Sample records for activity core holes

  1. Core Holes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl., 1987) | Open

  2. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of core holes were drilled from 1984 to 1988 as a part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) to better understand the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal...

  3. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of core holes were drilled from 1984 to 1988 as a part of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) to better understand the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal...

  4. Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes VC-1 and VC-2A, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  5. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dennis L. Nielson, Pisto Larry, C.W. Criswell, R. Gribble, K. Meeker, J.A. Musgrave, T. Smith, D. Wilson (1989) Scientific Core Hole Valles Caldera No. 2B (VC-2B), New Mexico:...

  6. Processing of Activated Core Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

  7. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence may bedieselsummerFact SheetsUltrafast Core-Hole

  8. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPointsProbing Core-Hole

  9. LOWFREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF XRAY GHOST BUBBLES A2597: A HISTORY RADIO ACTIVITY THE CORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarazin, Craig

    LOW­FREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF X­RAY GHOST BUBBLES A2597: A HISTORY RADIO ACTIVITY THE CORE T showed ``ghost holes'' X­ray emission west northeast central radio galaxy PKS 2322#123. Previous radio observations detect radio emission coming from interior X­ray holes. present low­frequency observations A2597

  10. Dynamics of galaxy cores and supermassive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work on the dynamical evolution of galactic nuclei containing supermassive black holes is reviewed. Topics include galaxy structural properties; collisionless and collisional equilibria; loss-cone dynamics; and dynamics of binary and multiple supermassive black holes.

  11. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  12. Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  13. Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Core Hole Drilling And...

  14. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  15. Core Lithology State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 4 Kilauea

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl., 1987)

  16. Core Lithology State of Hawail Scientific Observation Hole 2 Kilauea

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl., 1987)Volcano,

  17. Core-Level Activity Prediction for Multi-Core Power Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    1 Core-Level Activity Prediction for Multi-Core Power Management W. Lloyd Bircher1 and Lizy, University of Texas at Austin Abstract - Existing power management techniques operate by reducing performance generated by the workloads on individual cores. This causes sub-optimal power management and over

  18. Spin orientation of supermassive black holes in active galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Kollatschny

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Accretion of gas onto a central supermassive black hole is generally accepted to be the source of the emitted energy in active galactic nuclei.The broad emission lines we observe in their optical spectra are probably formed in the wind of an accretion disk at distances of light days to light years from the central black hole. The variable fraction of the emission lines originates at typical distances of only 1 to 50 light days from the central supermassive black hole. We derived a central black hole mass of M_orbital = 1.8 +/-0.4 x 10^7 M_sun in the Seyfert galaxy Mrk110 assuming the broad emission lines are generated in gas clouds orbiting within an accretion disk. This figure depends on the inclination angle of the accretion disk. Here we report on the detection of gravitational redshifted emission in the variable fraction of the broad emission lines. We derive a central black hole mass of M_grav = 14.0 +/-3.0 x 10^7 M_sun. These measurements are independent on the orientation of the accretion disk. The comparison of both black hole mass estimates allows to determine the projection of the central accretion disk angle i to 21 +/-5 deg. in Mrk110 and therefore the orientation of the spin axis of the central black hole.

  19. A comparative theoretical study on core-hole excitation spectra of azafullerene and its derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Yunfeng [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China) [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Gao, Bin, E-mail: bin.gao@uit.no [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China) [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry (CTCC), Department of Chemistry, University of TromsThe Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Troms (Norway); Deng, Mingsen, E-mail: deng@gznc.edu.cn [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China)] [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Luo, Yi [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China) [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Department of Theoretical Chemistry, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The core-hole excitation spectranear-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shake-up satellites have been simulated at the level of density functional theory for the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its derivatives (C{sub 59}N){sup +}, C{sub 59}HN, (C{sub 59}N){sub 2}, and C{sub 59}NC{sub 60}, in which the XPS shake-up satellites were simulated using our developed equivalent core hole Kohn-Sham (ECH-KS) density functional theory approach [B. Gao, Z. Wu, and Y. Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234704 (2008)] which aims for the study of XPS shake-up satellites of large-scale molecules. Our calculated spectra are generally in good agreement with available experimental results that validates the use of the ECH-KS method in the present work. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS, XES, and XPS shake-up satellites spectra in general can be used as fingerprints to distinguish the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its different derivatives. Meanwhile, different carbon K-edge spectra could also provide detailed information of (local) electronic structures of different molecules. In particular, a peak (at around 284.5 eV) in the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectrum of the heterodimer C{sub 59}NC{sub 60} is confirmed to be related to the electron transfer from the C{sub 59}N part to the C{sub 60} part in this charge-transfer complex.

  20. conductivity of Santa Fe Group aquifer systemsediments from the 98th Street core hole. Albuquerque. New Mexico: New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haneberg, William C.

    systemsediments from the 98th Street core hole. Albuquerque. New Mexico: New Mexico Geology. Vol. 20, pp. 14 Grande Basin, proceedings of the 39th Annual New Mexico Water Conference, Albuquerque. New Mexico. November 3-4.1994: New Mexico Water Re- sources Research Insitute Report No. 200, pp. 37-55. HEYWOOD, C

  1. Tunable synthesis of TiO{sub 2}/SrO core/shell nanowire arrays with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wenqi [Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang, Jie, E-mail: flyyangj@163.com [Faculty of Mechanical and Electronic Information, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [Faculty of Mechanical and Electronic Information, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gong, Yingpeng, E-mail: ypgong@jhust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hong, Hanlie [Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanowires with tunable SrO shell layer are easily fabricated. The core/shell structure can enhance the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanowires and restrict the recombination of the electrons/holes. Display Omitted Highlights: ? A facile method to fabricate TiO{sub 2}/SrO core-shell nanowire array is reported. ? The thickness of SrO shell layer can be tunable by adjusting the dipping time. ? TiO{sub 2}/SrO core/shell nanowires shows enhanced photocatalytic activity. -- Abstract: We report a simple method to fabricate well-aligned TiO{sub 2}/SrO core/shell nanowire arrays. The core/shell structure is confirmed to have crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanowires core and amorphous SrO shell layer. The shell is composed of SrO with tunable thickness. Photocatalytic activity measurement shows that TiO{sub 2}/SrO core/shell nanowire arrays outperform uncovered TiO{sub 2} nanowires. Such core/shell nanowire arrays have potential applications for photovoltaic devices and as high performance photocatalyst.

  2. Regular black holes: Electrically charged solutions, Reissner-Nordstroem outside a de Sitter core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zanchin, Vilson T. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica - CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico - IST, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa - UTL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adelia, 166, 09210-170, Santo Andre, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coordenadoria de Astronomia e Astrofisica, Observatorio Nacional-MCT, Rua General Jose Cristino 77, 20921-400 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To have the correct picture of a black hole as a whole, it is of crucial importance to understand its interior. The singularities that lurk inside the horizon of the usual Kerr-Newman family of black hole solutions signal an endpoint to the physical laws and, as such, should be substituted in one way or another. A proposal that has been around for sometime is to replace the singular region of the spacetime by a region containing some form of matter or false vacuum configuration that can also cohabit with the black hole interior. Black holes without singularities are called regular black holes. In the present work, regular black hole solutions are found within general relativity coupled to Maxwell's electromagnetism and charged matter. We show that there are objects which correspond to regular charged black holes, whose interior region is de Sitter, whose exterior region is Reissner-Nordstroem, and the boundary between both regions is made of an electrically charged spherically symmetric coat. There are several types of solutions: regular nonextremal black holes with a null matter boundary, regular nonextremal black holes with a timelike matter boundary, regular extremal black holes with a timelike matter boundary, and regular overcharged stars with a timelike matter boundary. The main physical and geometrical properties of such charged regular solutions are analyzed.

  3. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its...

  4. EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION AND HEATING OF TWO ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mason, Helen E., E-mail: durgesh@iucaa.ernet.in [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode, we have studied the coronal plasma in the core of two active regions. Concentrating on the area between opposite polarity moss, we found emission measure distributions having an approximate power-law form EM{proportional_to}T{sup 2.4} from log T = 5.5 up to a peak at log T = 6.55. We show that the observations compare very favorably with a simple model of nanoflare-heated loop strands. They also appear to be consistent with more sophisticated nanoflare models. However, in the absence of additional constraints, steady heating is also a viable explanation.

  5. Double core-hole spectroscopy of transient plasmas produced in the interaction of ultraintense x-ray pulses with neon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Cheng; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Double core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon atomic system in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in the detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the highly transient plasmas. For x-ray pulses with photon energy in the range of 937-1030 eV, where $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonance absorption from single core-hole (SCH) states of neon charge states exist, inner-shell resonant absorption (IRA) effects play important roles in the time evolution of population and DCH spectroscopy. Such IRA physical effects are illustrated in detail by investigating the interaction of x-ray pulses at a photon energy of 944 eV, which corresponds to the $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonant absorption from the SCH states ($1s2s^22p^4$, $1s2s2p^5$ and $1s2p^6$) of Ne$^{3+}$. After averaging over the space and time distribution o...

  6. EVIDENCE OF IMPULSIVE HEATING IN ACTIVE REGION CORE LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Mason, Helen E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A., E-mail: d.tripathi@damtp.cam.ac.u [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a full spectral scan of an active region from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) we have obtained emission measure EM(T) distributions in two different moss regions within the same active region. We have compared these with theoretical transition region EMs derived for three limiting cases, namely, static equilibrium, strong condensation, and strong evaporation from Klimchuk et al. The EM distributions in both the moss regions are strikingly similar and show a monotonically increasing trend from log T[K] = 5.15-6.3. Using photospheric abundances, we obtain a consistent EM distribution for all ions. Comparing the observed and theoretical EM distributions, we find that the observed EM distribution is best explained by the strong condensation case (EM{sub con}), suggesting that a downward enthalpy flux plays an important and possibly dominant role in powering the transition region moss emission. The downflows could be due to unresolved coronal plasma that is cooling and draining after having been impulsively heated. This supports the idea that the hot loops (with temperatures of 3-5 MK) seen in the core of active regions are heated by nanoflares.

  7. Up to 700k GPU cores, Kepler, and the Exascale future for simulations of star clusters around black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berczik, P; Wang, L; Zhong, S; Veles, O; Zinchenko, I; Huang, S; Tsai, M; Kennedy, G; Li, S; Naso, L; Li, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct astrophysical N-body simulations with up to a few million bodies using our parallel MPI/CUDA code on large GPU clusters in China, Ukraine and Germany, with different kinds of GPU hardware. These clusters are directly linked under the Chinese Academy of Sciences special GPU cluster program in the cooperation of ICCS (International Center for Computational Science). We reach about the half the peak Kepler K20 GPU performance for our phi-GPU code [2], in a real application scenario with individual hierarchically block time-steps with the high (4th, 6th and 8th) order Hermite integration schemes and a real core-halo density structure of the modeled stellar systems. The code and hardware are mainly used to simulate star clusters [23, 24] and galactic nuclei with supermassive black holes [20], in which correlations between distant particles cannot be neglected.

  8. Core Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, Et Al.,EtOpen

  9. Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, Et

  10. Core Holes At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Bargar, Et Al., 1995) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, EtOpen Energy

  11. Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, EtOpen

  12. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Chu, Et Al., 1990) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, EtOpenOpen

  13. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong, EtOpenOpen1988)

  14. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Urban, Et Al., 1987) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong,

  15. Core Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers Area(Armstrong,Energy

  16. Core Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers

  17. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1986)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open Energy Information

  18. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Gardner, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open Energy

  19. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Goff, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl., 1987) | Open

  20. Core Lithology From the State of Hawaii Scientific Observation Hole 1,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|Core Analysis At Geysers| Open EnergyAl., 1987) |

  1. ON THE TRANSITION FROM NUCLEAR-CLUSTER- TO BLACK-HOLE-DOMINATED GALAXY CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Graham, Alister W. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Giant elliptical galaxies, believed to be built from the merger of lesser galaxies, are known to house a massive black hole (MBH) at their center rather than a compact star cluster. If low- and intermediate-mass galaxies do indeed partake in the hierarchical merger scenario, then one needs to explain why their dense nuclear star clusters are not preserved in merger events. A valuable clue may be the recent revelation that nuclear star clusters and MBHs frequently co-exist in intermediate-mass bulges and elliptical galaxies. In an effort to understand the physical mechanism responsible for the disappearance of nuclear star clusters, we have numerically investigated the evolution of merging star clusters with seed BHs. Using BHs that are 1%-5% of their host nuclear cluster mass, we reveal how their binary coalescence during a merger dynamically heats the newly wed star cluster, expanding it, significantly lowering its central stellar density, and thus making it susceptible to tidal destruction during galaxy merging. Moreover, this mechanism provides a pathway to explain the observed reduction in the nucleus-to-galaxy stellar mass ratio as one proceeds from dwarf to giant elliptical galaxies.

  2. The Fundamental Plane of Black Hole Activity in the Optical Band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saikia, Payaswini; Falcke, Heino

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Black hole accretion and jet formation have long been thought to be scale invariant. One empirical relation suggesting scale invariance is the Fundamental Plane of Black Hole activity, which is a plane in the space given by black hole mass and the radio/X-ray luminosities. We search for an alternative version of this plane using the luminosity of [OIII] emission line instead of X-ray luminosity. We use a complete sample of 39 supermassive black holes selected from the Palomar Spectroscopic Survey with available radio and optical measurements and information on black hole mass. A sample of stellar mass X-ray binaries has also been included to examine if physical processes behind accretion is universal across the entire range of black hole mass. We present the results of multivariate regression analysis performed on the AGN sample and show that the sample stretches out as a plane in the 3D logarithmic space created by bolometric luminosity, radio luminosity and black hole mass. We reproduce the established Fund...

  3. 9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings Friedhelm) Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential the history of cosmic radiation and solar activity over many millennia. Although records from different

  4. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  5. Radio Jets in Galaxies with Actively Accreting Black Holes: new insights from the SDSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guinevere Kauffmann; Timothy M. Heckman; Philip N. Best

    2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of nearby radio-loud AGN are found in massive, old elliptical galaxies with weak emission lines. At high redshifts,however, most known radio AGN have strong emission lines. In this paper, we examine a subset of radio AGN with emission lines selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The probability for a nearby radio AGN to have emission lines is a strongly decreasing function of galaxy mass and an increasing function of radio luminosity above 10^25 W/Hz. Emission line and radio luminosities are correlated, but with large dispersion. At a given radio power, AGN with small black holes have higher [OIII] luminosities (which we interpret as higher accretion rates) than AGN with big black holes. However, if we scale both radio and emission line luminosities by the black hole mass, we find a correlation between normalized radio power and accretion rate in Eddington units that is independent of black hole mass. There is also a clear correlation between normalized radio power and the age of the stellar population in the galaxy. Present-day AGN with the highest normalized radio powers are confined to galaxies with small black holes. High-redshift, high radio-luminosity AGN could be explained if big black holes were similarly active at earlier cosmic epochs. To investigate why only a small fraction of emission line AGN become radio loud, we create matched samples of radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN and compare their host galaxy properties and environments. The main difference lies in their environments; our local density estimates are a factor 2 larger around the radio-loud AGN. We propose a scenario in which radio-loud AGN with emission lines are located in galaxies where accretion of both cold and hot gas can occur simultaneously. (Abridged)

  6. Experimental Verification of the Chemical Sensitivity of Two-Site Double Core-Hole States Formed by an X-ray FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salen, P; Schmidt, H T; Thomas, R D; Larsson, M; Feifel, R; Piancastelli, M N; Fang, L; Murphy, B; Osipov, T; Berrah, N; Kukk, E; Ueda, K; Bozek, J D; Bostedt, C; Wada, S; Richter, R; Feyer, V; Prince, K C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed X-ray two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy (XTPPS) using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) in order to study double core-hole (DCH) states of CO2, N2O and N2. The experiment verifies the theory behind the chemical sensitivity of two-site (ts) DCH states by comparing a set of small molecules with respect to the energy shift of the tsDCH state and by extracting the relevant parameters from this shift.

  7. A MONTE CARLO MARKOV CHAIN BASED INVESTIGATION OF BLACK HOLE SPIN IN THE ACTIVE GALAXY NGC 3783

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Christopher S.

    The analysis of relativistically broadened X-ray spectral features from the inner accretion disk provides a powerful tool for measuring the spin of supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). However, AGN ...

  8. Effect of optical pumping on the refractive index and temperature in the core of active fibre

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gainov, V V; Ryabushkin, Oleg A [V.A.Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Fryazino Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the refractive index change (RIC) induced in the core of Yb{sup 3+}-doped active silica fibres by pulsed pumping. RIC kinetic measurements with a Mach - Zehnder interferometer make it possible to separately assess the contributions of the electronic and thermal mechanisms to the RIC and evaluate temperature nonuniformities in the fibre.

  9. The cosmic growth of the active black hole population at 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, A; Gavignaud, I; Schramm, M; Silverman, J; Merloni, A; Zamorani, G; Hirschmann, M; Mainieri, V; Wisotzki, L; Shankar, F; Fiore, F; Koekemoer, A M; Temporin, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a census of the active black hole population at 1hole mass and Eddington ratio, employing a maximum likelihood fitting technique. The study of the active black hole mass function (BHMF) and the Eddington ratio distribution function (ERDF) allows to clearly disentangle the AGN downsizing phenomenon, present in the AGN luminosity function (AGN LF), into its physical processes of black hole mass downsizing and accretion rate evolution. We are utilizing type 1 AGN samples from 3 optical surveys (VVDS, zCOSMOS and SDSS), that cover a wide range of 3 dex in luminosity over our redshift interval of interest. We investigate the cosmic evolution of the AGN population as a function of AGN luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rate. Compared to z = 0 we find a distinct change in the shape of the BHMF and the ERDF, consistent with downsizing in black hole mass. The active fraction or duty cycle of type 1 AGN at z~1.5 is almost flat as...

  10. Lattice-Strain Control of the Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasser, P. [Berlin Institute of Technology (Technische Universitat Berlin); Koh, Shirlaine [University of Houston, Houston; Anniyev, Toyli [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Greeley, Jeff [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Yu, Chengfei [University of Houston, Houston; Liu, Zengcai [University of Houston, Houston; Kaya, Sarpa [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Nordlund, Dennis [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Ogasawara, Hirohito [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Toney, Michael F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Anders, Nilsson [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrocatalysis will play a key role in future energy conversion and storage technologies, such as water electrolysers, fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Molecular interactions between chemical reactants and the catalytic surface control the activity and efficiency, and hence need to be optimized; however, generalized experimental strategies to do so are scarce. Here we show how lattice strain can be used experimentally to tune the catalytic activity of dealloyed bimetallic nanoparticles for the oxygen-reduction reaction, a key barrier to the application of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. We demonstrate the core-shell structure of the catalyst and clarify the mechanistic origin of its activity. The platinum-rich shell exhibits compressive strain, which results in a shift of the electronic band structure of platinum and weakening chemisorption of oxygenated species. We combine synthesis, measurements and an understanding of strain from theory to generate a reactivity-strain relationship that provides guidelines for tuning electrocatalytic activity.

  11. Lattice-Strain Control of the Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasser, Peter; Shirlaine, Koh; Anniyev, Toyli; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; More, Karren L.; Yu, Chengfei; Liu, Zengcai; Kaya, Sarp; Nordlund, Dennis; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Toney, Michael F.; Nilsson, Anders R.

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrocatalysis will play a key role in future energy conversion and storage technologies, such as water electrolysers, fuel cells and metalair batteries. Molecular interactions between chemical reactants and the catalytic surface control the activity and efficiency, and hence need to be optimized; however, generalized experimental strategies to do so are scarce. Here we show how lattice strain can be used experimentally to tune the catalytic activity of dealloyed bimetallic nanoparticles for the oxygen-reduction reaction, a key barrier to the application of fuel cells and metalair batteries. We demonstrate the coreshell structure of the catalyst and clarify the mechanistic origin of its activity. The platinum-rich shell exhibits compressive strain, which results in a shift of the electronic band structure of platinum and weakening chemisorption of oxygenated species. We combine synthesis, measurements and an understanding of strain from theory to generate a reactivitystrain relationship that provides guidelines for tuning electrocatalytic activity.

  12. CAN A LONG NANOFLARE STORM EXPLAIN THE OBSERVED EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ACTIVE REGION CORES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana M.; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Warren, Harry P., E-mail: fanamariam.mulumoore@nasa.gov [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    All theories that attempt to explain the heating of the high-temperature plasma observed in the solar corona are based on short bursts of energy. The intensities and velocities measured in the cores of quiescent active regions, however, can be steady over many hours of observation. One heating scenario that has been proposed to reconcile such observations with impulsive heating models is the 'long nanoflare storm', where short-duration heating events occur infrequently on many sub-resolution strands; the emission of the strands is then averaged together to explain the observed steady structures. In this Letter, we examine the emission measure distribution predicted for such a long nanoflare storm by modeling an arcade of strands in an active region core. Comparisons of the computed emission measure distributions with recent observations indicate that the long nanoflare storm scenario implies greater than five times more 1 MK emission than is actually observed for all plausible combinations of loop lengths, heating rates, and abundances. We conjecture that if the plasma had 'super coronal' abundances, the model may be able to match the observations at low temperatures.

  13. On The Linearity of The Black Hole - Bulge Mass Relation in Active and in Nearby Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor

    2001-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of PG quasar observations suggests a nonlinear relation between the black hole mass, M_BH, and the bulge mass, M_bulge, although a linear relation, as proposed for nearby galaxies, cannot be ruled out. New M_BH values for nearby galaxies from Gebhardt et al., and L_bulge measurements for Seyfert 1 galaxies from Virani et al., are used here to obtain a more accurate value for the slope of the M_BH-M_bulge relation. The combined sample of 40 active and non-active galaxies suggests a significantly nonlinear relation, M_BH\\propto M_bulge^{1.53\\pm 0.14}. Further support for a nonlinear relation is provided by the slope of the M_BH-stellar velocity dispersion relation found recently, and by the low M_BH found in late type spiral galaxies. The mean M_BH/M_bulge ratio is therefore not a universal constant, but rather drops from ~0.5% in bright (M_V ~ -22) ellipticals, to ~0.05% in low luminosity (M_V ~ -18) bulges. Hubble Space Telescope determinations of M_BH in late type spirals, and of the bulge magnitude in narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies (both predicted to have low M_BH), can further test the validity of the nonlinear M_BH-M_bulge relation.

  14. Coreshell TiO{sub 2} microsphere with enhanced photocatalytic activity and improved lithium storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Hong, E-mail: guohongcom@126.com [School of Chemistry Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, No. 2, Green Lake North Road, Kunming 650091, Yunnan (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qujing Normal University, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China); Tian, Dongxue; Liu, Lixiang; Wang, Yapeng; Guo, Yuan; Yang, Xiangjun [School of Chemistry Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, No. 2, Green Lake North Road, Kunming 650091, Yunnan (China)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inorganic hollow coreshell spheres have attracted considerable interest due to their singular properties and wide range of potential applications. Herein a novel facile generic strategy of combining template assisted and solvothermal alcoholysis is employed to prepare corevoidshell anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle aggregates with an excellent photocatalytic activity, and enhanced lithium storage in large quantities. Amorphous carbon can be loaded on the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles uniformly under a suitably formulated ethanol/water system in the solvothermal alcoholysis process, and the subsequent calcination results of the formation of coreshellshell anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle aggregates. The intrinsic corevoidshell nature as well as high porosity of the unique nanostructures contributes greatly to the superior photocatalytic activity and improved performance as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: A novel strategy of combining template assisted and solvothermal alcoholysis is employed to prepare unique corevoidshell anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle aggregates with the superior photocatalytic activity and improved lithium storage. Highlights: ? TiO{sub 2} mesospheres are synthesized by solvothermal alcoholysis. ? It is corevoidshell structure and the thickness of shell is estimated to 80 nm. ? It exhibits a remarkable photocatalytic activity and improved lithium storage.

  15. DIAGNOSING THE TIME DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. II. NANOFLARE TRAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The time dependence of heating in solar active regions can be studied by analyzing the slope of the emission measure distribution coolward of the peak. In a previous study we showed that low-frequency heating can account for 0% to 77% of active region core emission measures. We now turn our attention to heating by a finite succession of impulsive events for which the timescale between events on a single magnetic strand is shorter than the cooling timescale. We refer to this scenario as a 'nanoflare train' and explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. Our conclusions are (1) nanoflare trains are consistent with 86% to 100% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are properly accounted for; (2) steeper slopes are found for larger values of the ratio of the train duration {Delta} {sub H} to the post-train cooling and draining timescale {Delta} {sub C}, where {Delta} {sub H} depends on the number of heating events, the event duration and the time interval between successive events ({tau} {sub C}); (3) {tau} {sub C} may be diagnosed from the width of the hot component of the emission measure provided that the temperature bins are much smaller than 0.1 dex; (4) the slope of the emission measure alone is not sufficient to provide information about any timescale associated with heating-the length and density of the heated structure must be measured for {Delta} {sub H} to be uniquely extracted from the ratio {Delta} {sub H}/{Delta} {sub C}.

  16. EVIDENCE FOR STEADY HEATING: OBSERVATIONS OF AN ACTIVE REGION CORE WITH HINODE AND TRACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P.; Brooks, David H. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [Department of Physics, Alabama A and M, 4900 Meridian Street, Normal, AL 35762 (United States)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The timescale for energy release is an important parameter for constraining the coronal heating mechanism. Observations of 'warm' coronal loops ({approx}1 MK) have indicated that the heating is impulsive and that coronal plasma is far from equilibrium. In contrast, observations at higher temperatures ({approx}3 MK) have generally been consistent with steady heating models. Previous observations, however, have not been able to exclude the possibility that the high temperature loops are actually composed of many small-scale threads that are in various stages of heating and cooling and only appear to be in equilibrium. With new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode we have the ability to investigate the properties of high temperature coronal plasma in extraordinary detail. We examine the emission in the core of an active region and find three independent lines of evidence for steady heating. We find that the emission observed in XRT is generally steady for hours, with a fluctuation level of approximately 15% in an individual pixel. Short-lived impulsive heating events are observed, but they appear to be unrelated to the steady emission that dominates the active region. Furthermore, we find no evidence for warm emission that is spatially correlated with the hot emission, as would be expected if the high temperature loops are the result of impulsive heating. Finally, we also find that intensities in the 'moss', the footpoints of high temperature loops, are consistent with steady heating models provided that we account for the local expansion of the loop from the base of the transition region to the corona. In combination, these results provide strong evidence that the heating in the core of an active region is effectively steady, that is, the time between heating events is short relative to the relevant radiative and conductive cooling times.

  17. Energy input from quasars regulates the growth and activity of black holes and their host galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiziana Di Matteo; Volker Springel; Lars Hernquist

    2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early Universe, while galaxies were still forming, black holes as massive as a billion solar masses powered quasars. Supermassive black holes are found at the centers of most galaxies today, where their masses are related to the velocity dispersions of stars in their host galaxies and hence to the mass of the central bulge of the galaxy. This suggests a link between the growth of the black holes and the host galaxies, which has indeed been assumed for a number of years. But the origin of the observed relation between black hole mass and stellar velocity dispersion, and its connection with the evolution of galaxies have remained unclear. Here we report simulations that simultaneously follow star formation and the growth of black holes during galaxy-galaxy collisions. We find that in addition to generating a burst of star formation, a merger leads to strong inflows that feed gas to the supermassive black hole and thereby power the quasar. The energy released by the quasar expels enough gas to quench both star formation and further black hole growth. This determines the lifetime of the quasar phase (approaching 100 million years) and explains the relationship between the black hole mass and the stellar velocity dispersion.

  18. OUTFLOWS AND DARK BANDS AT ARCADE-LIKE ACTIVE REGION CORE BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tarr, L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode have revealed outflows and non-thermal line broadening in low intensity regions at the edges of active regions (ARs). We use data from Hinode's EIS, Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer instrument to investigate the boundaries of arcade-like AR cores for NOAA ARs 11112, 10978, and 9077. A narrow, low intensity region that is observed at the core's periphery as a dark band shows outflows and increased spectral line broadening. This dark band is found to exist for days and appears between the bright coronal loop structures of different coronal topologies. We find a case where the dark band region is formed between the magnetic field from emerging flux and the field of the pre-existing flux. A magnetic field extrapolation indicates that this dark band is coincident with the spine lines or magnetic separatrices in the extrapolated field. This occurs over unipolar regions where the brightened coronal field is separated in connectivity and topology. This separation does not appear to be infinitesimal and an initial estimate of the minimum distance of separation is found to be Almost-Equal-To 1.5-3.5 Mm.

  19. Accretion and nuclear activity of quiescent supermassive black holes. II: optical study and interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Soria; Alister W. Graham; Giuseppina Fabbiano; Alessandro Baldi; Martin Elvis; Helmut Jerjen; Silvia Pellegrini; Aneta Siemiginowska

    2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Our X-ray study of the nuclear activity in a new sample of six quiescent early-type galaxies, and in a larger sample from the literature, confirmed (Soria et al., Paper I) that the Bondi accretion rate of diffuse hot gas is not a good indicator of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) X-ray luminosity. Here we suggest that a more reliable estimate of the accretion rate must include the gas released by the stellar population inside the sphere of influence of the SMBH, in addition to the Bondi inflow of hot gas across that surface. We use optical surface-brightness profiles to estimate the mass-loss rate from stars in the nuclear region: we show that for our sample of galaxies it is an order of magnitude higher (~ 10^{-4} - 10^{-3} M_sun/yr) than the Bondi inflow rate of hot gas, as estimated from Chandra (Paper I). Only by taking into account both sources of fuel can we constrain the true accretion rate, the accretion efficiency, and the power budget. Radiatively efficient accretion is ruled out, for quiescent SMBHs. For typical radiatively inefficient flows, the observed X-ray luminosities of the SMBHs imply accretion fractions ~ 1 - 10% (ie, ~ 90 - 99% of the available gas does not reach the SMBH) for at least five of our six target galaxies, and most of the other galaxies with known SMBH masses. We discuss the conditions for mass conservation inside the sphere of influence, so that the total gas injection is balanced by accretion plus outflows. We show that a fraction of the total accretion power (mechanical plus radiative) would be sufficient to sustain a self-regulating, slow outflow which removes from the nuclear region all the gas that does not sink into the BH (``BH feedback''). The rest of the accretion power may be carried out in a jet, or advected. We also discuss scenarios that would lead to an intermittent nuclear activity.

  20. USING A DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE AND DENSITY MEASUREMENTS IN AN ACTIVE REGION CORE TO TEST A STEADY HEATING MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Schmelz, Joan T. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Saar, Steve H.; Kashyap, Vinay L., E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The frequency of heating events in the corona is an important constraint on the coronal heating mechanisms. Observations indicate that the intensities and velocities measured in active region cores are effectively steady, suggesting that heating events occur rapidly enough to keep high-temperature active region loops close to equilibrium. In this paper, we couple observations of active region (AR) 10955 made with the X-Ray Telescope and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode to test a simple steady heating model. First we calculate the differential emission measure (DEM) of the apex region of the loops in the active region core. We find the DEM to be broad and peaked around 3 MK. We then determine the densities in the corresponding footpoint regions. Using potential field extrapolations to approximate the loop lengths and the density-sensitive line ratios to infer the magnitude of the heating, we build a steady heating model for the active region core and find that we can match the general properties of the observed DEM for the temperature range of 6.3 < log T < 6.7. This model, for the first time, accounts for the base pressure, loop length, and distribution of apex temperatures of the core loops. We find that the density-sensitive spectral line intensities and the bulk of the hot emission in the active region core are consistent with steady heating. We also find, however, that the steady heating model cannot address the emission observed at lower temperatures. This emission may be due to foreground or background structures, or may indicate that the heating in the core is more complicated. Different heating scenarios must be tested to determine if they have the same level of agreement.

  1. Cosmic Evolution of Black Holes and Spheroids. V. The Relation Between Black Hole Mass and Host Galaxy Luminosity for a Sample of 79 Active Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Daeseong; Bennert, Vardha N; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W; Malkan, Matthew A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the cosmic evolution of the black hole (BH) mass -- bulge luminosity relation using a sample of 52 active galaxies at $z \\sim 0.36$ and $z \\sim 0.57$ in the BH mass range of $10^{7.4-9.1} M_{\\odot}$. By consistently applying multi-component spectral and structural decomposition to high-quality Keck spectra and high-resolution HST images, BH masses ($M_{\\rm BH}$) are estimated using the H$\\beta$ broad emission line combined with the 5100 \\AA\\ nuclear luminosity, and bulge luminosities ($L_{\\rm bul}$) are derived from surface photometry. Comparing the resulting $M_{\\rm BH}-L_{\\rm bul}$ relation to local active galaxies and taking into account selection effects, we find evolution of the form $M_{\\rm BH} / L_{\\rm bul} \\propto (1+z)^{\\gamma}$ with $\\gamma=1.8\\pm0.7$, consistent with BH growth preceding that of the host galaxies. Including an additional sample of 27 active galaxies with $0.5

  2. Accretion and nuclear activity of quiescent supermassive black holes. I: X-ray study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Soria; Giuseppina Fabbiano; Alister W. Graham; Alessandro Baldi; Martin Elvis; Helmut Jerjen; Silvia Pellegrini; Aneta Siemiginowska

    2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the nuclear activity in a sample of six quiescent early-type galaxies, with new Chandra data and archival HST optical images. Their nuclear sources have X-ray luminosities ~ 10^{38} - 10^{39} erg/s (L_X/L_Edd ~ 10^{-8} - 10^{-7}), and colors or spectra consistent with accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs)--except for the nucleus of NGC 4486B, which is softer than typical AGN spectra. In a few cases, the X-ray morphology of the nuclear sources shows hints of marginally extended structures, in addition to the surrounding diffuse thermal emission from hot gas, which is detectable on scales >~ 1 kpc. In one case (NGC 5845), a dusty disk may partially obstruct our direct view of the SMBH. We have estimated the temperature and density of the hot interstellar medium, which is one major source of fuel for the accreting SMBH; typical central densities are n_e ~ (0.02 +/- 0.01) cm^{-3}. Assuming that the hot gas is captured by the SMBH at the Bondi rate, we show that the observed X-ray luminosities are too faint to be consistent with standard disk accretion, but brighter than predicted by radiatively-inefficient solutions (eg, ADAF). In total, there are ~ 20 galaxies for which SMBH mass, hot gas density, and nuclear X-ray luminosity are simultaneously known. In some cases, the nuclear sources are brighter than predicted by the ADAF model; in other cases, they are consistent or fainter. We discuss the apparent lack of correlations between Bondi rate and X-ray luminosity, and suggest that, in order to understand the observed distribution, we need to know two additional parameters: the amount of gas supplied by the stellar population inside the accretion radius, and the fraction (possibly << 1) of the total gas available that is accreted by the SMBH. We shall discuss these issues in our Paper II.

  3. Lattice-Strain Control of Exceptional Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasser, Peter

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical approach to demonstrate how lattice strain can be used to continuously tune the catalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on bimetallic nanoparticles that have been dealloyed. The sluggish kinetics of the ORR is a key barrier to the adaptation of fuel cells and currently limits their widespread use. Dealloyed Pt-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles, however, have been shown to exhibit uniquely high reactivity for this reaction. We first present evidence for the formation of a core-shell structure during dealloying, which involves removal of Cu from the surface and subsurface of the precursor nanoparticles. We then show that the resulting Pt-rich surface shell exhibits compressive strain that depends on the composition of the precursor alloy. We next demonstrate the existence of a downward shift of the Pt d-band, resulting in weakening of the bond strength of intermediate oxygenated species due to strain. Finally, we combine synthesis, strain, and catalytic reactivity in an experimental/theoretical reactivity-strain relationship which provides guidelines for the rational design of strained oxygen reduction electrocatalysts. The stoichiometry of the precursor, together with the dealloying conditions, provides experimental control over the resulting surface strain and thereby allows continuous tuning of the surface electrocatalytic reactivity - a concept that can be generalized to other catalytic reactions.

  4. FLOWS AND MOTIONS IN MOSS IN THE CORE OF A FLARING ACTIVE REGION: EVIDENCE FOR STEADY HEATING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P., E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2009-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new measurements of the time variability of intensity, Doppler, and nonthermal velocities in moss in an active region core observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode in 2007 June. The measurements are derived from spectral profiles of the Fe XII 195 A line. Using the 2'' slit, we repeatedly scanned 150'' by 150'' in a few minutes. This is the first time it has been possible to make such velocity measurements in the moss, and the data presented are the highest cadence spatially resolved maps of moss Doppler and nonthermal velocities ever obtained in the corona. The observed region produced numerous C- and M-class flares with several occurring in the core close to the moss. The magnetic field was therefore clearly changing in the active region core, so we ought to be able to detect dynamic signatures in the moss if they exist. Our measurements of moss intensities agree with previous studies in that a less than 15% variability is seen over a period of 16 hr. Our new measurements of Doppler and nonthermal velocities reveal no strong flows or motions in the moss, nor any significant variability in these quantities. The results confirm that moss at the bases of high temperature coronal loops is heated quasi-steadily. They also show that quasi-steady heating can contribute significantly even in the core of a flare productive active region. Such heating may be impulsive at high frequency, but if so it does not give rise to large flows or motions.

  5. SASI ACTIVITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL NEUTRINO-HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF SUPERNOVA CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanke, Florian; Mueller, Bernhard; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Marek, Andreas; Janka, Hans-Thomas, E-mail: fhanke@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: annop@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: amarek@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The relevance of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) compared to neutrino-driven convection in three-dimensional (3D) supernova-core environments is still highly controversial. Studying a 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor, we demonstrate, for the first time, that violent SASI activity can develop in 3D simulations with detailed neutrino transport despite the presence of convection. This result was obtained with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code with the same sophisticated neutrino treatment so far used only in one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) models. While buoyant plumes initially determine the nonradial mass motions in the postshock layer, bipolar shock sloshing with growing amplitude sets in during a phase of shock retraction and turns into a violent spiral mode whose growth is only quenched when the infall of the Si/SiO interface leads to strong shock expansion in response to a dramatic decrease of the mass accretion rate. In the phase of large-amplitude SASI sloshing and spiral motions, the postshock layer exhibits nonradial deformation dominated by the lowest-order spherical harmonics (l = 1, m = 0, {+-}1) in distinct contrast to the higher multipole structures associated with neutrino-driven convection. We find that the SASI amplitudes, shock asymmetry, and nonradial kinetic energy in three dimensions can exceed those of the corresponding 2D case during extended periods of the evolution. We also perform parameterized 3D simulations of a 25 M{sub Sun} progenitor, using a simplified, gray neutrino transport scheme, an axis-free Yin-Yang grid, and different amplitudes of random seed perturbations. They confirm the importance of the SASI for another progenitor, its independence of the choice of spherical grid, and its preferred growth for fast accretion flows connected to small shock radii and compact proto-neutron stars as previously found in 2D setups.

  6. Radio Galaxies in Cooling Cores: Insights from a Complete Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Eilek; F. N. Owen

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed a new, complete, cooling-core sample with the VLA, in order to understand how the massive black hole in the central galaxy interacts with the local cluster plasma. We find that every cooling core is currently being energized by an active radio jet, which has probably been destabilized by its interaction with the cooling core. We argue that current models of cooling-core radio galaxies need to be improved before they can be used to determine the rate at which the jet is heating the cooling core. We also argue that the extended radio haloes we see in many cooling-core clusters need extended, in situ re-energization, which cannot be supplied solely by the central galaxy.

  7. Statistical Physics of Dark and Normal Matter Distribution in Galaxy Formation : Dark Matter Lumps and Black Holes in Core and Halo of Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajay Patwardhan

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In unified field theory the cosmological model of the universe has supersymmetric fields. Supersymmetric particles as dark and normal matter in galaxy clusters have a phase separation. Dark matter in halos have a statistical physics equation of state. Neutralino particle gas with gravitation can have a collapse of dark matter lumps. A condensate phase due to boson creation by annhillation and exchange can occur at high densities. The collapse of the boson condensate, including neutralinos, into the Schwarzschild radius creates dark matter black holes. Microscopic dark matter black holes can evaporate with Hawking effect giving gamma ray bursts and create a spectrum of normal particles. The phase separation of normal and dark matter in galaxy clusters and inside galaxies is given by statistical physics.

  8. Cosmic X-ray Surveys of Distant Active Galaxies: The Demographics, Physics, and Ecology of Growing Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, W N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review results from cosmic X-ray surveys of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the past ~ 15 yr that have dramatically improved our understanding of growing supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the distant universe. First, we discuss the utility of such surveys for AGN investigations and the capabilities of the missions making these surveys, emphasizing Chandra, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR. Second, we briefly describe the main cosmic X-ray surveys, the essential roles of complementary multiwavelength data, and how AGNs are selected from these surveys. We then review key results from these surveys on the AGN population and its evolution ("demographics"), the physical processes operating in AGNs ("physics"), and the interactions between AGNs and their environments ("ecology"). We conclude by describing some significant unresolved questions and prospects for advancing the field.

  9. Second-order perturbative corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction with the hole and particle approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casanova, David, E-mail: david.casanova@ehu.es [Kimika Fakultatea, Euskal Herria Unibersitatea (UPV/EHU), Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P.K. 1072, 20080 Donostia, Spain and IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)] [Kimika Fakultatea, Euskal Herria Unibersitatea (UPV/EHU), Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P.K. 1072, 20080 Donostia, Spain and IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Second-order corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction (RASCI) with the hole and particle truncation of the excitation operator are developed. Theoretically, the computational cost of the implemented perturbative approach, abbreviated as RASCI(2), grows like its single reference counterpart in MP2. Two different forms of RASCI(2) have been explored, that is the generalized Davidson-Kapuy and the Epstein-Nesbet partitions of the Hamiltonian. The preliminary results indicate that the use of energy level shift of a few tenths of a Hartree might systematically improve the accuracy of the RASCI(2) energies. The method has been tested in the computation of the ground state energy profiles along the dissociation of the hydrogen fluoride and N{sub 2} molecules, the computation of correlation energy in the G2/97 molecular test set, and in the computation of excitation energies to low-lying states in small organic molecules.

  10. Active core profile and transport modification by application of Ion Bernstein Wave power in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBlanc, B.; Bell, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large {triangledown}n{sub e}, {triangledown}T{sub e}, {triangledown}v{sub phi}, and {triangledown}T{sub i}, delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high)-mode but with a confinement zone moved inwards. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhanced NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central T{sub i} results from {chi}{sub i} reduction (compared to H-mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32--0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma.

  11. Coronal Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations), and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are establish...

  12. DIAGNOSING THE TIME-DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. I. LOW-FREQUENCY NANOFLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, S. J.; Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational measurements of active region emission measures contain clues to the time dependence of the underlying heating mechanism. A strongly nonlinear scaling of the emission measure with temperature indicates a large amount of hot plasma relative to warm plasma. A weakly nonlinear (or linear) scaling of the emission measure indicates a relatively large amount of warm plasma, suggesting that the hot active region plasma is allowed to cool and so the heating is impulsive with a long repeat time. This case is called low-frequency nanoflare heating, and we investigate its feasibility as an active region heating scenario here. We explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. For each model run, we calculate the slope {alpha} of the emission measure distribution EM(T){proportional_to}T {sup {alpha}}. Our conclusions are: (1) low-frequency nanoflare heating is consistent with about 36% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are not accounted for; (2) proper consideration of uncertainties yields a range in which as many as 77% of observed active regions are consistent with low-frequency nanoflare heating and as few as zero; (3) low-frequency nanoflare heating cannot explain observed slopes greater than 3; (4) the upper limit to the volumetric energy release is in the region of 50 erg cm{sup -3} to avoid unphysical magnetic field strengths; (5) the heating timescale may be short for loops of total length less than 40 Mm to be consistent with the observed range of slopes; (6) predicted slopes are consistently steeper for longer loops.

  13. Identification of the Active Species in Photochemical Hole Scavenging Reactions of Methanol on TiO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular and dissociative methanol adsorption species were prepared on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces to study photocatalytic oxidation of methanol in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Adsorbed methoxy groups (CH3O-) were found to be the photoactive form of adsorbed methanol converted to adsorbed formaldehyde and a surface OH group by hole-mediated C-H bond cleavage. These results suggest that adsorbed methoxy is the effective hole scavenger in photochemical reactions involving methanol.

  14. Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. K. Townsend

    1997-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lecture notes for a 'Part III' course 'Black Holes' given in DAMTP, Cambridge. The course covers some of the developments in Black Hole physics of the 1960s and 1970s.

  15. CHARACTERISTICS AND EVOLUTION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD AND CHROMOSPHERIC EMISSION IN AN ACTIVE REGION CORE OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R., E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [Department of Physics, Alabama A and M, 4900 Meridian Street, Normal, AL 35762 (United States)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the characteristics and evolution of the magnetic field and chromospheric emission in an active region core observed by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the moss is unipolar, the spatial distribution of magnetic flux evolves slowly, and that the magnetic field is only moderately inclined. We also show that the field-line inclination and horizontal component are coherent, and that the magnetic field is mostly sheared in the inter-moss regions where the highest magnetic flux variability is seen. Using extrapolations from spectropolarimeter magnetograms, we show that the magnetic connectivity in the moss is different from that in the quiet Sun because most of the magnetic field extends to significant coronal heights. The magnetic flux, field vector, and chromospheric emission in the moss also appear highly dynamic but actually show only small-scale variations in magnitude on timescales longer than the cooling times for hydrodynamic loops computed from our extrapolations, suggesting high-frequency (continuous) heating events. Some evidence is found for flux (Ca II intensity) changes on the order of 100-200 G (DN) on timescales of 20-30 minutes that could be taken as indicative of low-frequency heating. We find, however, that only a small fraction (10%) of our simulated loops would be expected to cool on these timescales, and we do not find clear evidence that the flux changes consistently produce intensity changes in the chromosphere. Using observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), we also determine that the filling factor in the moss is {approx}16%, consistent with previous studies and larger than the size of an SOT pixel. The magnetic flux and chromospheric intensity in most individual SOT pixels in the moss vary by less than {approx}20% and {approx}10%, respectively, on loop cooling timescales. In view of the high energy requirements of the chromosphere, we suggest that these variations could be sufficient for the heating of 'warm' EUV loops, but that the high basal levels may be more important for powering the hot core loops rooted in the moss. The magnetic field and chromospheric emission appear to evolve gradually on spatial scales comparable to the cross-field scale of the fundamental coronal structures inferred from EIS measurements.

  16. Convective cores in galactic cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kritsuk; T. Plewa; E. Mueller

    2001-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive grid refinement to study the dependence of hot gas flows in X-ray luminous giant elliptical galaxies on the efficiency of heat supply to the gas. We consider a number of potential heating mechanisms including Type Ia supernovae and sporadic nuclear activity of a central supermassive black hole. As a starting point for this research we use an equilibrium hydrostatic recycling model (Kritsuk 1996). We show that a compact cooling inflow develops, if the heating is slightly insufficient to counterbalance radiative cooling of the hot gas in the central few kiloparsecs. An excessive heating in the centre, instead, drives a convectively unstable outflow. We model the onset of the instability and a quasi-steady convective regime in the core of the galaxy in two-dimensions assuming axial symmetry. Provided the power of net energy supply in the core is not too high, the convection remains subsonic. The convective pattern is dominated by buoyancy driven large-scale mushroom-like structures. Unlike in the case of a cooling inflow, the X-ray surface brightness of an (on average) isentropic convective core does not display a sharp maximum at the centre. A hybrid model, which combines a subsonic peripheral cooling inflow with an inner convective core, appears to be stable. We also discuss observational implications of these results.

  17. BLACK HOLE AURORA POWERED BY A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Masaaki [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aichi University of Education, Kariya, Aichi 448-8542 (Japan); Takahashi, Rohta, E-mail: takahasi@phyas.aichi-edu.ac.j [Cosmic Radiation Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for high-energy emission sources generated by a standing magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) shock in a black hole magnetosphere. The black hole magnetosphere would be constructed around a black hole with an accretion disk, where a global magnetic field could be originated by currents in the accretion disk and its corona. Such a black hole magnetosphere may be considered as a model for the central engine of active galactic nuclei, some compact X-ray sources, and gamma-ray bursts. The energy sources of the emission from the magnetosphere are the gravitational and electromagnetic energies of magnetized accreting matters and the rotational energy of a rotating black hole. When the MHD shock generates in MHD accretion flows onto the black hole, the plasma's kinetic energy and the black hole's rotational energy can convert to radiative energy. In this Letter, we demonstrate the huge energy output at the shock front by showing negative energy postshock accreting MHD flows for a rapidly rotating black hole. This means that the extracted energy from the black hole can convert to the radiative energy at the MHD shock front. When an axisymmetric shock front is formed, we expect a ring-shaped region with very hot plasma near the black hole; this would look like an 'aurora'. The high-energy radiation generated from there would carry to us the information for the curved spacetime due to the strong gravity.

  18. Midland Core Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, Noel

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities for the repository during this quarter. The repository holds drill cores and cuttings samples from oil wells that can be viewed or checked out by users.

  19. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. ACCRETION-JET CONNECTION IN BLACK HOLES THE ORIGIN OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    of a sudden drop of the hard X-rays..." "The particles (corona/inner disk) are blown away..." "Jets have Direct collapse depends on: Metal content Mass of the core Angular momentum Can this model be tested observationally ? #12;HOW ARE FORM BLACK HOLE BINARIES ? CORE COLLAPSE MODELS: (Fryer & Kalogera ; Woosley & Heger

  1. Core Specialization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cores per node for handling system services, and thus reduce the effects of timing jitter due to interruptions from the operating system at the expense of (possibly) requiring...

  2. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Ross, 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  3. Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity...

  4. Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area...

  5. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1998 -...

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1991 - 1991 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  7. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1978 - 1985 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  8. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Lentz, E. J. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Baird, Mark L [ORNL; Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL; Lee, Ching-Tsai [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  9. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References Giday WoldeGabriel, Fraser Goff (1992) K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A...

  10. RHIC | Black Holes?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Black Holes at RHIC? Further discussion by Physicist Dmitri Kharzeev on why RHIC cannot produce a real gravitational black hole Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in...

  11. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  12. Extended core for motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An extended stator core in a motor/generator can be utilized to mitigate losses in end regions of the core and a frame of the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses, the stator core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent to or greater than a length of a magnetically active portion in the rotor. Alternatively, a conventional length stator core can be utilized with a shortened magnetically active portion to mitigate losses in the motor/generator. To mitigate the losses in the core caused by stator winding, the core can be extended to a length substantially equivalent or greater than a length of stator winding.

  13. The r-Process in Black Hole Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Wanajo; Hans-Thomas Janka

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    All the current r-process scenarios relevant to core-collapse supernovae are facing severe difficulties. In particular, recent core-collapse simulations with neutrino transport show no sign of a neutron-rich wind from the proto-neutron star. In this paper, we discuss nucleosynthesis of the r-process in an alternative astrophysical site, "black hole winds", which are the neutrino-driven outflow from the accretion torus around a black hole. This condition is assumed to be realized in double neutron star mergers, neutron star - black hole mergers, or hypernovae.

  14. Investigating the Effects of Core Length on Pore Volume to Breakthrough (PVBT) Behavior in Carbonate Core Samples during Matrix Acidizing with Hydrochloric Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nour, Mohamed

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    an increased PVBT for 20 inch cores compared to the 6 inch samples. Results from CAT scan experiments show enlarged worm-holing and face dissolution on the 20 inch cores compared to the 6 inch cores, due to increased acid spending at the same acid concentration...

  15. Cool core cycles: Cold gas and AGN jet feedback in cluster cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Deovrat; Babul, Arif

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using high-resolution 3-D and 2-D (axisymmetric) hydrodynamic simulations in spherical geometry, we study the evolution of cool cluster cores heated by feedback-driven bipolar active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets. Condensation of cold gas, and the consequent enhanced accretion, is required for AGN feedback to balance radiative cooling with reasonable efficiencies, and to match the observed cool core properties. A feedback efficiency (mechanical luminosity $\\approx \\epsilon \\dot{M}_{\\rm acc} c^2$; where $\\dot{M}_{\\rm acc}$ is the mass accretion rate at 1 kpc) as small as $5 \\times 10^{-5}$ is sufficient to reduce the cooling/accretion rate by $\\sim 10$ compared to a pure cooling flow. This value is smaller compared to the ones considered earlier, and is consistent with the jet efficiency and the fact that only a small fraction of gas at 1 kpc is accreted on to the supermassive black hole (SMBH). We find hysteresis cycles in all our simulations with cold mode feedback: {\\em condensation} of cold gas when the ratio...

  16. Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zacharakis, 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zacharakis,...

  17. Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal...

  18. Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick & Jayne, 2008) Exploration...

  19. Spectroscopy of the near-nuclear regions of Cygnus A: estimating the mass of the supermassive black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Tadhunter; A. Marconi; D. Axon; K. Wills; T. G. Robinson; N. Jackson

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a combination of high spatial resolution optical and near-IR spectroscopic data to make a detailed study of the kinematics of the NLR gas in the near-nuclear regions of the powerful, FRII radio galaxy Cygnus A (z=0.0560), with the overall goal of placing limits on the mass of any supermassive black hole in the core. Our K-band infrared observations (0.75 arcsec seeing) -- taken with NIRSPEC on the Keck II telescope -- show a smooth rotation pattern across the nucleus in the Paschen alpha and H_2 emission lines along a slit position (PA180) close to perpendicular to the radio axis, however, there is no evidence for such rotation along the radio axis (PA105). Higher spatial resolution observations of the [OIII]5007 emission line -- taken with STIS on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) -- confirm the general rotation pattern of the gas in the direction perpendicular to the radio axis, and provide evidence for steep velocity gradients within a radius of 0.1 arcsec of the core. The circular velocities measured from both the Keck and HST data lead to an estimate of the mass of the supermassive black hole of 2.5+/-0.7x10^9 solar masses. For the host galaxy properties of Cygnus A, this mass is consistent with the global correlations between black hole mass and host galaxy properties deduced for non-active galaxies. Therefore, despite the extreme power of its radio source and the quasar-like luminosity of its AGN, the black hole in Cygnus A is not unusually massive considering theluminosity of its host galaxy. Indeed, the estimated mass of the black hole in Cygnus A is similar to that inferred for the supermassive black hole in the FRI radio galaxy M87, despite the fact that the AGN and radio jets of Cygnus A are 2 -- 3 orders of magnitude more powerful.

  20. Core Specialization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSOConvertingCopy ServicesCore

  1. Connecting horizon pixels and interior voxels of a black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piero Nicolini; Douglas Singleton

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss to what extent one can infer details of the interior structure of a black hole based on its horizon. Recalling that black hole thermal properties are connected to the non-classical nature of gravity, we circumvent the restrictions of the no hair theorem by postulating that the black hole interior is singularity free due to violations of the usual energy conditions. Further these conditions allow one to establish a one-to-one, holographic projection between Planckian areal "bits" on the horizon and "voxels", representing the gravitational degrees of freedom in the black hole interior. We illustrate the repercussions of this idea by discussing an example of the black hole interior consisting of a de Sitter core postulated to arise from the local graviton quantum vacuum energy. It is shown that the black hole entropy can emerge as the statistical entropy of a gas of voxels.

  2. Thermal Gravitational Waves from Primordial Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal gravitational waves can be generated in various sources such as, in the cores of stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars due to the fermion collisions in the dense degenerate Fermi gas. Such high frequency thermal gravitational waves can also be produced during the collisions in a gamma ray burst or during the final stages of the evaporation of primordial black holes. Here we estimate the thermal gravitational waves from primordial black holes and estimate the integrated energy of the gravitational wave emission over the entire volume of the universe and over Hubble time. We also estimate the gravitational wave flux from gamma ray bursts and jets.

  3. Scaling Turbo Boost to a 1000 cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S, Ananth Narayan; Fedorova, Alexandra

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intel Core i7 processor code named Nehalem provides a feature named Turbo Boost which opportunistically varies the frequencies of the processor's cores. The frequency of a core is determined by core temperature, the number of active cores, the estimated power consumption, the estimated current consumption, and operating system frequency scaling requests. For a chip multi-processor(CMP) that has a small number of physical cores and a small set of performance states, deciding the Turbo Boost frequency to use on a given core might not be difficult. However, we do not know the complexity of this decision making process in the context of a large number of cores, scaling to the 100s, as predicted by researchers in the field.

  4. Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity...

  5. Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Exploration Activity...

  6. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Qingwu (Chelmsford, MA); Li, Wenguang (Andover, MA); Jiang, Hua (Methuen, MA)

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

  8. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor With Results from FY-2011 Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

  9. Dynamics of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward

    2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review of current theory of black-hole dynamics, concentrating on the framework in terms of trapping horizons. Summaries are given of the history, the classical theory of black holes, the defining ideas of dynamical black holes, the basic laws, conservation laws for energy and angular momentum, other physical quantities and the limit of local equilibrium. Some new material concerns how processes such as black-hole evaporation and coalescence might be described by a single trapping horizon which manifests temporally as separate horizons.

  10. Rotating Hairy Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kleihaus; J. Kunz

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct stationary black holes in SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory, which carry angular momentum and electric charge. Possessing non-trivial non-abelian magnetic fields outside their regular event horizon, they represent non-perturbative rotating hairy black holes.

  11. Disregarding the 'Hole Argument'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Roberts

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Jim Weatherall has suggested that Einstein's hole argument, as presented by Earman and Norton (1987), is based on a misleading use of mathematics. I argue on the contrary that Weatherall demands an implausible restriction on how mathematics is used. The hole argument, on the other hand, is in no new danger at all.

  12. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a property of one is measured (e.g., the spin of one photon in a two-photon system with net zero spin), the corresponding property of the second is fixed as well. This feature of...

  13. Microthermometry of Fluid Inclusions from the VC-1 Core Hole...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Some of these inclusions show extraordinary low temperatures of final melting point of ice (about -40C), suggesting that a CaCl2 component is present. CO2 contents in fluid...

  14. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Additional References Retrieved from...

  15. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Fawcett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    John W. Geissman, Giday WoldeGabriel, Craig D. Allen, Catrina M. Johnson, Susan J. Smith (2007) Two Middle Pleistocene Glacial-Interglacial Cycles from the Valle Grande, Jemez...

  16. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lachenbruch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regime of Long Valley Caldera. Journal of Geophysical Research. 81(5):763-768. J.L. Smith,R.W. Rex. 1977. Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera. () : American...

  17. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    isotope substitution experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, researchers from Sweden, Germany, and the U.S. have shown that the ultrafast (0- to 10-fs) dissociation...

  18. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |Frank CasellaEnergyUltracold Atoms: How

  19. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |Frank CasellaEnergyUltracold Atoms: HowUltrafast

  20. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |Frank CasellaEnergyUltracold Atoms:

  1. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |Frank CasellaEnergyUltracold Atoms:Ultrafast

  2. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram |Frank CasellaEnergyUltracold

  3. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriority Firm Exchange . .

  4. Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence may bedieselsummerFact SheetsUltrafast

  5. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPoints ofJanoschekProbing

  6. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPoints

  7. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPointsProbing

  8. Core Drilling Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tank Farms workers demonstrate core drilling capabilities for Hanford single-shell tanks. Core drilling is used to determine the current condition of each tank to assist in the overall assessment...

  9. On Noncommutative Black Holes Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faizal, Mir; Ulhoa, S C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we will analyze noncommutative deformation of the Schwarzschild black holes and Kerr black holes. We will perform our analysis by relating the commutative and the noncommutative metrics using an Moyal product. We will also analyze the thermodynamics of these noncommutative black hole solutions. We will explicitly derive expression for the corrected entropy and temperature of these black hole solutions.

  10. Holes in Spectral Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

    1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of an atom in the presence of a static perturbation is investigated. The perturbation couples a decaying state with a nondecaying state. A "hole" appears in the emission line at a frequency equal to the frequency difference between...

  11. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Ito & Tanaka, 1995) Exploration...

  12. Do Black Holes Exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    1993-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of information loss in black hole formation and the associated violations of basic laws of physics, such as conservation of energy, causality and unitarity, are avoided in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory, if the NGT charge of a black hole and its mass satisfy an inequality that does not violate any known experimental data and allows the existence of white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  13. Helical superconducting black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct novel static, asymptotically $AdS_5$ black hole solutions with Bianchi VII$_0$ symmetry that are holographically dual to superconducting phases in four spacetime dimensions with a helical p-wave order. We calculate the precise temperature dependence of the pitch of the helical order. At zero temperature the black holes have vanishing entropy and approach domain wall solutions that reveal homogenous, non-isotropic dual ground states with emergent scaling symmetry.

  14. Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area...

  15. TMI-2 core shipping preparations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

  16. 16 TAC, part 1, chapter 3, rule 3.100 Seismic Holes and Core Holes | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Projectsource HistorykV remoteaDivision Jump to:Energy

  17. Dynamics of stellar black holes in young star clusters with different metallicities - II. Black hole-black hole binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunetto Marco Ziosi; Michela Mapelli; Marica Branchesi; Giuseppe Tormen

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the formation and dynamical evolution of black hole-black hole (BH-BH) binaries in young star clusters (YSCs), by means of N-body simulations. The simulations include metallicity-dependent recipes for stellar evolution and stellar winds, and have been run for three different metallicities (Z = 0.01, 0.1 and 1 Zsun). Following recent theoretical models of wind mass-loss and core-collapse supernovae, we assume that the mass of the stellar remnants depends on the metallicity of the progenitor stars. We find that BH-BH binaries form efficiently because of dynamical exchanges: in our simulations, we find about 10 times more BH-BH binaries than double neutron star binaries. The simulated BH-BH binaries form earlier in metal-poor YSCs, which host more massive black holes (BHs) than in metal-rich YSCs. The simulated BH-BH binaries have very large chirp masses (up to 80 Msun), because the BH mass is assumed to depend on metallicity, and because BHs can grow in mass due to the merger with stars. The simulated BH-BH binaries span a wide range of orbital periods (10^-3-10^7 yr), and only a small fraction of them (0.3 per cent) is expected to merge within a Hubble time. We discuss the estimated merger rate from our simulations and the implications for Advanced VIRGO and LIGO.

  18. HINODE/EIS SPECTROSCOPIC VALIDATION OF VERY HOT PLASMA IMAGED WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY IN NON-FLARING ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Reale, Fabio, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use coronal imaging observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) spectral data to explore the potential of narrowband EUV imaging data for diagnosing the presence of hot (T {approx}> 5 MK) coronal plasma in active regions. We analyze observations of two active regions (AR 11281, AR 11289) with simultaneous AIA imaging and EIS spectral data, including the Ca XVII line (at 192.8 A), which is one of the few lines in the EIS spectral bands sensitive to hot coronal plasma even outside flares. After careful co-alignment of the imaging and spectral data, we compare the morphology in a three-color image combining the 171, 335, and 94 A AIA spectral bands, with the image obtained for Ca XVII emission from the analysis of EIS spectra. We find that in the selected active regions the Ca XVII emission is strong only in very limited areas, showing striking similarities with the features bright in the 94 A (and 335 A) AIA channels and weak in the 171 A band. We conclude that AIA imaging observations of the solar corona can be used to track hot plasma (6-8 MK), and so to study its spatial variability and temporal evolution at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  19. Fabricating the Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, Peter J.; Sayre, Edwin D. [Advanced Methods and Materials, Inc., 1190 Mountain View-Alviso Road, Suite P, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Houts, Mike [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid core heatpipe nuclear reactor has the potential to be the most dependable concept for the nuclear space power system. The design of the conversion system employed permits multiple failure modes instead of the single failure mode of other concepts. Regardless of the material used for the reactor, either stainless steel, high-temperature alloys, Nb1Zr, Tantalum Alloys or MoRe Alloys, making the solid core by machining holes in a large diameter billet is not satisfactory. This is because the large diameter billet will have large grains that are detrimental to the performance of the reactor due to grain boundary diffusion. The ideal fabrication method for the solid core is by hot isostatic pressure diffusion bonding (HIPing). By this technique, wrought fine-grained tubes of the alloy chosen are assembled into the final shape with solid cusps and seal welded so that there is a vacuum in between all surfaces to be diffusion bonded. This welded structure is then HIPed for diffusion bonding. A solid core made of Type 321 stainless steel has been satisfactorily produced by Advanced Methods and Materials and is undergoing evaluation by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

  20. Black hole accretion discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasota, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an introduction to models of accretion discs around black holes. After a presentation of the non-relativistic equations describing the structure and evolution of geometrically thin accretion discs we discuss their steady-state solutions and compare them to observation. Next we describe in detail the thermal-viscous disc instability model and its application to dwarf novae for which it was designed and its X-ray irradiated-disc version which explains the soft X--ray transients, i.e. outbursting black-hole low-mass X-ray binaries. We then turn to the role of advection in accretion flow onto black holes illustrating its action and importance with a toy model describing both ADAFs and slim discs. We conclude with a presentation of the general-relativistic formalism describing accretion discs in the Kerr space-time.

  1. Gravitating discs around black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas; J. -M. Hure; O. Semerak

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid discs and tori around black holes are discussed within different approaches and with the emphasis on the role of disc gravity. First reviewed are the prospects of investigating the gravitational field of a black hole--disc system by analytical solutions of stationary, axially symmetric Einstein's equations. Then, more detailed considerations are focused to middle and outer parts of extended disc-like configurations where relativistic effects are small and the Newtonian description is adequate. Within general relativity, only a static case has been analysed in detail. Results are often very inspiring, however, simplifying assumptions must be imposed: ad hoc profiles of the disc density are commonly assumed and the effects of frame-dragging and completely lacking. Astrophysical discs (e.g. accretion discs in active galactic nuclei) typically extend far beyond the relativistic domain and are fairly diluted. However, self-gravity is still essential for their structure and evolution, as well as for their radiation emission and the impact on the environment around. For example, a nuclear star cluster in a galactic centre may bear various imprints of mutual star--disc interactions, which can be recognised in observational properties, such as the relation between the central mass and stellar velocity dispersion.

  2. Analysis of spherically symmetric black holes in Braneworld models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Pavan

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on black holes and their physical proprieties has been active on last 90 years. With the appearance of the String Theory and the Braneworld models as alternative descriptions of our Universe, the interest on black holes, in these context, increased. In this work we studied black holes in Braneworld models. A class of spherically symmetric black holes is investigaded as well its stability under general perturbations. Thermodynamic proprieties and quasi-normal modes are discussed. The black holes studied are the SM (zero mass) and CFM solutions, obtained by Casadio {\\it et al.} and Bronnikov {\\it et al.}. The geometry of bulk is unknown. However the Campbell-Magaard Theorem guarantees the existence of a 5-dimensional solution in the bulk whose projection on the brane is the class of black holes considered. They are stable under scalar perturbations. Quasi-normal modes were observed in both models. The tail behavior of the perturbations is the same. The entropy upper bound of a body absorved by the black holes studied was calculated. This limit turned out to be independent of the black hole parameters.

  3. Thermodynamical instability of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Kiselev

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to Hawking radiation of black hole with a given spacetime structure, we consider a competitive transition due to a heat transfer from a hotter inner horizon to a colder outer horizon of Kerr black hole, that results in a stable thermodynamical state of extremal black hole. In this process, by supposing an emission of gravitational quanta, we calculate the mass of extremal black hole in the final state of transition.

  4. Towards noncommutative quantum black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Dominguez, J. C.; Obregon, O.; Sabido, M.; Ramirez, C. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, P.O. Box E-143, 37150 Leon Gto. (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, P.O. Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study noncommutative black holes. We use a diffeomorphism between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Kantowski-Sachs cosmological model, which is generalized to noncommutative minisuperspace. Through the use of the Feynman-Hibbs procedure we are able to study the thermodynamics of the black hole, in particular, we calculate the Hawking's temperature and entropy for the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole.

  5. Secure Core Contact Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secure Core Contact Information C. E. Irvine irvine@nps.edu 831-656-2461 Department of Computer for the secure management of local and/or remote information in multiple contexts. The SecureCore project Science Graduate School of Operations and Information Sciences www.cisr.nps.edu Project Description

  6. Dynamical Processes in the Central Kpc and Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac Shlosman

    2003-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss different aspects of nested bar dynamics and its effect on the gas flow and fueling of Active Galactic Nuclei. Specifically we focus on the dynamical decoupling between the primary and secondary bars and the gas flow across the bar-bar interface. We analyze the nuclear gaseous bar formation when gas gravity can be neglected or when it dominates. Finally, we discuss the possible effect of flat core, triaxial, dark halos on the formation of galactic bulges and supermassive black holes (SBHs) and argue in favor of SBH-bulge-halo correlation.

  7. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  8. Quantum black hole inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Altaie

    2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we follow a new approach for particle creation by a localized strong gravitational field. The approach is based on a definition of the physical vacuum drawn from Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Using the fact that the gravitational field red-shifts the frequency modes of the vacuum, a condition on the minimum stregth of the gravitational field required to achieve real particle creation is derived. Application of this requirement on a Schwartzchid black hole resulted in deducing an upper limit on the region, outside the event horizon, where real particles can be created. Using this regional upper limit, and considering particle creation by black holes as a consequence of the Casimir effect, with the assumption that the created quanta are to be added to the initial energy, we deduce a natural power law for the development of the event horizon, and consequently a logarithmic law for the area spectrum of an inflating black hole. Application of the results on a cosmological model shows that if we start with a Planck-dimensional black hole, then through the process of particle creation we end up with a universe having the presently estimated critical density. Such a universe will be in a state of eternal inflation.

  9. Black Holes at Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Webber

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In theories with large extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity, black holes are copiously produced in particle collisions at energies well above the Planck scale. I briefly review some recent work on the phenomenology of this process, with emphasis on theoretical uncertainties and possible strategies for measuring the number of extra dimensions.

  10. Core Analysis At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological Survey, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date...

  11. Absorption of planar massless scalar waves by Bardeen regular black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caio F. B. Macedo; Lus C. B. Crispino

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Accretion of fields by black holes is a subject of great interest in physics. It is known that accretion plays a fundamental role in active galactic nuclei and in the evolution of black holes. Accretion of fundamental fields is often related to the study of absorption cross section. Basically all black holes for which absorption of fields has been studied so far present singularities. However, even within general relativity, it is possible to construct regular black holes: objects with event horizons but without singularities. Many physically motivated regular black hole solutions have been proposed in the past years, demanding the understanding of their absorption properties. We study the absorption of planar massless scalar waves by Bardeen regular black holes. We compare the absorption cross section of Bardeen and Reissner--Nordstr\\"om black holes, showing that the former always have a bigger absorption cross section for fixed values of the field frequency and of the normalized black hole charge. We also show that it is possible for a Bardeen black hole to have the same high-frequency absorption cross section of a Reissner--Nordstr\\"om black hole. Our results suggest that, in mid-to-high-frequency regimes, regular black holes can have compatible properties with black holes with singularities, as far as absorption is concerned.

  12. Core shroud corner joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  13. Limits on New Physics from Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifford Cheung; Stefan Leichenauer

    2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes emit high energy particles which induce a finite density potential for any scalar field $\\phi$ coupling to the emitted quanta. Due to energetic considerations, $\\phi$ evolves locally to minimize the effective masses of the outgoing states. In theories where $\\phi$ resides at a metastable minimum, this effect can drive $\\phi$ over its potential barrier and classically catalyze the decay of the vacuum. Because this is not a tunneling process, the decay rate is not exponentially suppressed and a single black hole in our past light cone may be sufficient to activate the decay. Moreover, decaying black holes radiate at ever higher temperatures, so they eventually probe the full spectrum of particles coupling to $\\phi$. We present a detailed analysis of vacuum decay catalyzed by a single particle, as well as by a black hole. The former is possible provided large couplings or a weak potential barrier. In contrast, the latter occurs much more easily and places new stringent limits on theories with hierarchical spectra. Finally, we comment on how these constraints apply to the standard model and its extensions, e.g. metastable supersymmetry breaking.

  14. Double-core excitations in formamide can be probed by X-ray double-quantum-coherence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yu; Healion, Daniel; Biggs, Jason D.; Mukamel, Shaul [Department of Chemistry, University of California, 450 Rowland Hall, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2013-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The attosecond, time-resolved X-ray double-quantum-coherence four-wave mixing signals of formamide at the nitrogen and oxygen K-edges are simulated using restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory and the excited core hole approximation. These signals, induced by core exciton coupling, are particularly sensitive to the level of treatment of electron correlation, thus providing direct experimental signatures of electron and core-hole many-body effects and a test of electronic structure theories.

  15. Emergency core cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  16. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Noah A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  17. Core Values | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Core Values Core Values People - People are our most important resource. We respect and use our experience and skills and appreciate our diversity. Business Excellence - We are...

  18. Shape of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Mara E Gabach

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that celestial bodies tend to be spherical due to gravity and that rotation produces deviations from this sphericity. We discuss what is known and expected about the shape of black holes' horizons from their formation to their final, stationary state. We present some recent results showing that black hole rotation indeed manifests in the widening of their central regions, limits their global shapes and enforces their whole geometry to be close to the extreme Kerr horizon geometry at almost maximal rotation speed. The results depend only on the horizon area and angular momentum. In particular they are entirely independent of the surrounding geometry of the spacetime and of the presence of matter satisfying the strong energy condition. We also discuss the the relation of this result with the Hoop conjecture.

  19. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Lentz, E. J. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Endeve, Eirik [ORNL; Baird, Mark L [ORNL; Chertkow, Merek A [ORNL; Harris, James A [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL; Bruenn, S. W. [Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton; Blondin, J. M. [North Carolina State University

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{44}$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  20. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States)] [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Baird, Mark [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States)] [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6173 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Blondin, John [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)] [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  1. Two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory with Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field reference function and spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Inkoo; Lee, Yoon Sup, E-mail: yslee@kaist.edu [Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the formulation and implementation of KRCASPT2, a two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory based on Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field (KRCASSCF) reference function, in the framework of the spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential. The zeroth-order Hamiltonian is defined as the sum of nondiagonal one-electron operators with generalized two-component Fock matrix elements as scalar factors. The Kramers symmetry within the zeroth-order Hamiltonian is maintained via the use of a state-averaged density, allowing a consistent treatment of degenerate states. The explicit expressions are derived for the matrix elements of the zeroth-order Hamiltonian as well as for the perturbation vector. The use of a fully variational reference function and nondiagonal operators in relativistic multi-configurational perturbation theory is reported for the first time. A series of initial calculations are performed on the ionization potential and excitation energies of the atoms of the 6p-block; the results display a significant improvement over those from KRCASSCF, showing a closer agreement with experimental results. Accurate atomic properties of the superheavy elements of the 7p-block are also presented, and the electronic structures of the low-lying excited states are compared with those of their lighter homologues.

  2. Cooling, AGN Feedback and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuan; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G Mark; O'Shea, Brian W; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the ICM and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations...

  3. Black holes in massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babichev, Eugeny

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the black hole solutions of the ghost-free massive gravity theory and its bimetric extension and outline the main results on the stability of these solutions against small perturbations. Massive (bi)-gravity accommodates exact black hole solutions, analogous to those of General Relativity. In addition to these solutions, hairy black holes -- solutions with no correspondent in General Relativity -- have been found numerically, whose existence is a natural consequence of the absence of the Birkhoff's theorem in these theories. The existence of extra propagating degrees of freedom, makes the stability properties of these black holes richer and more complex than those of General Relativity. In particular, the bi-Schwarzschild black hole exhibits an unstable spherically symmetric mode, while the bi-Kerr geometry is also generically unstable, both against the spherical mode and against superradiant instabilities. If astrophysical black holes are described by these solutions, the superradiant instability o...

  4. Black Hole's 1/N Hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gia Dvali; Cesar Gomez

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the standard view classically black holes carry no hair, whereas quantum hair is at best exponentially weak. We show that suppression of hair is an artifact of the semi-classical treatment and that in the quantum picture hair appears as an inverse mass-square effect. Such hair is predicted in the microscopic quantum description in which a black hole represents a self-sustained leaky Bose-condensate of N soft gravitons. In this picture the Hawking radiation is the quantum depletion of the condensate. Within this picture we show that quantum black hole physics is fully compatible with continuous global symmetries and that global hair appears with the strength B/N, where B is the global charge swallowed by the black hole. For large charge this hair has dramatic effect on black hole dynamics. Our findings can have interesting astrophysical consequences, such as existence of black holes with large detectable baryonic and leptonic numbers.

  5. Reconstructing the massive black hole cosmic history through gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Sesana; Jonathan R. Gair; Emanuele Berti; Marta Volonteri

    2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The massive black holes we observe in galaxies today are the natural end-product of a complex evolutionary path, in which black holes seeded in proto-galaxies at high redshift grow through cosmic history via a sequence of mergers and accretion episodes. Electromagnetic observations probe a small subset of the population of massive black holes (namely, those that are active or those that are very close to us), but planned space-based gravitational-wave observatories such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) can measure the parameters of ``electromagnetically invisible'' massive black holes out to high redshift. In this paper we introduce a Bayesian framework to analyze the information that can be gathered from a set of such measurements. Our goal is to connect a set of massive black hole binary merger observations to the underlying model of massive black hole formation. In other words, given a set of observed massive black hole coalescences, we assess what information can be extracted about the underlying massive black hole population model. For concreteness we consider ten specific models of massive black hole formation, chosen to probe four important (and largely unconstrained) aspects of the input physics used in structure formation simulations: seed formation, metallicity ``feedback'', accretion efficiency and accretion geometry. For the first time we allow for the possibility of ``model mixing'', by drawing the observed population from some combination of the ``pure'' models that have been simulated. A Bayesian analysis allows us to recover a posterior probability distribution for the ``mixing parameters'' that characterize the fractions of each model represented in the observed distribution. Our work shows that LISA has enormous potential to probe the underlying physics of structure formation.

  6. Formation and Evolution of Galactic Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2002-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The main requirements for fueling an active galactic nucleus and to form massive black holes are reviewed. Low-luminosity AGN can be fueled easily from the local star clusters, near the nucleus, and the various stellar processes are described. Above a certain luminosity (and therefore accretion rate) large-scale gas flows from galactic scales are required. These can be driven by gravity torques of non-axisymmetric perturbations, such as bars, spirals, galaxy interactions. Observational evidence that these mechanisms are in action is found for high enough luminosities. It is very frequent that starbursts are also triggered through the same mechanisms, and the dense nuclear star clusters formed provide fuel for the AGN over a longer time-scale. Secular internal evolution and more violent evolution through interactions and mergers contribute to grow both a massive black hole and a bulge, and this could explain the observed proportionality relation between the mass of these two components.

  7. Slant hole completion test. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, R.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

  8. Observational Evidence for Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramesh Narayan; Jeffrey E. McClintock

    2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Astronomers have discovered two populations of black holes: (i) stellar-mass black holes with masses in the range 5 to 30 solar masses, millions of which are present in each galaxy in the universe, and (ii) supermassive black holes with masses in the range 10^6 to 10^{10} solar masses, one each in the nucleus of every galaxy. There is strong circumstantial evidence that all these objects are true black holes with event horizons. The measured masses of supermassive black hole are strongly correlated with properties of their host galaxies, suggesting that these black holes, although extremely small in size, have a strong influence on the formation and evolution of entire galaxies. Spin parameters have recently been measured for a handful of black holes. Based on the data, there is an indication that the kinetic power of at least one class of relativistic jet ejected from accreting black holes may be correlated with black hole spin. If verified, it would suggest that these jets are powered by a generalized Penrose process mediated by magnetic fields.

  9. Artificial ozone holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Dolya

    2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This article considers an opportunity of disinfecting a part of the Earth surface, occupying a large area of ten thousand square kilometers. The sunlight will cause dissociation of molecular bromine into atoms; each bromine atom kills thirty thousand molecules of ozone. Each bromine plate has a mass of forty milligrams grams and destroys ozone in the area of hundred square meters. Thus, to form the ozone hole over the area of ten thousand square kilometers, it is required to have the total mass of bromine equal to the following four tons.

  10. Thermal metastabilities in the solar core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attila Grandpierre; Gabor Agoston

    2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear stability analysis indicates that solar core is thermally stable for infinitesimal internal perturbations. For the first time, thermal metastabilities are found in the solar core when outer perturbations with significant amplitude are present. The obtained results show that hot bubbles generated by outer perturbations may travel a significant distance in the body of the Sun. These deep-origin hot bubbles have mass, energy, and chemical composition that may be related to solar flares. The results obtained may have remarkable relations to activity cycles in planets like Jupiter and also in extrasolar planetary systems.

  11. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA); Dahl, Leslie R. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  12. Supermassive black holes from OASIS and SAURON integral-field kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cappellari; R. Bacon; R. L. Davies; P. T. de Zeeuw; E. Emsellem; J. Falcon-Barroso; D. Krajnovic; H. Kuntschner; R. M. McDermid; R. F. Peletier; M. Sarzi; R. C. E. van den Bosch; G. van de Ven

    2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermassive black holes are a key element in our understanding of how galaxies form. Most of the progress in this very active field of research is based on just ~30 determinations of black hole mass, accumulated over the past decade. We illustrate how integral-field spectroscopy, and in particular our OASIS modeling effort, can help improve the current situation.

  13. Supermassive black holes from OASIS and SAURON integral-field kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappellari, M; Davies, R L; De Zeeuw, P T; Emsellem, E; Falcon-Barroso, J; Krajnovic, D; Kuntschner, H; McDermid, R M; Peletier, R F; Sarzi, M; Bosch, R C E van den; van de Ven, G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermassive black holes are a key element in our understanding of how galaxies form. Most of the progress in this very active field of research is based on just ~30 determinations of black hole mass, accumulated over the past decade. We illustrate how integral-field spectroscopy, and in particular our OASIS modeling effort, can help improve the current situation.

  14. The Ozone Hole Some perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    The Ozone Hole Some perspective The British Antarctic Survey The "Ozone Hole" International of the predicted ozone losses! This was quite a controversy. Ultimately, ozone losses started appearing in the late 1980s (see Figure below), but by then, there was already a credibility issue for ozone scientists. #12

  15. Optical black holes and solitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawn Westmoreland

    2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We exhibit a static, cylindrically symmetric, exact solution to the Euler-Heisenberg field equations (EHFE) and prove that its effective geometry contains (optical) black holes. It is conjectured that there are also soliton solutions to the EHFE which contain black hole geometries.

  16. Black Holes of Negative Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I demonstrate that, under certain circumstances, regions of negative energy density can undergo gravitational collapse into a black hole. The resultant exterior black hole spacetimes necessarily have negative mass and non-trivial topology. A full theory of quantum gravity, in which topology-changing processes take place, could give rise to such spacetimes.

  17. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  18. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  19. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  20. Magnetorotational collapse of very massive stars to black holes in full general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuk Tung Liu; Stuart L. Shapiro; Branson C. Stephens

    2007-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform axisymmetric simulations of the magnetorotational collapse of very massive stars in full general relativity. Our simulations are applicable to the collapse of supermassive stars (M > 10^3M_sun) and to very massive Pop III stars. We model our initial configurations by n=3 polytropes. The ratio of magnetic to rotational kinetic energy in these configurations is chosen to be small (1% and 10%). We find that such magnetic fields do not affect the initial collapse significantly. The core collapses to a black hole, after which black hole excision is employed to continue the evolution long enough for the hole to reach a quasi-stationary state. We find that the black hole mass is M_h = 0.95M and its spin parameter is J_h/M_h^2 = 0.7, with the remaining matter forming a torus around the black hole. We freeze the spacetime metric ("Cowling approximation") and continue to follow the evolution of the torus after the black hole has relaxed to quasi-stationary equilibrium. In the absence of magnetic fields, the torus settles down following ejection of a small amount of matter due to shock heating. When magnetic fields are present, the field lines gradually collimate along the hole's rotation axis. MHD shocks and the MRI generate MHD turbulence in the torus and stochastic accretion onto the central black hole. When the magnetic field is strong, a wind is generated in the torus, and the torus undergoes radial oscillations that drive episodic accretion onto the hole. These oscillations produce long-wavelength gravitational waves potentially detectable by LISA. The final state of the magnetorotational collapse always consists of a central black hole surrounded by a collimated magnetic field and a hot, thick accretion torus. This system is a viable candidate for the central engine of a long-soft gamma-ray burst.

  1. Mineralogy of drill hole UE-25p#1 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drill hole UE-25p{number_sign}1 is located east of the candidate repository block at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and as such provides information on the geology of the accessible environment. The hole was drilled to a depth of 1807 m (5923 ft) and is unique in that it penetrates tuffs that are older than any volcanic units previously encountered in drill holes at Yucca Mountain. In addition, it is the only hole drilled to date that penetrates the base of the tuff sequence and enters the underlying Paleozoic dolomite basement. We have examined the mineralogy of drill cuttings, core, and sidewall samples from drill hole UE-25p{number_sign}1 is similar to that in the other drill holes examined at Yucca Mountain. The only significant differences in mineralogy from other drill holes include the presence of dolomite in the Paleozoic carbonate rocks and the occurrence of up to 3% laumontite, a Ca-zeolite, in four samples of the Lithic Ridge Tuff. 15 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Strings, higher curvature corrections, and black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Mohaupt

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review old and recent results on subleading contributions to black hole entropy in string theory.

  3. Alternate Explosions: Collapse and Accretion Events with Red Holes instead of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Graber

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A red hole is "just like a black hole" except it lacks an event horizon and a singularity. As a result, a red hole emits much more energy than a black hole during a collapse or accretion event. We consider how a red hole solution can solve the "energy crisis" and power extremely energetic gamma ray bursts and hypernovae.

  4. ON THE PROSPECT OF CONSTRAINING BLACK HOLE SPIN THROUGH X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF HOTSPOTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaqoob, Tahir

    Future X-ray instrumentation is expected to allow us to significantly improve the constraints derived from the Fe?K lines in active galactic nuclei, such as the black hole angular momentum (spin) and the inclination angle ...

  5. Thermodynamics of regular black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2008-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate thermodynamics for a magnetically charged regular black hole (MCRBH), which comes from the action of general relativity and nonlinear electromagnetics, comparing with the Reissner-Norstr\\"om (RN) black hole in both four and two dimensions after dimensional reduction. We find that there is no thermodynamic difference between the regular and RN black holes for a fixed charge $Q$ in both dimensions. This means that the condition for either singularity or regularity at the origin of coordinate does not affect the thermodynamics of black hole. Furthermore, we describe the near-horizon AdS$_2$ thermodynamics of the MCRBH with the connection of the Jackiw-Teitelboim theory. We also identify the near-horizon entropy as the statistical entropy by using the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence.

  6. Black Hole Interior Mass Formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthapratim Pradhan

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue by explicit computations that, although the area product, horizon radii product, entropy product and \\emph {irreducible mass product} of the event horizon and Cauchy horizon are universal, the \\emph{surface gravity product}, \\emph{surface temperature product} and \\emph{Komar energy product} of the said horizons do not seem to be universal for Kerr-Newman (KN) black hole space-time. We show the black hole mass formula on the \\emph{Cauchy horizon} following the seminal work by Smarr\\cite{smarr} for the outer horizon. We also prescribed the \\emph{four} laws of black hole mechanics for the \\emph{inner horizon}. New definition of the extremal limit of a black hole is discussed.

  7. ARM - Ice Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, FeatureListGeneralPastIce Cores Outreach Home Room

  8. 2001 BTS Core Databook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment of Energy with6, 2014, 6:32 p.m. (MST)BTS CORE

  9. Fishing in Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Brotas

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coordinate system $(\\bar{x},\\bar{t})$ defined by $r = 2m + K\\bar{x}- c K \\bar{t}$ and $t=\\bar{x}/cK - 1 /cK \\int_{r_a}^r (1- 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2} (1 - 2m/r)^{-1}dr$ allow us to write the Schwarzschild metric in the form: \\[ds^2=c^2 d\\bar{t}^2 + (W^2/K^2 - 2W/K) d\\bar{x}^2 + 2c (1 + W/K) d\\bar{x}d\\bar{t} - r^2 (d\\theta^2 + cos^2\\theta d\\phi^2)\\] with $W=(1 - 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2}$, in which the coefficients' pathologies are moved to $r_K = 2m/(1+K^2)$. This new coordinate system is used to study the entrance into a black hole of a rigid line (a line in which the shock waves propagate with velocity c).

  10. Development of flow network analysis code for block type VHTR core by linear theory method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. H.; Yoon, S. J. [Dept. of Nuclear Engr., Seoul National Univ., Daehak-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J. W. [Dept. of Nuclear and Energy Engr, Dongguk Univ., Seokjang-Dong, Gyeongju, Gyeongsangbuk-Do, 780-714 (Korea, Republic of); Park, G. C. [Dept. of Nuclear Engr., Seoul National Univ., Daehak-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) is high-efficiency nuclear reactor which is capable of generating hydrogen with high temperature of coolant. PMR (Prismatic Modular Reactor) type reactor consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks. The flow paths in the prismatic VHTR core consist of coolant holes, bypass gaps and cross gaps. Complicated flow paths are formed in the core since the coolant holes and bypass gap are connected by the cross gap. Distributed coolant was mixed in the core through the cross gap so that the flow characteristics could not be modeled as a simple parallel pipe system. It requires lot of effort and takes very long time to analyze the core flow with CFD analysis. Hence, it is important to develop the code for VHTR core flow which can predict the core flow distribution fast and accurate. In this study, steady state flow network analysis code is developed using flow network algorithm. Developed flow network analysis code was named as FLASH code and it was validated with the experimental data and CFD simulation results. (authors)

  11. Next Generation Hole Injection/Transport Nano-Composites for High Efficiency OLED Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King Wang

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to use a novel nano-composite material system for the OLED anode coating/hole transport layer. The novel anode coating is intended to significantly increase not only hole injection/transport efficiency, but the device energy efficiency as well. Another goal of the Core Technologies Program is the optimization and scale-up of air-stable and cross-linkable novel HTL nano-composite materials synthesis and the development of low-cost, large-scale mist deposition processes for polymer OLED fabrication. This proposed technology holds the promise to substantially improve OLED energy efficiency and lifetime.

  12. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  13. Heat Engine of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeghi, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As we know, the cosmological constant in different theories of gravity acts as a thermodynamics variable. The cosmological constant exists in different actions of gravity and also appears in the solution of such theories. These lead to use the black hole as a heat engines. Also, there are two values for the cosmological constant as positive and negative values. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. In this paper, we are going to define heat engines for two different black holes as Dyonic BH and Kerr BH. And also, we calculate maximum efficiency for two black holes.

  14. Heat Engine of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sadeghi; Kh. Jafarzade

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As we know, the cosmological constant in different theories of gravity acts as a thermodynamics variable. The cosmological constant exists in different actions of gravity and also appears in the solution of such theories. These lead to use the black hole as a heat engines. Also, there are two values for the cosmological constant as positive and negative values. The case of negative cosmological constant supplies a natural realization of these engines in terms of the field theory description of the fluids to which they are holographically dual. In this paper, we are going to define heat engines for two different black holes as Dyonic BH and Kerr BH. And also, we calculate maximum efficiency for two black holes.

  15. Energy on black hole spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Corichi

    2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the issue of defining energy for test particles on a background black hole spacetime. We revisit the different notions of energy as defined by different observers. The existence of a time-like isometry allows for the notion of a total conserved energy to be well defined, and subsequently the notion of a gravitational potential energy is also meaningful. We then consider the situation in which the test particle is adsorbed by the black hole, and analyze the energetics in detail. In particular, we show that the notion of horizon energy es defined by the isolated horizons formalism provides a satisfactory notion of energy compatible with the particle's conserved energy. As another example, we comment a recent proposal to define energy of the black hole as seen by an observer at rest. This account is intended to be pedagogical and is aimed at the level of and as a complement to the standard textbooks on the subject.

  16. Introduction to Black Hole Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre-Henry Lambert

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    These lecture notes are an elementary and pedagogical introduction to the black hole evaporation, based on a lecture given by the author at the Ninth Modave Summer School in Mathematical Physics and are intended for PhD students. First, quantum field theory in curved spacetime is studied and tools needed for the remaining of the course are introduced. Then, quantum field theory in Rindler spacetime in 1+1 dimensions and in the spacetime of a spherically collapsing star are considered, leading to Unruh and Hawking effects, respectively. Finally, some consequences such as thermodynamics of black holes and information loss paradox are discussed.

  17. Hawking Emission and Black Hole Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Don N. Page

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of Hawking radiation and black hole thermodynamics is given, based largely upon hep-th/0409024.

  18. Supernova explosion and black hole formation with hadron-quark phase transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakazato, Ken'ichiro [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadronic matter undergoes a deconfinement transition to quark matter at high temperature and/or high density. It would be realized in collapsing cores of massive stars. The fates of core collapses are investigated for various cases. Equations of state including the hadron-quark phase transition with different values of bag constant are used. As a result, for the case with a small bag constant (i.e. the transition occurs at low density), the second bounce revives the shock wave leading to explosion for the model with 15 solar mass. The systematics on the bag constant is also studied for the black hole formation of a 40 solar mass progenitor.

  19. Electron Abundance in Protostellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Padoan; Karen Willacy; William Langer; Mika Juvela

    2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of the fractional electron abundance, Xe, in protostellar cores relies on observations of molecules, such as DCO+, H13CO+ and CO, and on chemical models to interpret their abundance. Studies of protostellar cores have revealed significant variations of Xe from core to core within a range 10^-8core age, extinction and density. We compute numerically the intensity of the radiation field within a density distribution generated by supersonic turbulence. Taking into account the lines of sight in all directions, the effective visual extinction in dense regions is found to be always much lower than the extinction derived from the column density along a fixed line of sight. Dense cores with volume and column densities comparable to observed protostellar cores have relatively low mass-averaged visual extinction, 2mag <= A_V <= 5mag, such that photo-ionization can sometimes be as important as cosmic ray ionization. Chemical models, including gas-grain chemistry and time dependent gas depletion and desorption, are computed for values of visual extinction in the range 2mag <= A_V <= 6mag, and for a hydrogen gas density of 10^4cm^-3$, typical of protostellar cores. The models presented here can reproduce some of the observed variations of ion abundance from core to core as the combined effect of visual extinction and age variations. The range of electron abundances predicted by the models is relatively insenstive to density over 10^4 to 10^6 cm^{-3}.

  20. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  1. Signatures of black holes at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Cavaglia; Romulus Godang; Lucien M. Cremaldi; Donald J. Summers

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Signatures of black hole events at CERN's Large Hadron Collider are discussed. Event simulations are carried out with the Fortran Monte Carlo generator CATFISH. Inelasticity effects, exact field emissivities, color and charge conservation, corrections to semiclassical black hole evaporation, gravitational energy loss at formation and possibility of a black hole remnant are included in the analysis.

  2. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  3. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  4. Absorption cross section in Lifshitz black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taeyoon Moon; Yun Soo Myung

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the absorption cross section of a minimally coupled scalar in the Lifshitz black hole obtained from the new massive gravity. The absorption cross section reduces to the horizon area in the low energy and massless limit of s-wave mode propagation, indicating that the Lifshitz black hole also satisfies the universality of low energy absorption cross section for black holes.

  5. Einstein, Black Holes Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Greg

    1 #12;Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves Gregory B. Cook Wake Forest University 2 #12;Einstein's Miraculous Year: 1905 Einstein, A. "Uber einen die Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light. Einstein, A. "Uber die von der molekularkinetischen

  6. From Pinholes to Black Holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenimore, Edward E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Pinhole photography has made major contributions to astrophysics through the use of coded apertures. Coded apertures were instrumental in locating gamma-ray bursts and proving that they originate in faraway galaxies, some from the birth of black holes from the first stars that formed just after the big bang.

  7. Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schultz

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

  8. Black Holes in Galaxy Mergers: Evolution of Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip F. Hopkins; Lars Hernquist; Thomas J. Cox; Tiziana Di Matteo; Paul Martini; Brant Robertson; Volker Springel

    2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on numerical simulations of gas-rich galaxy mergers, we discuss a model in which quasar activity is tied to the self-regulated growth of supermassive black holes in galaxies. Nuclear inflow of gas attending a galaxy collision triggers a starburst and feeds black hole growth, but for most of the duration of the starburst, the black hole is heavily obscured by surrounding gas and dust which limits the visibility of the quasar, especially at optical and UV wavelengths. Eventually, feedback energy from accretion heats the gas and expels it in a powerful wind, leaving a 'dead quasar'. Between buried and dead phases there is a window during which the galaxy would be seen as a luminous quasar. Because the black hole mass, radiative output, and distribution of obscuring gas and dust all evolve strongly with time, the duration of this phase of observable quasar activity depends on both the waveband and imposed luminosity threshold. We determine the observed and intrinsic lifetimes as a function of luminosity and frequency, and calculate observable lifetimes ~10 Myr for bright quasars in the optical B-band, in good agreement with empirical estimates and much smaller than the black hole growth timescales ~100 Myr, naturally producing a substantial population of 'buried' quasars. However, observed and intrinsic energy outputs converge in the IR and hard X-ray bands as attenuation becomes weaker and chances of observation greatly increase. We obtain the distribution of column densities along sightlines in which the quasar is seen above a given luminosity, and find that our result agrees remarkably well with observed estimates of the column density distribution from the SDSS for appropriate luminosity thresholds. (Abridged)

  9. Bent core liquid crystal elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verduzco, R.; DiMasi, E.; Luchette, P.; Ho Hong, S.; Harden, J.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Kilbey II, S.M.; Sprunt, S.; Gleeson, G.T. Jakli, A.

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid crystal (LC) elastomers with bent-core side-groups incorporate the properties of bent-core liquid crystals in a flexible and self-supporting polymer network. Bent-core liquid crystal elastomers (BCEs) with uniform alignment were prepared by attaching a reactive bent-core LC to poly(hydrogenmethylsiloxane) and crosslinking with a divinyl crosslinker. Phase behavior studies indicate a nematic phase over a wide temperature range that approaches room temperature, and thermoelastic measurements show that these BCEs can reversibly change their length by more than a factor of two upon heating and cooling. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies reveal multiple, broad low-angle peaks consistent with short-range smectic C order of the bent-core side groups. A comparison of these patterns with predictions of a Landau model for short-range smectic C order shows that the length scale for smectic ordering in BCEs is similar to that seen in pure bent-core LCs. The combination of rubber elasticity and smectic ordering of the bent-core side groups suggests that BCEs may be promising materials for sensing, actuating, and other advanced applications.

  10. Black Hole Radiation and Volume Statistical Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Rabinowitz

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The simplest possible equation for Hawking radiation, and other black hole radiated power is derived in terms of black hole density. Black hole density also leads to the simplest possible model of a gas of elementary constituents confined inside a gravitational bottle of Schwarzchild radius at tremendous pressure, which yields identically the same functional dependence as the traditional black hole entropy. Variations of Sbh can be obtained which depend on the occupancy of phase space cells. A relation is derived between the constituent momenta and the black hole radius which is similar to the Compton wavelength relation.

  11. Heterogeneous-k-core versus Bootstrap Percolation on Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. J. Baxter; S. N. Dorogovtsev; A. V. Goltsev; J. F. F. Mendes

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the heterogeneous-$k$-core, which generalizes the $k$-core, and contrast it with bootstrap percolation. Vertices have a threshold $k_i$ which may be different at each vertex. If a vertex has less than $k_i$ neighbors it is pruned from the network. The heterogeneous-$k$-core is the sub-graph remaining after no further vertices can be pruned. If the thresholds $k_i$ are $1$ with probability $f$ or $k \\geq 3$ with probability $(1-f)$, the process forms one branch of an activation-pruning process which demonstrates hysteresis. The other branch is formed by ordinary bootstrap percolation. We show that there are two types of transitions in this heterogeneous-$k$-core process: the giant heterogeneous-$k$-core may appear with a continuous transition and there may be a second, discontinuous, hybrid transition. We compare critical phenomena, critical clusters and avalanches at the heterogeneous-$k$-core and bootstrap percolation transitions. We also show that network structure has a crucial effect on these processes, with the giant heterogeneous-$k$-core appearing immediately at a finite value for any $f > 0$ when the degree distribution tends to a power law $P(q) \\sim q^{-\\gamma}$ with $\\gamma < 3$.

  12. Ice chemistry in starless molecular cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during core collapse period is responsible for high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H, and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of...

  13. SBIR Final Report. Liquid Core Optical Scintillating Fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beetz, C.P.; Steinbeck, J.; Buerstler, R.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase I SBIR project focused on developing flexible scintillating liquid core optical fibers, with potential uses in high-energy calorimetry, tracking, preradiators, active targets or other fast detectors. Progress on the six tasks of the project is summarized. The technical developments involve three technology components: (1) highly flexible capillaries or tubes of relatively low n (index of refraction) to serve as cladding and liquid core containment; (2) scintillator (and clear) fluids of relatively high n to serve as a core-- these fluids must have a high light transmission and, for some applications, radiation hardness; (3) optical end plugs, plug insertion, and plug-cladding tube sealing technology to contain the core fluids in the tubes, and to transmit the light.

  14. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico-IST, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa-UTL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Astronomical Institute of Kharkov, V. N. Karazin National University, 35 Sumskaya Street, Kharkov, 61022 (Ukraine)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to be less difficult than one could think of it.

  15. Black Hole Evaporation as a Nonequilibrium Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiromi Saida

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    When a black hole evaporates, there arises a net energy flow from the black hole into its outside environment due to the Hawking radiation and the energy accretion onto black hole. Exactly speaking, due to the net energy flow, the black hole evaporation is a nonequilibrium process. To study details of evaporation process, nonequilibrium effects of the net energy flow should be taken into account. In this article we simplify the situation so that the Hawking radiation consists of non-self-interacting massless matter fields and also the energy accretion onto the black hole consists of the same fields. Then we find that the nonequilibrium nature of black hole evaporation is described by a nonequilibrium state of that field, and we formulate nonequilibrium thermodynamics of non-self-interacting massless fields. By applying it to black hole evaporation, followings are shown: (1) Nonequilibrium effects of the energy flow tends to accelerate the black hole evaporation, and, consequently, a specific nonequilibrium phenomenon of semi-classical black hole evaporation is suggested. Furthermore a suggestion about the end state of quantum size black hole evaporation is proposed in the context of information loss paradox. (2) Negative heat capacity of black hole is the physical essence of the generalized second law of black hole thermodynamics, and self-entropy production inside the matter around black hole is not necessary to ensure the generalized second law. Furthermore a lower bound for total entropy at the end of black hole evaporation is given. A relation of the lower bound with the so-called covariant entropy bound conjecture is interesting but left as an open issue.

  16. Accretion-driven core collapse and the collisional formation of massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Clarke I. Bonnell

    2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the conditions required for a cluster core to shrink, by adiabatic accretion of gas from the surrounding cluster, to densities such that stellar collisions are a likely outcome. We show that the maximum densities attained, and hence the viability of collisions, depends on a competition between core shrinkage (driven by accretion) and core puffing up (driven by relaxation effects). The expected number of collisions scales as $N_{core}^{5/3} \\tilde v^2$ where $N_{core}$ is the number of stars in the cluster core and $\\tilde v$ is the free fall velocity of the parent cluster (gas reservoir). Thus whereas collisions are very unlikely in a relatively low mass, low internal velocity system such as the Orion Nebula Cluster, they become considerably more important at the mass and velocity scale characteristic of globular clusters. Thus stellar collisions in response to accretion induced core shrinkage remains a viable prospect in more massive clusters, and may contribute to the production of intermediate mass black holes in these systems.

  17. BSW process of the slowly evaporating charged black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liancheng Wang; Feng He; Xiangyun Fu

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the BSW process of the slowly evaporating charged black hole. It can be found that the BSW process will also arise near black hole horizon when the evaporation of charged black hole is very slow. But now the background black hole does not have to be an extremal black hole, and it will be approximately an extremal black hole unless it is nearly a huge stationary black hole.

  18. Event-horizon-scale structure in the supermassive black hole candidate at the Galactic Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheperd Doeleman; Jonathan Weintroub; Alan E. E. Rogers; Richard Plambeck; Robert Freund; Remo P. J. Tilanus; Per Friberg; Lucy M. Ziurys; James M. Moran; Brian Corey; Ken H. Young; Daniel L. Smythe; Michael Titus; Daniel P. Marrone; Roger J. Cappallo; Douglas C. J. Bock; Geoffrey C. Bower; Richard Chamberlin; Gary R. Davis; Thomas P. Krichbaum; James Lamb; Holly Maness; Arthur E. Niell; Alan Roy; Peter Strittmatter; Daniel Werthimer; Alan R. Whitney; David Woody

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cores of most galaxies are thought to harbour supermassive black holes, which power galactic nuclei by converting the gravitational energy of accreting matter into radiation (ref 1). Sagittarius A*, the compact source of radio, infrared and X-ray emission at the centre of the Milky Way, is the closest example of this phenomenon, with an estimated black hole mass that is 4 million times that of the Sun (refs. 2,3). A long-standing astronomical goal is to resolve structures in the innermost accretion flow surrounding Sgr A* where strong gravitational fields will distort the appearance of radiation emitted near the black hole. Radio observations at wavelengths of 3.5 mm and 7 mm have detected intrinsic structure in Sgr A*, but the spatial resolution of observations at these wavelengths is limited by interstellar scattering (refs. 4-7). Here we report observations at a wavelength of 1.3 mm that set a size of 37 (+16, -10; 3-sigma) microarcseconds on the intrinsic diameter of Sgr A*. This is less than the expected apparent size of the event horizon of the presumed black hole, suggesting that the bulk of SgrA* emission may not be not centred on the black hole, but arises in the surrounding accretion flow.

  19. Old Maid Flat geothermal exploratory hole No. 7A drilling and completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling and testing efforts for a 6000-foot geothermal exploratory hole on the western approaches to Mount Hood, near Portland, Oregon were completed. The intent of the drilling was to encounter a hydrothermal reservoir in a postulated fracture system and confirm the existence of a moderate-temperature (200/sup 0/F) geothermal resource in the Old Main Flat (OMF) vicinity of Mount Hood. The exploratory hole, OMF No. 7A, was completed to a total depth of 6027 feet in 54 days using conventional rotary drilling techniques. The hole was found to be incapable of producing fluids with the desired temperatures. A maximum hole temperature of about 235/sup 0/F was recorded at total depth and a temperature gradient of about 3.3/sup 0/F/100 feet was exhibited over the lower 1000 feet of hole. A variety of technical data, including physical samples such as cores, cuttings, and borehole fluids, plus geophysical well logs were acquired. Data analyses are continuing, with results to be made available through future separate reports.

  20. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  1. "Meissner effect" and Blandford-Znajek mechanism in conductive black hole magnetospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Komissarov; J. C. McKinney

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The expulsion of axisymmetric magnetic field from the event horizons of rapidly rotating black holes has been seen as an astrophysically important effect that may significantly reduce or even nullify the efficiency of the Blandford-Znajek mechanism of powering the relativistic jets in Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma Ray Bursts. However, this Meissner-like effect is seen in vacuum solutions of black hole electrodynamics whereas the Blandford-Znajek mechanism is concerned with plasma-filled magnetospheres. In this paper we argue that conductivity dramatically changes the properties of axisymmetric electromagnetic solutions -- even for a maximally rotating Kerr black hole the magnetic field is pulled inside the event horizon. Moreover, the conditions resulting in outgoing Poynting flux in the Blandford-Znajek mechanism exist not on the event horizon but everywhere within the black hole ergosphere. Thus, the Meissner effect is unlikely to be of interest in astrophysics of black holes, at least not in the way this has been suggested so far. These conclusions are supported by the results of time-dependent numerical simulations with three different computer codes. The test problems involve black holes with the rotation parameter ranging from $a=0.999$ to $a=1$. The pure electrodynamic simulations deal with the structure of conductive magnetospheres of black holes placed in a uniform-at-infinity magnetic field (Wald's problem) and the magnetohydrodynamic simulations are used to study the magnetospheres arising in the problem of disk accretion.

  2. Supermassive Black Hole Growth and Merger Rates from Cosmological N-body Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Kelly Holley-Bockelmann; Steinn Sigurdsson; Tom Abel

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how seed black holes grow into intermediate and supermassive black holes (IMBHs and SMBHs, respectively) has important implications for the duty-cycle of active galactic nuclei (AGN), galaxy evolution, and gravitational wave astronomy. Most studies of the cosmological growth and merger history of black holes have used semianalytic models and have concentrated on SMBH growth in luminous galaxies. Using high resolution cosmological N-body simulations, we track the assembly of black holes over a large range of final masses -- from seed black holes to SMBHs -- over widely varying dynamical histories. We used the dynamics of dark matter halos to track the evolution of seed black holes in three different gas accretion scenarios. We have found that growth of Sagittarius A* - size SMBH reaches its maximum mass M_{SMBH}~10^6Msun at z~6 through early gaseous accretion episodes, after which it stays at near constant mass. At the same redshift, the duty-cycle of the host AGN ends, hence redshift z=6 marks the transition from an AGN to a starburst galaxy which eventually becomes the Milky Way. By tracking black hole growth as a function of time and mass, we estimate that the IMBH merger rate reaches a maximum of R_{max}=55 yr^-1 at z=11. From IMBH merger rates we calculate N_{ULX}=7 per Milky Way type galaxy per redshift in redshift range 2

  3. Charged spinning black holes as particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Shaowen; Liu Yuxiao; Guo Heng; Fu Chune [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been pointed out that the spinning Kerr black hole with maximal spin could act as a particle collider with arbitrarily high center-of-mass energy. In this paper, we will extend the result to the charged spinning black hole, the Kerr-Newman black hole. The center-of-mass energy of collision for two uncharged particles falling freely from rest at infinity depends not only on the spin a but also on the charge Q of the black hole. We find that an unlimited center-of-mass energy can be approached with the conditions: (1) the collision takes place at the horizon of an extremal black hole; (2) one of the colliding particles has critical angular momentum; (3) the spin a of the extremal black hole satisfies (1/{radical}(3)){<=}(a/M){<=}1, where M is the mass of the Kerr-Newman black hole. The third condition implies that to obtain an arbitrarily high energy, the extremal Kerr-Newman black hole must have a large value of spin, which is a significant difference between the Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes. Furthermore, we also show that, for a near-extremal black hole, there always exists a finite upper bound for center-of-mass energy, which decreases with the increase of the charge Q.

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Strand

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

  5. Submicron patterned metal hole etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Lake Oswego, OR); Liberman, Vladimir (Needham, MA); Morse, Jeffrey (Martinez, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet chemical process for etching submicron patterned holes in thin metal layers using electrochemical etching with the aid of a wetting agent. In this process, the processed wafer to be etched is immersed in a wetting agent, such as methanol, for a few seconds prior to inserting the processed wafer into an electrochemical etching setup, with the wafer maintained horizontal during transfer to maintain a film of methanol covering the patterned areas. The electrochemical etching setup includes a tube which seals the edges of the wafer preventing loss of the methanol. An electrolyte composed of 4:1 water: sulfuric is poured into the tube and the electrolyte replaces the wetting agent in the patterned holes. A working electrode is attached to a metal layer of the wafer, with reference and counter electrodes inserted in the electrolyte with all electrodes connected to a potentiostat. A single pulse on the counter electrode, such as a 100 ms pulse at +10.2 volts, is used to excite the electrochemical circuit and perform the etch. The process produces uniform etching of the patterned holes in the metal layers, such as chromium and molybdenum of the wafer without adversely effecting the patterned mask.

  6. Quantum Geometry and Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G., J Fernando Barbero

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overall picture of the advances in the description of black hole physics from the perspective of loop quantum gravity. After an introduction that discusses the main conceptual issues we present some details about the classical and quantum geometry of isolated horizons and their quantum geometry and then use this scheme to give a natural definition of the entropy of black holes. The entropy computations can be neatly expressed in the form of combinatorial problems solvable with the help of methods based on number theory and the use of generating functions. The recovery of the Bekenstein-Hawking law and corrections to it is explained in some detail. After this, due attention is paid to the discussion of semiclassical issues. An important point in this respect is the proper interpretation of the horizon area as the energy that should appear in the statistical-mechanical treatment of the black hole model presented here. The chapter ends with a comparison between the microscopic and semiclassical app...

  7. Electrocatalysts having gold monolayers on platinum nanoparticle cores, and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to gold-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of an electrocatalytically active core at least partially encapsulated by an outer shell of gold or gold alloy. The invention more particularly relates to such particles having a noble metal-containing core, and more particularly, a platinum or platinum alloy core. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  8. RETENTION OF STELLAR-MASS BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morscher, Meagan; Umbreit, Stefan; Farr, Will M.; Rasio, Frederic A., E-mail: m.morscher@u.northwestern.edu, E-mail: s-umbreit@northwestern.edu, E-mail: w-farr@northwestern.edu, E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Globular clusters should be born with significant numbers of stellar-mass black holes (BHs). It has been thought for two decades that very few of these BHs could be retained through the cluster lifetime. With masses {approx}10 M{sub Sun }, BHs are {approx}20 times more massive than an average cluster star. They segregate into the cluster core, where they may eventually decouple from the remainder of the cluster. The small-N core then evaporates on a short timescale. This is the so-called Spitzer instability. Here we present the results of a full dynamical simulation of a globular cluster containing many stellar-mass BHs with a realistic mass spectrum. Our Monte Carlo simulation code includes detailed treatments of all relevant stellar evolution and dynamical processes. Our main finding is that old globular clusters could still contain many BHs at present. In our simulation, we find no evidence for the Spitzer instability. Instead, most of the BHs remain well mixed with the rest of the cluster, with only the innermost few tens of BHs segregating significantly. Over the 12 Gyr evolution, fewer than half of the BHs are dynamically ejected through strong binary interactions in the cluster core. The presence of BHs leads to long-term heating of the cluster, ultimately producing a core radius on the high end of the distribution for Milky Way globular clusters (and those of other galaxies). A crude extrapolation from our model suggests that the BH-BH merger rate from globular clusters could be comparable to the rate in the field.

  9. Black holes are almost optimal quantum cloners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Adami; G. Ver Steeg

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    If black holes were able to clone quantum states, a number of paradoxes in black hole physics would disappear. However, the linearity of quantum mechanics forbids exact cloning of quantum states. Here we show that black holes indeed clone incoming quantum states with a fidelity that depends on the black hole's absorption coefficient, without violating the no-cloning theorem because the clones are only approximate. Perfectly reflecting black holes are optimal universal "quantum cloning machines" and operate on the principle of stimulated emission, exactly as their quantum optical counterparts. In the limit of perfect absorption, the fidelity of clones is equal to what can be obtained via quantum state estimation methods. But for any absorption probability less than one, the cloning fidelity is nearly optimal as long as $\\omega/T\\geq10$, a common parameter for modest-sized black holes.

  10. Detecting neutrinos from black hole neutron stars mergers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. L. Caballero; G. C. McLaughlin; R. Surman

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    While it is well known that neutrinos are emitted from standard core collapse protoneutron star supernovae, less attention has been focused on neutrinos from accretion disks. These disks occur in some supernovae (i.e. "collapsars") as well as in compact object mergers, and they emit neutrinos with similar properties to those from protoneutron star supernovae. These disks and their neutrinos play an important role in our understanding of gamma ray bursts as well as the nucleosynthesis they produce. We study a disk that forms in the merger of a black hole and a neutron star and examine the neutrino fluxes, luminosities and neutrino surfaces for the disk. We also estimate the number of events that would be registered in current and proposed supernova neutrino detectors if such an event were to occur in the Galaxy.

  11. Remarks on Renormalization of Black Hole Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Pyo Kim; Sung Ku Kim; Kwang-Sup Soh; Jae Hyung Yee

    1996-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We elaborate the renormalization process of entropy of a nonextremal and an extremal Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m black hole by using the Pauli-Villars regularization method, in which the regulator fields obey either the Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac distribution depending on their spin-statistics. The black hole entropy involves only two renormalization constants. We also discuss the entropy and temperature of the extremal black hole.

  12. Hole cleaning requirements with seabed returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordt, David Paul

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of different non-Newtonian fluids 56 INTRODUCTION A drilling fluid is used for removing cuttings from the hole, controlling subsurface pressures, preventing caving-in of the formations, suspension of cuttings, weighting materials, and many other uses... of the hole. The drilling problems related to hole cleaning can occur at low as well as high annular velocities. Cuttings can travel no faster than the fluid in which they are transported; however, they can travel more slowly. Their fall (slip) rate...

  13. Probing the Constituent Structure of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukas Gruending; Stefan Hofmann; Sophia Mller; Tehseen Rug

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the cross section for scattering processes between graviton emitters on the near side of a Schwarzschild surface and absorbers on its far side, that is black hole constituents. We show that these scatterings allow to directly extract structural observables such as the momentum distribution of black hole constituents. For this we employ a quantum bound state description originally developed in quantum chromodynamics and recently applied to general relativity that allows to consider black holes in a relativistic Hartree like framework.

  14. Black hole initial data without elliptic equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istvn Rcz; Jeffrey Winicour

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore whether a new method to solve the constraints of Einstein's equations, which does not involve elliptic equations, can be applied to provide initial data for black holes. We show that this method can be successfully applied to a nonlinear perturbation of a Schwarzschild black hole by establishing the well-posedness of the resulting constraint problem. We discuss its possible generalization to the boosted, spinning multiple black hole problem.

  15. Absorption cross section of RN black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sini R.; V. C. Kuriakose

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a charged scalar field in the RN black hole space time is studied using WKB approximation. In the present work it is assumed that matter waves can get reflected from the event horizon. Using this effect, the Hawking temperature and the absorption cross section for RN black hole placed in a charged scalar field are calculated. The absorption cross section $\\sigma _{abs}$ is found to be inversely proportional to square of the Hawking temperature of the black hole.

  16. Black holes with massive graviton hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Brito; Vitor Cardoso; Paolo Pani

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    No-hair theorems exclude the existence of nontrivial scalar and massive vector hair outside four-dimensional, static, asymptotically flat black-hole spacetimes. We show, by explicitly building nonlinear solutions, that black holes can support massive graviton hair in theories of massive gravity. These hairy solutions are, most likely, the generic end state of the recently discovered monopole instability of Schwarzschild black holes in massive graviton theories.

  17. Gelcasting Alumina Cores for Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janney, M A; Klug, F J

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General Electric currently uses silica investment casting cores for making superalloy turbine blades. The silica core technology does not provide the degree of dimensional control needed for advanced turbine system manufacture. The sum of the various process variables in silica core manufacturing produces cores that have more variability than is allowed for in advanced, power-generation gas turbine airfoils.

  18. EVERY BCG WITH A STRONG RADIO AGN HAS AN X-RAY COOL CORE: IS THE COOL CORE-NONCOOL CORE DICHOTOMY TOO SIMPLE?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, M., E-mail: msun@virginia.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The radio active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in X-ray cool cores has been proposed as a crucial ingredient in the evolution of baryonic structures. However, it has long been known that strong radio AGNs also exist in 'noncool core' clusters, which brings up the question whether an X-ray cool core is always required for the radio feedback. In this work, we present a systematic analysis of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and strong radio AGNs in 152 groups and clusters from the Chandra archive. All 69 BCGs with radio AGN more luminous than 2 x 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1} at 1.4 GHz are found to have X-ray cool cores. BCG cool cores can be divided into two classes: the large cool core (LCC) class and the corona class. Small coronae, easily overlooked at z > 0.1, can trigger strong heating episodes in groups and clusters, long before LCCs are formed. Strong radio outbursts triggered by coronae may destroy embryonic LCCs and thus provide another mechanism to prevent the formation of LCCs. However, it is unclear whether coronae are decoupled from the radio feedback cycles as they have to be largely immune to strong radio outbursts. Our sample study also shows the absence of groups with a luminous cool core while hosting a strong radio AGN, which is not observed in clusters. This points to a greater impact of radio heating on low-mass systems than clusters. Few L {sub 1.4GHz} > 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1} radio AGNs (approx16%) host an L {sub 0.5-10keV} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} X-ray AGN, while above these thresholds, all X-ray AGNs in BCGs are also radio AGNs. As examples of the corona class, we also present detailed analyses of a BCG corona associated with a strong radio AGN (ESO 137-006 in A3627) and one of the faintest coronae known (NGC 4709 in the Centaurus cluster). Our results suggest that the traditional cool core/noncool core dichotomy is too simple. A better alternative is the cool core distribution function, with the enclosed X-ray luminosity or gas mass.

  19. Supermassive black holes (SMBH) and formation of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently confirmed correlation between the mass of SMBH and bulges of galaxies (and their central velocity dispersion), suggest a common formation scenario for galaxies and their central black holes. Common fueling can be invoked through internal dynamical processes, external accretion, and hierarchical merging of structures. The success of recent theories is reviewed, as the self-regulated growth of both bulges and SMBHs, the predicted AGN statistics, when activity is triggered by accretion and mergers, the predicted frequency of binary SMBH and consequences. In particular, the SMBH growth problem can now be revised, invoking intermediate-mass black holes (IMBH) as BH seeds in the early universe. As a by-product, the merger of binary SMBHs help to heat and destroy central stellar cusps. Remaining problems are mentioned.

  20. Intrinsic Shapes of Molecular Cloud Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Jones; Shantanu Basu; John Dubinski

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We conduct an analysis of the shapes of molecular cloud cores using recently compiled catalogs of observed axis ratios of individual cores mapped in ammonia or through optical selection. We apply both analytical and statistical techniques to deproject the observed axis ratios in order to determine the true distribution of cloud core shapes. We find that neither pure oblate nor pure prolate cores can account for the observed distribution of core shapes. Intrinsically triaxial cores produce distributions which agree with observations. The best-fit triaxial distribution contains cores which are more nearly oblate than prolate.

  1. Thermoelectric DC conductivities from black hole horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis Donos; Jerome P. Gauntlett

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic expression for the DC electrical conductivity in terms of black hole horizon data was recently obtained for a class of holographic black holes exhibiting momentum dissipation. We generalise this result to obtain analogous expressions for the DC thermoelectric and thermal conductivities. We illustrate our results using some holographic Q-lattice black holes as well as for some black holes with linear massless axions, in both $D=4$ and $D=5$ bulk spacetime dimensions, which include both spatially isotropic and anisotropic examples. We show that some recently constructed ground states of holographic Q-lattices, which can be either electrically insulating or metallic, are all thermal insulators.

  2. Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator,...

  3. Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

  4. Lower Dimensional Black Holes: Inside and Out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    I survey the physics of black holes in two and three spacetime dimensions, with special attention given to an understanding of their exterior and interior properties.

  5. Approximate initial data for binary black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth A. Dennison; Thomas W. Baumgarte; Harald P. Pfeiffer

    2006-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct approximate analytical solutions to the constraint equations of general relativity for binary black holes of arbitrary mass ratio in quasicircular orbit. We adopt the puncture method to solve the constraint equations in the transverse-traceless decomposition and consider perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes caused by boosts and the presence of a binary companion. A superposition of these two perturbations then yields approximate, but fully analytic binary black hole initial data that are accurate to first order in the inverse of the binary separation and the square of the black holes' momenta.

  6. A new spin on black hole hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that scalar hair can be added to rotating, vacuum black holes of general relativity. These hairy black holes (HBHs) clarify a lingering question concerning gravitational solitons: if a black hole can be added at the centre of a boson star, as it typically can for other solitons. We argue that it can, but only if it is spinning. The existence of such HBHs is related to the Kerr superradiant instability triggered by a massive scalar field. This connection leads to the following conjecture: a (hairless) black hole which is afflicted by the superradiant instability of a given field must allow hairy generalizations with that field.

  7. Grain alignment in starless cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, T. J.; Bagley, M. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Krejny, M. [Cree Inc., 4600 Silicon Dr., Durham, NC (United States); Andersson, B.-G. [SOFIA Science Center, USRA, Moffett Field, CA (United States); Bastien, P., E-mail: tjj@astro.umn.edu [Centre de recherche en astrophysique du Qubec and Dpartment de Physique, Universit de Montral, Montral (Canada)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present near-IR polarimetry data of background stars shining through a selection of starless cores taken in the K band, probing visual extinctions up to A{sub V}?48. We find that P{sub K}/?{sub K} continues to decline with increasing A{sub V} with a power law slope of roughly ?0.5. Examination of published submillimeter (submm) polarimetry of starless cores suggests that by A{sub V}?20 the slope for P versus ? becomes ??1, indicating no grain alignment at greater optical depths. Combining these two data sets, we find good evidence that, in the absence of a central illuminating source, the dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores with no internal radiation source cease to become aligned with the local magnetic field at optical depths greater than A{sub V}?20. A simple model relating the alignment efficiency to the optical depth into the cloud reproduces the observations well.

  8. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  9. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  10. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  11. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  12. Dynamical friction in constant density cores: a failure of the Chandrasekhar formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Read; Tobias Goerdt; Ben Moore; A. P. Pontzen; Joachim Stadel; George Lake

    2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Using analytic calculations and N-body simulations we show that in constant density (harmonic) cores, sinking satellites undergo an initial phase of very rapid (super-Chandrasekhar) dynamical friction, after which they experience no dynamical friction at all. For density profiles with a central power law profile of log-slope, $-\\alpha$, the infalling satellite heats the background and causes $\\alpha$ to decrease. For $\\alpha < 0.5$ initially, the satellite generates a small central constant density core and stalls as in the $\\alpha = 0$ case. We discuss some astrophysical applications of our results to decaying satellite orbits, galactic bars and mergers of supermassive black hole binaries. In a companion paper we show that a central constant density core can provide a natural solution to the timing problem for Fornax's globular clusters.

  13. Simulations of black hole-neutron star binary coalescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William H. Lee

    2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the results of dynamical simulations of the coalescence of black hole-neutron star binaries. We use a Newtonian Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics code, and include the effects of gravitational radiation back reaction with the quadrupole approximation for point masses, and compute the gravitational radiation waveforms. We assume a polytropic equation of state determines the structure of the neutron star in equilibrium, and use an ideal gas law to follow the dynamical evolution. Three main parameters are explored: (i) The distribution of angular momentum in the system in the initial configuration, namely tidally locked systems vs. irrotational binaries; (ii) The stiffness of the equation of state through the value of the adiabatic index Gamma (ranging from Gamma=5/3 to Gamma=3); (iii) The initial mass ratio q=M(NS)/M(BH). We find that it is the value of Gamma that determines how the coalescence takes place, with immediate and complete tidal disruption for Gamma less than 2, while the core of the neutron star survives and stays in orbit around the black hole for Gamma=3. This result is largely independent of the initial mass ratio and spin configuration, and is reflected directly in the gravitational radiation signal. For a wide range of mass ratios, massive accretion disks are formed (M(disk)~0.2 solar masses), with baryon-free regions that could possibly give rise to gamma ray bursts.

  14. Quasilinear Carbon Transport In An Impurity Hole Plasma In LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikkelsen, David R. [PPPL; Tanaka, K. [NIFS; Nunami, M. [NIFS; Watanabe, T-H. [Nagoya University; Sugama, H. [NIFS; Yoshinuma, M. [NIFS; Suzuki, Y. [NIFS; Goto, M. [NIFS; Morita, S. [NIFS; Wieland, B. [NIFS; Yamada, I. [NIFS; Yashura, R. [NIFS; Akiyama, T. [NIFS; Pablant, Novimir A. [PPPL

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive electrostatic gyrokinetic linear stability calculations for ion-scale microinstabilities in an LHD plasma with an ion-ITB and carbon "impurity hole" are used to make quasilinear estimates of particle flux to explore whether microturbulence can explain the observed outward carbon fluxes that flow "up" the impurity density gradient. The ion temperature is not stationary in the ion-ITB phase of the simulated discharge, during which the core carbon density decreases continuously. To fully sample these varying conditions the calculations are carried out at three radial locations and four times. The plasma parameter inputs are based on experimentally measured profiles of electron and ion temperature, as well as electron and carbon density. The spectroscopic line-average ratio of hydrogen and helium densities is used to set the density of these species. Three ion species (H,He,C) and the electrons are treated kinetically, including collisions. Electron instability drive does enhance the growth rate significantly, but the most unstable modes have characteristics of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in all cases. As the carbon density gradient is scanned between the measured value and zero, the quasilinear carbon flux is invariably inward when the carbon density profile is hollow, so turbulent transport due to the instabilities considered here does not explain the observed outward flux of impurities in impurity hole plasmas. The stiffness of the quasilinear ion heat flux is found to be 1.7-2.3, which is lower than several estimates in tokamaks.

  15. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion. -- II. Core Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, D; Goldsmith, P F; Langer, W D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have surveyed submillimeter continuum emission from relatively quiescent regions in the Orion molecular cloud to determine how the core mass function in a high mass star forming region compares to the stellar initial mass function. Such studies are important for understanding the evolution of cores to stars, and for comparison to formation processes in high and low mass star forming regions. We used the SHARC II camera on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory telescope to obtain 350 \\micron data having angular resolution of about 9 arcsec, which corresponds to 0.02 pc at the distance of Orion. Our analysis combining dust continuum and spectral line data defines a sample of 51 Orion molecular cores with masses ranging from 0.1 \\Ms to 46 \\Ms and a mean mass of 9.8 \\Ms, which is one order of magnitude higher than the value found in typical low mass star forming regions, such as Taurus. The majority of these cores cannot be supported by thermal pressure or turbulence, and are probably supercritical.They are th...

  16. Kansalliskirjasto Dublin Core Dublin Core metadataformaatin suomalainen versio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    - Medical Subject Headings 3. DDC - Dewey Decimal Classification 4. LCC - Library of Congress Classification: - Merkintjrjestelmt: #12;Kansalliskirjasto Dublin Core 2(6) 1. LCSH - Library of Congress Subject Headings 2. MESH 5. UDC - Universal Decimal Classification Suomalaiset merkintjrjestelmt katso sfs_aihe.pdf Kuvaus

  17. Core Values | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCool MagneticCoos BayCore FileCore

  18. Laminated grid and web magnetic cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sefko, John (Monroeville, PA); Pavlik, Norman M. (Plum Borough, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laminated magnetic core characterized by an electromagnetic core having core legs which comprise elongated apertures and edge notches disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of the legs, such as high reluctance cores with linear magnetization characteristics for high voltage shunt reactors. In one embodiment the apertures include compact bodies of microlaminations for more flexibility and control in adjusting permeability and/or core reluctance.

  19. Rotating embedded black holes: Entropy and Hawking's radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng Ibohal

    2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we derive a class of rotating embedded black holes. Then we study Hawking's radiation effects on these embedded black holes. The surface gravity, entropy and angular velocity are given for each of these black holes.

  20. Black Holes at the LHC: Progress since 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Seong Chan [FRDP, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the recent noticeable progresses in black hole physics focusing on the up-coming super-collider, the LHC. We discuss the classical formation of black holes by particle collision, the greybody factors for higher dimensional rotating black holes, the deep implications of black hole physics to the 'energy-distance' relation, the security issues of the LHC associated with black hole formation and the newly developed Monte-Carlo generators for black hole events.

  1. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, J.M.

    1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

  2. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John M. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  3. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INLs LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  4. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David S.; Myers, Gregory J.

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  5. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David S. (New York, NY); Myers, Gregory J. (Cornwall, NY)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  6. Topological Black Holes in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kowalski-Glikman; D. Nowak-Szczepaniak

    2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the black hole solutions with horizons of non-trivial topology and investigate their properties in the framework of an approach to quantum gravity being an extension of Bohm's formulation of quantum mechanics. The solutions we found tend asymptotically (for large $r$) to topological black holes. We also analyze the thermodynamics of these space-times.

  7. Primordial black holes and asteroid danger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Shatskiy

    2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Probability for a primordial black hole to invade the Kuiper belt was calculated. We showed that primordial black holes of certain masses can significantly change asteroids' orbits. These events may result in disasters, local for our solar system and global for the Earth (like the Tunguska meteorite). We also estimated how often such events occur.

  8. Dynamics of Primordial Black Hole Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; K. Jedamzik

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical investigation of the gravitational collapse of horizon-size density fluctuations to primordial black holes (PBHs) during the radiation-dominated phase of the Early Universe. The collapse dynamics of three different families of initial perturbation shapes, imposed at the time of horizon crossing, is computed. The perturbation threshold for black hole formation, needed for estimations of the cosmological PBH mass function, is found to be $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 0.7$ rather than the generally employed $\\delta_{\\rm c} \\approx 1/3$, if $\\delta$ is defined as $\\Delta M/\\mh$, the relative excess mass within the initial horizon volume. In order to study the accretion onto the newly formed black holes, we use a numerical scheme that allows us to follow the evolution for long times after formation of the event horizon. In general, small black holes (compared to the horizon mass at the onset of the collapse) give rise to a fluid bounce that effectively shuts off accretion onto the black hole, while large ones do not. In both cases, the growth of the black hole mass owing to accretion is insignificant. Furthermore, the scaling of black hole mass with distance from the formation threshold, known to occur in near-critical gravitational collapse, is demonstrated to apply to primordial black hole formation.

  9. Black holes cannot support conformal scalar hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Zannias

    1994-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the only static asymptotically flat non-extrema black hole solution of the Einstein-conformally invariant scalar field equations having the scalar field bounded on the horizon, is the Schwarzschild one. Thus black holes cannot be endowed with conformal scalar hair of finite length.

  10. Strings, black holes, and quantum information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We find multiple relations between extremal black holes in string theory and 2- and 3-qubit systems in quantum information theory. We show that the entropy of the axion-dilaton extremal black hole is related to the concurrence of a 2-qubit state, whereas the entropy of the STU black holes, Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) as well as non-BPS, is related to the 3-tangle of a 3-qubit state. We relate the 3-qubit states with the string theory states with some number of D-branes. We identify a set of large black holes with the maximally entangled Greenberger, Horne, Zeilinger (GHZ) class of states and small black holes with separable, bipartite, and W states. We sort out the relation between 3-qubit states, twistors, octonions, and black holes. We give a simple expression for the entropy and the area of stretched horizon of small black holes in terms of a norm and 2-tangles of a 3-qubit system. Finally, we show that the most general expression for the black hole and black ring entropy in N=8 supergravity/M theory, which is given by the famous quartic Cartan E{sub 7(7)} invariant, can be reduced to Cayley's hyperdeterminant describing the 3-tangle of a 3-qubit state.

  11. Quantum Entropy of Charged Rotating Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss a method for obtaining the one-loop quantum corrections to the tree-level entropy for a charged Kerr black hole. Divergences which appear can be removed by renormalization of couplings in the tree-level gravitational action in a manner similar to that for a static black hole.

  12. Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking Materials for Blue Electrophosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Phosphine Oxide Based Electron Transporting and Hole Blocking...

  13. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues....

  14. T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site...

  15. Can Superconducting Cosmic Strings Piercing Seed Black Holes Generate Supermassive Black Holes in the Early Universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake, Matthew J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a large number of supermassive black holes at redshifts $z> 6$, when the Universe was only nine hundred million years old, has raised the fundamental question of how such massive compact objects could form in a (cosmologically) short time interval. Each of the proposed standard scenarios for black hole formation, involving rapid accretion of seed black holes, or black hole mergers, faces severe theoretical difficulties in explaining the short time formation of supermassive objects. In the present Letter, we propose an alternative scenario for the formation of supermassive black holes in the early Universe in which energy transfer from superconducting cosmic strings, piercing small seed black holes, is the main physical process leading to rapid mass increase. The increase in mass of a primordial seed black hole pierced by two antipodal strings is estimated and it is shown that this increases linearly in time. Due to the high energy transfer rate from the cosmic strings, we find that supermassi...

  16. Measurement and analysis of fractures in vertical, slant, and horizontal core, with examples from the Mesaverde formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Hill, R.E. (CER Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimum analysis of natural fracture characteristics and distributions in reservoirs requires conscientious supervision of coring operations, on-site core processing, careful layout and marketing of the core, and detailed measurement of fracture characteristics. Natural fractures provide information on the in situ permeability system, and coring-induced fractures provide data on the in situ stresses. Fracture data derived from vertical core should include fracture height, type and location of fracture terminations with respect to lithologic heterogeneity, fracture planatary and roughness, and distribution with depth. Fractures in core from either a vertical or a deviated well will yield information on dip, dip azimuth, strike, mineralization, and the orientation of fractures relative to the in situ stresses. Only measurements of fractures in core from a deviated/horizontal well will provide estimates of fracture spacing and porosity. These data can be graphed and cross-plotted to yield semi-quantitative fracture characteristics for reservoir models. Data on the orientations of fractures relative to each other in unoriented core can be nearly as useful as the absolute orientations of fractures. A deviated pilot hole is recommended for fracture assessment prior to a drilling horizontal production well because it significantly enhances the chances of fracture intersection, and therefore of fracture characterization. 35 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Analysis & Design of Active Inductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rana, Dibyendu

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Inductor DC bus voltage capped at 800 V by bleeder resistor .......... 59 Figure 39: Circuit diagram for experimental setup ........................................................ 60 Figure 40: Experimental setup for 200 W, three phase diode rectifier... ................................................................................. 79 Figure 57: Thyristor based CSI with Active Inductor emulating the reactor ................. 80 Figure 58: Relative core losses at 20 kHz. Reprinted with permission from [58] ......... 86 Figure 59: Nanocrystalline core (Vitoperm) core loss...

  18. Black hole and holographic dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the connection between black hole and holographic dark energy. We examine the issue of the equation of state (EOS) for holographic energy density as a candidate for the dark energy carefully. This is closely related to the EOS for black hole, because the holographic dark energy comes from the black hole energy density. In order to derive the EOS of a black hole, we may use its dual (quantum) systems. Finally, a regular black hole without the singularity is introduced to describe an accelerating universe inside the cosmological horizon. Inspired by this, we show that the holographic energy density with the cosmological horizon as the IR cutoff leads to the dark energy-dominated universe with $\\omega_{\\rm \\Lambda}=-1$.

  19. Quantum Black Hole Model and Hawking's Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Berezin

    1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The black hole model with a self-gravitating charged spherical symmetric dust thin shell as a source is considered. The Schroedinger-type equation for such a model is derived. This equation appeared to be a finite differences equation. A theory of such an equation is developed and general solution is found and investigated in details. The discrete spectrum of the bound state energy levels is obtained. All the eigenvalues appeared to be infinitely degenerate. The ground state wave functions are evaluated explicitly. The quantum black hole states are selected and investigated. It is shown that the obtained black hole mass spectrum is compatible with the existence of Hawking's radiation in the limit of low temperatures both for large and nearly extreme Reissner-Nordstrom black holes. The above mentioned infinite degeneracy of the mass (energy) eigenvalues may appeared helpful in resolving the well known information paradox in the black hole physics.

  20. Black Hole Thermodynamics Based on Unitary Evolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Yu-Lei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we try to construct black hole thermodynamics based on the fact that, the formation and evaporation of a black hole can be described by quantum unitary evolutions. First, we show that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy $S_{BH}$ cannot be a Boltzmann or thermal entropy. To confirm this statement, we show that the original black hole's "first law" cannot be treated as the first law of thermodynamics formally, due to some missing metric perturbations caused by matter. Then, by including those (quantum) metric perturbations, we show that the black hole formation and evaporation can be described in a unitary manner effectively, through a quantum channel between the exterior and interior of the event horizon. In this way, the paradoxes of information loss and firewall can be resolved effectively. Finally, we show that black hole thermodynamics can be constructed in an ordinary way, by constructing statistical mechanics.

  1. Fourier Analysis of the BTZ Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian M. Tolfree

    2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we extend our previous work regarding the role of the Fourier transformation in bulk to boundary mappings to include the BTZ black hole. We follow standard procedures for modifying Fourier Transformations to accommodate quotient spaces and arrive at a bulk to boundary mapping in a black hole background. We show that this mapping is consistent with known results and lends a new insight into the AdS/CFT duality. We find that the micro-states corresponding to the entropy of a bulk scalar field are the Fourier coefficients on the boundary, which transform under the principal series representation of $SL(2,R)$. Building upon this we present a toy model to analyze the implications of this for the origin of black hole entropy. We find that the black hole micro-states live on the boundary and correspond to the possible emission modes of the black hole

  2. An electromagnetic black hole made of metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Qiang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, a black hole is a region of space with huge gravitational field in the means of general relativity, which absorbs everything hitting it including the light. In general relativity, the presence of matter-energy densities results in the motion of matter propagating in a curved spacetime1, which is similar to the electromagnetic-wave propagation in a curved space and in an inhomogeneous metamaterial2. Hence one can simulate the black hole using electromagnetic fields and metamaterials. In a recent theoretical work, an optical black hole has been proposed based on metamaterials, in which the numerical simulations showed a highly efficient light absorption3. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of electromagnetic black hole in the microwave frequencies. The proposed black hole is composed of non-resonant and resonant metamaterial structures, which can absorb electromagnetic waves efficiently coming from all directions due to the local control of electromagnetic fields. Hence the elect...

  3. Fermionic greybody factors in dilaton black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahed Abedi; Hessamaddin Arfaei

    2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the question of emission of fermions in the process of dilaton black hole evolution and its characters for different dilaton coupling constants $\\alpha$ is studied. The main quantity of interest, the greybody factors are calculated both numerically and in analytical approximation. The dependence of rates of evaporation and behaviour on the dilaton coupling constant is analyzed. Having calculated the greybody factors we are able to address the question of the final fate of the dilaton black hole. For that we also need to make dynamical treatment of the solution by considering the backreaction which will show a crucial effect on the final result. We find a transition line in $(Q/M, \\alpha)$ plane that separates the two regimes for the fate of the black hole, decay regime and extremal regime. In the decay regime the black hole completely evaporates, while in the extremal regime the black hole approaches the extremal limit by radiation and becomes stable.

  4. Black holes in Asymptotically Safe Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saueressig, Frank; D'Odorico, Giulio; Vidotto, Francesca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes are among the most fascinating objects populating our universe. Their characteristic features, encompassing spacetime singularities, event horizons, and black hole thermodynamics, provide a rich testing ground for quantum gravity ideas. In this note we observe that the renormalization group improved Schwarzschild black holes constructed by Bonanno and Reuter within Weinberg's asymptotic safety program constitute a prototypical example of a Hayward geometry used to model non-singular black holes within quantum gravity phenomenology. Moreover, they share many features of a Planck star: their effective geometry naturally incorporates the one-loop corrections found in the effective field theory framework, their Kretschmann scalar is bounded, and the black hole singularity is replaced by a regular de Sitter patch. The role of the cosmological constant in the renormalization group improvement process is briefly discussed.

  5. Radial illite On the cores of the Soultz well EPS1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    reservoir, we propose to study the nature of palæo-circulations. Several outcrops have been visited are quarries, abandoned or with activities. Six samples have been also collected among the granite cores

  6. The balance of power: accretion and feedback in stellar mass black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fender, Rob

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review we discuss the population of stellar-mass black holes in our galaxy and beyond, which are the extreme endpoints of massive star evolution. In particular we focus on how we can attempt to balance the available accretion energy with feedback to the environment via radiation, jets and winds, considering also possible contributions to the energy balance from black hole spin and advection. We review quantitatively the methods which are used to estimate these quantities, regardless of the details of the astrophysics close to the black hole. Once these methods have been outlined, we work through an outburst of a black hole X-ray binary system, estimating the flow of mass and energy through the different accretion rates and states. While we focus on feedback from stellar mass black holes in X-ray binary systems, we also consider the applicability of what we have learned to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. As an important control sample we also review the coupling between accretion an...

  7. Scientific Core Hole Valles Caldera No. 2B (VC-2B), New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dennis L. Nielson, Pisto Larry, C.W. Criswell, R. Gribble, K. Meeker, J.A. Musgrave, T. Smith and D. Wilson Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Santa Rosa, CA; 19890101 Published...

  8. A Core Hole in the Southwestern Moat of the Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and fluid chemistry. Authors Harold A. Wollenberg, Michael L. Sorey, Christopher D. Farrar, Art F. White, S. Flexser and L.C. Bartel Published Journal EOS, Transactions American...

  9. RosettaHoles: Rapid assessment of protein core packing for structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, David

    , and validation Will Sheffler1 and David Baker2 * 1 Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington of this article. Grant sponsors: Genome Training Grant and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. *Correspondence to: David Baker, University of Washington, J 567 Health Sciences Bldg, Box 357350, Seattle, WA. E

  10. Scientific Core Hole Valles Caldera No. 2B (VC-2B), New Mexico: Drilling

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformation Evaluation,Schmid SiliconSchwenksville,

  11. Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes VC-1 and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd JumpInformationScotts Corners, NewSeegerSelden, NewVC-2A, Valles

  12. A Core Hole in the Southwestern Moat of the Long Valley Caldera: Early

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe CommissionEnergyEnergySeismicGeothermalResults | Open

  13. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island, Florida: Energy Resources Jump enMexico

  14. Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompanyPCNInformationLumiledsEconomic

  15. Microthermometry of Fluid Inclusions from the VC-1 Core Hole in Valles

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne,Caldera, New Mexico | Open

  16. Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump|Information Dobson,Field |

  17. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Benoit, 1984) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump|Information Dobson,Field

  18. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lachenbruch, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump|Information

  19. Core Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump|InformationInformation

  20. Core Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands

  1. Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Fawcett, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands2007) | Open Energy Information

  2. Young Collapsed Supernova Remnants: Similarities and Differences in Neutron Stars, Black Holes, and More Exotic Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Graber

    2000-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Type Ia supernovae are thought to explode completely, leaving no condensed remnant, only an expanding shell. Other types of supernovae are thought to involve core collapse and are expected to leave a condensed remnant, which could be either a neutron star or a black hole, or just possibly, something more exotic, such as a quark orstrange star, a naked singularity, a frozen star, a wormhole or a red hole. It has proven surprisingly difficult to determine which type of condensed remnant has been formed in those cases where the diagnostic highly regular pulsar signature of a neutron star is absent. We consider possible observational differences between the two standard candidates, as well as the more speculative alternatives. We classify condensed remnants according to whether they do or do not possess three major features: 1)a hard surface, 2)an event horizon, and 3)a singularity. Black holes and neutron stars differ on all three criteria. Some of the less frequently considered alternatives are "intermediate," in the sense that they possess some of the traits of a black hole and some of the traits of a neutron star. This possibility makes distinguishing the various possibilities even more difficult.

  3. Cretaceous shallow drilling, US Western Interior: Core research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, M.A.

    1993-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is a continuing multidisciplinary study of middle to Upper Cretaceous marine carbonate and clastic rocks in the Utah-Colorado-Kansas corridor of the old Cretaceous seaway that extended from the Gulf Coast to the Arctic during maximum Cretaceous transgressions. It is collaborative between in the US Geological Survey (W.E. Dean, P.I.) and University researchers led by The Pennsylvania State University(M.A. Arthur, P.I.) and funded by DOE and the USGS, in part. Research focusses on the Greenhom, Niobrara and lower Pierre Shale units and their equivalents, combining biostratigraphic/paleoecologic studies, inorganic, organic and stable isotopic geochemical studies, mineralogical investigations and high-resolution geophysical logging. This research requires unweathered samples and continuous smooth exposures'' in the form of cores from at least 4 relatively shallow reference holes (i.e. < 1000m) in transect from east to west across the basin. The major initial effort was recovery in Year 1 of the project of continuous cores from each site in the transect. This drilling provided samples and logs of strata ranging from pelagic sequences that contain organic-carbon-rich marine source rocks to nearshore coal-bearing units. This transect also will provide information on the extent of thermal maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in organic-carbon-rich strata along a burial gradient.

  4. EARLY EVOLUTION OF PRESTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horedt, G. P., E-mail: g.horedt@online.de [Kronwinkler 50, D-81245, Munich (Germany)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prestellar cores are approximated by singular polytropic spheres. Their early evolution is studied analytically with a Bondi-like scheme. The considered approximation is meaningful for polytropic exponents {gamma} between 0 and 6/5, implying radial power-law density profiles between r {sup -1} and r {sup -2.5}. Gravitationally unstable Jeans and Bonnor-Ebert masses differ at most by a factor of 3.25. Tidally stable prestellar cores must have a mean density contrast {approx}> 8 with respect to the external parent cloud medium. The mass-accretion rate relates to the cube of equivalent sound speed, as in Shu's seminal paper. The prestellar masses accreted over 10{sup 5} years cover the whole stellar mass spectrum; they are derived in simple closed form, depending only on the polytropic equation of state. The stellar masses that can be formed via strict conservation of angular momentum are at most of the order of a brown dwarf.

  5. Gravitational waves versus black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevor W. Marshall

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that, in order for the gravitational field to be propagated as a wave, it is necessary for it to satisfy a further set of field equations, in addition to those of Einstein and Hilbert, and these equations mean there is a preferred coordinate frame, called the Global Inertial Frame, giving rise to a unique metric . The implication is that a true gravitational field is not compatible with Einstein's Principle of Equivalence, which is in contradiction with his other fundamental concept of locality. The additional field equations ensure that gravitational collapse does not go below the Schwarzschild radius, thereby excluding the possibility of singular solutions (black holes) of the Einstein-Hilbert equations. Such solutions would also violate Einstein's locality principle.

  6. Holes in the ghost condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krotov, D. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Moscow State University, Department of Physics, Vorobjevy Gory, Moscow, 119899 (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, B. Cheremushkinskaya, 25, Moscow, 117259 (Russian Federation); Rebbi, C. [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Rubakov, V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary prospect 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Zakharov, V. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Physik, Foeringer Ring 6, 80805, Munichn (Germany)

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recently proposed model of 'ghost condensation', spatially homogeneous states may mix, via tunneling, with inhomogeneous states which are somewhat similar to bubbles in the theory of false vacuum decay, the corresponding bubble nucleation rate being exponentially sensitive to the ultraviolet completion of the model. The conservation of energy and charge requires that the energy density is negative and the field is strongly unstable in a part of the nucleated bubble. Unlike in the theory of false vacuum decay, this region does not expand during subsequent real-time evolution. In the outer part, positive energy outgoing waves develop, which eventually form shocks. Behind the outgoing waves and away from the bubble center, the background settles down to its original value. The outcome of the entire process is thus a microscopic region of negative energy and strong field - 'hole in the ghost condensate' - plus a collection of outgoing waves (particles of the ghost condensate field) carrying away finite energy.

  7. Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.

    1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference. This pump is used in nuclear fission reactors. 19 figs.

  8. False Vacuum Lumps with the Fermionic Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Hosotani; Ramin G. Daghigh

    2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable gravitating lumps with a false vacuum core surrounded by the true vacuum in a scalar field potential exist in the presence of fermions at the core. These objects may exist in the universe at various scales.

  9. Slim Holes At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes 2OpenMaui

  10. Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

    2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by of a mile toward the north and is located over mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

  11. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a simulant fluid to match the dynamics of fuel pebbles andfuel pebbles through reactor cores with and without coupled fluid

  12. Challenges for coring deep permafrost on earth and mars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfiffner, Susan Marie [ORNL; Onstott, Tullis [Princeton University; Ruskeeniemi, T [Geological Survey of Finland; Talikka, M [Geological Survey of Finland; Bakermans, Corien [Michigan State University, East Lansing; McGown, Daniel [Princeton University; Chan, E. [Princeton University; Johnson, Adam [Indiana University; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Le Puil, M [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Difurio, Sarah A [ORNL; Pratt, L.M. [Indiana University; Stotler, R [University of Waterloo, Canada; Frape, S [University of Waterloo, Canada; Telling, J [University of Toronto; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood [University of Toronto; Neill, I [Wolfden Resources, Inc., Ontario, Canada; Zerbin, B [Major Drilling Group International, Inc., Manitoba, Canada

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scientific drilling expedition to the High Lake region of Nunavut, Canada, was recently completed with the goals of collecting samples and delineating gradients in salinity, gas composition, pH, pe, and microbial abundance in a 400 m thick permafrost zone and accessing the underlying pristine subpermafrost brine. With a triple-barrel wireline tool and the use of stringent quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) protocols, 200 m of frozen, Archean, mafic volcanic rock was collected from the lower boundary that separates the permafrost layer and subpermafrost saline water. Hot water was used to remove cuttings and prevent the drill rods from freezing in place. No cryopegs were detected during penetration through the permafrost. Coring stopped at the 535 m depth, and the drill water was bailed from the hole while saline water replaced it. Within 24 hours, the borehole iced closed at 125 m depth due to vapor condensation from atmospheric moisture and, initially, warm water leaking through the casing, which blocked further access. Preliminary data suggest that the recovered cores contain viable anaerobic microorganisms that are not contaminants even though isotopic analyses of the saline borehole water suggests that it is a residue of the drilling brine used to remove the ice from the upper, older portion of the borehole. Any proposed coring mission to Mars that seeks to access subpermafrost brine will not only require borehole stability but also a means by which to generate substantial heating along the borehole string to prevent closure of the borehole from condensation of water vapor generated by drilling.

  13. FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: core-barrel vibra-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: core-barrel vibra- tions, in-core neutron noise, shell- mode vibrations CALCULATION OF THE NEUTRON NOISE INDUCED BY SHELL-MODE CORE-BARREL VIBRATIONS IN A 1-D, TWO-GROUP, TWO-REGION SLAB REACTOR MODEL CARL SUNDE,* CHRISTOPHE DEMAZI?RE, and IMRE PÁZSIT Chalmers University of Technology

  14. UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team MINUTES November 19, 2012 Regents Room, Chapman Hall, 10 Strategic Planning Core team with oversight, coordination, and providing campus leadership with strategic strategic planning framework. c. Distinguished Core Team from Operational teams (Functional and Thematic). 4

  15. Thermodynamics of Dyonic Lifshitz Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Zingg

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes with asymptotic anisotropic scaling are conjectured to be gravity duals of condensed matter system close to quantum critical points with non-trivial dynamical exponent z at finite temperature. A holographic renormalization procedure is presented that allows thermodynamic potentials to be defined for objects with both electric and magnetic charge in such a way that standard thermodynamic relations hold. Black holes in asymptotic Lifshitz spacetimes can exhibit paramagnetic behavior at low temperature limit for certain values of the critical exponent z, whereas the behavior of AdS black holes is always diamagnetic.

  16. Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

  17. Black hole hair in higher dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao Cao; Yi-Xin Chen; Jian-Long Li

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the property of matter in equilibrium with a static, spherically symmetric black hole in D-dimensional spacetime. It requires this kind of matter has an equation of state (\\omega\\equiv p_r/\\rho=-1/(1+2kn), k,n\\in \\mathbb{N}), which seems to be independent of D. However, when we associate this with specific models, some interesting limits on space could be found: (i)(D=2+2kn) while the black hole is surrounded by cosmic strings; (ii)the black hole can be surrounded by linear dilaton field only in 4-dimensional spacetime. In both cases, D=4 is special.

  18. Radion clouds around evaporating black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Kaluza-Klein model, with a matter source associated with Hawking radiation from an evaporating black hole, is used to obtain a simple form for the radion effective potential. The environmental effect generally causes a matter-induced shift of the radion vacuum, resulting in the formation of a radion cloud around the hole. There is an albedo due to the radion cloud, with an energy dependent reflection coefficient that depends upon the size of the extra dimensions and the temperature of the hole.

  19. Electrical Conduction in Native Deoxyribonucleic Acid: Hole Hopping Transfer Mechanism? Zdravko Kutnjak* and Cene Filipic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    Electrical Conduction in Native Deoxyribonucleic Acid: Hole Hopping Transfer Mechanism? Zdravko with the activation energy of 0:9 eV; however, based on the quality of the fits, the hopping ansatz cannot be ruled, and for possible applications in nanoelec- tronic circuit technology [2,5,6]. However, despite inten- sive

  20. Enhanced efficiency of p-type doping by band-offset effect in wurtzite and zinc-blende GaAs/InAs-core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Changsheng; Wang, Jiqing, E-mail: jqwang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn; Lin, Weixian; Mao, Huibing; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Pingxiong [Key Laboratory of Polarized Materials and Devices, East china Normal University, shanghai 200241 (China); Xing, Huaizhong [Department of Applied Physics, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using first principles calculation based on density-functional theory, we investigated p-type electronic structures and the doping mechanism in wurtzite (WZ) and zinc-blende (ZB) GaAs/InAs-core-shell nanowires (NWs) along the [0001] and [111] directions, respectively. Comparing the doping in WZ and ZB core-shell NWs, we found it is easier and more stable to realize dopant in WZ NWs. Due to the type I band-offset, p-type doping in the GaAs-core of GaAs{sub core}/InAs{sub shell} for both WZ and ZB NWs makes that the valence band-edge electrons in the InAs-shell can spontaneously transfer to the impurity states, forming one-dimensional hole gas. In particular, this process accompanies with a reverse transition in WZ core-shell nanowire due to the existence of antibonding and bonding states.

  1. Thermodynamics of Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole: thermal stability of Nariai black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study thermodynamics of the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole in five dimensions by introducing two temperatures based on the standard and Bousso-Hawking normalizations. We use the first-law of thermodynamics to derive thermodynamic quantities. The two temperatures indicate that the Nariai black hole is thermodynamically unstable. However, it seems that black hole thermodynamics favors the standard normalization, and does not favor the Bousso-Hawking normalization.

  2. Functional Partitioning to Optimize End-to-End Performance on Many-core Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Min [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL] [ORNL; Butt, Ali R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)] [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Meng, Fei [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Xiaosong [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL] [ORNL; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling computations on emerging massive-core supercomputers is a daunting task, which coupled with the significantly lagging system I/O capabilities exacerbates applications end-to-end performance. The I/O bottleneck often negates potential performance benefits of assigning additional compute cores to an application. In this paper, we address this issue via a novel functional partitioning (FP) runtime environment that allocates cores to specific application tasks - checkpointing, de-duplication, and scientific data format transformation - so that the deluge of cores can be brought to bear on the entire gamut of application activities. The focus is on utilizing the extra cores to support HPC application I/O activities and also leverage solid-state disks in this context. For example, our evaluation shows that dedicating 1 core on an oct-core machine for checkpointing and its assist tasks using FP can improve overall execution time of a FLASH benchmark on 80 and 160 cores by 43.95% and 41.34%, respectively.

  3. Black hole evolution: I. Supernova-regulated black hole growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubois, Yohan; Silk, Joseph; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Teyssier, Romain

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of a supermassive black hole (BH) is determined by how much gas the host galaxy is able to feed it, which in turn is controlled by the cosmic environment, through galaxy mergers and accretion of cosmic flows that time how galaxies obtain their gas, but also by internal processes in the galaxy, such as star formation and feedback from stars and the BH itself. In this paper, we study the growth of a 10^12 Msun halo at z=2, which is the progenitor of an archetypical group of galaxies at z=0, and of its central BH by means of a high-resolution zoomed cosmological simulation, the Seth simulation. We study the evolution of the BH driven by the accretion of cold gas in the galaxy, and explore the efficiency of the feedback from supernovae (SNe). For a relatively inefficient energy input from SNe, the BH grows at the Eddington rate from early times, and reaches self-regulation once it is massive enough. We find that at early cosmic times z>3.5, efficient feedback from SNe forbids the formation of a settled...

  4. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, John Wesley (Schenectady, NY); Tong, Wei (Clifton Park, NY)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  5. Tucker Wireline Open Hole Wireline Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, M.

    2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tucker Wireline unit ran a suite of open hole logs right behind the RMOTC logging contractor for comparison purposes. The tools included Dual Laterolog, Phased Induction, BHC Sonic, and Density-Porosity.

  6. Towards Black Hole Entropy in Shape Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Herczeg; Vasudev Shyam

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Shape dynamics is classical theory of gravity which agrees with general relativity in many important cases, but possesses different gauge symmetries and constraints. Rather than spacetime diffeomorphism invariance, shape dynamics takes spatial diffeomorphism invariance and spatial Weyl invariance as the fundamental gauge symmetries associated with the gravitational field. Since the area of the event horizon of a black hole transforms under a generic spatial Weyl transformation, there has been some doubt that one can speak sensibly about the thermodynamics of black holes in shape dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to show that by treating the event horizon of a black hole as an interior boundary, one can recover familiar notions of black hole thermodynamics in shape dynamics and define a gauge invariant entropy that agrees with general relativity.

  7. Multipole moments of bumpy black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigeland, Sarah Jane

    General relativity predicts the existence of black holes, compact objects whose spacetimes depend only on their mass, spin, and charge in vacuum (the no-hair theorem). As various observations probe deeper into the strong ...

  8. Hole Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. Total round-trip power loss, coupling efficiency and themicron. Total round-trip power loss and coupling efficiencythe total fractional power loss per round trip, the hole

  9. Black Hole Thermodynamics in Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas R. Mureika; John W. Moffat; Mir Faizal

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the thermodynamics of a non-rotating and rotating black hole in a modified theory of gravity that includes scalar and vector modifications to general relativity, which results in a modified gravitational constant $G = G_N(1+\\alpha)$ and a new gravitational charge $Q = \\sqrt{\\alpha G_N}M$. The influence of the parameter $\\alpha$ alters the non-rotating black hole's lifetime, temperature and entropy profiles from the standard Schwarzschild case. The thermodynamics of a rotating black hole is analyzed and it is shown to possess stable, cold remnants. The thermodynamic properties of a vacuum solution regular at $r=0$ are investigated and the solution without a horizon called a "gray hole" is not expected to possess an information loss problem.

  10. Energy of 4-Dimensional Black Hole, etc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriy Palatnik

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter I suggest possible redefinition of mass density, not depending on speed of the mass element, which leads to a more simple stress-energy for an object. I calculate energy of black hole.

  11. Anosov maps with rectangular holes. Nonergodic cases.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingenier'ia. Universidad de la Rep'ublica C.C. 30, Montevideo, Uruguay E­mail: roma@fing.edu.uy; Fax: (598 Partially supported by CONICYT (Uruguay). 1 #12; Running head: Anosov maps with rectangular holes Address

  12. Horizon Operator Approach to Black Hole Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. 't Hooft

    1994-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The $S$-matrix Ansatz for the construction of a quantum theory of black holes is further exploited. We first note that treating the metric tensor $g_{\\m\

  13. Topological Black Holes -- Outside Looking In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the general mathematical construction and physical picture of topological black holes, which are black holes whose event horizons are surfaces of non-trivial topology. The construction is carried out in an arbitrary number of dimensions, and includes all known special cases which have appeared before in the literature. I describe the basic features of massive charged topological black holes in $(3+1)$ dimensions, from both an exterior and interior point of view. To investigate their interiors, it is necessary to understand the radiative falloff behaviour of a given massless field at late times in the background of a topological black hole. I describe the results of a numerical investigation of such behaviour for a conformally coupled scalar field. Significant differences emerge between spherical and higher genus topologies.

  14. Spacetime constraints on accreting black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garofalo, David [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California 91109 (United States)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spin dependence of accretion onto rotating Kerr black holes using analytic techniques. In its linear regime, angular momentum transport in MHD turbulent accretion flow involves the generation of radial magnetic field connecting plasma in a differentially rotating flow. We take a first principles approach, highlighting the constraint that limits the generation and amplification of radial magnetic fields, stemming from the transfer of energy from mechanical to magnetic form. Because the energy transferred in magnetic form is ultimately constrained by gravitational potential energy or Killing energy, the spin dependence of the latter allows us to derive spin-dependent constraints on the success of the accreting plasma to expel its angular momentum. We find an inverse relationship between this ability and black hole spin. If this radial magnetic field generation forms the basis for angular momentum transfer in accretion flows, accretion rates involving Kerr black holes are expected to be lower as the black hole spin increases in the prograde sense.

  15. Scattering map for two black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro P. S. de Moura; Patricio S. Letelier

    1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the motion of light in the gravitational field of two Schwarzschild black holes, making the approximation that they are far apart, so that the motion of light rays in the neighborhood of one black hole can be considered to be the result of the action of each black hole separately. Using this approximation, the dynamics is reduced to a 2-dimensional map, which we study both numerically and analytically. The map is found to be chaotic, with a fractal basin boundary separating the possible outcomes of the orbits (escape or falling into one of the black holes). In the limit of large separation distances, the basin boundary becomes a self-similar Cantor set, and we find that the box-counting dimension decays slowly with the separation distance, following a logarithmic decay law.

  16. Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, William E. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive hot cell access hole decontamination machine. A mobile housing has an opening large enough to encircle the access hole and has a shielding door, with a door opening and closing mechanism, for uncovering and covering the opening. The housing contains a shaft which has an apparatus for rotating the shaft and a device for independently translating the shaft from the housing through the opening and access hole into the hot cell chamber. A properly sized cylindrical pig containing wire brushes and cloth or other disks, with an arrangement for releasably attaching it to the end of the shaft, circumferentially cleans the access hole wall of radioactive contamination and thereafter detaches from the shaft to fall into the hot cell chamber.

  17. Thermodynamics and evaporation of the noncommutative black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2007-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the thermodynamics of the noncommutative black hole whose static picture is similar to that of the nonsingular black hole known as the de Sitter-Schwarzschild black hole. It turns out that the final remnant of extremal black hole is a thermodynamically stable object. We describe the evaporation process of this black hole by using the noncommutativity-corrected Vaidya metric. It is found that there exists a close relationship between thermodynamic approach and evaporation process.

  18. Spacetime noncommutative effect on black hole as particle accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikun Ding; Changqing Liu; Qian Guo

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spacetime noncommutative effect on black hole as particle accelerators and, find that particle falling from infinity with zero velocity cannot collide with unbound energy when the noncommutative Kerr black hole is exactly extremal. Our results also show that the bigger of the spinning black hole's mass is, the higher of center of mass energy that the particles obtain. For small and medium noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole, the collision energy depends on the black holes' mass.

  19. Light curve of a source orbiting around a black hole: A fitting-formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, analytical fitting-formula for a photometric light curve of a source of light orbiting around a black hole is presented. The formula is applicable for sources on a circular orbit with radius smaller than 45 gravitational radii from the black hole. This range of radii requires gravitational focusation of light rays and the Doppler effect to be taken into account with care. The fitting-formula is therefore useful for modelling the X-ray variability of inner regions in active galactic nuclei.

  20. Slim Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes 2 slim holes

  1. Comment on "Black holes constrain varying constants"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Flambaum

    2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper [DDL] claims that the increase of the proton electric charge e leads to a (forbidden) decrease of black hole entropy, therefore, possible evidence for variation of $\\alpha=e^2/\\hbar c$ [alpha] must be interpreted as a decrease of the speed of light. We argue that purely theoretical consideration of black holes possibly cannot give any model-independent limitations on variation of fundamental constants.

  2. Fractionated Branes and Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinec, Emil J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining a variety of results in string theory and general relativity, a picture of the black hole interior is developed wherein spacetime caps off at an inner horizon, and the inter-horizon region is occupied by a Hagedorn gas of a very low tension state of fractionated branes. This picture leads to natural resolutions of a variety of puzzles concerning quantum black holes. Gravity Research Foundation 2015 Fourth Prize Award for Essays on Gravitation.

  3. Fractionated Branes and Black Hole Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emil J. Martinec

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining a variety of results in string theory and general relativity, a picture of the black hole interior is developed wherein spacetime caps off at an inner horizon, and the inter-horizon region is occupied by a Hagedorn gas of a very low tension state of fractionated branes. This picture leads to natural resolutions of a variety of puzzles concerning quantum black holes. Gravity Research Foundation 2015 Fourth Prize Award for Essays on Gravitation.

  4. Local temperature for dynamical black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward; R. Di Criscienzo; M. Nadalini; L. Vanzo; S. Zerbini

    2008-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A local Hawking temperature was recently derived for any future outer trapping horizon in spherical symmetry, using a Hamilton-Jacobi tunneling method, and is given by a dynamical surface gravity as defined geometrically. Descriptions are given of the operational meaning of the temperature, in terms of what observers measure, and its relation to the usual Hawking temperature for static black holes. Implications for the final fate of an evaporating black hole are discussed.

  5. Notes on Black Hole Fluctuations and Backreaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu; Alpan Raval; Sukanya Sinha

    1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In these notes we prepare the ground for a systematic investigation into the issues of black hole fluctuations and backreaction by discussing the formulation of the problem, commenting on possible advantages and shortcomings of existing works, and introducing our own approach via a stochastic semiclassical theory of gravity based on the Einstein-Langevin equation and the fluctuation-dissipation relation for a self-consistent description of metric fluctuations and dissipative dynamics of the black hole with backreaction of its Hawking radiance.

  6. Core Competencies | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy Copy of FINAL SG DemoCore

  7. Core Universities | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCool MagneticCoos BayCore File

  8. Core Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and Heat Islands Jump|Information Dobson, EtCore

  9. The core legion object model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M.; Grimshaw, A. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legion project at the University of Virginia is an architecture for designing and building system services that provide the illusion of a single virtual machine to users, a virtual machine that provides secure shared object and shared name spaces, application adjustable fault-tolerance, improved response time, and greater throughput. Legion targets wide area assemblies of workstations, supercomputers, and parallel supercomputers, Legion tackles problems not solved by existing workstation based parallel processing tools; the system will enable fault-tolerance, wide area parallel processing, inter-operability, heterogeneity, a single global name space, protection, security, efficient scheduling, and comprehensive resource management. This paper describes the core Legion object model, which specifies the composition and functionality of Legion`s core objects-those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects in the Legion system. The object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single global name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects.

  10. The obscuration by dust of most of the growth of supermassive black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejo Martinez-Sansigre; Steve Rawlings; Mark Lacy; Dario Fadda; Francine R. Marleau; Chris Simpson; Chris J. Willott; Matt J. Jarvis

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermassive black holes underwent periods of exponential growth during which we seem them as quasars in the distant Universe. The summed emission from these quasars generates the cosmic X-ray background, the spectrum of which has been used to argue that most black-hole growth is obscured. There are clear examples of obscured black-hole growth in the form of `type-2' quasars, but their numbers are fewer than expected from modelling of the X-ray background. Here we report on the direct detection of a population of distant type-2 quasars which is at least comparable in size to the well-known unobscured type-1 population. We selected objects that have mid-infrared and radio emissions characteristic of quasars, but which are faint at near-infrared and optical wavelengths. This population is responsible for most of the black hole growth in the young Universe and, throughout cosmic history, black-hole growth occurs in the dusty, gas-rich centres of active galaxies.

  11. Black holes at the centers of nearby dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Edward C.; Shahinyan, Karlen; Sugarman, Hannah R.; Vlez, Darik O. [Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Eracleous, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a distance-limited portion of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, we have identified 28 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in nearby (d?80 Mpc) low-mass, low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. The accreting objects at the galaxy centers are expected to be intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) with M{sub BH}?10{sup 6} M{sub ?}. The AGNs were selected using several optical emission-line diagnostics after careful modeling of the continuum present in the spectra. We have limited our survey to objects with spectral characteristics similar to those of Seyfert nuclei, excluding emission-line galaxies with ambiguous spectra that could be powered by stellar processes. Thus, as a set, the host galaxies in our sample are the least massive objects in the very local universe certain to contain central black holes. Our sample is dominated by narrow-line (type 2) AGNs, and it appears to have a much lower fraction of broad-line objects than that observed for luminous, optically selected Seyfert galaxies. Given our focus on the nearest objects included in the SDSS, our survey is more sensitive to low-luminosity emission than previous optical searches for AGNs in low-mass galaxies. The [O iii] ?5007 luminosities of the Seyfert nuclei in our sample have a median value of L{sub 5007}=210{sup 5} L{sub ?} and extend down to ?10{sup 4} L{sub ?}. Using published data for broad-line IMBH candidates, we have derived an [O iii] bolometric correction of log(L{sub bol}/L{sub 5007})=3.00.3, which is significantly lower than values obtained for high-luminosity AGNs. Applying this correction to our sample, we obtain minimum black hole mass estimates that fall mainly in the 10{sup 3} M{sub ?}10{sup 4} M{sub ?} range, which is roughly where the predicted mass functions for different black hole seed formation scenarios overlap the most. In the stellar mass range that includes the bulk of the AGN host galaxies in our sample, we derive a lower limit on the AGN fraction of a few percent, indicating that active nuclei in dwarf galaxies are not as rare as previously thought.

  12. The Revival of White Holes as Small Bangs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alon Retter; Shlomo Heller

    2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Black holes are extremely dense and compact objects from which light cannot escape. There is an overall consensus that black holes exist and many astronomical objects are identified with black holes. White holes were understood as the exact time reversal of black holes, therefore they should continuously throw away material. It is accepted, however, that a persistent ejection of mass leads to gravitational pressure, the formation of a black hole and thus to the "death of while holes". So far, no astronomical source has been successfully tagged a white hole. The only known white hole is the Big Bang which was instantaneous rather than continuous or long-lasting. We thus suggest that the emergence of a white hole, which we name a 'Small Bang', is spontaneous - all the matter is ejected at a single pulse. Unlike black holes, white holes cannot be continuously observed rather their effect can only be detected around the event itself. Gamma ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the universe. Long gamma-ray bursts were connected with supernova eruptions. There is a new group of gamma-ray bursts, which are relatively close to Earth, but surprisingly lack any supernova emission. We propose identifying these bursts with white holes. White holes seem like the best explanation of gamma-ray bursts that appear in voids. We also predict the detection of rare gigantic gamma-ray bursts with energies much higher than typically observed.

  13. active core fluctuations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from few to thousands of seconds. The fundamental processes originating such fractal-like behavior are not yet understood. To untangle the most significant features of...

  14. active region core: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We selected two regions that were not affected too much by any line-of-sight lower temperature emission. We found that the EM had a power law of the form EMpropto Tb,...

  15. Manipulation of emission energy in GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires with radial heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbosa, B. G.; Arakaki, H.; Souza, C. A. de; Pusep, Yu. A. [Instituto de Fisica de So Carlos, Universidade de So Paulo, 13560-970 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoluminescence was studied in GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires (NWs) with different radial heterostructures. We demonstrated that manipulation of the emission energy may be achieved by appropriate choice of the shell structure. The emission at highest energy is generated in the NWs with tunneling thin AlGaAs inner shell and thin GaAs outer shell due to recombination of the photoexcited electrons confined in the outer shell with the holes in the core. Lower energy emission was shown to occur in the NWs with thick outer shell grown in the form of a short-period GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well structure. In this case, the tunneling probability through the multiple quantum wells controls the energy emitted by the NWs. The doping of core results in dominated low energy emission from the GaAs core.

  16. CONSTRAINING INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umbreit, Stefan; Rasio, Frederic A., E-mail: s-umbreit@northwestern.edu, E-mail: rasio@northwestern.edu [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decades after the first predictions of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) in globular clusters (GCs) there is still no unambiguous observational evidence for their existence. The most promising signatures for IMBHs are found in the cores of GCs, where the evidence now comes from the stellar velocity distribution, the surface density profile, and, for very deep observations, the mass-segregation profile near the cluster center. However, interpretation of the data, and, in particular, constraints on central IMBH masses, require the use of detailed cluster dynamical models. Here we present results from Monte Carlo cluster simulations of GCs that harbor IMBHs. As an example of application, we compare velocity dispersion, surface brightness and mass-segregation profiles with observations of the GC M10, and constrain the mass of a possible central IMBH in this cluster. We find that, although M10 does not seem to possess a cuspy surface density profile, the presence of an IMBH with a mass up to 0.75% of the total cluster mass, corresponding to about 600 M{sub Sun }, cannot be excluded. This is also in agreement with the surface brightness profile, although we find it to be less constraining, as it is dominated by the light of giants, causing it to fluctuate significantly. We also find that the mass-segregation profile cannot be used to discriminate between models with and without IMBH. The reason is that M10 is not yet dynamically evolved enough for the quenching of mass segregation to take effect. Finally, detecting a velocity dispersion cusp in clusters with central densities as low as in M10 is extremely challenging, and has to rely on only 20-40 bright stars. It is only when stars with masses down to 0.3 M{sub Sun} are included that the velocity cusp is sampled close enough to the IMBH for a significant increase above the core velocity dispersion to become detectable.

  17. Holographic superconductor in the exact hairy black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Chanyong Park

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the charged black hole of hyperbolic horizon with scalar hair (charged Martinez-Troncoso-Zanelli: CMTZ black hole) as a model of analytic hairy black hole for holographic superconductor. For this purpose, we investigate the second order phase transition between CMTZ and hyperbolic Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-AdS (HRNAdS) black holes. However, this transition unlikely occur. As an analytic treatment for holographic superconductor, we develop superconductor in the bulk and superfluidity on the boundary using the CMTZ black hole below the critical temperature. The presence of charge destroys the condensates around the zero temperature, which is in accord with the thermodynamic analysis of the CMTZ black hole.

  18. Coupled Full-Core Problem witssh VERA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inc Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Core Physics, Inc. Southern States Energy Board City University of New York Texas A&M University Florida State University University of...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: QD core shell heterostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    QD core shell heterostructures Introduction of Prof. David Kelley and UC Merced to SSLS On January 11, 2012, in Energy Efficiency, News, News & Events, Partnership, Solid-State...

  20. Material with core-shell structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Claudia (Rio Rancho, NM); Richard, Monique N. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dehne, Aaron (Maumee, OH); Phillips, Jonathan (Rio Rancho, NM); Stamm, Kimber L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Fanson, Paul T. (Brighton, MI)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  1. The Environmental Impact of Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abraham Loeb

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The supermassive black holes observed at the centers of almost all present-day galaxies, had a profound impact on their environment. I highlight the principle of self-regulation, by which supermassive black holes grow until they release sufficient energy to unbind the gas that feeds them from their host galaxy. This principle explains several observed facts, including the correlation between the mass of a central black hole and the depth of the gravitational potential well of its host galaxy, and the abundance and clustering properties of bright quasars in the redshift interval of z~2-6. At lower redshifts, quasars might have limited the maximum mass of galaxies through the suppression of cooling flows in X-ray clusters. The seeds of supermassive black holes were likely planted in dwarf galaxies at redshifts z>10, through the collapse of massive or supermassive stars. The minimum seed mass can be identified observationally through the detection of gravitational waves from black hole binaries by Advanced LIGO or LISA. Aside from shaping their host galaxies, quasar outflows filled the intergalactic medium with magnetic fields and heavy elements. Beyond the reach of these outflows, the brightest quasars at z>6 have ionized exceedingly large volumes of gas (tens of comoving Mpc) prior to global reionization, and must have suppressed the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function in these volumes before the same occurred through the rest of the universe.

  2. Perturbative String Thermodynamics near Black Hole Horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Mertens; Henri Verschelde; Valentin I. Zakharov

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide further computations and ideas to the problem of near-Hagedorn string thermodynamics near (uncharged) black hole horizons, building upon our earlier work JHEP 1403 (2014) 086. The relevance of long strings to one-loop black hole thermodynamics is emphasized. We then provide an argument in favor of the absence of $\\alpha'$-corrections for the (quadratic) heterotic thermal scalar action in Rindler space. We also compute the large $k$ limit of the cigar orbifold partition functions (for both bosonic and type II superstrings) which allows a better comparison between the flat cones and the cigar cones. A discussion is made on the general McClain-Roth-O'Brien-Tan theorem and on the fact that different torus embeddings lead to different aspects of string thermodynamics. The black hole/string correspondence principle for the 2d black hole is discussed in terms of the thermal scalar. Finally, we present an argument to deal with arbitrary higher genus partition functions, suggesting the breakdown of string perturbation theory (in $g_s$) to compute thermodynamical quantities in black hole spacetimes.

  3. Investigating Dark Energy with Black Hole Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Mersini-Houghton; Adam Kelleher

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The accelerated expansion of the universe is ascribed to the existence of dark energy. Black holes accretion of dark energy induces a mass change proportional to the energy density and pressure of the background dark energy fluid. The time scale during which the mass of black holes changes considerably is too long relative to the age of the universe, thus beyond detection possibilities. We propose to take advantage of the modified black hole masses for exploring the equation of state $w[z]$ of dark energy, by investigating the evolution of supermassive black hole binaries on a dark energy background. Deriving the signatures of dark energy accretion on the evolution of binaries, we find that dark energy imprints on the emitted gravitational radiation and on the changes in the orbital radius of the binary can be within detection limits for certain supermassive black hole binaries. In this talk I describe how binaries can provide a useful tool in obtaining complementary information on the nature of dark energy, based on the work done with A.Kelleher.

  4. Black Holes with Flavors of Quantum Hair?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gia Dvali

    2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that black holes can posses a long-range quantum hair of super-massive tensor fields, which can be detected by Aharonov-Bohm tabletop interference experiments, in which a quantum-hairy black hole, or a remnant particle, passes through the loop of a magnetic solenoid. The long distance effect does not decouple for an arbitrarily high mass of the hair-providing field. Because Kaluza-Klein and String theories contain infinite number of massive tensor fields, we study black holes with quantum Kaluza-Klein hair. We show that in five dimensions such a black hole can be interpreted as a string of `combed' generalized magnetic monopoles, with their fluxes confined along it. For the compactification on a translation-invariant circle, this substructure uncovers hidden flux conservation and quantization of the monopole charges, which constrain the quantum hair of the resulting four-dimensional black hole. For the spin-2 quantum hair this result is somewhat unexpected, since the constituent `magnetic' charges have no `electric' counterparts. Nevertheless, the information about their quantization is encoded in singularity.

  5. Natural thorium isotopes in marine sediment core off Labuan port

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafidz, B. Y.; Asnor, A. S.; Terence, R. C.; Mohamed, C. A. R. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment core was collected from Labuan port and analyzed to determine the radioactivity of thorium (Th) isotopes. The objectives of this study are to determine the possible sources of Th isotopes at Labuan port and estimates the sedimentation rate based on {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The results suggest the {sup 230}Th and {sup 232}Th might be originated from terrestrial sedimentary rock while {sup 228}Th originated by authigenic origin. High ratio value of {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th detected at the top surface sediment indicates the increasing of {sup 230}Th at the recent years which might be contributed from the anthropogenic sources. The sedimentation rate of core sediment from Labuan Port was successfully estimated by using {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The result show high sedimentation rate with 4.67 cm/year indicates rapid deposition occurred at this study area due to the high physical activity at the Labuan port. By assume the constant sedimentation rate at this area; we estimated the age of 142 cm core sediment obtained from Labuan port is 32 years started from 1981 to 2012. This chronology will be used in forthcoming research to investigate the historical profile of anthropogenic activities affecting the Labuan port.

  6. Molecular Line Observations of a Carbon-Chain-Rich Core L492

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya Hirota; Satoshi Yamamoto

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on molecular abundances and distributions in a starless dense core L492. We have found that the abundances of carbon-chain molecules such as CCS, C$_{3}$S, HC$_{3}$N, HC$_{5}$N, and HC$_{7}$N are comparable to those in chemically young dark cloud cores called "carbon-chain--producing regions", such as L1495B, L1521B, L1521E, and TMC-1. This is the first dark cloud core with extremely rich in carbon-chain-molecules that is found outside the Taurus region. In addition, the deuterium fractionation ratios of DNC/HNC and DCO$^{+}$/HCO$^{+}$ are also comparable to those in carbon-chain--producing regions, being significantly lower than those in the evolved prestellar cores such as L1498 and L1544. On the other hand, the abundances of NH$_{3}$ and N$_{2}$H$^{+}$ are systematically higher than those in carbon-chain--producing regions. Our mapping observations reveal that the central hole of molecular distributions, which were reported for CCS and C$^{34}$S in evolved prestellar cores is not significant in L492, indicating that the depletion factor of molecules is not very high. Furthermore, L492 is dynamically more evolved than carbon-chain--producing regions, and the protostellar collapse has started like L1498 and L1544. Therefore, it is likely that the chemical and dynamical evolutionary stage of L492 is intermediate between carbon-chain--producing regions (L1495B, L1521B, L1521E, and TMC-1) and evolved prestellar cores (L1498 and L1544).

  7. Black Hole Chromosphere at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis Anchordoqui; Haim Goldberg

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    If the scale of quantum gravity is near a TeV, black holes will be copiously produced at the LHC. In this work we study the main properties of the light descendants of these black holes. We show that the emitted partons are closely spaced outside the horizon, and hence they do not fragment into hadrons in vacuum but more likely into a kind of quark-gluon plasma. Consequently, the thermal emission occurs far from the horizon, at a temperature characteristic of the QCD scale. We analyze the energy spectrum of the particles emerging from the "chromosphere", and find that the hard hadronic jets are almost entirely suppressed. They are replaced by an isotropic distribution of soft photons and hadrons, with hundreds of particles in the GeV range. This provides a new distinctive signature for black hole events at LHC.

  8. Hole interactions with molecular vibrations on DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Omerzu; M. Licer; T. Mertelj; V. V. Kabanov; D. Mihailovic

    2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a study of the interactions between holes and molecular vibrations on dry DNA using photoinduced infrared absorption spectroscopy. Laser photoexcited (PE) holes are found to have a room-temperature lifetime in excess of 1 ms, clearly indicating the presence of localization. However, from a quantitative model analysis of the frequency shifts of vibrational modes caused by the PE holes, we find the holevibrational coupling constant to be relatively small, 0.2. This interaction leads to a change in the conformational energy of 0.015 eV, which is too small to cause selftrapping at room temperature. We conclude that, at least in the dry (A) form, DNA is best understood in terms of a double chain of coupled quantum dots arising from the pseudo-random chain sequence of base pairs, in which Anderson localization prevents the formation of a metallic state.

  9. Neutrino Majorana Mass from Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Uehara

    2002-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new mechanism to generate the neutrino Majorana mass in TeV-scale gravity models. The black hole violates all non-gauged symmetries and can become the origin of lepton number violating processes. The fluctuation of higher-dimensional spacetime can result in the production of a black hole, which emits 2 neutrinos. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, this process is equivalent to the free propagation of a neutrino with the insertion of the black hole. From this fact, we derive the neutrino Majorana mass. The result is completely consistent with the recently observed evidence of neutrinoless double beta decay. And the obtained neutrino Majorana mass satisfies the constraint from the density of the neutrino dark matter, which affects the cosmic structure formation. Furthermore, we can explain the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays by the Z-burst scenario with it.

  10. Particle-hole symmetry parameters for nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ian Bentley

    2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Two parameters, nu and zeta, motivated by particle-hole symmetry are introduced. These parameters are determined using the number of proton (or neutron) particles and holes counted from neighboring shell closures. The new parameters can be used to evaluate particle-hole and proton-neutron symmetries of adopted B(E2) values, which indicate that both symmetries are approximate for A>100. The combined symmetries motivate empirical fits of binding energies and the energy ratio E(4_1^+)/E(2_1^+). A global binding energy fit consisting of a traditional liquid droplet and one new shell term, comprised of a function of nu and zeta, reproduces the experimental binding energies of 2353 nuclei with an r.m.s. standard deviation of 1.55 MeV.

  11. Turbodrilling in the hot-hole environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert, P.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, geothermal and other types of hot-hole drilling have presented what seemed to be insurmountable barriers to efficient and extended use of downhole drilling motors, particularly those containing elastomeric bearing or motor components. Typical temperatures of 350 to 700/sup 0/F (177 to 371/sup 0/C) damage the elastomers and create other operating problems, reducing the life of the motors and their ability to drill efficiently. Recent innovations in turbodrill design have opened heretofore unrealized potentials and have allowed, for the first time, extended downhole drilling time in hot-hole conditions. The unique feature of this turbodrill is the lack of any elastomers or other temperature-sensitive materials. Its capabilities are matched closely to the requirements of drilling in elevated-temperature environments. The bearing assembly can withstand conditions encountered in typical geothermal formations and provides the performance necessary to stay in the hole. The result is increased rate of penetration (ROP) and more economical drilling.

  12. Structure of the Spherical Black Hole Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bonanno; S. Droz; W. Israel; S. M. Morsink

    1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal structure of a charged spherical black hole is still a topic of debate. In a nonrotating but aspherical gravitational collapse to form a spherical charged black hole, the backscattered gravitational wave tails enter the black hole and are blueshifted at the Cauchy horizon. This has a catastrophic effect if combined with an outflux crossing the Cauchy horizon: a singularity develops at the Cauchy horizon and the effective mass inflates. Recently a numerical study of a massless scalar field in the \\RN background suggested that a spacelike singularity may form before the Cauchy horizon forms. We will show that there exists an approximate analytic solution of the scalar field equations which allows the mass inflation singularity at the Cauchy horizon to exist. In particular, we see no evidence that the Cauchy horizon is preceded by a spacelike singularity.

  13. Gravitational energy of rotating black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Maluf; E. F. Martins; A. Kneip

    1996-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity the energy density of asymptotically flat gravitational fields can be naturaly defined as a scalar density restricted to a three-dimensional spacelike hypersurface $\\Sigma$. Integration over the whole $\\Sigma$ yields the standard ADM energy. After establishing the reference space with zero gravitational energy we obtain the expression of the localized energy for a Kerr black hole. The expression of the energy inside a surface of constant radius can be explicitly calculated in the limit of small $a$, the specific angular momentum. Such expression turns out to be exactly the same as the one obtained by means of the method preposed recently by Brown and York. We also calculate the energy contained within the outer horizon of the black hole for {\\it any} value of $a$. The result is practically indistinguishable from $E=2M_{ir}$, where $M_{ir}$ is the irreducible mass of the black hole.

  14. Platinum Monolayer on IrFe CoreShell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki K.; Kuttiyiel, K.A.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.R.

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

  15. Localized hole effects in inner-shell excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rescigno, T.N.; Orel, A.E.

    1983-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ab initio calculations of valence shell ionization potentials have shown that orbital relaxation and correlation differences usually make contributions of comparable magnitude. In marked contrast to this observation is the situation for deep core ionization, where correlation differences (approx. 1 eV) play a relatively minor role compared to orbital relaxation (approx. 20 eV). Theoretical calculations have shown that this relaxation is most easily described if the 1s-vacancy created by a K-shell excitation is allowed to localize on one of the atomic centers. For molecules possessing a center of inversion, this means that the molecular orbitals that best describe the final state do not transform as any irreducible representation of the molecular point group. Recent experimental work by Shaw, King, Read and Cvejanovic and by Stefani and coworkers has prompted us to carry out further calculations on N/sub 2/, as well as analogous investigations of 1s/sub N/ ..-->.. ..pi..* excitation in NO and N/sub 2/O. The generalized oscillator strengths display a striking similarity and point to the essential correctness of the localized hole picture for N/sub 2/. The theoretical calculations are briefly described, followed by a summary of the results and comparison to experiment, followed by a short discussion.

  16. Core Science Requirement Final Document Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagalante, Anthony F.

    Core Science Requirement Final Document Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and MENDEL SCIENCE EXPERIENCE COURSES Core requirement of 2 semesters of science with laboratory; requirement to be met by the end of the sophomore year Rationale Science literacy is an integral part of the intellectual

  17. Pre-supernova neutrino emissions from ONe cores in the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae: are they distinguishable from those of Fe cores?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kato, Chinami; Yamada, Shoichi; Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi; Ishidoshiro, Koji

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aiming to distinguish two types of progenitors of core collapse supernovae, i.e., one with a core composed mainly of oxygen and neon (abbreviated as ONe core) and the other with an iron core (or Fe core), we calculated the luminosities and spectra of neutrinos emitted from these cores prior to gravitational collapse, taking neutrino oscillation into account. We found that the total energies emitted as $\\bar{\

  18. Vacuum polarization for lukewarm black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Winstanley; Phil M. Young

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the renormalized expectation value of the square of a quantum scalar field on a Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter black hole in which the temperatures of the event and cosmological horizons are equal (`lukewarm' black hole). Our numerical calculations for a thermal state at the same temperature as the two horizons indicate that this renormalized expectation value is regular on both the event and cosmological horizons. We are able to show analytically, using an approximation for the field modes near the horizons, that this is indeed the case.

  19. Vacuum polarization for lukewarm black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winstanley, Elizabeth; Young, Phil M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the renormalized expectation value of the square of a quantum scalar field on a Reissner-Nordstroem-de Sitter black hole in which the temperatures of the event and cosmological horizons are equal ('lukewarm' black hole). Our numerical calculations for a thermal state at the same temperature as the two horizons indicate that this renormalized expectation value is regular on both the event and cosmological horizons. We are able to show analytically, using an approximation for the field modes near the horizons, that this is indeed the case.

  20. Tachyon Perturbation on Two Dimensional Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aniket Basu

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the black hole geometry in the presence of tachyonic perturbations, and solve for the form of allowed tachyonic hair in the presence of back reaction, and for the form of the metric under the assumption that only the metric is perturbed but not the dilaton. We evaluate the Kretschmann scalar and argue that the horizon becomes singular in the presence of tachyons, implying that the black hole has turned into a naked singularity. A form of the allowed tachyon potential emerges as a requirement of self-consistency of our solution.

  1. Einstein-Yang-Mills-Lorentz Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose A. R. Cembranos; Jorge Gigante Valcarcel

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Different black hole solutions of the coupled Einstein-Yang-Mills equations are well known from long time. They have attracted much attention from mathematicians and physicists from their discovery. In this work, we analyze black holes associated with the gauge Lorentz group. In particular, we study solutions which identify the gauge connection with the spin connection. This ansatz allows to find exact solutions to the complete system of equations. By using this procedure, we show the equivalence between the Yang-Mills-Lorentz model in curved space-time and a particular set of extended gravitational theories.

  2. Chaotic Information Processing by Extremal Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axenides, Minos; Nicolis, Stam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review an explicit regularization of the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence, that preserves all isometries of bulk and boundary degrees of freedom. This scheme is useful to characterize the space of the unitary evolution operators that describe the dynamics of the microstates of extremal black holes in four spacetime dimensions. Using techniques from algebraic number theory to evaluate the transition amplitudes, we remark that the regularization scheme expresses the fast quantum computation capability of black holes as well as its chaotic nature.

  3. Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electronhole...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electronhole pairs in CsI. Yield, variance and spatial distribution of electronhole pairs in CsI. Abstract: A Monte Carlo...

  4. Evaluation of Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hole with drill cuttings. The second test, on November 2, 1978, utilized a nitrogen-foam-water mixture to clean residual particles from bottom hole, following which nitrogen was...

  5. Topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai Ronggen [Key Laboratory of Frontiers in Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China) and Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China (KITPC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735, Beijing 100190 (China); Cao Liming [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Ohta, Nobuyoshi [Department of Physics, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We find topological (charged) black holes whose horizon has an arbitrary constant scalar curvature 2k in Horava-Lifshitz theory. Without loss of generality, one may take k=1, 0, and -1. The black hole solution is asymptotically anti-de Sitter with a nonstandard asymptotic behavior. Using the Hamiltonian approach, we define a finite mass associated with the solution. We discuss the thermodynamics of the topological black holes and find that the black hole entropy has a logarithmic term in addition to an area term. We find a duality in Hawking temperature between topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz theory and Einstein's general relativity: the temperature behaviors of black holes with k=1, 0, and -1 in Horava-Lifshitz theory are, respectively, dual to those of topological black holes with k=-1, 0, and 1 in Einstein's general relativity. The topological black holes in Horava-Lifshitz theory are thermodynamically stable.

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300...

  7. The Formation and Evolution of Prestellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Andr; Shantanu Basu; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving our understanding of the initial conditions and earliest stages of star formation is crucial to gain insight into the origin of stellar masses, multiple systems, and protoplanetary disks. We review the properties of low-mass dense cores as derived from recent millimeter/submillimeter observations of nearby molecular clouds and discuss them in the context of various contemporary scenarios for cloud core formation and evolution. None of the extreme scenarios can explain all observations. Pure laminar ambipolar diffusion has relatively long growth times for typical ionization levels and has difficulty satisfying core lifetime constraints. Purely hydrodynamic pictures have trouble accounting for the inefficiency of core formation and the detailed velocity structure of individual cores. A possible favorable scenario is a mixed model involving gravitational fragmentation of turbulent molecular clouds close to magnetic criticality. The evolution of the magnetic field and angular momentum in individual cloud cores after the onset of gravitational collapse is also discussed. In particular, we stress the importance of radiation-magnetohydrodynamical processes and resistive MHD effects during the protostellar phase. We also emphasize the role of the formation of the short-lived first (protostellar) core in providing a chance for sub-fragmentation into binary systems and triggering MHD outflows. Future submillimeter facilities such as Herschel and ALMA will soon provide major new observational constraints in this field. On the theoretical side, an important challenge for the future will be to link the formation of molecular clouds and prestellar cores in a coherent picture.

  8. UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UW-Milwaukee Strategic Planning Core Team Minutes Tuesday, December 18, 2012 Regents Room, Chapman Hall, 8-10 a.m. 1. Welcome and meeting objectives 2. Core Team Suggested Guidelines ("Ground Rules") a. Communication (within team and with across campus and others) Input is always welcomed Open communication

  9. UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

  10. Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments Christiane Jablonowski (University of Michigan-13/2006 #12;Motivation Test cases for 3D dynamical cores on the sphere are hard to find in the literature groups lack standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques Idea: Establish a collection of test cases

  11. Lateral restraint assembly for reactor core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorholt, Wilhelm (San Diego, CA); Luci, Raymond K. (Del Mar, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A restraint assembly for use in restraining lateral movement of a reactor core relative to a reactor vessel wherein a plurality of restraint assemblies are interposed between the reactor core and the reactor vessel in circumferentially spaced relation about the core. Each lateral restraint assembly includes a face plate urged against the outer periphery of the core by a plurality of compression springs which enable radial preloading of outer reflector blocks about the core and resist low-level lateral motion of the core. A fixed radial key member cooperates with each face plate in a manner enabling vertical movement of the face plate relative to the key member but restraining movement of the face plate transverse to the key member in a plane transverse to the center axis of the core. In this manner, the key members which have their axes transverse to or subtending acute angles with the direction of a high energy force tending to move the core laterally relative to the reactor vessel restrain such lateral movement.

  12. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  13. Experto Universitario Java Sesin 1: Spring core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Enterprise Spring 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computacin e IA Spring core Puntos a tratar 2 #12;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computacin e IA;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computacin e IA Spring core

  14. Method and apparatus for recovering unstable cores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, Patrick L. (Los Alamos, NM); Barraclough, Bruce L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus suitable for stabilizing hydrocarbon cores are given. Such stabilized cores have not previously been obtainable for laboratory study, and such study is believed to be required before the hydrate reserves can become a utilizable resource. The apparatus can be built using commercially available parts and is very simple and safe to operate.

  15. Module Handbook Core Univ. of Oldenburg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Energy Conversion Process · Location Dependence of Wind Energy Potential and Wind Energy Forecasting/EUREC Course 2008/2009 #12;EUREC Core Courses at University of Oldenburg, 1st Semester Wind Energy Module Module Description: Wind Energy Field: Core Oldenburg Courses: Wind Energy Wind Energy

  16. CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandvik, Tobias

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    cores with 4 106 transistors each gives 10 times the performance as 1 big core 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 x 108Number of transistors P e r f o r m a n c e CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors p.8/36 Everyone is going parallel Every major chip vendor... on Many-core Processors p.22/36 Stencil operations Evaluate ?2u?x2 on a regular grid: DO K=2,NK-1 DO J=2,NJ-1 DO I=2,NI-1 D2UDX2(I,J,K) = (U(I+1,J,K) - 2.0*U(I,J,K) + & U(I-1,J,K))/(DX*DX) END DO END DO END DO CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors p.23...

  17. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  18. A Note on Black Hole Temperature and Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Silva

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose intuitive derivations of the Hawking temperature and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of a Schwarzschild black hole.

  19. Entropy of charged dilaton-axion black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanwi Ghosh; Soumitra SenGupta

    2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Using brick wall method the entropy of charged dilaton-axion black hole is determined for both asymptotically flat and non-flat cases. The entropy turns out to be proportional to the horizon area of the black hole confirming the Beckenstien, Hawking area-entropy formula for black holes. The leading order logarithmic corrections to the entropy are also derived for such black holes.

  20. Can the fluctuations of a black hole be treated thermodynamically?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostyantyn Ropotenko

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the temperature of a typical Schwarzschild black hole is very low, some doubts are raised about whether the fluctuations of the black hole can be treated thermodynamically. It is shown that this is not the case: the thermodynamic fluctuations of a black hole are considerably larger than the corresponding quantum fluctuations. Moreover the ratio of the mean square thermodynamic fluctuation to the corresponding quantum fluctuation can be interpreted as a number of the effective constituents of a black hole.

  1. Black holes in Born-Infeld extended new massive gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghodsi, Ahmad; Yekta, Davood Mahdavian [Department of Physics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, P.O. Box 1436, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we find different types of black holes for the Born-Infeld extended new massive gravity. Our solutions include (un)charged warped (anti-)de Sitter black holes for four and six derivative expanded action. We also look at the black holes in unexpanded Born-Infeld action. In each case we calculate the entropy, angular momentum and mass of the black holes. We also find the central charges for the conformal field theory duals.

  2. Entropy and Area of Black Holes in Loop Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple arguments related to the entropy of black holes strongly constrain the spectrum of the area operator for a Schwarzschild black hole in loop quantum gravity. In particular, this spectrum is fixed completely by the assumption that the black hole entropy is maximum. Within the approach discussed, one arrives in loop quantum gravity at a quantization rule with integer quantum numbers $n$ for the entropy and area of a black hole.

  3. Active negative-index metamaterial powered by an electron beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Michael

    An active negative index metamaterial that derives its gain from an electron beam is introduced. The metamaterial consists of a stack of equidistant parallel metal plates perforated by a periodic array of holes shaped as ...

  4. THE CLUSTER AND FIELD GALAXY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FRACTION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martini, Paul

    The fraction of cluster galaxies that host luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is an important probe of AGN fueling processes, the cold interstellar medium at the centers of galaxies, and how tightly black holes and ...

  5. Roles of core-shell and {delta}-ray kinetics in layered BN {alpha}-voltaic efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnick, Corey [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Kaviany, Massoud [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo-Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    {alpha}-voltaics harvest electron-hole pairs created as energetic {alpha} particles collide with and ionize electrons in a semiconductor, creating {delta}-rays. After ionization, charged pair production continues through {delta}-ray impact ionization events and the Auger relaxation of core-shell holes created through K-shell ionization events. Secondary ionization events are quantified using the TPP-2M model, the fraction of K-shell ionization events is determined using the energy-loss Coulomb-repulsion perturbed-stationary-state relativistic theory, and the relaxation of the resulting holes is treated with a fully ab initio approach using multiple Fermi golden rule calculations for ranges of carrier concentrations and temperatures. The limiting rate is 15 ns{sup -1} for small carrier concentrations and high temperatures, as compared to the radiative core-shell relaxation rate estimated here at 20 ns{sup -1}, indicating that Auger modes contribute significantly. Moreover, the K-shell ionization events are shown to dominate for low energy {alpha} particles and vanish for high energy ones. Thus, the efficiency loss due to energy dissipation in the fuel layer is mitigated, which is demonstrated by the analysis of a layered fuel-voltaic device with an efficiency from 20% to 14% for fuel layers between 5 and 10 {mu}m thick. The design of a {alpha}-voltaic integrated with a thermoelectric generator is suggested for improved efficiency and the system-level mitigation of radiation damage and geometric inefficiency.

  6. Heating and cooling in the Perseus cluster core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Fabian; J. S. Sanders

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that the radiative cooling time of the hot X-ray emitting gas in the cores of most clusters of galaxies is less than 10^10 yr. In many clusters the gas temperature also drops towards the centre. If we draw a causal connection between these two properties then we infer the presence of a cooling flow onto the central galaxy. High spectral resolution XMM-Newton data and high spatial resolution Chandra data, show however a lack of X-ray emitting gas below about one third of the cluster virial temperature. The explanation is that some form of heating balances cooling. The smoothness and similarity of the cooling time profiles and the flatness of the required heating profiles all indicate that we must seek a relatively gentle, quasi-continuous (on timescales heat source. The likely such source is the central black hole and its powerful jets which create bubble-like cavities in the inner hot gas. We briefly review the general heating and cooling statistics in an X-ray bright sample of cluster before we discuss the detailed situation in the Perseus cluster, the X-ray brightest cluster in the Sky.

  7. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  8. Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument JONATHAN BAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    1 Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument JONATHAN BAIN Department of Humanities and Social@duke.poly.edu word count: 5498 #12;2 word count: 5498 Einstein Algebras and the Hole Argument ABSTRACT. Einstein. In particular, I suggest that a gauge-invariant interpretation of Einstein algebras that avoids the hole

  9. MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westervelt, R.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R. M. Westervelt, J. C.MOTION OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R. M. Westervelt, J. C.OF ELECTRON-HOLE DROPS IN Ge R M Westervelt, J C Culbertson

  10. The Role of Primordial Kicks on Black Hole Merger Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Tom Abel; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial stars are likely to be very massive $\\geq30\\Msun$, form in isolation, and will likely leave black holes as remnants in the centers of their host dark matter halos in the mass range $10^{6}-10^{10}\\Ms$. Such early black holes, at redshifts z$\\gtsim10$, could be the seed black holes for the many supermassive black holes found in galaxies in the local universe. If they exist, their mergers with nearby supermassive black holes may be a prime signal for long wavelength gravitational wave detectors. We simulate formation of black holes in the center of high redshift dark matter halos and explore implications of initial natal kick velocities conjectured by some formation models. The central concentration of early black holes in present day galaxies is reduced if they are born even with moderate kicks of tens of km/s. The modest kicks allow the black holes to leave their parent halo, which consequently leads to dynamical friction being less effective on the lower mass black holes as compared to those still embedded in their parent halos. Therefore, merger rates may be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Using analytical and illustrative cosmological N--body simulations we quantify the role of natal kicks of black holes formed from massive metal free stars on their merger rates with supermassive black holes in present day galaxies. Our results also apply to black holes ejected by the gravitational slingshot mechanism.

  11. On Space-Time Singularities, Holes, and Extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchak, John

    On Space-Time Singularities, Holes, and Extensions John Byron Manchak*y Here, we clarify the relationship among three space-time conditions of interest: geodesic completeness, hole. In what follows, we consider three space-time conditions of interest: geodesic completeness, hole

  12. Hole pairing from attraction of opposite chirality spin vortices: Non-BCS superconductivity in Underdoped Cuprates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Marchetti; F. Ye; Z. B. Su; L. Yu

    2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Within a gauge approach to the t-J model, we propose a new, non-BCS mechanism of superconductivity for underdoped cuprates. We implement the no-double occupancy constraint with a (semionic) slave-particle formalism. The dopant generates a vortex-like quantum distortion of the AF background centered on the empty sites, with opposite chirality for cores on the two N\\'eel sublattices. Empty sites are described in terms of spinless fermionic holons and the long-range attraction between spin vortices on two opposite N\\'eel sublattices is the holon pairing force, leading eventually to SC. The spin fluctuations are described by bosonic spinons with a gap generated by scattering on spin vortices. Due to the occupation constraint, there is a gauge attraction between holon and spinon, binding them into a physical hole. Through gauge interaction the spin vortex attraction induces the formation of spin-singlet RVB pairs reducing the spinon gap. Lowering T, there are two crossovers as precursors of the SC transition: at the higher one a gas of holon pairs appears, reducing the hole spectral weight, while at the lower one a gas of spinon pairs also appears, giving rise to a gas of incoherent preformed hole pairs with magnetic vortices in the plasma phase, supporting a Nernst signal. At an even lower T the hole pairs become coherent and SC appears beyond a critical doping. The proposed SC mechanism is not of the BCS-type, because it involves a gain in kinetic energy (lowering of spinon gap) and it is "almost" of the classical 3D XY-type. Since both the spinon gap and the holon pairing originate from the same term in the slave-particle representation of the t-J model, this approach incorporates a strong interplay between AF and SC, giving rise to a universal relation between Tc and the energy of the resonance mode, as observed in neutron scattering experiments.

  13. Remote down-hole well telemetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

  14. Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngangbam Ishwarchandra; Ng. Ibohal; K. Yugindro Singh

    2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present an exact solution of Einstein's field equations describing the Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background. It is also regarded as an embedded solution that the Schwarzschild black hole is embedded into the dark energy space producing Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole. It is found that the space-time geometry of Schwarzschild-dark energy solution is non-vacuum Petrov type $D$ in the classification of space-times. We study the energy conditions (like weak, strong and dominant conditions) for the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution. We also find that the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution violates the strong energy condition due to the negative pressure leading to a repulsive gravitational force of the matter field in the space-time. It is shown that the time-like vector field for an observer in the Schwarzschild-dark energy space is expanding, accelerating, shearing and non-rotating. We investigate the surface gravity and the area of the horizons for the Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole.

  15. Black hole formation in the early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supermassive black holes with up to a $\\rm 10^{9}~M_{\\odot}$ dwell in the centers of present-day galaxies, and their presence has been confirmed at z $\\geq$ 6. Their formation at such early epochs is still an enigma. Different pathways have been suggested to assemble supermassive black holes in the first billion years after the Big Bang. Direct collapse has emerged as a highly plausible scenario to form black holes as it provides seed masses of $\\rm 10^{5}-10^{6}~M_{\\odot}$. Gravitational collapse in atomic cooling haloes with virial temperatures T$_{vir} \\geq 10^{4}$~K may lead to the formation of massive seed black holes in the presence of an intense background UV flux. Turbulence plays a central role in regulating accretion and transporting angular momentum. We present here the highest resolution cosmological large-eddy simulations to date which track the evolution of high-density regions on scales of $0.25$~AU beyond the formation of the first peak, and study the impact of subgrid-scale turbulence. The pe...

  16. Vector particles tunneling from BTZ black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge-Rui Chen; Shiwei Zhou; Yong-Chang Huang

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate vector particles' Hawking radiation from a BTZ black hole. By applying the WKB approximation and the Hamilton-Jacobi Ansatz to the Proca equation, we obtain the tunneling spectrum of vector particles. The expected Hawking temperature is recovered.

  17. Brief review on higher spin black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfredo Perez; David Tempo; Ricardo Troncoso

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some relevant results in the context of higher spin black holes in three-dimensional spacetimes, focusing on their asymptotic behaviour and thermodynamic properties. For simplicity, we mainly discuss the case of gravity nonminimally coupled to spin-3 fields, being nonperturbatively described by a Chern-Simons theory of two independent sl(3,R) gauge fields. Since the analysis is particularly transparent in the Hamiltonian formalism, we provide a concise discussion of their basic aspects in this context; and as a warming up exercise, we briefly analyze the asymptotic behaviour of pure gravity, as well as the BTZ black hole and its thermodynamics, exclusively in terms of gauge fields. The discussion is then extended to the case of black holes endowed with higher spin fields, briefly signaling the agreements and discrepancies found through different approaches. We conclude explaining how the puzzles become resolved once the fall off of the fields is precisely specified and extended to include chemical potentials, in a way that it is compatible with the asymptotic symmetries. Hence, the global charges become completely identified in an unambiguous way, so that different sets of asymptotic conditions turn out to contain inequivalent classes of black hole solutions being characterized by a different set of global charges.

  18. Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yi

    surface to purify air, employing existing technology in a new way. It is the brainchild of artistFEATURE Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish Björk FEATURE Academics & Industry: ResearchIScOvER mAGAZInE discover@sheffield.ac.uk Research and Innovation Services University of Sheffield New

  19. Weighing black holes from zero to high redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Marconi; D. Axon; R. Maiolino; T. Nagao; P. Pietrini; A. Robinson; G. Torricelli

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the virial theorem provides a tool to estimate supermassive black hole (BH) masses in large samples of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with broad emission lines at all redshifts and luminosities, if the broad line region (BLR) is gravitationally bound. In this paper we discuss the importance of radiation forces on BLR clouds arising from the deposition of momentum by ionizing photons. Such radiation forces counteract gravitational ones and, if not taken into account, BH masses can be severely underestimated. We provide virial relations corrected for the effect of radiation pressure and we discuss their physical meaning and application. If these corrections to virial masses, calibrated with low luminosity objects, are extrapolated to high luminosities then the BLRs of most quasars might be gravitationally unbound. The importance of radiation forces in high luminosity objects must be thoroughly investigated to assess the reliability of quasar BH masses.

  20. Eight powers of ten: similarities in black hole accretion on all mass scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Fender; Elmar Koerding; Tomaso Belloni; Phil Uttley; Ian McHardy; Tasso Tzioumis

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss the recent advances in the quantitative comparison of accretion, and the accretion:jet coupling, in accreting black holes in both X-ray binaries (where M ~ 10Msun) and Active Galactic Nuclei (10^5Msun < M < 10^9Msun). These similarities include the radiative efficiency and jet power as a function of accretion rate, which are themselves probably the origin of the `fundamental plane of black hole activity'. A second `fundamental plane' which connects mass, accretion rate and timing properties provides us with a further physical diagnostic. Patterns of radio loudness (i.e. jet production) as a function of luminosity and accretion state are shown to be similar for X-ray binaries and AGN. Finally we discuss how neutron stars are a useful control sample, and what the future may hold for this field.

  1. The river model of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. S. Hamilton; Jason P. Lisle

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an under-appreciated way to conceptualize stationary black holes, which we call the river model. The river model is mathematically sound, yet simple enough that the basic picture can be understood by non-experts. %that can by understood by non-experts. In the river model, space itself flows like a river through a flat background, while objects move through the river according to the rules of special relativity. In a spherical black hole, the river of space falls into the black hole at the Newtonian escape velocity, hitting the speed of light at the horizon. Inside the horizon, the river flows inward faster than light, carrying everything with it. We show that the river model works also for rotating (Kerr-Newman) black holes, though with a surprising twist. As in the spherical case, the river of space can be regarded as moving through a flat background. However, the river does not spiral inward, as one might have anticipated, but rather falls inward with no azimuthal swirl at all. Instead, the river has at each point not only a velocity but also a rotation, or twist. That is, the river has a Lorentz structure, characterized by six numbers (velocity and rotation), not just three (velocity). As an object moves through the river, it changes its velocity and rotation in response to tidal changes in the velocity and twist of the river along its path. An explicit expression is given for the river field, a six-component bivector field that encodes the velocity and twist of the river at each point, and that encapsulates all the properties of a stationary rotating black hole.

  2. Tank 241-AP-105, cores 208, 209 and 210, analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-AP-105. Push mode core segments were removed from Risers 24 and 28 between July 2, 1997, and July 14, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-AP-105 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997) and Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, or total organic carbon (TOC) analysis exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP and DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Two cores, each consisting of four segments, were expected from Tank 241-AP-105. Three cores were sampled, and complete cores were not obtained. TSAP states core samples should be transported to the laboratory within three calendar days from the time each segment is removed from the tank. This requirement was not met for all cores. Attachment 1 illustrates subsamples generated in the laboratory for analysis and identifies their sources. This reference also relates tank farm identification numbers to their corresponding 222-S Laboratory sample numbers.

  3. {sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. NEW EQUATIONS OF STATE IN SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hempel, M.; Liebendoerfer, M. [Departement Physik, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstr. 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Fischer, T. [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schaffner-Bielich, J. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss three new equations of state (EOS) in core-collapse supernova simulations. The new EOS are based on the nuclear statistical equilibrium model of Hempel and Schaffner-Bielich (HS), which includes excluded volume effects and relativistic mean-field (RMF) interactions. We consider the RMF parameterizations TM1, TMA, and FSUgold. These EOS are implemented into our spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model, which is based on general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics and three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport. The results obtained for the new EOS are compared with the widely used EOS of H. Shen et al. and Lattimer and Swesty. The systematic comparison shows that the model description of inhomogeneous nuclear matter is as important as the parameterization of the nuclear interactions for the supernova dynamics and the neutrino signal. Furthermore, several new aspects of nuclear physics are investigated: the HS EOS contains distributions of nuclei, including nuclear shell effects. The appearance of light nuclei, e.g., deuterium and tritium, is also explored, which can become as abundant as alphas and free protons. In addition, we investigate the black hole formation in failed core-collapse supernovae, which is mainly determined by the high-density EOS. We find that temperature effects lead to a systematically faster collapse for the non-relativistic LS EOS in comparison with the RMF EOS. We deduce a new correlation for the time until black hole formation, which allows the determination of the maximum mass of proto-neutron stars, if the neutrino signal from such a failed supernova would be measured in the future. This would give a constraint for the nuclear EOS at finite entropy, complementary to observations of cold neutron stars.

  5. 06/05/2013 14:42Did the universe evolve to make black holes? Page 1 of 10http://phys.org/news/2013-05-universe-evolve-black-holes.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Andy

    -05-universe-evolve-black-holes.html Profile Newsletter Favorites Activity PM My news Sign In Register Nanotechnology All Nanotechnology Previews will load in a moment Bio & Medicine Previews will load in a moment Nanophysics Previews will load in a moment Nanomaterials Previews will load in a moment Physics All Physics

  6. Core analysis workstation development and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, C.W.; Kochendarfer, R.A.; Mays, B.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering workstation utilizing a three-dimensional reactor simulator along with a series of auxiliary programs has been developed for use in predicting core reactivity and power distributions. This workstation can be used by both core analysis and core operations personnel. Expected applications are power distribution analyses, technical specification limit verification, and various types of reactivity analyses. Reactor operations personnel can quickly simulate load follow or other reactor maneuvers and, through the interactive graphics capability of the personal computer, the reactor responses, such as power distribution and control rod position, can be displayed and understood by operations personnel.

  7. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 19982012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at 8 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  8. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 19982012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trend was identified in the HPCI results. Statistically significant decreasing trends were identified for RCIC start-only and 8-hour trends.

  9. Improved methods for simulating nearly extremal binary black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark A. Scheel; Matthew Giesler; Daniel A. Hemberger; Geoffrey Lovelace; Kevin Kuper; Michael Boyle; Bela Szilagyi; Lawrence E. Kidder

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical black holes could be nearly extremal (that is, rotating nearly as fast as possible); therefore, nearly extremal black holes could be among the binaries that current and future gravitational-wave observatories will detect. Predicting the gravitational waves emitted by merging black holes requires numerical-relativity simulations, but these simulations are especially challenging when one or both holes have mass $m$ and spin $S$ exceeding the Bowen-York limit of $S/m^2=0.93$. We present improved methods that enable us to simulate merging, nearly extremal black holes more robustly and more efficiently. We use these methods to simulate an unequal-mass, precessing binary black hole coalescence, where the larger black hole has $S/m^2=0.99$. We also use these methods to simulate a non-precessing binary black hole coalescence, where both black holes have $S/m^2=0.994$, nearly reaching the Novikov-Thorne upper bound for holes spun up by thin accretion disks. We demonstrate numerical convergence and estimate the numerical errors of the waveforms; we compare numerical waveforms from our simulations with post-Newtonian and effective-one-body waveforms; we compare the evolution of the black-hole masses and spins with analytic predictions; and we explore the effect of increasing spin magnitude on the orbital dynamics (the so-called "orbital hangup" effect).

  10. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina L. Benone; Luis C. B. Crispino; Carlos Herdeiro; Eugen Radu

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  11. Acoustic clouds: standing sound waves around a black hole analogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benone, Carolina L; Herdeiro, Carlos; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions sound waves in fluids experience an acoustic horizon with analogue properties to those of a black hole event horizon. In particular, a draining bathtub-like model can give rise to a rotating acoustic horizon and hence a rotating black hole (acoustic) analogue. We show that sound waves, when enclosed in a cylindrical cavity, can form stationary waves around such rotating acoustic black holes. These acoustic perturbations display similar properties to the scalar clouds that have been studied around Kerr and Kerr-Newman black holes; thus they are dubbed acoustic clouds. We make the comparison between scalar clouds around Kerr black holes and acoustic clouds around the draining bathtub explicit by studying also the properties of scalar clouds around Kerr black holes enclosed in a cavity. Acoustic clouds suggest the possibility of testing, experimentally, the existence and properties of black hole clouds, using analog models.

  12. Predictability in Quantum Gravity and Black Hole Evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A possible resolution of the information loss paradox for black holes is proposed in which a phase transition occurs when the temperature of an evaporating black hole equals a critical value, $T_c$, and Lorentz invariance and diffeomorphism invariance are spontaneously broken. This allows a generalization of Schr\\"odinger's equation for the quantum mechanical density matrix, such that a pure state can evolve into a mixed state, because in the symmetry broken phase the conservation of energy-momentum is spontaneously violated. TCP invariance is also spontaneously broken together with time reversal invariance, allowing the existence of white holes, which are black holes moving backwards in time. Domain walls would form which separate the black holes and white holes (anti-black holes) in the broken symmetry regime, and the system could evolve into equilibrium producing a balance of information loss and gain.

  13. Incorporation of silica into baroplastic core-shell nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewlett, Sheldon A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core-shell baroplastics are nanophase materials that exhibit pressure-induced flow at low temperatures and high pressures. Core-shell baroplastics used in this work are comprised of a low Tg poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) core ...

  14. Hole-transport material variation in fully vacuum deposited perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polander, Lauren E.; Pahner, Paul; Schwarze, Martin; Saalfrank, Matthias; Koerner, Christian; Leo, Karl, E-mail: karl.leo@iapp.de [Institut fr Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitt Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work addresses the effect of energy level alignment between the hole-transporting material and the active layer in vacuum deposited, planar-heterojunction CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub x?3}Cl{sub x} perovskite solar cells. Through a series of hole-transport materials, with conductivity values set using controlled p-doping of the layer, we correlate their ionization potentials with the open-circuit voltage of the device. With ionization potentials beyond 5.3 eV, a substantial decrease in both current density and voltage is observed, which highlights the delicate energetic balance between driving force for hole-extraction and maximizing the photovoltage. In contrast, when an optimal ionization potential match is found, the open-circuit voltage can be maximized, leading to power conversion efficiencies of up to 10.9%. These values are obtained with hole-transport materials that differ from the commonly used Spiro-MeO-TAD and correspond to a 40% performance increase versus this reference.

  15. The Role of Primordial Kicks on Black Hole Merger Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Micic; Tom Abel; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial stars are likely to be very massive >30 Msun, form in isolation, and will likely leave black holes as remnants in the centers of their host dark matter halos. We expect primordial stars to form in halos in the mass range 10^6-10^10 Msun. Some of these early black holes, formed at redshifts z>10, could be the seed black hole for a significant fraction of the supermassive black holes found in galaxies in the local universe. If the black hole descendants of the primordial stars exist, their mergers with nearby supermassive black holes may be a prime candidate for long wavelength gravitational wave detectors. We simulate formation and evolution of dark matter halos in LambdaCDM universe. We seed high-redshift dark matter halos with early black holes, and explore the merger history of the host halos and the implications of black hole's kick velocities arising from their coalescence. The central concentration of low mass early black holes in present day galaxies is reduced if they experience even moderate kicks of tens of km/s. Even such modest kicks allow the black holes to leave their parent halo, which consequently leads to dynamical friction being less effective on the low mass black holes that were ejected, compared to those still embedded in their parent halos. Therefore, merger rates with central supermassive black holes in the largest halos may be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Using analytical and illustrative cosmological N-body simulations, we quantify the role of kicks on the merger rates of black holes formed from massive metal free stars with supermassive black holes in present day galaxies.

  16. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhmeyer, Uwe [Kaiser Systems, Inc, 126 Sohier Road, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  17. Magnetic core studies at LBNL and LLNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molvik, A.W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL) and DE-AC03-76SF00098 (LBNL). References Wayne Meier,Magnetic Core Studies at LBNL and LLNL A. W. Molvik a,* , A.Livermore, CA 94550, USA LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA c

  18. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  19. Viscosity anomaly in core-softened liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. D. Fomin; V. N. Ryzhov

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present article presents a molecular dynamics study of several anomalies of core-softened systems. It is well known that many core-softened liquids demonstrate diffusion anomaly. Usual intuition relates the diffusion coefficient to shear viscosity via Stockes-Einstein relation. However, it can break down at low temperature. In this respect it is important to see if viscosity also demonstrates anomalous behavior.

  20. The effects of the chemical composition and strain on the electronic properties of GaSb/InAs core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ning, Feng; Wang, Dan; Tang, Li-Ming, E-mail: lmtang@hnu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Ke-Qiu, E-mail: keqiuchen@hnu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of the chemical composition and strain on the electronic properties of [111] zinc-blende (ZB) and [0001] wurtzite (WZ) GaSb/InAs core-shell nanowires (NWs) with different core diameters and shell thicknesses are studied using first-principles methods. The band structures of the [111] ZB GaSb/InAs core-shell NWs underwent a noticeable type-I/II band alignment transition, associated with a direct-to-indirect band gap transition under a compressive uniaxial strain. The band structures of the [0001] WZ GaSb/InAs core-shell NWs preserved the direct band gap under either compressive or tensile uniaxial strains. In addition, the band gaps and the effective masses of the carriers could be tuned by their composition. For the core-shell NWs with a fixed GaSb-core size, the band gaps decreased linearly with an increasing InAs-shell thickness, caused by the significant downshift of the conduction bands. For the [111] ZB GaSb/InAs core-shell NWs, the calculated effective masses indicated that the transport properties could be changed from hole-dominated conduction to electron-dominated conduction by changing the InAs-shell thickness.

  1. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

    1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

  3. Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

  4. The compactness of presupernova stellar cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S. E., E-mail: sukhbold@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The success or failure of the neutrino-transport mechanism for producing a supernova in an evolved massive star is known to be sensitive not only to the mass of the iron core that collapses, but also to the density gradient in the silicon and oxygen shells surrounding that core. Here we study the systematics of a presupernova core's 'compactness' as a function of the mass of the star and the physics used in its calculation. Fine-meshed surveys of presupernova evolution are calculated for stars from 15 to 65 M {sub ?}. The metallicity and the efficiency of semiconvection and overshoot mixing are both varied and bare carbon-oxygen cores are explored as well as full hydrogenic stars. Two different codes, KEPLER and MESA, are used for the study. A complex interplay of carbon and oxygen burning, especially in shells, can cause rapid variations in the compactness for stars of very nearly the same mass. On larger scales, the distribution of compactness with main sequence mass is found to be robustly non-monotonic, implying islands of 'explodabilty,' particularly around 8-20 M {sub ?} and 25-30 M {sub ?}. The carbon-oxygen (CO) core mass of a presupernova star is a better, (though still ambiguous) discriminant of its core structure than the main sequence mass.

  5. CSAT Role-Based/Core Competency Training Program | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Services Training Cybersecurity Training Warehouse DOE Training & Education CSAT Role-BasedCore Competency Training Program CSAT Role-BasedCore Competency Training...

  6. Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy . Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State...

  7. Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Synthesis of Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

  8. Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution of Gold-Platinum Nanoparticles and Their Electrocatalytic Effect Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell...

  9. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Abstract: Non-toxic magnetic...

  10. Mineralogic variation in drill core UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipera, S.J.; Vaniman, D.T.; Carlos, B.A.; Bish, D.L.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative X-ray powder diffraction methods have been used to analyze 108 samples from drill core UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This drill hole, located within the imbricate fault zone east of the potential Yucca Mountain repository site, confirms the authors` previous knowledge of gross-scale mineral distributions at Yucca Mountain and provides insight into possible shallow pathways for hydrologic recharge into the potential host rock. Analyses of samples from UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16 have shown that the distribution of major zeolitized horizons, of silica phases, and of glassy tuffs are similar to those noted in nearby drill cores. However, the continuous core and closer sample spacing in UE-25 UZ{number_sign}16 provide a more exact determination of mineral stratigraphy, particularly in hydrologically important units such as the Paintbrush bedded tuffs above the Topopah Spring Tuff and in the upper vitrophyre of the Topopah Spring Tuff. The discovery of matrix zeolitization in the devitrified Topopah Spring Tuff of UE25 UZ{number_sign}16 shows that some unexpected mineralogic features can still be encountered in the exploration of Yucca Mountain and emphasizes the importance of obtaining a more complete three-dimensional model of Yucca Mountain mineralogy.

  11. Observable fractions of core-collapse supernova light curves brightened by binary companions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moriya, Takashi J; Izzard, Robert G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many core-collapse supernova progenitors are presumed to be in binary systems. If a star explodes in a binary system, the early supernova light curve can be brightened by the collision of the supernova ejecta with the companion star. The early brightening can be observed when the observer is in the direction of the hole created by the collision. Based on a population synthesis model, we estimate the fractions of core-collapse supernovae in which the light-curve brightening by the collision can be observed. We find that 0.19% of core-collapse supernova light curves can be observed with the collisional brightening. Type Ibc supernova light curves are more likely to be brightened by the collision (0.53%) because of the high fraction of the progenitors being in binary systems and their proximity to the companion stars. Type II and IIb supernova light curves are less affected (~1e-3% and ~1e-2%, respectively). Although the early, slow light-curve declines of some Type IIb and Ibc supernovae are argued to be caused...

  12. Gravitational radiation from dynamical black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean A. Hayward

    2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective energy tensor for gravitational radiation is identified for uniformly expanding flows of the Hawking mass-energy. It appears in an energy conservation law expressing the change in mass due to the energy densities of matter and gravitational radiation, with respect to a Killing-like vector encoding a preferred flow of time outside a black hole. In a spin-coefficient formulation, the components of the effective energy tensor can be understood as the energy densities of ingoing and outgoing, transverse and longitudinal gravitational radiation. By anchoring the flow to the trapping horizon of a black hole in a given sequence of spatial hypersurfaces, there is a locally unique flow and a measure of gravitational radiation in the strong-field regime.

  13. Laser stabilization using spectral hole burning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Rippe; B. Julsgaard; A. Walther; S. Krll

    2006-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have frequency stabilized a Coherent CR699-21 dye laser to a transient spectral hole on the 606 nm transition in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5. A frequency stability of 1 kHz has been obtained on the 10 microsecond timescale together with a long-term frequency drift below 1 kHz/s. RF magnetic fields are used to repopulate the hyperfine levels allowing us to control the dynamics of the spectral hole. A detailed theory of the atomic response to laser frequency errors has been developed which allows us to design and optimize the laser stabilization feedback loop, and specifically we give a stability criterion that must be fulfilled in order to obtain very low drift rates. The laser stability is sufficient for performing quantum gate experiments in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5.

  14. Geometric description of BTZ black holes thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernando Quevedo; Alberto Sanchez

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the properties of the space of thermodynamic equilibrium states of the Ba\\~nados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole in (2+1)-gravity. We use the formalism of geometrothermodynamics to introduce in the space of equilibrium states a $2-$dimensional thermodynamic metric whose curvature is non-vanishing, indicating the presence of thermodynamic interaction, and free of singularities, indicating the absence of phase transitions. Similar results are obtained for generalizations of the BTZ black hole which include a Chern-Simons term and a dilatonic field. Small logarithmic corrections of the entropy turn out to be represented by small corrections of the thermodynamic curvature, reinforcing the idea that thermodynamic curvature is a measure of thermodynamic interaction.

  15. The hydraulic jump as a white hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the geometry of the circular hydraulic jump, the velocity of the liquid in the interior region exceeds the speed of capillary-gravity waves (ripplons), whose spectrum is `relativistic' in the shallow water limit. The velocity flow is radial and outward, and thus the relativistic ripplons cannot propagating into the interior region. In terms of the effective 2+1 dimensional Painleve-Gullstrand metric appropriate for the propagating ripplons, the interior region imitates the white hole. The hydraulic jump represents the physical singularity at the white-hole horizon. The instability of the vacuum in the ergoregion inside the circular hydraulic jump and its observation in recent experiments on superfluid 4He by E. Rolley, C. Guthmann, M.S. Pettersen and C. Chevallier in physics/0508200 are discussed.

  16. Phase Structure of Higher Spin Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhishek Chowdhury; Arunabha Saha

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the study of the phase structure of higher spin black holes carried out in arXiv$:1210.0284$ using the "canonical formalism". In particular we study the low as well as high temperature regimes. We show that the Hawking-Page transition takes place in the low temperature regime. The thermodynamically favoured phase changes from conical surplus to black holes and then again to conical surplus as we increase temperature. We then show that in the high temperature regime the diagonal embedding gives the appropriate description. We also give a map between the parameters of the theory near the IR and UV fixed points. This makes the "good" solutions near one end map to the "bad" solutions near the other end and vice versa.

  17. Quantized black holes, their spectrum and radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriplovich, I. B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: khriplovich@inp.nsk.su

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Under quite natural general assumptions, the following results are obtained. The maximum entropy of a quantized surface is demonstrated to be proportional to the surface area in the classical limit. The general structure of the horizon spectrum is found. In the special case of loop quantum gravity, the value of the Barbero-Immirzi parameter is found. The discrete spectrum of thermal radiation of a black hole fits the Wien profile. The natural widths of the lines are much smaller than the distances between them. The total intensity of the thermal radiation is estimated. If the density of quantized primordial black holes is close to the present upper limit on the dark-matter density in our Solar system, the sensitivity of modern detectors is close to that necessary for detecting this radiation.

  18. Charged Cylindrical Black Holes in Conformal Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson Levi Said; Joseph Sultana; Kristian Zarb Adami

    2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering cylindrical topology we present the static solution for a charged black hole in conformal gravity. We show that unlike the general relativistic case there are two different solutions, both including a factor that when set to zero recovers the familiar static charged black string solution in Einstein's theory. This factor gives rise to a linear term in the potential that also features in the neutral case and may have significant ramifications for particle trajectories.

  19. Comparing quantum black holes and naked singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Singh

    2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    There are models of gravitational collapse in classical general relativity which admit the formation of naked singularities as well as black holes. These include fluid models as well as models with scalar fields as matter. Even if fluid models were to be regarded as unphysical in their matter content, the remaining class of models (based on scalar fields) generically admit the formation of visible regions of finite but arbitrarily high curvature. Hence it is of interest to ask, from the point of view of astrophysics, as to what a stellar collapse leading to a naked singularity (or to a visible region of very high curvature) will look like, to a far away observer. The emission of energy during such a process may be divided into three phases - (i) the classical phase, during which matter and gravity can both be treated according to the laws of classical physics, (ii) the semiclassical phase, when gravity is treated classically but matter behaves as a quantum field, and (iii) the quantum gravitational phase. In this review, we first give a summary of the status of naked singularities in classical relativity, and then report some recent results comparing the semiclassical phase of black holes with the semiclassical phase of spherical collapse leading to a naked singularity. In particular, we ask how the quantum particle creation during the collapse leading to a naked singularity compares with the Hawking radiation from a star collapsing to form a black hole. It turns out that there is a fundamental difference between the two cases. A spherical naked star emits only about one Planck energy during its semiclassical phase, and the further evolution can only be determined by the laws of quantum gravity. This contrasts with the semiclassical evaporation of a black hole.

  20. Noncommutative Inspired Black Holes in Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent string theory motivated paper, Nicolini, Smailagic and Spallucci (NSS) presented an interesting model for a noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like black hole solution in 4-dimensions. The essential effect of having noncommutative co-ordinates in this approach is to smear out matter distributions on a scale associated with the turn-on of noncommutativity which was taken to be near the 4-d Planck mass. In particular, NSS assumed that this smearing was essentially Gaussian. This energy scale is sufficiently large that in 4-d such effects may remain invisible indefinitely. Extra dimensional models which attempt to address the gauge hierarchy problem, however, allow for the possibility that the effective fundamental scale may not be far from {approx} 1 TeV, an energy regime that will soon be probed by experiments at both the LHC and ILC. In this paper we generalize the NSS model to the case where flat, toroidally compactified extra dimensions are accessible at the TeV-scale and examine the resulting modifications in black hole properties due to the existence of noncommutativity. We show that while many of the noncommutativity-induced black hole features found in 4-d by NSS persist, in some cases there can be significant modifications due the presence of extra dimensions. We also demonstrate that the essential features of this approach are not particularly sensitive to the Gaussian nature of the smearing assumed by NSS.

  1. Kerr black holes with scalar hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a family of solutions of Einstein's gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field, describing asymptotically flat, spinning black holes with scalar hair and a regular horizon. These hairy black holes (HBHs) are supported by rotation and have no static limit. Besides mass M and angular momentum J, they carry a conserved, continuous Noether charge Q measuring the scalar hair. HBHs branch off from the Kerr metric at the threshold of the superradiant instability and reduce to spinning boson stars in the limit of vanishing horizon area. They overlap with Kerr black holes for a set of (M,J) values. A single Killing vector field preserves the solutions, tangent to the null geodesic generators of the event horizon. HBHs can exhibit sharp physical differences when compared to the Kerr solution, such as J/M^2>1, quadrupole moment larger than J^2/M and larger orbital angular velocity at the innermost stable circular orbit. Families of HBHs connected to the Kerr geometry should exist in scalar (...

  2. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  3. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014. The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 kVA transformer passed the impulse test in KEMA high-voltage laboratories. Additional products include: nine papers published in the IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, one patent has been filed, three PhD students weresupported from beginning to graduation, five postdoctoral fellows, and three MSc students were partially supported. The electrical characteristics of our dry-type toroidal transformers are similar to those of the oil-immersed pole mounted transformers currently in use by many utilities, but toroids have higher efficiency. The no-load losses of the 50 kVA prototype are only 45 W. A standard transformer has no-load losses between 90 and 240 W. Thus, even the finest transformer built today with standard technology has double the amount of no-load losses than the prototype toroidal transformer. When the manufacturing process is prepared for mass production, the cost of a dry-type toroidal transformer would be similar to the price of an oil-filed standard design. However, because of the greatly reduced losses, the total ownership cost of a toroidal transformer could be about half of a traditional design. We got a grant from Power Bridge NY in the amount of $149,985 from June 2014 to May 2015 to continue developing the transformer with commercialization objectives. We are considering the possibility to incorporate a company to manufacture the transformers and have contacted investors. The current status of the real life testing is as follows: after several months of silence, Con Edison has re-started conversations and has shown willingness to test the transformer. Other companies, PSE&G and National Grid have recently also shown interest and we will present our product to them soon.

  4. RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN SPIN-FLIP RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F. K.; Wang Dong [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Chen Xian, E-mail: fkliu@pku.edu.cn [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical relativity simulations predict that coalescence of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries leads not only to a spin flip but also to a recoiling of the merger remnant SMBHs. In the literature, X-shaped radio sources are popularly suggested to be candidates for SMBH mergers with spin flip of jet-ejecting SMBHs. Here we investigate the spectral and spatial observational signatures of the recoiling SMBHs in radio sources undergoing black hole spin flip. Our results show that SMBHs in most spin-flip radio sources have mass ratio q {approx}> 0.3 with a minimum possible value q{sub min} {approx_equal} 0.05. For major mergers, the remnant SMBHs can get a kick velocity as high as 2100 km s{sup -1} in the direction within an angle {approx}< 40 Degree-Sign relative to the spin axes of remnant SMBHs, implying that recoiling quasars are biased to be with high Doppler-shifted broad emission lines while recoiling radio galaxies are biased to large apparent spatial off-center displacements. We also calculate the distribution functions of line-of-sight velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacements for spin-flip radio sources with different apparent jet reorientation angles. Our results show that the larger the apparent jet reorientation angle is, the larger the Doppler-shifting recoiling velocity and apparent spatial off-center displacement will be. We investigate the effects of recoiling velocity on the dust torus in spin-flip radio sources and suggest that recoiling of SMBHs would lead to 'dust-poor' active galactic nuclei. Finally, we collect a sample of 19 X-shaped radio objects and for each object give the probability of detecting the predicted signatures of recoiling SMBH.

  5. UNLEASHING POSITIVE FEEDBACK: LINKING THE RATES OF STAR FORMATION, SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE ACCRETION, AND OUTFLOWS IN DISTANT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silk, Joseph [Institut d'Astrophysique, UMR 7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis Blvd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beecroft Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure-regulated star formation is a simple variant on the usual supernova-regulated star formation efficiency that controls the global star formation rate as a function of cold gas content in star-forming galaxies, and accounts for the Schmidt-Kennicutt law in both nearby and distant galaxies. Inclusion of active galactic nucleus (AGN) induced pressure, by jets and/or winds that flow back onto a gas-rich disk, can lead, under some circumstances, to significantly enhanced star formation rates, especially at high redshift and most likely followed by the more widely accepted phase of star formation quenching. Simple expressions are derived that relate supermassive black hole growth, star formation, and outflow rates. The ratios of black hole to spheroid mass and of both black hole accretion and outflow rates to star formation rate are predicted as a function of time. I suggest various tests of the AGN-triggered star formation hypothesis.

  6. Stratigraphy and geochemistry of the Stone Mountain core (64001/2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korotev, R.L.; Morris, R.V.; Lauer, H.V. Jr.

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferromagnetic resonance and magnetic data measured on both sections of the double drive tube cord 64001/2 collected on Stone Mountain, station four, Apollo 16 are reported, along with instrumental neutron activation analysis data measured on the lower section. These data provide insight into the depositional and irradiational history and the geochemical provenances of the core.

  7. CORE GAS SLOSHING IN ABELL 1644

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Ryan E.; Wegner, Gary A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wilder Lab, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Markevitch, Maxim; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R., E-mail: ryan.e.johnson@dartmouth.ed, E-mail: gary.a.wegner@bellz.dartmouth.ed, E-mail: mmarkevitch@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: cjf@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: wrf@cfa.harvard.ed [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of a 72 ks Chandra observation of the double cluster Abell 1644 (z = 0.047). The X-ray temperatures indicate that the masses are M{sub 500} = (2.6 +- 0.4) x 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub sun} for the northern sub-cluster and M{sub 500} = (3.1 +- 0.4) x 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub sun} for the southern, main cluster. We identify a sharp edge in the radial X-ray surface brightness of the main cluster, which we find to be a cold front, with a jump in temperature of a factor of {approx}3. This edge possesses a spiral morphology characteristic of core gas sloshing around the cluster potential minimum. We present observational evidence, supported by hydrodynamic simulations, that the northern sub-cluster is the object that initiated the core gas sloshing in the main cluster at least 700 Myr ago. We discuss reheating of the main cluster's core gas via two mechanisms brought about by the sloshing gas: first, the release of gravitational potential energy gained by the core's displacement from the potential minimum, and second, a dredging inward of the outer, higher entropy cluster gas along finger-shaped streams. We find that the available gravitational potential energy is small compared to the energy released by the cooling gas in the core.

  8. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween, and each interconnect wall consists of thin layers of the cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of interconnect material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002-0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002-0.05 cm thick.

  9. Scattering of Sound Waves by a Canonical Acoustic Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sam R. Dolan; Ednilton S. Oliveira; Lus C. B. Crispino

    2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of a monochromatic planar perturbation impinging upon a canonical acoustic hole. We show that acoustic hole scattering shares key features with black hole scattering. The interference of wavefronts passing in opposite senses around the hole creates regular oscillations in the scattered intensity. We examine this effect by applying a partial wave method to compute the differential scattering cross section for a range of incident wavelengths. We demonstrate the existence of a scattering peak in the backward direction, known as the glory. We show that the glory created by the canonical acoustic hole is approximately 170 times less intense than the glory created by the Schwarzschild black hole, for equivalent horizon-to-wavelength ratios. We hope that direct experimental observations of such effects may be possible in the near future.

  10. Method and apparatus of assessing down-hole drilling conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehl, UT); Johnson, Monte L. (Orem, UT); Bartholomew, David B. (Springville, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for use in assessing down-hole drilling conditions are disclosed. The apparatus includes a drill string, a plurality of sensors, a computing device, and a down-hole network. The sensors are distributed along the length of the drill string and are capable of sensing localized down-hole conditions while drilling. The computing device is coupled to at least one sensor of the plurality of sensors. The data is transmitted from the sensors to the computing device over the down-hole network. The computing device analyzes data output by the sensors and representative of the sensed localized conditions to assess the down-hole drilling conditions. The method includes sensing localized drilling conditions at a plurality of points distributed along the length of a drill string during drilling operations; transmitting data representative of the sensed localized conditions to a predetermined location; and analyzing the transmitted data to assess the down-hole drilling conditions.

  11. Black holes in extra dimensions can decay on the bulk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2003-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the extra dimensional theories, with TeV scale Plank constant, black holes may be produced in the Large Hadron Collider experiments. We have argued that in the d-dimensional black hole, the intrinsically 4-dimensional brane fields do not see the same geometry at the horizon, as in a 4-dimensional space-time. Kaluza-Klein modes invades the brane and surroundings and the brane fields can be considered as a thermal system at the temperature of the black hole. From energy and entropy consideration, we show that whether or not a six-dimensional black hole will decay by emitting Kaluza-Klein modes or the standard model particles, will depend on the length scale of the extra dimensions as well as on the mass of the black hole. For higher dimensional black holes, Kaluza-Klein modes will dominate the decay.

  12. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  13. The Design and Performance of IceCube DeepCore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The IceCube Collaboration

    2011-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The IceCube neutrino observatory in operation at the South Pole, Antarctica, comprises three distinct components: a large buried array for ultrahigh energy neutrino detection, a surface air shower array, and a new buried component called DeepCore. DeepCore was designed to lower the IceCube neutrino energy threshold by over an order of magnitude, to energies as low as about 10 GeV. DeepCore is situated primarily 2100 m below the surface of the icecap at the South Pole, at the bottom center of the existing IceCube array, and began taking physics data in May 2010. Its location takes advantage of the exceptionally clear ice at those depths and allows it to use the surrounding IceCube detector as a highly efficient active veto against the principal background of downward-going muons produced in cosmic-ray air showers. DeepCore has a module density roughly five times higher than that of the standard IceCube array, and uses photomultiplier tubes with a new photocathode featuring a quantum efficiency about 35% higher than standard IceCube PMTs. Taken together, these features of DeepCore will increase IceCube's sensitivity to neutrinos from WIMP dark matter annihilations, atmospheric neutrino oscillations, galactic supernova neutrinos, and point sources of neutrinos in the northern and southern skies. In this paper we describe the design and initial performance of DeepCore.

  14. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe through a horizontal pipe. Since the densities of the two liq- uids are almost always different, gravity

  15. Neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, John F.; Cherry, John F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Collapse Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mechanisms of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Simulation Results

  16. 2.0 CORE LOGO 2.01 OVERVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellaire, Graham

    2.0 CORE LOGO 2.01 OVERVIEW 2.02 CLEAR SPACE AND MINIMUM SIZE 2.03 EXAMPLES OF PLACEMENT APPLIED TO THE CORE LOGO 2.08 APPLYING THE LOGO PROPERLY 2.09 LINKS TO DALHOUSIE AUTHORIZED CORE LOGO as a university with real substance and stature, and seen as a vibrant, welcoming community. Our core logo

  17. Hole boring in a DT pellet and fast ion ignition with ultra-intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naumova, N; Tikhonchuk, V T; Labaune, C; Sokolov, I V; Mourou, G; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.025002

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently achieved high intensities of short laser pulses open new prospects in their application to hole boring in inhomogeneous overdense plasmas and for ignition in precompressed DT fusion targets. A simple analytical model and numerical simulations demonstrate that pulses with intensities exceeding 1022 W/cm2 may penetrate deeply into the plasma as a result of efficient ponderomotive acceleration of ions in the forward direction. The penetration depth as big as hundreds of microns depends on the laser fluence, which has to exceed a few tens of GJ/cm2. The fast ions, accelerated at the bottom of the channel with an efficiency of more than 20%, show a high directionality and may heat the precompressed target core to fusion conditions.

  18. Particle-Hole Asymmetry and Brightening of Solitons in A Strongly Repulsive BEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Radha; Clark, Charles W

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study solitary wave propagation in the condensate of a system of hard-core bosons with nearest neighbor interactions. For this strongly repulsive system, the evolution equation for the condensate order parameter obtained using spin coherent state averages is different from the usual Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE). The system is found to support two kinds of solitons when there is a particle-hole imbalance: a gray soliton that dies out as the velocity approaches the Bogoliubov sound velocity, and a new type of soliton which brightens and persists all the way up to the sound velocity, transforming into a periodic wave train at supersonic speed. Analogous to GPE soliton, the energy-momentum dispersion for both the solitons is characterized by Lieb II modes.

  19. Particle-Hole Asymmetry and Brightening of Solitons in A Strongly Repulsive BEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radha Balakrishnan; Indubala I. Satija; Charles W. Clark

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study solitary wave propagation in the condensate of a system of hard-core bosons with nearest-neighbor interactions. For this strongly repulsive system, the evolution equation for the condensate order parameter of the system, obtained using spin coherent state averages is different from the usual Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE). The system is found to support two kinds of solitons when there is a particle-hole imbalance: a dark soliton that dies out as the velocity approaches the sound velocity, and a new type of soliton which brightens and persists all the way up to the sound velocity, transforming into a periodic wave train at supersonic speed. Analogous to the GPE soliton, the energy-momentum dispersion for both solitons is characterized by Lieb II modes.

  20. Prospects for detecting Dark Matter with neutrino telescopes in Intermediate Mass Black Holes scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertone, Gianfranco

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current strategies of indirect Dark Matter detection with neutrino telescopes are based on the search for high-energy neutrinos from the Solar core or from the center of the Earth. Here, we propose a new strategy based on the detection of neutrinos from Dark Matter annihilations in 'mini-spikes' around Intermediate Mass Black Holes. Neutrino fluxes, in this case, depend on the annihilation cross-section of Dark Matter particles, whereas solar and terrestrial fluxes are sensitive to the scattering cross-section off nucleons, a circumstance that makes the proposed search complementary to the existing ones. We discuss the prospects for detection with upcoming under-water and under-ice experiments such as ANTARES and IceCube, and show that several, up to many, sources could be detected with both experiments. A kilometer scale telescope in the Mediterranean appears to be ideally suited for the proposed search.

  1. Prospects for detecting Dark Matter with neutrino telescopes in Intermediate Mass Black Holes scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianfranco Bertone

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Current strategies of indirect Dark Matter detection with neutrino telescopes are based on the search for high-energy neutrinos from the Solar core or from the center of the Earth. Here, we propose a new strategy based on the detection of neutrinos from Dark Matter annihilations in 'mini-spikes' around Intermediate Mass Black Holes. Neutrino fluxes, in this case, depend on the annihilation cross-section of Dark Matter particles, whereas solar and terrestrial fluxes are sensitive to the scattering cross-section off nucleons, a circumstance that makes the proposed search complementary to the existing ones. We discuss the prospects for detection with upcoming under-water and under-ice experiments such as ANTARES and IceCube, and show that several, up to many, sources could be detected with both experiments. A kilometer scale telescope in the Mediterranean appears to be ideally suited for the proposed search.

  2. KKW Analysis for the Dyadosphere of a Charged Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Radinschi

    2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Keski-Vakkuri, Kraus and Wilczek (KKW) analysis is used to compute the temperature and entropy in the dyadosphere of a charged black hole solution. For our purpose we choose the dyadosphere region of the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole solution. Our results show that the expressions of the temperature and entropy in the dyadosphere of this charged black hole are not the Hawking temperature and the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, respectively.

  3. A Quantum Material Model of Static Schwarzschild Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. -T. Sung

    1997-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum-mechanical prescription of static Einstein field equation is proposed in order to construct the matter-metric eigen-states in the interior of a static Schwarzschild black hole where the signature of space-time is chosen as (--++). The spectrum of the quantum states is identified to be the integral multiples of the surface gravity. A statistical explanation of black hole entropy is given and a quantisation rule for the masses of Schwarzschild black holes is proposed.

  4. A mathematical simulation of horizontal drain-hole performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Thomas Ru-Kang

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow Rate Obtained From This Model and From BOSS-AIM. 22 Comparison of The Gas-Oil Ratio Obtained From This Model and From BOSS-AIM. 24 Relative Positions of Conventional Well and Horizontal Drain-Hole in Simulation Runs. . . . . 27 Comparison... of The Economic Oil Recovery Obtained From Horizontal Drain-Hole and From Conventional Well. . . . . . . 28 Comparison of The Cumulative Gas-Oil Ratio Obtained From Horizontal Drain-Hole and From Conventional Well. . . 29 Effect of Horizontal Drain...

  5. Classical and Quantum Properties of Liouville Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. B. Mann

    1994-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Black hole spacetimes can arise when a Liouville field is coupled to two- dimensional gravity. Exact solutions are obtained both classically and when quantum corrections due to back reaction effects are included. The black hole temperature depends upon the mass and the thermodynamic limit breaks down before evaporation of the black hole is complete, indicating that higher-loop effects must be included for a full description of the process.

  6. Brownian Motion of Black Holes in Dense Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Merritt; Peter Berczik; Frederik Laun

    2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the Brownian motion of a massive particle ("black hole") at the center of a galaxy using N-body simulations. Our galaxy models have power-law central density cusps like those observed at the centers of elliptical galaxies. The simulations show that the black hole achieves a steady-state kinetic energy that is substantially different than would be predicted based on the properties of the galaxy model in the absence of the black hole. The reason appears to be that the black hole responds to stars whose velocities have themselves been raised by the presence of the black hole. Over a wide range of density slopes and black hole masses, the black hole's mean kinetic energy is equal to what would be predicted under the assumption that it is in energy equipartition with stars lying within a distance ~r_h/2 from it, where r_h is the black hole's influence radius. The dependence of the Brownian velocity on black hole mass is approximately ~ 1/M^{1/(3-gamma)} with gamma the power-law index of the stellar density profile, rho~1/r^gamma. This is less steep than the 1/M dependence predicted in a model where the effect of the black hole on the stellar velocities is ignored. The influence of a stellar mass spectrum on the black hole's Brownian motion is also evaluated and found to be consistent with predictions from Chandrasekhar's theory. We use these results to derive a probability function for the mass of the Milky Way black hole based on a measurement of its proper motion velocity. Interesting constraints on M will require a velocity resolution exceeding 0.5 km/s.

  7. 1 Evaluation of the Intel Core i7 Turbo Boost feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Charles; Preet Jassi; Ananth Narayan S; Abbas Sadat; Ra Fedorova

    AbstractThe Intel Core i7 processor code named Nehalem has a novel feature called Turbo Boost which dynamically varies the frequencies of the processors cores. The frequency of a core is determined by core temperature, the number of active cores, the estimated power and the estimated current consumption. We perform an extensive analysis of the Turbo Boost technology to characterize its behavior in varying workload conditions. In particular, we analyze how the activation of Turbo Boost is affected by inherent properties of applications (i.e., their rate of memory accesses) and by the overall load imposed on the processor. Furthermore, we analyze the capability of Turbo Boost to mitigate Amdahls law by accelerating sequential phases of parallel applications. Finally, we estimate the impact of the Turbo Boost technology on the overall energy consumption. We found that Turbo Boost can provide (on average) up to a 6% reduction in execution time but can result in an increase in energy consumption up to 16%. Our results also indicate that Turbo Boost sets the processor to operate at maximum frequency (where it has the potential to provide the maximum gain in performance) when the mapping of threads to hardware contexts is sub-optimal. I.

  8. Asteroseismic Diagnostics of Stellar Convective Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwesh Mazumdar; Sarbani Basu; Braxton L. Collier; Pierre Demarque

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the small frequency separations as diagnostics of the mass of the convective core and evolutionary stage of solar-type stars. We demonstrate how the small separations can be combined to provide sensitive tests for the presence of convective overshoot at the edge of the core. These studies are focused on low degree oscillation modes, the only modes expected to be detected in distant stars. Using simulated data with realistic errors, we find that the mass of the convective core can be estimated to within 5% if the total stellar mass is known. Systematic errors arising due to uncertainty in the mass could be up to 20%. The evolutionary stage of the star, determined in terms of the central hydrogen abundance using our proposed technique, however, is much less sensitive to the mass estimate.

  9. Small Hairy Black Holes in Global AdS Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pallab Basu; Jyotirmoy Bhattacharya; Sayantani Bhattacharyya; R. Loganayagam; Shiraz Minwalla; V. Umesh

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study small charged black holes in global AdS spacetime in the presence of a charged massless minimally coupled scalar field. In a certain parameter range these black holes suffer from well known superradiant instabilities. We demonstrate that the end point of the resultant tachyon condensation process is a hairy black hole which we construct analytically in a perturbative expansion in the black hole radius. At leading order our solution is a small undeformed RNAdS black hole immersed into a charged scalar condensate that fills the AdS `box'. These hairy black hole solutions appear in a two parameter family labelled by their mass and charge. Their mass is bounded from below by a function of their charge; at the lower bound a hairy black hole reduces to a regular horizon free soliton which can also be thought of as a nonlinear Bose condensate. We compute the microcanonical phase diagram of our system at small mass, and demonstrate that it exhibits a second order `phase transition' between the RNAdS black hole and the hairy black hole phases.

  10. Hydrodynamic model for electron-hole plasma in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Svintsov; V. Vyurkov; S. Yurchenko; T. Otsuji; V. Ryzhii

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a hydrodynamic model describing steady-state and dynamic electron and hole transport properties of graphene structures which accounts for the features of the electron and hole spectra. It is intended for electron-hole plasma in graphene characterized by high rate of intercarrier scattering compared to external scattering (on phonons and impurities), i.e., for intrinsic or optically pumped (bipolar plasma), and gated graphene (virtually monopolar plasma). We demonstrate that the effect of strong interaction of electrons and holes on their transport can be treated as a viscous friction between the electron and hole components. We apply the developed model for the calculations of the graphene dc conductivity, in particular, the effect of mutual drag of electrons and holes is described. The spectra and damping of collective excitations in graphene in the bipolar and monopolar limits are found. It is shown that at high gate voltages and, hence, at high electron and low hole densities (or vice-versa), the excitations are associated with the self-consistent electric field and the hydrodynamic pressure (plasma waves). In intrinsic and optically pumped graphene, the waves constitute quasineutral perturbations of the electron and hole densities (electron-hole sound waves) with the velocity being dependent only on the fundamental graphene constants.

  11. Energy Distribution of a Charged Regular Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irina Radinschi

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the energy distribution of a charged regular black hole by using the energy-momentum complexes of Einstein and M{\\o}ller.

  12. Spectroscopy of the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deyou Chen; Haitang Yang

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The entropy spectrum of a spherically symmetric black hole was derived via the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule in Majhi and Vagenas's work. Extending this work to charged and rotating black holes, we quantize the horizon area and the entropy of an Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion (EMDA) black hole via the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule and the adiabatic invariance. The result shows the area spectrum and the entropy spectrum are respectively equally spaced and independent on the parameters of the black hole.

  13. Particle Acceleration Around 5-dimensional Kerr Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmadjon Abdujabbarov; Naresh Dadhich; Bobomurat Ahmedov; Husan Eshkuvatov

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    On the lines of the 4-dimensional Kerr black hole we consider the particle acceleration near a 5-dimensional Kerr black hole which has the two rotation parameters. It turns out that the center of mass energy of the two equal mass colliding particles as expected diverges for the extremal black hole and there is a symmetry in the results for $\\theta = 0, \\pi/2$. Because of the two rotation parameters, $r=0$ can be a horizon without being a curvature singularity. It is shown that the acceleration of particles to high energies near the 5-D extreme rotating black hole avoids fine-tuning of the angular momentum of particles.

  14. Moduli vacuum bubbles produced by evaporating black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J. R. [Physics Department, Indiana University Northwest, 3400 Broadway, Gary, Indiana 46408 (United States)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model with a toroidally compactified extra dimension giving rise to a temperature-dependent 4D effective potential with one-loop contributions due to the Casimir effect, along with a 5D cosmological constant. The forms of the effective potential at low and high temperatures indicate a possibility for the formation of a domain wall bubble, formed by the modulus scalar field, surrounding an evaporating black hole. This is viewed as an example of a recently proposed black hole vacuum bubble arising from matter-sourced moduli fields in the vicinity of an evaporating black hole [D. Green, E. Silverstein, and D. Starr, Phys. Rev. D 74, 024004 (2006)]. The black hole bubble can be highly opaque to lower-energy particles and photons, and thereby entrap them within. For high-temperature black holes, there may also be a symmetry-breaking black hole bubble of false vacuum of the type previously conjectured by Moss [I. G. Moss, Phys. Rev. D 32, 1333 (1985)], tending to reflect low-energy particles from its wall. A double bubble composed of these two different types of bubble may form around the black hole, altering the hole's emission spectrum that reaches outside observers. Smaller mass black holes that have already evaporated away could have left vacuum bubbles behind that contribute to the dark matter.

  15. Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (1993) Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleThermalGr...

  16. accreting black holes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collapse or accretion event. We consider how a red hole solution can solve the "energy crisis" and power extremely energetic gamma ray bursts and hypernovae. James S. Graber...

  17. Complete single-horizon quantum corrected black hole spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltola, Ari; Kunstatter, Gabor [Department of Physics and Winnipeg Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a semiclassical polymerization of the interior of Schwarzschild black holes gives rise to a tantalizing candidate for a nonsingular, single-horizon black hole spacetime. The exterior has nonzero quantum stress energy but closely approximates the classical spacetime for macroscopic black holes. The interior exhibits a bounce at a microscopic scale and then expands indefinitely to a Kantowski-Sachs spacetime. Polymerization therefore removes the singularity and produces a scenario reminiscent of past proposals for universe creation via quantum effects inside a black hole.

  18. Exploring higher dimensional black holes at the large hadron collider.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Chris M; Palmer, M J; Parker, Michael A; Richardson, P

    cross section for production of black holes not too much heavier than the fundamental Planck scale corresponds to a production rate of a few Hertz at the LHC design luminosity. In the following sections, the process of the black hole production and decay... scattering in quantum gravity, hep-th/9906038. [7] R. Emparan, G. T. Horowitz, and R. C. Myers, Exact description of black holes on branes, JHEP 01 (2000) 007, [hep-th/9911043]. [8] S. B. Giddings and S. Thomas, High energy colliders as black hole factories...

  19. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

  20. The ecology of star clusters and intermediate mass black holes in the Galactic bulge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Portegies Zwart; Holger Baumgardt; Stephen L. W. McMillan; Junichiro Makino; Piet Hut; Toshi Ebisuzaki

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate the inner 100pc of the Milky-Way Galaxy to study the formation and evolution of the population of star clusters and intermediate mass black holes. For this study we perform extensive direct N-body simulations of the star clusters which reside in the bulge, and of the inner few tenth of parsecs of the super massive black hole in the Galactic center. In our N-body simulations the dynamical friction of the star cluster in the tidal field of the bulge are taken into account via (semi)analytic soluations. The N-body calculations are used to calibrate a (semi)analytic model of the formation and evolution of the bulge. We find that about 10% of the clusters born within 100pc of the Galactic center undergo core collapse during their inward migration and form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) via runaway stellar merging. After the clusters dissolve, these IMBHs continue their inward drift, carrying a few of the most massive stars with them. We predict that region within about 10 parsec of the SMBH is populated by about 50IMBHs of some 1000Msun. Several of these are expected to be accompanied still by some of the most massive stars from the star cluster. We also find that within a few milliparsec of the SMBH there is a steady population of several IMBHs. This population drives the merger rate between IMBHs and the SMBH at a rate of about one per 10Myr, sufficient to build the accumulate majority of mass of the SMBH. Mergers of IMBHs with SMBHs throughout the universe are detectable by LISA, at a rate of about two per week.