solutions to the railroad industry in energy the conservation. (1) Alternate Fuels - An examination of various blends of bio-based diesel fuels for the railroad industry, using Norfolk Southern as a model for the industry. The team determined that bio-diesel fuel is a suitable alternative to using straight diesel fuel, however, the cost and availability across the country varies to a great extent. (2) Utilization of fuel cells for locomotive power systems - While the application of the fuel cell has been successfully demonstrated in the passenger car, this is a very advanced topic for the railroad industry. There are many safety and power issues that the research team examined. (3) Thermal and emission reduction for current large scale diesel engines - The current locomotive system generates large amount of heat through engine cooling and heat dissipation when the traction motors are used to decelerate the train. The research team evaluated thermal management systems to efficiently deal with large thermal loads developed by the operating engines. (4) Use of Composite and Exotic Replacement Materials - Research team redesigned various components using new materials, coatings, and processes to provide the needed protection. Through design, analysis, and testing, new parts that can withstand the hostile environments were developed. (5) Tribology Applications - Identification of tribology issues in the Railroad industry which play a significant role in the improvement of energy usage. Research team analyzed and developed solutions which resulted in friction modification to improve energy efficiency.

  11. DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) recently released a report finding that inter-regional cooperation can help lower the cost of transporting wind energy from windy areas in the Midwest and South-Central United States to areas with less wind generation capability in the Southeastern United States, improving the ability to meet our nation's electricity demand using clean resources. DOE awarded the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and LCG Consulting an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) grant to evaluate the benefits of coordinating inter-regional transfers of wind energy.

  12. Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Battery energy storage systems life cycle costs case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminathan, S.; Miller, N.F.; Sen, R.K.

    1998-08-01

    This report presents a comparison of life cycle costs between battery energy storage systems and alternative mature technologies that could serve the same utility-scale applications. Two of the battery energy storage systems presented in this report are located on the supply side, providing spinning reserve and system stability benefits. These systems are compared with the alternative technologies of oil-fired combustion turbines and diesel generators. The other two battery energy storage systems are located on the demand side for use in power quality applications. These are compared with available uninterruptible power supply technologies.

  14. Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of KeyElectrical Products: The Case of India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert,Virginie; McMahon, James E.

    2005-12-20

    The goal of this project was to estimate the net benefits that cost-effective improvements in energy efficiency can bring to developing countries. The study focused on four major electrical products in the world's second largest developing country, India. These products--refrigerators, room air conditioners, electric motors, and distribution transformers--are important targets for efficiency improvement in India and in other developing countries. India is an interesting subject of study because of it's size and rapid economic growth. Implementation of efficient technologies in India would save billions in energy costs, and avoid hundreds of megatons of greenhouse gas emissions. India also serves as an example of the kinds of improvement opportunities that could be pursued in other developing countries.

  15. Pollution prevention benefits of non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves - 11000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, Michael E; Dodge, Robert L

    2011-01-11

    Radiation shielding is commonly used to protect the glovebox worker from unintentional direct and secondary radiation exposure, while working with plutonium-238 and plutonium-239. Shielding glovebox gloves are traditionally composed of lead-based materials, i.e., hazardous waste. This has prompted the development of new, non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. No studies, however, have investigated the pollution prevention benefits of these new glovebox gloves. We examined both leaded and non-hazardous shielding glovebox gloves. The nonhazardous substitutes are higher in cost, but this is offset by eliminating the costs associated with onsite waste handling of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) items. In the end, replacing lead with non-hazardous substitutes eliminates waste generation and future liability.

  16. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-01-27

    This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grid’s potential contribution to the nation’s goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

  17. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-01-15

    This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grid’s potential contribution to the nation’s goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

  18. Modifications to Replacement Costs System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godec, M. [ICF Resources, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1989-05-18

    The purpose of this memorandum is to document the improvements and modifications made to the Replacement Costs of Crude Oil (REPCO) Supply Analysis System. While some of this work was performed under our previous support contract to DOE/ASFE, we are presenting all modifications and improvements are presented here for completeness. The memo primarily documents revisions made to the Lower-48 Onshore Model. Revisions and modifications made to other components and models in the REPCO system which are documented elsewhere are only highlighted in this memo. Generally, the modifications made to the Lower-48 Onshore Model reflect changes that have occurred in domestic drilling, oil field costs, and reserves since 1982, the date of the most recent available data used for the original Replacement Costs report, published in 1985.

  19. Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Kirby, B.; Lew, D.; Clark, C.; DeCesaro, J.; Lynn, K.

    2011-06-01

    This report examines how wind and solar integration studies have evolved, what analysis techniques work, what common mistakes are still made, what improvements are likely to be made in the near future, and why calculating integration costs is such a difficult problem and should be undertaken carefully, if at all.

  20. Increasing spin-flips and decreasing cost: Perturbative corrections for external singles to the complete active space spin flip model for low-lying excited states and strong correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayhall, Nicholas J.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-07-28

    An approximation to the spin-flip extended configuration interaction singles method is developed using a second-order perturbation theory approach. In addition to providing significant efficiency advantages, the new framework is general for an arbitrary number of spin-flips, with the current implementation being applicable for up to around 4 spin-flips. Two new methods are introduced: one which is developed using non-degenerate perturbation theory, spin-flip complete active-space (SF-CAS(S)), and a second quasidegenerate perturbation theory method, SF-CAS(S){sub 1}. These two approaches take the SF-CAS wavefunction as the reference, and then perturbatively includes the effect of single excitations. For the quasidegenerate perturbation theory method, SF-CAS(S){sub 1}, the subscripted 1 in the acronym indicates that a truncated denominator expansion is used to obtain an energy-independent down-folded Hamiltonian. We also show how this can alternatively be formulated in terms of an extended Lagrangian, by introducing an orthonormality constraint on the first-order wavefunction. Several numerical examples are provided, which demonstrate the ability of SF-CAS(S) and SF-CAS(S){sub 1} to describe bond dissociations, singlet-triplet gaps of organic molecules, and exchange coupling parameters for binuclear transition metal complexes.

  1. Program Evaluation: Preparation Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preparation Activities Program Evaluation: Preparation Activities There are some specific ... Criteria, Logistics, Cost, and Analysis A peer review requires evaluation against ...

  2. System Cost Analysis for an Interior Permanent Magnet Motor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Campbell

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this program is to provide an assessment of the cost structure for an interior permanent magnet ('IPM') motor which is designed to meet the 2010 FreedomCAR specification. The program is to evaluate the range of viable permanent magnet materials for an IPM motor, including sintered and bonded grades of rare earth magnets. The study considers the benefits of key processing steps, alternative magnet shapes and their assembly methods into the rotor (including magnetization), and any mechanical stress or temperature limits. The motor's costs are estimated for an annual production quantity of 200,000 units, and are broken out into such major components as magnetic raw materials, processing and manufacturing. But this is essentially a feasibility study of the motor's electromagnetic design, and is not intended to include mechanical or thermal studies as would be done to work up a selected design for production.

  3. Hybrid energy system cost analysis: San Nicolas Island, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, T.L.; McKenna, E.

    1996-07-01

    This report analyzes the local wind resource and evaluates the costs and benefits of supplementing the current diesel-powered energy system on San Nicolas Island, California (SNI), with wind turbines. In Section 2.0 the SNI site, naval operations, and current energy system are described, as are the data collection and analysis procedures. Section 3.0 summarizes the wind resource data and analyses that were presented in NREL/TP 442-20231. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 present the conceptual design and cost analysis of a hybrid wind and diesel energy system on SNI, with conclusions following in Section 6. Appendix A presents summary pages of the hybrid system spreadsheet model, and Appendix B contains input and output files for the HYBRID2 program.

  4. UV/oxidation providers shed technical problems, fight cost perceptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapaport, D. )

    1993-05-01

    Systems combining ultraviolet light and oxidation (UV/oxidation) to remove contaminants from water were introduced in the early 1980s. Since then, improvements in the technology, a wide array of applications, educational efforts by companies offering the systems and changes in environmental regulations have accelerated acceptance of UV/oxidation technology. From the standpoint of regulatory officials, the major advantage of UV/oxidation is that it creates no secondary pollutants to treat or haul away. It is a self-contained, in situ treatment technology. This benefit has gained importance as regulations have become more stringent regarding disposal of secondary pollutants, such as saturated carbon, and concentration levels of air emissions created by air stripping. Such regulations have increased the costs of monitoring and disposal, while the costs of using UV/oxidation were decreasing.

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on

  6. Health Benefits of GHG Reduction | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Health Benefits of GHG Reduction Reducing GHG emissions could benefit public health by reducing the negative effects of particulate matter and ozone that result from the burning of fossil fuels. In a 1997 study, the World Resources Institute (WRI), the World Health Organization (WHO), and others estimated that eight million avoidable air pollution-related deaths will occur worldwide by the year 2020. More recently, researchers evaluated the health benefits in the next 20 years from reductions of

  7. BENEFIT 2016 Funding Opportunity Webinars | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Funding Opportunity Webinars BENEFIT 2016 Funding Opportunity Webinars These webinars provide an overview of the BENEFIT 2016 Funding Opportunity. The first introductory webinar was held on December 21, 2015 (text version). A second webinar for full applications was held on March 14 (text version). The Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Innovations Technologies (BENEFIT) Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001383 seeks to fund three Innovations topics and two Frontiers topics

  8. Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting Better Buildings Residential Network All-Member Peer Exchange Call: Member Reporting and Benefits, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, May 22, 2014. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar Nothing But Networking for Residential

  9. Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program SCGSR Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Information for Laboratory Scientists and Thesis Advisors Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Benefits Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page The SCGSR program provides supplemental awards to support part of a graduate student's thesis research to be conducted at a DOE laboratory. Supplemental awards are intended to cover incremental

  10. Benefits | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benefits Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) VFP Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home Benefits Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Selected faculty and participating students spend 10 weeks (Summer Term) at a DOE national laboratory engaged in a research project under the guidance of a laboratory scientist. Faculty members build collaborative relationships with DOE research scientists, become familiar with DOE

  11. Employee Health Plan Benefits Enrollment/Disenrollment Packet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    400-PKG (03-2015) Supersedes (03-2013) Issue SANDIA PROPRIETARY INFORMATION PERSONALLY IDENTIFIABLE INFORMATION (PII) (WHEN COMPLETE) Page 1 Employee Health Plan Benefits Enrollment/Disenrollment Packet Benefits MUST receive this form within 31 calendar days of the mid-year election change event. IMPORTANT ENROLLMENT REQUIREMENTS STEP 1: Complete Section A. STEP 2: Review the eligibility criteria located in Section 3 of the Sandia Health Benefits Plan for Employees Summary Plan Description (SPD)

  12. DOE Benefits Forecasts: Report of the External Peer Review Panel |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Benefits Forecasts: Report of the External Peer Review Panel DOE Benefits Forecasts: Report of the External Peer Review Panel A report for the FY 2007 GPRA methodology review, highlighting the views of an external expert peer review panel on DOE benefits forecasts. PDF icon Report of the External Peer Review Panel More Documents & Publications Industrial Technologies Funding Profile by Subprogram Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power

  13. EV Everywhere: Electric Vehicle Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits EV Everywhere: Electric Vehicle Benefits EV Everywhere: Electric Vehicle Benefits Plug-in electric vehicles (also known as electric cars or EVs) are connected, fun, and practical. They can reduce emissions and even save you money. Fueling with electricity offers some advantages not available in conventional internal combustion engine vehicles. Because electric motors react quickly, EVs are very responsive and have very good torque. EVs are often more digitally connected than

  14. Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Programs. FY 2003 - FY 2020 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs. FY 2003 - FY 2020 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs. FY 2003 - FY 2020 This report summarizes the results of EERE's annual GPRA (The Government Performance and Results Act of 1993) data call for FY 2003. The reported data communicate the benefits of EERE's

  15. Benefits of Thermoelectric Technology for the Automobile | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Residential Network All-Member Peer Exchange Call: Member Reporting and Benefits, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, May 22, 2014. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Webinar Nothing But Networking for Residential Network Members Energy

    document provides information about the benefits of performing EM&V. PDF icon Benefits of EM&V

  16. Benefits of Using Logic Modeling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits of Using Logic Modeling Benefits of Using Logic Modeling Benefits of developing and using logic models are: The model helps communicate the program to people outside the program in a concise and compelling way The model helps program staff to gain a common understanding of how the program works and their responsibilities to make it work Choosing a small set of performance indicators based upon a logic model: Keeps attention on all aspects of performance, balances the perturbations that

  17. Example Cost Codes for Construction Projects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides an example outline of cost items and their corresponding cost codes that may be used for construction projects.

  18. 2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Report," collects the cost and quality of fossil fuel purchases made by electric ... a reduction of approximately 9 percent of natural gas purchases, cost, and quality data. ...

  19. Reducing Photovoltaic Costs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaics Reducing Photovoltaic Costs Reducing Photovoltaic Costs Photo of gloved hands pouring liquid from a glass bottle to glass beaker. The development of more ...

  20. Property:Cost | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cost Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:Cost&oldid285418...

  1. California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: California Biomass Collaborative Energy Cost Calculators AgencyCompany...

  2. Cost Competitive Electricity from Photovoltaic Concentrators...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost Competitive Electricity from Photovoltaic Concentrators Called 'Imminent' July 13, ... solar cells will reduce the cost of electricity from sunlight to competitive levels ...

  3. Early Station Costs Questionnaire | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Presentation by Marc Melaina, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, at the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market ...

  4. Asian Co-benefits Partnership (ACP) Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and information to help mainstream climate and developmental co-benefits into decision-making processes in Asia." The Tookit "offers recent publication from ACP member...

  5. Benefits of Biofuel Production and Use in California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... (based on 2011 survey by the Bureau of Labor Statistics) navy.milsubmit... State policies recognize the social, economic, and environmental benefits of biofuels. ...

  6. Northern New Mexico companies benefit from economic development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northern New Mexico companies benefit from economic development funds Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:...

  7. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Health Benefits of Particle Filtration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Health ... designs and more of these studies report statistically significant ...

  8. Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP AgencyCompany Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy...

  9. Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Methods and Applications Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Accounting for Co-benefits in Asia's Transportation Sector: Methods and Applications...

  10. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Employers and Contractors Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits ... The Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project fosters the growth of a high-quality ...

  11. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Home Energy Workers Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits for ... The Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project fosters the growth of a high-quality ...

  12. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homeowners and Consumers Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project: Benefits for Homeowners and Consumers The Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project fosters the ...

  13. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - NREL Reveals Benefits of O2 Contact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reveals Benefits of O2 Contact with Defects in 2D Semiconductors December 11, 2015 Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have explained...

  14. Energy Efficiency Public Benefits Funds | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    restructuring legislation created separate public benefits funds that support renewable energy and residential energy efficiency. The efficiency fund is known as the Energy...

  15. Projected Benefits of EERE's Portfolio (by program and model)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-17

    This collection of charts shows the benefits metrics for renewable energy technologies in the EERE portfolio for 2010-2050 for both the NEMS and MARKAL models.

  16. Recovery Act Investment Wraps Up, Delivering Major Benefits to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivering Major Benefits to the Nation October 5, 2015 - 3:21pm Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy...

  17. ARM - Possible Benefits of Global Warming on Agriculture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ListPossible Benefits of Global Warming on Agriculture Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts ...

  18. Verifying the Benefits and Resolving the Issues in the Commercializati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Key Benefits in Using Ethanol-Diesel Blends Impact of External Heat-shielding Techniques on Shell Surface Temperatures and Dynamic Shell Thermal ...

  19. The potential benefits of distributed deneration and rate-related...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages Smart Grid Investments Improve Grid Reliability, Resilience, and Storm Responses (November 2014)

  20. EAC Presentation: Metrics and Benefits Analysis for the ARRA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and benefits analysis for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act smart grid programs including the Smart Grid Investment Grants and the Smart Grid Demonstration Program. ...