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1

Core Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Holes Core Holes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Core Holes Details Activities (8) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core holes are drilled to identify lithology and mineralization Stratigraphic/Structural: Retrieved samples can be used to identify fracture networks or faults Hydrological: Thermal: Thermal conductivity measurements can be done on retrieved samples. Dictionary.png Core Holes: A core hole is a well that is drilled using a hallow drill bit coated with synthetic diamonds for the purposes of extracting whole rock samples from

2

Core Holes At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date 2002 - 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration...

3

Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eichelberger, Et Al., 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger, Et...

4

Core Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski,...

5

Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Urban, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Urban, Et Al., 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Urban, Et Al., 1987)...

6

Core Holes At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Bargar, Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date 1989 - 1991 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration...

7

Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Drilling for the four holes followed the same general pattern: 1) set a conductor casing to a depth of 30-50', 2) drill - 6" hole through mostly sand/clay sedentary formations to 500-600', 3) set 4-1/2" surface casing at that depth 4) core HQ (3.89" dia.) mostly through limestone/dolornite or

8

Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

understand the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal alteration, and subsurface architecture of the Valles caldera. Several authors have reported results from these core holes,...

9

Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

understand the stratigraphy, structure, hydrothermal alteration, and subsurface architecture of the Valles caldera. Several authors have reported results from these core holes,...

10

Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three core holes drilled between 2002 and 2005. Depths: 1,728; 3,435; 4,727 ft. Two deeper wells encountered temps of 327 and 329 oF and permable fractures in sedimentary and volcanic rocks; enabled injection and flow testing up to 70 gpm. Quartz fluid inclusions give temps of 264 and 316 oF. Core drillling allowed an understanding of geology and geothermal system that could never have been obtained from cuttings in this particular geologic setting. References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field

11

Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell Published: GRC, 2005 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Lake City Hot Springs Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Hole_Drilling_And_Testing_At_The_Lake_City,_California_Geothermal_Field&oldid=389996

12

Black Holes in Active Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent years have seen tremendous progress in the quest to detect supermassive black holes in the centers of nearby galaxies, and gas-dynamical measurements of the central masses of active galaxies have been valuable contributions to the local black hole census. This review summarizes measurement techniques and results from observations of spatially resolved gas disks in active galaxies, and reverberation mapping of the broad-line regions of Seyfert galaxies and quasars. Future prospects for the study of black hole masses in active galaxies, both locally and at high redshift, are discussed.

A. J. Barth

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists from the University of Frankfurt in Germany, Berkeley Lab, Kansas State University, and Auburn University has now resolved the issue with an appropriate twist of quantum fuzziness. By means of coincident detection of the photoelectron ejected from molecular nitrogen and the Auger electron emitted femtoseconds later, the team found that how the measurements are done determines which description-localized or delocalized-is valid.

14

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists from the University of Frankfurt in Germany, Berkeley Lab, Kansas State University, and Auburn University has now resolved the issue with an appropriate twist of quantum fuzziness. By means of coincident detection of the photoelectron ejected from molecular nitrogen and the Auger electron emitted femtoseconds later, the team found that how the measurements are done determines which description-localized or delocalized-is valid.

15

Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Benoit, 1984...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basis Several core holes were also drilled in the caldera's west moat by Phillips Petroleum Company in 1982, including: PLV-1, drilled to approximately 711 m depth PLV-2,...

16

Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dennis L. Nielson, Pisto Larry, C.W. Criswell, R. Gribble, K. Meeker, J.A. Musgrave, T. Smith, D. Wilson (1989) Scientific Core Hole Valles Caldera No. 2B (VC-2B), New Mexico:...

17

Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Probing Core-Hole Localization Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen Print Wednesday, 25 February 2009 00:00 The behavior of the core hole created in molecular x-ray photoemission experiments has provided molecular scientists with a valuable window through which to probe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules. But the answer to one fundamental quantum question-whether the core hole is localized or delocalized-has remained elusive for diatomic molecules in which both atoms are the same element. An international team of scientists from the University of Frankfurt in Germany, Berkeley Lab, Kansas State University, and Auburn University has now resolved the issue with an appropriate twist of quantum fuzziness. By means of coincident detection of the photoelectron ejected from molecular nitrogen and the Auger electron emitted femtoseconds later, the team found that how the measurements are done determines which description-localized or delocalized-is valid.

18

Retarded cores, black holes and galaxy formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... It seems likely that elliptical galaxies contain massive 'black holes'?objects collapsed within their Schwarzschild radii?in their nuclei (see, for example, Wolfe and Burbidge2). The principal ... seems to be required to power the observed phenomena. For such a mass, the Schwarzschild radius (R s) is about 10?4 pc; for a mass of 1011 ...

John Gribbin

1974-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

19

Core Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Stratigraphic slim hole 24-33 was drilled in a lease area south of current production during March 2001. The well was continuously cored from 235 m to the total depth of 610 m. Several fracture zones were encountered with noticeably large fracture apertures and the maximum recorded temperature was comparable to nearby productive wells. A second well, slim hole 12-33, was drilled to a total depth of 297 m during April 2001. Continuous core was taken from 152 m to total depth. Numerous open fractures were also observed in this well and the maximum recorded temperature was similar to the 24-33 well.

20

Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print Wednesday, 22 February 2006 00:00 A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental challenge for the radiation chemistry community to unravel the early time dynamics of electronically excited states in water because their short (femtosecond) time scales are difficult to access directly with pump-probe measurements. Using a combination of isotope substitution experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, researchers from Sweden, Germany, and the U.S. have shown that the ultrafast (0- to 10-fs) dissociation dynamics of liquid water can be successfully probed with x-ray emission spectroscopy.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Core Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Drilling took longer than scheduled due to severe losses of circulation in the shallow subsurface causing considerable disruptions with the drilling and difficulty with cementing the 7 inch and 4.5 inch casing. An artesian flow of hot water was encountered at 163ft (49.7m) but efforts to obtain an uncontaminated sample of the water were frustrated by unstable hole conditions. In contrast, the 3.782" HQ interval of the well, continuously

22

Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental challenge for the radiation chemistry community to unravel the early time dynamics of electronically excited states in water because their short (femtosecond) time scales are difficult to access directly with pump-probe measurements. Using a combination of isotope substitution experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, researchers from Sweden, Germany, and the U.S. have shown that the ultrafast (0- to 10-fs) dissociation dynamics of liquid water can be successfully probed with x-ray emission spectroscopy.

23

Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental challenge for the radiation chemistry community to unravel the early time dynamics of electronically excited states in water because their short (femtosecond) time scales are difficult to access directly with pump-probe measurements. Using a combination of isotope substitution experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, researchers from Sweden, Germany, and the U.S. have shown that the ultrafast (0- to 10-fs) dissociation dynamics of liquid water can be successfully probed with x-ray emission spectroscopy.

24

Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water Print A thorough understanding of the chemical processes that are initiated when radiation interacts with aqueous systems is essential for many diverse fields, from condensed matter physics to medicine to environmental science. An incoming photon with enough energy to produce a core hole in a water molecule sets off motions that can affect bonding configurations, which in turn affect subsequent chemical-reaction pathways. However, it is a fundamental challenge for the radiation chemistry community to unravel the early time dynamics of electronically excited states in water because their short (femtosecond) time scales are difficult to access directly with pump-probe measurements. Using a combination of isotope substitution experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, researchers from Sweden, Germany, and the U.S. have shown that the ultrafast (0- to 10-fs) dissociation dynamics of liquid water can be successfully probed with x-ray emission spectroscopy.

25

Processing of Activated Core Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN FAILING CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results of a systematic study of failing core-collapse supernovae and the formation of stellar-mass black holes (BHs). Using our open-source general-relativistic 1.5D code GR1D equipped with a three-species neutrino leakage/heating scheme and over 100 presupernova models, we study the effects of the choice of nuclear equation of state (EOS), zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass and metallicity, rotation, and mass-loss prescription on BH formation. We find that the outcome, for a given EOS, can be estimated, to first order, by a single parameter, the compactness of the stellar core at bounce. By comparing protoneutron star (PNS) structure at the onset of gravitational instability with solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkof equations, we find that thermal pressure support in the outer PNS core is responsible for raising the maximum PNS mass by up to 25% above the cold NS value. By artificially increasing neutrino heating, we find the critical neutrino heating efficiency required for exploding a given progenitor structure and connect these findings with ZAMS conditions, establishing, albeit approximately, for the first time based on actual collapse simulations, the mapping between ZAMS parameters and the outcome of core collapse. We also study the effect of progenitor rotation and find that the dimensionless spin of nascent BHs may be robustly limited below a* = Jc/GM{sup 2} = 1 by the appearance of nonaxisymmetric rotational instabilities.

O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D., E-mail: evanoc@tapir.caltech.edu, E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu [TAPIR, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Active Cores in Deep Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep field observations are an essential tool to probe the cosmological evolution of galaxies. In this context, X-ray deep fields provide information about some of the most energetic cosmological objects: active galactic nuclei (AGN). Astronomers are interested in detecting sufficient numbers of AGN to probe the accretion history at high redshift. This talk gives an overview of the knowledge resulting from a highly complete soft X-ray selected sample collected with ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Chandra deep fields. The principal outcome based on X-ray luminosity functions and space density evolution studies is that low-luminosity AGN evolve in a dramatically different way from high-luminosity AGN: The most luminous quasars perform at significantly earlier cosmic times and are most numerous in a unit volume at cosmological redshift z~2. In contrast, low-luminosity AGN evolve later and their space density peaks at z~0.7. This finding is also interpreted as an anti-hierarchical growth of supermassive black holes in the Universe. Comparing this with star formation rate history studies one concludes that supermassive black holes enter the cosmic stage before the bulk of the first stars. Therefore, first solutions of the so-called hen-egg problem are suggested. Finally, status developments and expectations of ongoing and future extended observations such as the XMM-COSMOS project are highlighted.

G. Hasinger; A. Mueller

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

28

K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Seventeen K/Ar dates were obtained on illitic clays within Valles caldera (1.13 Ma) to investigate the impact of hydrothermal alteration on Quaternary to Precambrian intracaldera and pre-caldera rocks in a large,

29

Double Core-Hole Production in N{sub 2}: Beating the Auger Clock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the creation of double K-shell holes in N{sub 2} molecules via sequential absorption of two photons on a time scale shorter than the core-hole lifetime by using intense x-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. The production and decay of these states is characterized by photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. In molecules, two types of double core holes are expected, the first with two core holes on the same N atom, and the second with one core hole on each N atom. We report the first direct observations of the former type of core hole in a molecule, in good agreement with theory, and provide an experimental upper bound for the relative contribution of the latter type.

Fang, L.; Berrah, N. [Physics Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008 (United States); Hoener, M. [Physics Department, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Gessner, O.; Kornilov, O. [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tarantelli, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universitadi Perugia, and ISTM-CNR, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Pratt, S. T.; Kanter, E. P. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Buth, C. [PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Physics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Guehr, M.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Cryan, J.; Glownia, M. [PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Coffee, R. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Chen, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kukk, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku 20014 Turku (Finland); Leone, S. R. [Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of California Berkeley, California 94710 (United States)

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

Double core hole production in N{sub 2} : beating the auger clock.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the creation of double K-shell holes in N{sub 2} molecules via sequential absorption of two photons on a time scale shorter than the core-hole lifetime by using intense x-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. The production and decay of these states is characterized by photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. In molecules, two types of double core holes are expected, the first with two core holes on the same N atom, and the second with one core hole on each N atom. We report the first direct observations of the former type of core hole in a molecule, in good agreement with theory, and provide an experimental upper bound for the relative contribution of the latter type.

Fang, L.; Hoener, M.; Gessner, O.; Tarantelli, F.; Pratt, S. T.; Kornilov, O.; Buth, C.; Guhr, M.; Kanter, E. P.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Chen, M.; Coffee, R.; Cryan, J.; Glownia, J. M.; Kukk, E.; Leone, S. R.; Berrah, N. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( XSD); (Western Michigan Univ.); (LBNL); (Univ. di Perugia); (Louisiana State Univ.); (SLAC National Accelerator Lab.); (LLNL); (Univ. of Turku); (Univ. of California at Berkeley)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada Abstract N/A Author U.S. Geological Survey Published Publisher Not Provided, 2009 Report Number 2009-1022 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada Citation U.S. Geological Survey. 2009. Physical-Property Measurements on Core Samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect,

32

Gate-Modulated Thermoelectric Power Factor of Hole Gas in GeSi CoreShell Nanowires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We experimentally studied the thermoelectric power factor of hole gas in individual GeSi coreshell nanowires with Ge core diameters ranging from 11 to 25 nm. The Ge cores are dopant-free, but the Fermi level in the cores is pinned by surface and defect ...

Jaeyun Moon; Ji-Hun Kim; Zack C.Y. Chen; Jie Xiang; Renkun Chen

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

33

On black hole evolution in active galactic nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......whether higher accretion rates during low activity periods...accretion discs|black hole physics|galaxies: active|galaxies...the decreasing accretion rate must pass through the range of intermediate accretion rates ( _10-3 .AEdd)' At......

R. Moderski; M. Sikora

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fran Ridge horizontal coring summary report hole UE-25h No. 1, Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hole UE-25h No. 1 was core drilled during December 1982 and January 1983 within several degrees of due west, 400 ft horizontally into the southeast slope of Fran Ridge at an altitude of 3409 ft. The purpose of the hole was to obtain data pertinent for radionuclide transport studies in the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff. This unit had been selected previously as the host rock for the potential underground nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, adjacent to the southwestern part of the Nevada Test Site. The hole was core drilled first with air, then with air mist, and finally with air, soap, and water. Many problems were encountered, including sloughing of tuff into the uncased hole, vibration of the drill rods, high rates of bit wear, and lost circulation of drilling fluids. On the basis of experience gained in drilling this hole, ways to improve horizontal coring with air are suggested in this report. All of the recovered core, except those pieces that were wrapped and waxed, were examined for lithophysal content, for fractures, and for fracture-fill mineralization. The results of this examination are given in this report. Core recovery greater than 80% at between 209 and 388 ft permitted a fracture frequency analysis. The results are similar to the fracture frequencies observed in densely welded nonlithophysal tuff from holes USW GU-3 and USW G-4. The fractures in core from UE-25h No. 1 were found to be smooth and nonmineralized or coated with calcite, silica, or manganese oxide. Open fractures with caliche (porous, nonsparry calcite) were not observed beyond 83.5 ft, which corresponds to an overburden depth of 30 ft.

Norris, A.E.; Byers, F.M. Jr.; Merson, T.J.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A comparative theoretical study on core-hole excitation spectra of azafullerene and its derivatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The core-hole excitation spectranear-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shake-up satellites have been simulated at the level of density functional theory for the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its derivatives (C{sub 59}N){sup +}, C{sub 59}HN, (C{sub 59}N){sub 2}, and C{sub 59}NC{sub 60}, in which the XPS shake-up satellites were simulated using our developed equivalent core hole Kohn-Sham (ECH-KS) density functional theory approach [B. Gao, Z. Wu, and Y. Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234704 (2008)] which aims for the study of XPS shake-up satellites of large-scale molecules. Our calculated spectra are generally in good agreement with available experimental results that validates the use of the ECH-KS method in the present work. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS, XES, and XPS shake-up satellites spectra in general can be used as fingerprints to distinguish the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its different derivatives. Meanwhile, different carbon K-edge spectra could also provide detailed information of (local) electronic structures of different molecules. In particular, a peak (at around 284.5 eV) in the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectrum of the heterodimer C{sub 59}NC{sub 60} is confirmed to be related to the electron transfer from the C{sub 59}N part to the C{sub 60} part in this charge-transfer complex.

Deng, Yunfeng [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China) [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Gao, Bin, E-mail: bin.gao@uit.no [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China) [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry (CTCC), Department of Chemistry, University of TromsThe Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Troms (Norway); Deng, Mingsen, E-mail: deng@gznc.edu.cn [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China)] [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Luo, Yi [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China) [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018 (China); Department of Theoretical Chemistry, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Electron Core-Hole Interaction in the X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of 3d Transition Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fully relativistic scheme is presented that allows one to deal with the electronic band structure of a solid and the influence of the electron core-hole interaction on its x-ray absorption spectra on the same level. This is achieved in a parameter-free way by working throughout in the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory and linear response formalism. Application to the L2,3-absorption spectra of 3d transition metals demonstrates that the electron core-hole interaction intermixes the L2 and L3 partial spectra, strongly affecting the so-called branching ratio. The consequences of this for the magnetic circular x-ray dichroism sum rules are discussed.

J. Schwitalla and H. Ebert

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

Regular black holes: Electrically charged solutions, Reissner-Nordstroem outside a de Sitter core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To have the correct picture of a black hole as a whole, it is of crucial importance to understand its interior. The singularities that lurk inside the horizon of the usual Kerr-Newman family of black hole solutions signal an endpoint to the physical laws and, as such, should be substituted in one way or another. A proposal that has been around for sometime is to replace the singular region of the spacetime by a region containing some form of matter or false vacuum configuration that can also cohabit with the black hole interior. Black holes without singularities are called regular black holes. In the present work, regular black hole solutions are found within general relativity coupled to Maxwell's electromagnetism and charged matter. We show that there are objects which correspond to regular charged black holes, whose interior region is de Sitter, whose exterior region is Reissner-Nordstroem, and the boundary between both regions is made of an electrically charged spherically symmetric coat. There are several types of solutions: regular nonextremal black holes with a null matter boundary, regular nonextremal black holes with a timelike matter boundary, regular extremal black holes with a timelike matter boundary, and regular overcharged stars with a timelike matter boundary. The main physical and geometrical properties of such charged regular solutions are analyzed.

Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zanchin, Vilson T. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica - CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico - IST, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa - UTL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adelia, 166, 09210-170, Santo Andre, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coordenadoria de Astronomia e Astrofisica, Observatorio Nacional-MCT, Rua General Jose Cristino 77, 20921-400 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Structure of the particle-hole amplitudes in no-core shell model wave functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the structure of the no-core shell model wave functions for {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C by investigating the ground state and first excited state electron scattering charge form factors. In both nuclei, large particle-hole (ph) amplitudes in the wave functions appear with the opposite sign to that needed to reproduce the shape of the (e,e{sup '}) form factors, the charge radii, and the B(E2) values for the lowest two states. The difference in sign appears to arise mainly from the monopole DELTA(Planck constant/2pi)omega=2 matrix elements of the kinetic and potential energy (T+V) that transform under the harmonic oscillator SU(3) symmetries as (lambda,mu)=(2,0). These are difficult to determine self-consistently, but they have a strong effect on the structure of the low-lying states and on the giant monopole and quadrupole resonances. The Lee-Suzuki transformation, used to account for the restricted nature of the space in terms of an effective interaction, introduces large higher-order DELTA(Planck constant/2pi)omega=n,n>2, ph amplitudes in the wave functions. The latter ph excitations aggravate the disagreement between the experimental and predicted (e,e{sup '}) form factors with increasing model spaces, especially at high momentum transfers. For sufficiently large model spaces, the situation begins to resolve itself for {sup 6}Li, but the convergence is slow. A prescription to constrain the ph excitations would likely accelerate convergence of the calculations.

Hayes, A. C. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kwiatkowski, A. A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE MASS-SPHEROID STELLAR MASS RELATION FOR SERSIC AND CORE-SERSIC GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have examined the relationship between supermassive black hole mass (M{sub BH}) and the stellar mass of the host spheroid (M{sub sph,*}) for a sample of 75 nearby galaxies. To derive the spheroid stellar masses we used improved Two Micron All Sky Survey K{sub s}-band photometry from the ARCHANGEL photometry pipeline. Dividing our sample into core-Sersic and Sersic galaxies, we find that they are described by very different M{sub BH}-M{sub sph,*} relations. For core-Sersic galaxies-which are typically massive and luminous, with M{sub BH} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }-we find M{sub BH}{proportional_to} M{sub sph,*}{sup 0.97{+-}0.14}, consistent with other literature relations. However, for the Sersic galaxies-with typically lower masses, M{sub sph,*} {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }-we find M{sub BH}{proportional_to}M{sub sph,*}{sup 2.22{+-}0.58}, a dramatically steeper slope that differs by more than 2 standard deviations. This relation confirms that, for Sersic galaxies, M{sub BH} is not a constant fraction of M{sub sph,*}. Sersic galaxies can grow via the accretion of gas which fuels both star formation and the central black hole, as well as through merging. Their black hole grows significantly more rapidly than their host spheroid, prior to growth by dry merging events that produce core-Sersic galaxies, where the black hole and spheroid grow in lockstep. We have additionally compared our Sersic M{sub BH}-M{sub sph,*} relation with the corresponding relation for nuclear star clusters, confirming that the two classes of central massive object follow significantly different scaling relations.

Scott, Nicholas; Graham, Alister W [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Vic 3122 (Australia); Schombert, James [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Black Hole Formation in Core-Collapse Supernovae and Time-of-Flight Measurements of the Neutrino Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early black hole formation in core-collapse supernovae may be triggered by mass accretion or a change in the high-density equation of state. We consider the possibility that black hole formation happens when the flux of neutrinos is still measurably high. If this occurs, then the neutrino signal from the supernova will be terminated abruptly (the transition takes $\\lesssim 0.5$ ms). The properties and duration of the signal before the cutoff are important measures of both the physics and astrophysics of the cooling proto-neutron star. For the event rates expected in present and proposed detectors, the cutoff will generally appear sharp, thus allowing model-independent time-of-flight mass tests for the neutrinos after the cutoff. If black hole formation occurs relatively early, within a few ($\\sim 1$) seconds after core collapse, then the expected luminosities are of order $L_{BH} = 10^{52}$ erg/s per flavor. In this case, the neutrino mass sensitivity can be extraordinary. For a supernova at a distance $D = 10$ kpc, SuperKamiokande can detect a $\\bar{\

J. F. Beacom; R. N. Boyd; A. Mezzacappa

2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

THE COLD SHOULDER: EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACTIVE REGION CORES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coronal heating mechanism for active region core loops is difficult to determine because these loops are often not resolved and cannot be studied individually. Rather, we concentrate on the 'inter-moss' areas between loop footpoints. We use observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer and the X-Ray Telescope to calculate the emission measure distributions of eight inter-moss areas in five different active regions. The combined data sets provide both high- and low-temperature constraints and ensure complete coverage in the temperature range appropriate for active regions. For AR 11113, the emission can be modeled with heating events that occur on timescales less than the cooling time. The loops in the core regions appear to be close to equilibrium and are consistent with steady heating. The other regions studied, however, appear to be dominated by nanoflare heating. Our results are consistent with the idea that active region age is an important parameter in determining whether steady or nanoflare heating is primarily responsible for the core emission, that is, older regions are more likely to be dominated by steady heating, while younger regions show more evidence of nanoflares.

Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its...

43

Double core-hole spectroscopy of transient plasmas produced in the interaction of ultraintense x-ray pulses with neon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Double core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon atomic system in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in the detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the highly transient plasmas. For x-ray pulses with photon energy in the range of 937-1030 eV, where $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonance absorption from single core-hole (SCH) states of neon charge states exist, inner-shell resonant absorption (IRA) effects play important roles in the time evolution of population and DCH spectroscopy. Such IRA physical effects are illustrated in detail by investigating the interaction of x-ray pulses at a photon energy of 944 eV, which corresponds to the $1s\\rightarrow 2p$ resonant absorption from the SCH states ($1s2s^22p^4$, $1s2s2p^5$ and $1s2p^6$) of Ne$^{3+}$. After averaging over the space and time distribution o...

Gao, Cheng; Yuan, Jianmin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

DWARF GALAXIES WITH OPTICAL SIGNATURES OF ACTIVE MASSIVE BLACK HOLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a sample of 151 dwarf galaxies (10{sup 8.5} ?< M{sub *} ?< 10{sup 9.5} M{sub ?}) that exhibit optical spectroscopic signatures of accreting massive black holes (BHs), increasing the number of known active galaxies in this stellar-mass range by more than an order of magnitude. Utilizing data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 and stellar masses from the NASA-Sloan Atlas, we have systematically searched for active BHs in ?25,000 emission-line galaxies with stellar masses comparable to the Magellanic Clouds and redshifts z < 0.055. Using the narrow-line [O III]/H? versus [N II]/H? diagnostic diagram, we find photoionization signatures of BH accretion in 136 galaxies, a small fraction of which also exhibit broad H? emission. For these broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates, we estimate BH masses using standard virial techniques and find a range of 10{sup 5} ?< M{sub BH} ?< 10{sup 6} M{sub ?} and a median of M{sub BH} ? 2 10{sup 5} M{sub ?}. We also detect broad H? in 15 galaxies that have narrow-line ratios consistent with star-forming galaxies. Follow-up observations are required to determine if these are true type 1 AGN or if the broad H? is from stellar processes. The median absolute magnitude of the host galaxies in our active sample is M{sub g} = 18.1 mag, which is ?1-2 mag fainter than previous samples of AGN hosts with low-mass BHs. This work constrains the smallest galaxies that can form a massive BH, with implications for BH feedback in low-mass galaxies and the origin of the first supermassive BH seeds.

Reines, Amy E. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Geha, Marla, E-mail: areines@nrao.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

LOW-LATITUDE CORONAL HOLES, DECAYING ACTIVE REGIONS, AND GLOBAL CORONAL MAGNETIC STRUCTURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the relationship between decaying active-region magnetic fields, coronal holes, and the global coronal magnetic structure using Global Oscillations Network Group synoptic magnetograms, Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory extreme-ultraviolet synoptic maps, and coronal potential-field source-surface models. We analyze 14 decaying regions and associated coronal holes occurring between early 2007 and late 2010, 4 from cycle 23 and 10 from cycle 24. We investigate the relationship between asymmetries in active regions' positive and negative magnetic intensities, asymmetric magnetic decay rates, flux imbalances, global field structure, and coronal hole formation. Whereas new emerging active regions caused changes in the large-scale coronal field, the coronal fields of the 14 decaying active regions only opened under the condition that the global coronal structure remained almost unchanged. This was because the dominant slowly varying, low-order multipoles prevented opposing-polarity fields from opening and the remnant active-region flux preserved the regions' low-order multipole moments long after the regions had decayed. Thus, the polarity of each coronal hole necessarily matched the polar field on the side of the streamer belt where the corresponding active region decayed. For magnetically isolated active regions initially located within the streamer belt, the more intense polarity generally survived to form the hole. For non-isolated regions, flux imbalance and topological asymmetry prompted the opposite to occur in some cases.

Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Haislmaier, K. J. [George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Linking the fate of massive black hole binaries to the active galactic nuclei luminosity function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massive black hole binaries are naturally predicted in the context of the hierarchical model of structure formation. The binaries that manage to lose most of their angular momentum can coalesce to form a single remnant. In the last stages of this process, the holes undergo an extremely loud phase of gravitational wave emission, possibly detectable by current and future probes. The theoretical effort towards obtaining a coherent physical picture of the binary path down to coalescence is still underway. In this paper, for the first time, we take advantage of observational studies of active galactic nuclei evolution to constrain the efficiency of gas-driven binary decay. Under conservative assumptions we find that gas accretion toward the nuclear black holes can efficiently lead binaries of any mass forming at high redshift (> 2) to coalescence within the current time. The observed "downsizing" trend of the accreting black hole luminosity function further implies that the gas inflow is sufficient to drive light ...

Dotti, Massimo; Montuori, Carmen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Slim Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slim Holes Slim Holes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Slim Holes Details Activities (30) Areas (24) Regions (1) NEPA(6) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: If core is collected Stratigraphic/Structural: If core is collected Hydrological: Fluid flow and water chemistry Thermal: Thermal gradient or bottom hole temperature Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 100.0010,000 centUSD 0.1 kUSD 1.0e-4 MUSD 1.0e-7 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 169.8916,989 centUSD 0.17 kUSD 1.6989e-4 MUSD 1.6989e-7 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 200.0020,000 centUSD

48

Variable depth core sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

Bourgeois, Peter M. (Hamburg, NY); Reger, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Variable depth core sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

50

9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9,400 years of cosmic radiation and solar activity from ice cores and tree rings Friedhelm, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8582, Japan Edited by Timothy Patterson, Carleton) Understanding the temporal variation of cosmic radiation and solar activity during the Holocene is essential

Wehrli, Bernhard

51

PeV neutrinos observed by IceCube from cores of active galactic nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I show that the high energy neutrino flux predicted to arise from active galactic nuclei cores can explain the PeV neutrinos detected by IceCube without conflicting with the constraints from the observed extragalactic cosmic-ray and ?-ray backgrounds.

Floyd W. Stecker

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Woldegabriel & Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Woldegabriel & Goff, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Samples for age dating taken from core hole VC-2B in the Suphur Springs area of the Valles Caldera. References Giday WoldeGabriel, Fraser Goff (1992) K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Woldegabriel_%26_Goff,_1992)&oldid=387687"

53

Lattice-Strain Control of the Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrocatalysis will play a key role in future energy conversion and storage technologies, such as water electrolysers, fuel cells and metalair batteries. Molecular interactions between chemical reactants and the catalytic surface control the activity and efficiency, and hence need to be optimized; however, generalized experimental strategies to do so are scarce. Here we show how lattice strain can be used experimentally to tune the catalytic activity of dealloyed bimetallic nanoparticles for the oxygen-reduction reaction, a key barrier to the application of fuel cells and metalair batteries. We demonstrate the coreshell structure of the catalyst and clarify the mechanistic origin of its activity. The platinum-rich shell exhibits compressive strain, which results in a shift of the electronic band structure of platinum and weakening chemisorption of oxygenated species. We combine synthesis, measurements and an understanding of strain from theory to generate a reactivitystrain relationship that provides guidelines for tuning electrocatalytic activity.

Strasser, Peter; Shirlaine, Koh; Anniyev, Toyli; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; More, Karren L.; Yu, Chengfei; Liu, Zengcai; Kaya, Sarp; Nordlund, Dennis; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Toney, Michael F.; Nilsson, Anders R.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Lattice-Strain Control of the Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrocatalysis will play a key role in future energy conversion and storage technologies, such as water electrolysers, fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Molecular interactions between chemical reactants and the catalytic surface control the activity and efficiency, and hence need to be optimized; however, generalized experimental strategies to do so are scarce. Here we show how lattice strain can be used experimentally to tune the catalytic activity of dealloyed bimetallic nanoparticles for the oxygen-reduction reaction, a key barrier to the application of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. We demonstrate the core-shell structure of the catalyst and clarify the mechanistic origin of its activity. The platinum-rich shell exhibits compressive strain, which results in a shift of the electronic band structure of platinum and weakening chemisorption of oxygenated species. We combine synthesis, measurements and an understanding of strain from theory to generate a reactivity-strain relationship that provides guidelines for tuning electrocatalytic activity.

Strasser, P. [Berlin Institute of Technology (Technische Universitat Berlin); Koh, Shirlaine [University of Houston, Houston; Anniyev, Toyli [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Greeley, Jeff [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Yu, Chengfei [University of Houston, Houston; Liu, Zengcai [University of Houston, Houston; Kaya, Sarpa [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Nordlund, Dennis [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Ogasawara, Hirohito [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Toney, Michael F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Anders, Nilsson [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Core Analysis At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 1979) Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Core samples were recovered from rather evenly spaced intervals throughout the borehole (Fig. 4) from 29 coring runs. Core recovered with respect to total coring footage was 66.6%. Total recovery of core was 47 m or about 3.7% of the total section penetrated in the drill hole. No cuttings were returned because no mud circulated back to the surface. References George V. Keller, L. Trowbridge Grose, John C. Murray, Catherine K. Skokan (1979) Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of

56

Simultaneously enhanced transmission and artificial optical activity in gold film perforated with chiral hole array  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a simple two-dimensional metallic periodic chiral structure (PCS) consisting of a dielectric substrate and a thin gold film perforated with gammadion-shaped chiral hole array, in which the transmittance and artificial optical activity can be simultaneously enhanced. The principle and optical performance of the PCS are demonstrated through the experimental realization of a PCS sample, from numerical design, fabrication, to optical characterization. Good agreement between theory and experiment has been obtained. The PCS sample shows an enhanced transmittance of 53% at wavelength 1168 nm, accompanied nearby by a polarization rotation peak with the effective specific rotatory power up to 105?deg/mm. The enhancement mechanism of the dual effect is thoroughly studied by investigating the optical anomalies (i.e., Rayleigh anomalies, surface plasmon polaritons, and localized surface plasmons) in the PCS and their roles in the light-matter interaction. Several light-anomaly coupling regimes have been revealed. The single-layer metallic PCS is relatively easy to realize in optical frequencies by using mature microfabrication techniques such as electron-beam lithography and lift-off technique. The physical insight into the enhancement mechanism provides guidelines to develop more complicated PCS, such as multilayer PCS with metal and dielectric inclusions, which can produce stronger optical activity and better optical performance.

Benfeng Bai; Janne Laukkanen; Anni Lehmuskero; Jari Turunen

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

X-ray Properties of Intermediate-mass Black Holes in Active Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a pilot study of the X-ray properties of intermediate-mass (~10^5-10^6 M_sun) black holes in active galaxies using the Chandra X-ray telescope. Eight of the 10 active galaxies are detected with a significance of at least 3 sigma, with X-ray luminosities in the range L_(0.5-2 keV) ~ 10^41-10^43 ergs/s. The optical-to-X-ray flux ratios are consistent with expectations, given the known correlations between alpha_ox and ultraviolet luminosity, while a couple of objects appear to be anomalously X-ray weak. The range of 0.5--2 keV photon indices we measure, 1 X-ray spectral index. On the other hand, we do find evidence for a correlation between X-ray power-law slope and both X-ray luminosity and Eddington ratio, which may suggest that X-ray emission mechanisms weaken at high Eddington ratio. Such a weakening may explain the X-ray weakness of one of our most optically luminous objects.

Jenny E. Greene; Luis C. Ho

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

58

Maps showing location of stratigraphic cross sections and cored drill holes used in the study of the Devonian black shales in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maps were prepared showing the location of drill holes used in the stratigraphic study of black shale deposits in the Appalachian Basin. (DC)

Roen, J.B.; Wallace, L.G.; Kepferle, R.C.; Potter, P.E.; Pryor, W.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

DIAGNOSING THE TIME DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. II. NANOFLARE TRAINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The time dependence of heating in solar active regions can be studied by analyzing the slope of the emission measure distribution coolward of the peak. In a previous study we showed that low-frequency heating can account for 0% to 77% of active region core emission measures. We now turn our attention to heating by a finite succession of impulsive events for which the timescale between events on a single magnetic strand is shorter than the cooling timescale. We refer to this scenario as a 'nanoflare train' and explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. Our conclusions are (1) nanoflare trains are consistent with 86% to 100% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are properly accounted for; (2) steeper slopes are found for larger values of the ratio of the train duration {Delta} {sub H} to the post-train cooling and draining timescale {Delta} {sub C}, where {Delta} {sub H} depends on the number of heating events, the event duration and the time interval between successive events ({tau} {sub C}); (3) {tau} {sub C} may be diagnosed from the width of the hot component of the emission measure provided that the temperature bins are much smaller than 0.1 dex; (4) the slope of the emission measure alone is not sufficient to provide information about any timescale associated with heating-the length and density of the heated structure must be measured for {Delta} {sub H} to be uniquely extracted from the ratio {Delta} {sub H}/{Delta} {sub C}.

Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

OUTFLOWS AND DARK BANDS AT ARCADE-LIKE ACTIVE REGION CORE BOUNDARIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode have revealed outflows and non-thermal line broadening in low intensity regions at the edges of active regions (ARs). We use data from Hinode's EIS, Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer instrument to investigate the boundaries of arcade-like AR cores for NOAA ARs 11112, 10978, and 9077. A narrow, low intensity region that is observed at the core's periphery as a dark band shows outflows and increased spectral line broadening. This dark band is found to exist for days and appears between the bright coronal loop structures of different coronal topologies. We find a case where the dark band region is formed between the magnetic field from emerging flux and the field of the pre-existing flux. A magnetic field extrapolation indicates that this dark band is coincident with the spine lines or magnetic separatrices in the extrapolated field. This occurs over unipolar regions where the brightened coronal field is separated in connectivity and topology. This separation does not appear to be infinitesimal and an initial estimate of the minimum distance of separation is found to be Almost-Equal-To 1.5-3.5 Mm.

Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tarr, L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

E-Print Network 3.0 - active region core Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the core is controlled... by the rate at which the mantle can remove heat. Rapid core cooling favours the operation of a geodynamo Source: Nimmo, Francis - Department of Earth...

62

Slim Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slim Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Slim Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Esmeralda Energy Company (EEC) intends to drill a core hole to a maximum depth of 4,000 feet on its Emigrant Project in Fish Lake Valley, Esmeralda County, Nevada. The drilling project is the key component in phased program of resource evaluation by EEC References John Deymonaz, Jeffrey G. Hulen, Gregory D. Nash, Alex Schriener (2008) Esmeralda Energy Company Final Scientific Technical Report, January

63

Cosmic X-ray Surveys of Distant Active Galaxies: The Demographics, Physics, and Ecology of Growing Supermassive Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review results from cosmic X-ray surveys of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the past ~ 15 yr that have dramatically improved our understanding of growing supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the distant universe. First, we discuss the utility of such surveys for AGN investigations and the capabilities of the missions making these surveys, emphasizing Chandra, XMM-Newton, and NuSTAR. Second, we briefly describe the main cosmic X-ray surveys, the essential roles of complementary multiwavelength data, and how AGNs are selected from these surveys. We then review key results from these surveys on the AGN population and its evolution ("demographics"), the physical processes operating in AGNs ("physics"), and the interactions between AGNs and their environments ("ecology"). We conclude by describing some significant unresolved questions and prospects for advancing the field.

Brandt, W N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Accreting Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I outline the theory of accretion onto black holes, and its application to observed phenomena such as X-ray binaries, active galactic nuclei, tidal disruption events, and gamma-ray bursts. The dynamics as well as radiative signatures of black hole accretion depend on interactions between the relatively simple black-hole spacetime and complex radiation, plasma and magnetohydrodynamical processes in the surrounding gas. I will show how transient accretion processes could provide clues to these interactions. Larger global magnetohydrodynamic simulations as well as simulations incorporating plasma microphysics and full radiation hydrodynamics will be needed to unravel some of the current mysteries of black hole accretion.

Begelman, Mitchell C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

New Evidence for High Activity of the Super-Massive Black Hole in our Galaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prominent K-shell emission lines of neutral iron (hereafter, FeI-K) and hard-continuum X-rays were found from molecular clouds (MCs) in the Sagittarius B (Sgr B) region with the two separate Suzaku observations in 2005 and 2009. The X-ray flux of FeI-K decreased in correlation to the hard-continuum flux by factor of 0.4-0.5 in 4 years, which is nearly equal to the light-travelling across the MCs. The rapid and correlated time-variability, the equivalent width of FeI-K, and the K-edge absorption depth of FeI are consistently explained by "X-ray echoes" due to the fluorescent and Thomson-scattering of an X-ray flare from an external source. The required flux of the X-ray flare depends on the distance to the MCs and the duration time. The flux, even in the minimum case, is larger than those of the brightest Galactic X-ray sources. Based on these facts, we conclude that the super-massive black hole, Sgr A*, exhibited a big-flare about a few hundred years ago and the luminosity of higher than 4x10^39 erg s^{-1}. T...

Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Koyama, Katsuji

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

CHARACTERIZATION OF A SAMPLE OF INTERMEDIATE-TYPE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. HOST BULGE PROPERTIES AND BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a study of the host bulge properties and their relations with the black hole mass for a sample of 10 intermediate-type active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our sample consists mainly of early-type spirals, four of them hosting a bar. For 70{sup +10} {sub -17}% of the galaxies, we have been able to determine the type of the bulge, and find that these objects probably harbor a pseudobulge or a combination of classical bulge/pseudobulge, suggesting that pseudobulges might be frequent in intermediate-type AGNs. In our sample, 50% {+-} 14% of the objects show double-peaked emission lines. Therefore, narrow double-peaked emission lines seem to be frequent in galaxies harboring a pseudobulge or a combination of classical bulge/pseudobulge. Depending on the bulge type, we estimated the black hole mass using the corresponding M {sub BH}-{sigma}* relation and found them within a range of 5.69 {+-} 0.21 < log M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} < 8.09 {+-} 0.24. Comparing these M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} values with masses derived from the FWHM of H{beta} and the continuum luminosity at 5100 A from their SDSS-DR7 spectra (M {sub BH}), we find that 8 out of 10 (80{sup +7} {sub -17}%) galaxies have black hole masses that are compatible within a factor of 3. This result would support that M {sub BH} and M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} are the same for intermediate-type AGNs, as has been found for type 1 AGNs. However, when the type of the bulge is taken into account, only three out of the seven (43{sup +18} {sub -15}%) objects of the sample have their M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} and M {sub BH} compatible within 3{sigma} errors. We also find that estimations based on the M {sub BH}-{sigma}* relation for pseudobulges are not compatible in 50% {+-} 20% of the objects.

Benitez, Erika; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Martinez, Benoni; Jimenez-Bailon, Elena [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)] [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Mendez-Abreu, Jairo; Lopez-Martin, Luis [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)] [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Fuentes-Carrera, Isaura [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM-IPN), U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico)] [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM-IPN), U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Chavushyan, Vahram [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apdo. Postal 51-216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)] [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apdo. Postal 51-216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Leon-Tavares, Jonathan, E-mail: erika@astro.unam.mx [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, 02540 Kylmaelae (Finland)] [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, 02540 Kylmaelae (Finland)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Radio Sources in Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei. I. VLA Detections of Compact, Flat-Spectrum Cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a 0.2" resolution, 15 GHz survey of a sample of 48 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei with the Very Large Array. Compact radio emission has been detected in 57% (17 of 30) of LINERs and low-luminosity Seyferts, at least 15 of which have a flat to inverted radio spectrum (alpha > -0.3). The compact radio cores are found in both type 1 (i.e. with broad Halpha) and type 2 (without broad Halpha) nuclei. The 2 cm radio power is significantly correlated with the emission-line ([OI] lambda6300) luminosity. While the present observations are consistent with the radio emission originating in star-forming regions, higher resolution radio observations of 10 of the detected sources, reported in a companion paper (Falcke et al. 2000), show that the cores are very compact (= 10^8K) and probably synchrotron self-absorbed, ruling out a starburst origin. Thus, our results suggest that at least 50% of low-luminosity Seyferts and LINERs in the sample are accretion powered, with the radio emission presumably coming from jets or advection-dominated accretion flows. We have detected only 1 of 18 `transition' (i.e. LINER + HII) nuclei observed, indicating their radio cores are significantly weaker than those of `pure' LINERs.

Neil M. Nagar; Heino Falcke; Andrew S. Wilson; Luis C. Ho

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

68

Slim Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Stratigraphic slim hole 24-33 was drilled in a lease area south of current production during March 2001. The well was continuously cored from 235 m to the total depth of 610 m. Several fracture zones were encountered with noticeably large fracture apertures and the maximum recorded temperature was comparable to nearby productive wells. A second well, slim hole 12-33, was drilled to a total depth of 297 m during April 2001. Continuous core was taken from 152 m to total depth. Numerous open fractures were also observed in this well and the maximum recorded temperature was similar to the 24-33 well. References

69

Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9) 9) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run tier completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

70

Identification of the Active Species in Photochemical Hole Scavenging Reactions of Methanol on TiO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular and dissociative methanol adsorption species were prepared on rutile TiO2(110) surfaces to study photocatalytic oxidation of methanol in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Adsorbed methoxy groups (CH3O-) were found to be the photoactive form of adsorbed methanol converted to adsorbed formaldehyde and a surface OH group by hole-mediated C-H bond cleavage. These results suggest that adsorbed methoxy is the effective hole scavenger in photochemical reactions involving methanol.

Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

71

Evaluation of storing Shippingport Core II spent blanket fuel assemblies in the T Plant PWR Core II fuel pool without active cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PWR Core II fuel pool chiller-off test was conducted because it appeared possible that acceptable pool-water temperatures could be maintained without operating the chillers, thus saving hundreds of thousands of dollars in maintenance and replacement costs. Test results showed that the water-cooling capability is no longer needed to maintain pool temperature below 38{degrees}C (100{degrees}F).

Gilbert, E.R.; Lanning, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dana, C.M.; Hedengren, D.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

DIAGNOSING THE TIME-DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. I. LOW-FREQUENCY NANOFLARES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observational measurements of active region emission measures contain clues to the time dependence of the underlying heating mechanism. A strongly nonlinear scaling of the emission measure with temperature indicates a large amount of hot plasma relative to warm plasma. A weakly nonlinear (or linear) scaling of the emission measure indicates a relatively large amount of warm plasma, suggesting that the hot active region plasma is allowed to cool and so the heating is impulsive with a long repeat time. This case is called low-frequency nanoflare heating, and we investigate its feasibility as an active region heating scenario here. We explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. For each model run, we calculate the slope {alpha} of the emission measure distribution EM(T){proportional_to}T {sup {alpha}}. Our conclusions are: (1) low-frequency nanoflare heating is consistent with about 36% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are not accounted for; (2) proper consideration of uncertainties yields a range in which as many as 77% of observed active regions are consistent with low-frequency nanoflare heating and as few as zero; (3) low-frequency nanoflare heating cannot explain observed slopes greater than 3; (4) the upper limit to the volumetric energy release is in the region of 50 erg cm{sup -3} to avoid unphysical magnetic field strengths; (5) the heating timescale may be short for loops of total length less than 40 Mm to be consistent with the observed range of slopes; (6) predicted slopes are consistently steeper for longer loops.

Bradshaw, S. J.; Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

X-RAY NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IN S{sup 4}G BARRED GALAXIES: NO LINK BETWEEN BAR STRENGTH AND CO-OCCURRENT SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE FUELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stellar bars can lead to gas inflow toward the center of a galaxy and stimulate nuclear star formation. However, there is no compelling evidence on whether they also feed a central supermassive black hole: by measuring the fractions of barred active and inactive galaxies, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. In this paper, we aim to understand the lack of observational evidence for bar-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by studying a sample of 41 nearby (d < 35 Mpc) barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We use Chandra observations to measure nuclear 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities and estimate Eddington ratios, together with Spitzer 3.6 ?m imaging to quantify the strength of the stellar bar in two independent ways: (1) from its structure, as traced by its ellipticity and boxiness, and (2) from its gravitational torque Q{sub b} , taken as the maximum ratio of the tangential force to the mean background radial force. In this way, rather than discretizing the presence of both stellar bars and nuclear activity, we are able to account for the continuum of bar strengths and degrees of AGN activity. We find nuclear X-ray sources in 31 out of 41 galaxies with median X-ray luminosity and Eddington ratio of L{sub X} = 4.3 10{sup 38} erg s{sup 1} and L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} = 6.9 10{sup 6}, respectively, consistent with low-luminosity AGN activity. Including upper limits for those galaxies without nuclear detections, we find no significant correlation between any of the bar strength indicators and the degree of nuclear activity, irrespective of galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, Hubble type, or bulge size. Strong bars do not favor brighter or more efficient nuclear activity, implying that at least for the low-luminosity regime, supermassive black hole fueling is not closely connected to large-scale features.

Cisternas, Mauricio; Knapen, Johan H.; Gonzlez-Martn, Omaira; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Kim, Taehyun [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Daz-Garca, Simn; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Comern, Sbastien; Laine, Jarkko [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu FI-90014 (Finland); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sheth, Kartik [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Aix Marseille Universit, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Gil de Paz, Armando [Departamento de Astrofsica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Holwerda, Benne W., E-mail: mauricio@iac.es [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); and others

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

Definition: Core Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis Core Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Core Analysis Core samples are obtained from drilling a well, typically using a synthetic diamond coated bit that has a hollow center so cylindrical rock samples ("core") can be extracted. Core samples successfully recovered are visually inspected to determine rock type, mineralization, and fracture networks, then certain laboratory analyses may ensue to acquire detailed rock properties. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A core sample is a cylindrical section of (usually) a naturally occurring substance. Most core samples are obtained by drilling with special drills into the substance, for example sediment or rock, with a hollow steel tube called a core drill. The hole made for the core sample is

75

Slim Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slim Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., Slim Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Vale Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In April-May 1995, Sandia drilled a cost-shared exploratory slimhole with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation (TGC), which owns leases in the Vale KGIL4. In addition to possible discovery of a new geothermal resource, this situation offered an opportunity for direct cost comparison between an exploration sl.irnholedrilled with "hybrid" techniques on a diamond-coring rig and a previous exploration well, which was conventionally drilled but would be considered a slimhole in that technology. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

76

A Semi-Analytic Model for the Co-evolution of Galaxies, Black Holes, and Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new semi-analytic model that self-consistently traces the growth of supermassive black holes (BH) and their host galaxies within the context of the LCDM cosmological framework. In our model, the energy emitted by accreting black holes regulates the growth of the black holes themselves, drives galactic scale winds that can remove cold gas from galaxies, and produces powerful jets that heat the hot gas atmospheres surrounding groups and clusters. We present a comprehensive comparison of our model predictions with observational measurements of key physical properties of low-redshift galaxies, such as cold gas fractions, stellar metallicities and ages, and specific star formation rates. We find that our new models successfully reproduce the exponential cutoff in the stellar mass function and the stellar and cold gas mass densities at z~0, and predict that star formation should be largely, but not entirely, quenched in massive galaxies at the present day. We also find that our model of self-regulated BH growth naturally reproduces the observed relation between BH mass and bulge mass. We explore the global formation history of galaxies in our models, presenting predictions for the cosmic histories of star formation, stellar mass assembly, cold gas, and metals. We find that models assuming the "concordance" LCDM cosmology overproduce star formation and stellar mass at high redshift (z>2). A model with less small-scale power predicts less star formation at high redshift, and excellent agreement with the observed stellar mass assembly history, but may have difficulty accounting for the cold gas in quasar absorption systems at high redshift (z~3-4).

Rachel S. Somerville; Philip F. Hopkins; Thomas J. Cox; Brant E. Robertson; Lars Hernquist

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

White holes and eternal black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate isolated white holes surrounded by vacuum, which correspond to the time reversal of eternal black holes that do not evaporate. We show that isolated white holes produce quasi- thermal Hawking radiation. The time reversal of this radiation, incident on a black hole precursor, constitutes a special preparation that will cause the black hole to become eternal.

Stephen D. H. Hsu

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Core Specialization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Core Specialization Core Specialization Core Specialization Core Specialization (CS) is a feature of the Cray operating system that allows the user to reserve one or more cores per node for handling system services, and thus reduce the effects of timing jitter due to interruptions from the operating system at the expense of (possibly) requiring more nodes to run an application. The specialized cores may also be used in conjunction with Cray's MPI asynchronous progress engine [1] to improve the overlap of communication and computation for applications that use non-blocking MPI functions. In the absence of CS, the compute cores must service their own non-blocking calls. Hyper-Threading complicates questions abouty the most effective use of processor resources. HT doubles the number of compute stream (i.e.

79

Core Specialization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Core Core Specialization Core Specialization Core Specialization (CS) is a feature of the Cray operating system that allows the user to reserve one or more cores per node for handling system services, and thus reduce the effects of timing jitter due to interruptions from the operating system at the expense of (possibly) requiring more nodes to run an application. The specialized cores may also be used in conjunction with Cray's MPI asynchronous progress engine [1] to improve the overlap of communication and computation for applications that use non-blocking MPI functions. In the absence of CS, the compute cores must service their own non-blocking calls. Hyper-Threading complicates questions abouty the most effective use of processor resources. HT doubles the number of compute stream (i.e.

80

On the location of the supermassive black hole in CTA 102  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei represent one of the most powerful phenomena in the Universe. They form in the surroundings of the supermassive black holes as a by-product of accretion onto the central black hole in active galaxies. The flow in the jets propagates at velocities close to the speed of light. The distance between the first part of the jet that is visible in radio images (core) and the black hole is still a matter of debate. Only very-long-baseline interferometry observations resolve the innermost compact regions of the radio jet. Those can access the jet base, and combining data at different wavelenghts, address the physical parameters of the outflow from its emission. We have performed an accurate analysis of the frequency-dependent shift of the VLBI core location for a multi-wavelength set of images of the blazar CTA 102 including data from 6 cm down to 3 mm. The measure of the position of the central black hole, with mass $\\sim 10^{8.93}\\,M_\\odot$, in the blazar CTA 102 reveals a ...

Fromm, C M; Ros, E; Savolainen, T; Zensus, J A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Laughlin, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A few cores...

82

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Slim Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 2 slim holes References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet...

84

Core Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis Core Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Core Analysis Details Activities (41) Areas (28) Regions (2) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Core analysis is done to define lithology. Stratigraphic/Structural: Core analysis can locate faults or fracture networks. Oriented core can give additional important information on anisotropy. Hydrological: Thermal: Thermal conductivity can be measured from core samples. Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 2,000.00200,000 centUSD 2 kUSD 0.002 MUSD 2.0e-6 TUSD / 30 foot core Median Estimate (USD): 10,000.001,000,000 centUSD

85

Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Geothermal Area (EERE, 2010)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EERE, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Geothermal Area (EERE, 2010) Exploration Activity...

86

Thermal Gradient Holes At Glass Mountain Area (Cumming And Mackie...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Cumming And Mackie, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not...

87

Hole cleaning requirements with seabed returns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

size and fluid density. The least important were rotary speed, feed concentration, annulus size, and drillpipe eccentricity. They also reported that, in Newtonian fluids, transport efficiency improves with increasing viscosity; however, they noted... is set; therefore, no marine riser can be utilized. The coring occurs up to 3000 ft below the seafloor with the bit cutting an 11. 438 in. hole. The rig pumps have a maximum output of 600 gpm under normal coring operations with untreated seawater...

Nordt, David Paul

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fusion Activation through Attachment Protein Stalk Domains Indicates a Conserved Core Mechanism of Paramyxovirus Entry into Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Structure and Assembly Fusion Activation through Attachment Protein...viral integral membrane glycoproteins (fusion [F] and attachment [HN, H, or G...receptor recognition, followed by the fusion of viral and cellular membranes, resulting...

Sayantan Bose; Albert S. Song; Theodore S. Jardetzky; Robert A. Lamb

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

89

THE M {sub BH}-L {sub SPHEROID} RELATION AT HIGH AND LOW MASSES, THE QUADRATIC GROWTH OF BLACK HOLES, AND INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a sample of 72 galaxies with reliable supermassive black hole masses M {sub bh}, we derive the M {sub bh}-(host spheroid luminosity, L) relation for (1) the subsample of 24 core-Sersic galaxies with partially depleted cores, and (2) the remaining subsample of 48 Sersic galaxies. Using K{sub s} -band Two Micron All Sky Survey data, we find the near-linear relation M {sub bh}{proportional_to}L {sup 1.10{+-}0.20} {sub K{sub s}} for the core-Sersic spheroids thought to be built in additive dry merger events, while we find the relation M {sub bh}{proportional_to}L {sup 2.73{+-}0.55}{sub K{sub s}} for the Sersic spheroids built from gas-rich processes. After converting literature B-band disk galaxy magnitudes into inclination- and dust-corrected bulge magnitudes, via a useful new equation presented herein, we obtain a similar result. Unlike with the M {sub bh}-(velocity dispersion) diagram, which is also updated here using the same galaxy sample, it remains unknown whether barred and non-barred Sersic galaxies are offset from each other in the M {sub bh}-L diagram. While black hole feedback has typically been invoked to explain what was previously thought to be a nearly constant M {sub bh}/M {sub Spheroid} mass ratio of {approx}0.2%, we advocate that the near-linear M {sub bh}-L and M {sub bh}-M {sub Spheroid} relations observed at high masses may have instead arisen largely from the additive dry merging of galaxies. We argue that feedback results in a dramatically different scaling relation, such that black hole mass scales roughly quadratically with the spheroid mass in Sersic galaxies. We therefore introduce a revised cold-gas 'quasar' mode feeding equation for semi-analytical models to reflect what we dub the quadratic growth of black holes in Sersic galaxies built amidst gas-rich processes. Finally, we use our new Sersic M {sub bh}-L equations to predict the masses of candidate intermediate mass black holes in almost 50 low-luminosity spheroids containing active galactic nuclei, finding many masses between that of stellar mass black holes and supermassive black holes.

Graham, Alister W.; Scott, Nicholas, E-mail: AGraham@swin.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)] [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

90

Correlation between the photon index and X-ray luminosity of black hole X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei: observations and interpretation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the observed correlation between the 2--10 keV X-ray luminosity (in unit of the Eddington luminosity; $l_X \\equiv L_X/L_{Edd}$) and the photon index ($\\Gamma$) of the X-ray spectrum for both black hole X-ray binaries (BHBs) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We construct a large sample, with $10^{-9} 10^{-3}$ and $10^{-6.5} 10^{-3}$ respectively, while $\\Gamma$ is nearly a constant when $l_X 10^{-6.5}$. We explain the above correlation in the framework of a coupled hot accretion flow -- jet model. The radio emission always come from the jet while the X-ray emission comes from the accretion flow and jet when $l_X$ is above and below $10^{-6.5}$, respectively. More specifically, we assume that with the increase of mass accretion rate, the hot accretion flow develops into a clumpy and further a disc -- corona two-phase structure because of thermal instability. We argue that such kind of two-phase accretion flow can explain the observed positive correlation.

Yang, Qi-Xiang; Yuan, Feng; Zdziarski, Andrzej A; Gierlinski, Marek; Ho, Luis C; Yu, Zhaolong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Boitnott...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Greg N. Boitnott (2003) Core Analysis For The Development...

92

Nanostructured Polyaniline-Decorated Pt/C@PANI CoreShell Catalyst with Enhanced Durability and Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) However, the insufficient electrocatalytic activity and durability of Pt cathode catalysts still remains a major obstacle for PEMFC applications. ... Figure 4. Polarization curves of single PEM fuel cells with cathodes fabricated from (a) PANI@Pt/C (30%) and (b) Pt/C catalysts after the indicated numbers of CV cycles. ... Time-effective and reliable methods for studying catalyst durability are indispensable for developing PEMFC catalysts. ...

Siguo Chen; Zidong Wei; XueQiang Qi; Lichun Dong; Yu-Guo Guo; Lijun Wan; Zhigang Shao; Li Li

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Visible-Light Photochemical Activity of Heterostructured Core-Shell Materials Composed of Selected Ternary Titanates and Ferrites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-24 For example, CdS,25 Cu2O,26 BiOI,22 ZnFe2O4,27 and CuInS2,28 were combined with TiO2 for visible °C shows the highest reaction rate. Fe-doped TiO2, which absorbs visible light, did not show enhanced active under visible light, such as metal and nonmetal doping,3,8-12 dye sensitization,13

Rohrer, Gregory S.

94

Black Hole Horizons and Black Hole Thermodynamics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work investigates how black holes can be described in terms of different definitions of horizons. Global definitions in terms of event horizons and Killing (more)

Nielsen, Alex

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al.,...

96

Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Geothermal Area (Erkan, Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Erkan, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Geothermal Area (Erkan, Et Al., 2007)...

97

Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,...

98

Thermal Gradient Holes At Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen, Et Al....  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen,...

99

A toroidal black hole for the AGN phenomenon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new approach to the study of the AGN phenomenon is proposed, in which the nucleus activity is related to the metric of the inner massive black hole. The possibility of a Toroidal Black Hole (TBH), in contrast to the usual Spherical Black Hole (SBH), is discussed as a powerful tool in understanding AGN related phenomena, such as the energetics, the production of jets and the acceleration of particles, the shape of the magnetic field and the lifetime of nucleus activity.

Fulvio Pompilio; S. M. Harun-or-Rashid; Matts Roos

2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Stellar core collapse and supernova  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massive stars that end their stable evolution as their iron cores collapse to a neutron star or black hole long been considered good candidates for producing Type II supernovae. For many years the outward propagation of the shock wave produced by the bounce of these iron cores has been studied as a possible mechanism for the explosion. For the most part, the results of these studies have not been particularly encouraging, except, perhaps, in the case of very low mass iron cores or very soft nuclear equations of state. The shock stalls, overwhelmed by photodisintegration and neutrino losses, and the star does not explode. More recently, slow late time heating of the envelope of the incipient neutron star has been found to be capable of rejuvenating the stalled shock and producing an explosion after all. The present paper discusses this late time heating and presents results from numerical calculations of the evolution, core collapse, and subsequent explosion of a number of recent stellar models. For the first time they all, except perhaps the most massive, explode with reasonable choices of input physics. 39 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

Wilson, J.R.; Mayle, R.; Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Black Hole Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mass of a black hole has traditionally been identified with its energy. We describe a new perspective on black hole thermodynamics, one that identifies the mass of a black hole with chemical enthalpy, and the cosmological constant as thermodynamic pressure. This leads to an understanding of black holes from the viewpoint of chemistry, in terms of concepts such as Van der Waals fluids, reentrant phase transitions, and triple points. Both charged and rotating black holes exhibit novel chemical-type phase behaviour, hitherto unseen.

David Kubiznak; Robert B. Mann

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

Black holes and thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A black hole of given mass, angular momentum, and charge can have a large number of different unobservable internal configurations which reflect the possible different initial configurations of the matter which collapsed to produce the hole. The logarithm of this number can be regarded as the entropy of the black hole and is a measure of the amount of information about the initial state which was lost in the formation of the black hole. If one makes the hypothesis that the entropy is finite, one can deduce that the black holes must emit thermal radiation at some nonzero temperature. Conversely, the recently derived quantum-mechanical result that black holes do emit thermal radiation at temperature ??2? k c, where ? is the surface gravity, enables one to prove that the entropy is finite and is equal to c3A4 G?, where A is the surface area of the event horizon or boundary of the black hole. Because black holes have negative specific heat, they cannot be in stable thermal equilibrium except when the additional energy available is less than 1/4 the mass of the black hole. This means that the standard statistical-mechanical canonical ensemble cannot be applied when gravitational interactions are important. Black holes behave in a completely random and time-symmetric way and are indistinguishable, for an external observer, from white holes. The irreversibility that appears in the classical limit is merely a statistical effect.

S. W. Hawking

1976-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

RHIC | Black Holes?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Black Holes at RHIC? Black Holes at RHIC? Further discussion by Physicist Dmitri Kharzeev on why RHIC cannot produce a real gravitational black hole Black holes are among the most mysterious objects in the universe. The gravitational field of a black hole is so strong that Einstein's general relativity tells us that nothing, not even light, can escape from the black hole's interior. However, in 1974 physicist Stephen Hawking demonstrated that black holes must emit radiation once the quantum effects are included. According to quantum mechanics, the physical vacuum is bubbling with short-lived virtual particle-antiparticle pairs. Creation of a particle-antiparticle pair from the vacuum conflicts with energy conservation, but energy need not be conserved at short times in quantum mechanics, according to Heisenberg's

104

Core Values | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Core Values Core Values Core Values People - People are our most important resource. We respect and use our experience and skills and appreciate our diversity. Business Excellence - We are fiscally responsible and actively pursue best business practices. Safety - We protect our human and material resources and promote safe work practices within the office and at our sites. Communication - We take full advantage of our virtual organization's strengths and share information freely across all levels of the organization. Leadership and Teamwork - We encourage leadership and teamwork at all levels of the organization. We value active participation and demonstrate respect for each other. Customer Service - We openly communicate with all our customers in a timely manner and actively seek opportunities to improve our services.

105

Over Core Stress | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Over Core Stress Over Core Stress Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Over Core Stress Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Over Core Stress: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Rock Lab Analysis Core Analysis Cuttings Analysis Isotopic Analysis- Rock Over Core Stress Paleomagnetic Measurements Petrography Analysis Rock Density X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) References Page Area Activity Start Date Activity End Date Reference Material

106

Slim Holes At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area...

107

Uniformly accelerated black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The static and stationary C metric are examined in a generic framework and their interpretations studied in some detail, especially those with two event horizons, one for the black hole and another for the acceleration. We find that (i) the spacetime of an accelerated static black hole is plagued by either conical singularities or a lack of smoothness and compactness of the black hole horizon, (ii) by using standard black hole thermodynamics we show that accelerated black holes have a higher Hawking temperature than Unruh temperature of the accelerated frame, and (iii) the usual upper bound on the product of the mass and acceleration parameters (<1/27) is just a coordinate artifact. The main results are extended to accelerated rotating black holes with no significant changes.

Patricio S. Letelier and Samuel R. Oliveira

2001-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Core Analysis At Jemez Mountain Area (Eichelberger & Koch, 1979...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Mountain Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References John C....

109

Core Analysis At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Colado...

110

Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date - 2003 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Here we...

111

Core Analysis At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Alum Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal...

112

Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes See linked...

113

Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1985 - 1988 Usefulness useful...

114

Slim Holes At Salt Wells Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slim Holes At Salt Wells Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Slim Holes At Salt Wells Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Salt Wells Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date 1980 - 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The blind Salt Wells geothermal system was first identified when Anadarko Petroleum Corporation drilled slim hole and geothermal exploration wells at the site in 1980. Two reports detail the results of this drilling activity. This report details the well completion practices applied to the initial slim hole discovery well. Notes In 1980, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation drilled a slim hole discovery well near Simpson Pass. The hole was initially rotary-drilled to 161.5 m for

115

Core Log Valles Caldera No. 2A, New Mexico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2A, New Mexico Abstract Scientific core hole VC-2A was drilled into the western ring-fracture zone at Sulphur Springs in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. VC-2A, the second...

116

"Hybrid" Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a solution of the Einstein equations, obtained by gluing the external Kerr metric and the internal Weyl metric, describing an axisymmetric static vacuum distorted black hole. These metrics are glued at the null surfaces representing their horizons. For this purpose we use the formalism of massive thin null shells. The corresponding solution is called a "hybrid" black hole. The massive null shell has an angular momentum which is the origin of the rotation of the external Kerr spacetime. At the same time, the shell distorts the geometry inside the horizon. The inner geometry of the "hybrid" black hole coincides with the geometry of the interior of a non-rotating Weyl-distorted black hole. Properties of the "hybrid" black holes are briefly discussed.

Valeri P. Frolov; Andrei V. Frolov

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Core Level Spectroscopies Surface Science and X-Ray Spectroscopy Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Core Level Spectroscopy Creation and Decay of Core Holes Spectroscopic Techniques X-ray Photoelectron (XPS) X-ray Absorption (XAS) X-ray Emission (XES) Auger Electron (AES) Core holes are created by the ionization of a core electron in XPS and by excitation in XAS . The XPS and XAS final states are highly unstable and the core hole decays by non-radiant Auger relaxation (AES) or by radiant x-ray emission processes (XES). XPS and AES probe the unoccupied electronic stru cture, while XAS projects the unoccupied valence states of the system onto a particular atom. A brief description of the each of the different spectroscopies illustrated by schematic pictures of the creation and decay with data measured for N2 adsorbed on Ni(100) can be found by scrolling

118

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1976 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Temperatures have been obtained to depths up to 133 m in 22 boreholes with measurements being made at least four times in each borehole. Geothermal gradients ranged from 240C/km to 450 0C/km. References Combs, J. (1 December 1976) Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=511217"

119

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

120

Ultrafast Core-Hole Induced Dynamics in Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemistry community to unravel the early time dynamics of electronically excited states in water because their short (femtosecond) time scales are difficult to access...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lachenbruch...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regime of Long Valley Caldera. Journal of Geophysical Research. 81(5):763-768. J.L. Smith,R.W. Rex. 1977. Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera. () : American...

122

Core Holes At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Fawcett...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

John W. Geissman, Giday WoldeGabriel, Craig D. Allen, Catrina M. Johnson, Susan J. Smith (2007) Two Middle Pleistocene Glacial-Interglacial Cycles from the Valle Grande, Jemez...

123

Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

alteration, ore deposits, hydrology, structural geology, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. Authors John A. Musgrave, Fraser E. Goff, Lisa Shevenell, Patricio E. Trujillo Jr,...

124

Peptidomimetics in the Discovery of New Insect Growth Regulators: Studies on the Structure?Activity Relationships of the Core Pentapeptide Region of Allatostatins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CA were selected as the target, and the core pentapeptide region (YDFGL) was chosen as the lead sequence in the search for new IGRs based on the allatostatins. ... Substitution of Leu with Ile, Val, Met, and Nle demonstrated little inhibition of JH biosynthesis by III5 (<200-fold) and III6 (<100-fold) relative to the penptapeptide, and III7 and III8 showed no effect on JH biosynthesis. ...

Zhen-peng Kai; Yong Xie; Juan Huang; Stephen S. Tobe; Jin-rui Zhang; Yun Ling; Li Zhang; Yi-chen Zhao; Xin-ling Yang

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

Quasar evolution and the growth of black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......hole which accretes at a rate that is ultimately limited...intermittently at an average rate that is a universal function...that the mean accretion rate scales as M 1.5 t 6...sufficiently massive galaxies pass through a quasar phase...accretion discs|black hole physics|galaxies: active......

Todd A. Small; Roger D. Blandford

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Core Analysis At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Core sample from the observation wells Deep Blue No....

127

Core Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Rock core analyses and mineral assemblage investigations...

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis identifies core Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

what their analysis of a mock core has revealed... on information obtained from ice core analysis. Higher thinking skills goals for this activity: Standards... for...

129

Entropy of quasiblack holes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We trace the origin of the black hole entropy S, replacing a black hole by a quasiblack hole. Let the boundary of a static body approach its own gravitational radius, in such a way that a quasihorizon forms. We show that if the body is thermal with the temperature taking the Hawking value at the quasihorizon limit, it follows, in the nonextremal case, from the first law of thermodynamics that the entropy approaches the Bekenstein-Hawking value S=A/4. In this setup, the key role is played by the surface stresses on the quasihorizon and one finds that the entropy comes from the quasihorizon surface. Any distribution of matter inside the surface leads to the same universal value for the entropy in the quasihorizon limit. This can be of some help in the understanding of black hole entropy. Other similarities between black holes and quasiblack holes such as the mass formulas for both objects had been found previously. We also discuss the entropy for extremal quasiblack holes, a more subtle issue.

Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica-CENTRA, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico-IST, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa-UTL, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Astronomical Institute of Kharkov, V. N. Karazin National University, 35 Sumskaya Street, Kharkov, 61022 (Ukraine)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

The AGN Black Hole Mass Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The AGN Black Hole Mass Database is a compilation of all published spectroscopic reverberation-mapping studies of active galaxies. We have created a public web interface, where users may get the most up-to-date black hole masses from reverberation mapping for any particular active galactic nucleus (AGN), as well as obtain the individual measurements upon which the masses are based and the appropriate references. While the database currently focuses on the measurements necessary for black hole mass determinations, we also plan to expand it in the future to include additional useful information, such as host-galaxy characteristics. New reverberation mapping results will also be incorporated into the database as they are published in peer-refereed journals.

Bentz, Misty C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

RHIC | Black Holes?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Black Holes at RHIC? Black Holes at RHIC? Before RHIC began operations in 2000, some were concerned that it would produce black holes that would threaten the earth. Here's why those concerns were unfounded. Committee Review of Speculative "Disaster Scenarios" at RHIC In July 1999, Brookhaven Lab Director John Marburger convened a committee of distinguished physicists to write a comprehensive report on the arguments that address the safety of speculative disaster scenarios at RHIC. The scenarios are: Creation of a black hole that would "eat" ordinary matter. Initiation of a transition to a new, more stable universe. Formation of a "strangelet" that would convert ordinary matter to a new form. jaffee "We conclude that there are no credible mechanisms for catastrophic

132

Charged Schrodinger black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct charged and rotating asymptotically Schrdinger black hole solutions of type IIB supergravity. We begin by obtaining a closed-form expression for the null Melvin twist of a broad class of type IIB backgrounds, ...

Adams, Allan

133

Holes in Spectral Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The decay of an atom in the presence of a static perturbation is investigated. The perturbation couples a decaying state with a nondecaying state. A "hole" appears in the emission line at a frequency equal to the frequency ...

Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Black Holes in 4 Nearby Radio Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the velocity dispersion profiles of the nuclei of NGC 1326, 2685, 5273 and 5838 in the CO first overtone band. There is evidence for a black hole (BH) in NGC 1326 and 5838. Gas is seen flowing out of the nuclear region of NGC 5273. We put upper limits on the nuclear BHs responsible for its activity and that of NGC 2685.

Mould, Jeremy; Cotter, Garret; Batt, David; Durre', Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

On Black Hole Entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two techniques for computing black hole entropy in generally covariant gravity theories including arbitrary higher derivative interactions are studied. The techniques are Wald's Noether charge approach introduced recently, and a field redefinition method developed in this paper. Wald's results are extended by establishing that his local geometric expression for the black hole entropy gives the same result when evaluated on an arbitrary cross-section of a Killing horizon (rather than just the bifurcation surface). Further, we show that his expression for the entropy is not affected by ambiguities which arise in the Noether construction. Using the Noether charge expression, the entropy is evaluated explicitly for black holes in a wide class of generally covariant theories. Further, it is shown that the Killing horizon and surface gravity of a stationary black hole metric are invariant under field redefinitions of the metric of the form $\\bar{g}_{ab}\\equiv g_{ab} + \\Delta_{ab}$, where $\\Delta_{ab}$ is a tensor field constructed out of stationary fields. Using this result, a technique is developed for evaluating the black hole entropy in a given theory in terms of that of another theory related by field redefinitions. Remarkably, it is established that certain perturbative, first order, results obtained with this method are in fact {\\it exact}. The possible significance of these results for the problem of finding the statistical origin of black hole entropy is discussed.}

Ted Jacobson; Gungwon Kang; Robert C. Myers

1994-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

136

Core Drilling Demonstration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tank Farms workers demonstrate core drilling capabilities for Hanford single-shell tanks. Core drilling is used to determine the current condition of each tank to assist in the overall assessment...

137

Antarctic Ice Sheet: Stable Isotope Analyses of Byrd Station Cores and Interhemispheric Climatic Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...221) from the deep core hole at Camp Century in Greenland. Caution is in order...derived from deep ice cores at Camp Century in Greenland (10) displays a...Byrd Station curve, although the Camp Century curve is more detailed because...

Samuel Epstein; R. P. Sharp; A. J. Gow

1970-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

138

Slim hole drilling proven in remote exploration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on a helicopter-supported slim hole exploration project in a remote tropical forest which cost 15% less than a conventional drilling operation. The potential savings after improvements in rig equipment, bits, and drilling and coring methods may approach 30%. Because of the small size of the slim hole equipment, the impact on the rain forest was small. The areas cleared for locations and access during the operation were 75% less than that required for similar operations with conventional road-transported rigs. During the second half of 1991, Total Exploration Gabon, a subsidiary of Total Exploration Production, conducted a slim hole drilling project in the Gabonese tropical rain forest in a joint venture with Chevron Corp., Exxon Corp., and Austria's OMV AG. During this helicopter-supported operation, two wells were drilled: one to 2,747 m (9,010 ft) ending with a 3 in. hole and one to 418 m (1,371 ft) ending with a 5-7/8 in. hole. Continuous coring operations recovered 1,868 m (6,127 ft), or 59% of the total length drilled.

Dachary, J. (Total Exploration Production, Libreville (GA)); Vighetto, R. (Total Exploration Production, Paris (FR))

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

Thermal Gradient Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes Thermal Gradient Holes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Thermal Gradient Holes Details Activities (50) Areas (39) Regions (4) NEPA(29) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Field wide fluid flow characteristics if an array of wells are drilled Thermal: Mapping and projecting thermal anomalies Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 5.00500 centUSD 0.005 kUSD 5.0e-6 MUSD 5.0e-9 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 16.501,650 centUSD 0.0165 kUSD 1.65e-5 MUSD 1.65e-8 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 50.005,000 centUSD

140

Probing black holes with constellation-X  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Constellation-X is a premiere X-ray spectroscopy mission due to launch within the next decade. With a factor of 100 increase in sensitivity over current X-ray spectroscopy missions and an excellent energy resolution of 2 eV at 6 keV one of the prime science goals of the mission will be to observe activity near the black hole event horizon by measuring changes in the Fe K? fluorescence emission line profile and time-linked intensity changes between the line and the continuum. Detailed variability studies with Constellation-X will allow us to reconstruct images of the accretion disk probe the effects of strong gravity in the vicinity of black holes and measure black hole mass and spin via deconvolution of the line profile.

Kimberly A. Weaver

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Yucca Mountain Project prototype air-coring test, U12g tunnel, Nevada test site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Prototype Air-Coring Test was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) G-Tunnel facility to evaluate standard coring techniques, modified slightly for air circulation, for use in testing at a prospective nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Air-coring technology allows sampling of subsurface lithology with minimal perturbation to ambient characteristic such as that required for exploratory holes near aquifers, environmental applications, and site characterization work. Two horizontal holes were cored, one 50 ft long and the other 150 ft long, in densely welded fractured tuff to simulate the difficult drilling conditions anticipated at Yucca Mountain. Drilling data from seven holes on three other prototype tests in nonwelded tuff were also collected for comparison. The test was used to establish preliminary standards of performance for drilling and dust collection equipment and to assess procedural efficiencies. The Longyear-38 drill achieved 97% recovery for HQ-size core (-2.5 in.), and the Atlas Copco dust collector (DCT-90) captured 1500 lb of fugitive dust in a mine environment with only minor modifications. Average hole production rates were 6-8 ft per 6-h shift in welded tuff and almost 20 ft per shift on deeper holes in nonwelded tuff. Lexan liners were successfully used to encapsulate core samples during the coring process and protect core properties effectively. The Prototype Air-Coring Test demonstrated that horizontal air coring in fractured welded tuff (to at least 150 ft) can be safely accomplished by proper selection, integration, and minor modification of standard drilling equipment, using appropriate procedures and engineering controls. The test also indicated that rig logistics, equipment, and methods need improvement before attempting a large-scale dry drilling program at Yucca Mountain.

Ray, J.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Newsom, J.C. [Newsom Industries, Citrus Heights, CA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

143

HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large-grain sand in ice. Results with this core showed that the viscosity of the drilling fluid must also be carefully controlled. When coarse sand was being cored, the core barrel became stuck because the drilling fluid was not viscous enough to completely remove the large grains of sand. These tests were very valuable to the project by showing the difficulties in coring permafrost or hydrates in a laboratory environment (as opposed to a field environment where drilling costs are much higher and the potential loss of equipment greater). Among the conclusions reached from these simulated hydrate coring tests are the following: Frozen hydrate core samples can be recovered successfully; A spring-finger core catcher works best for catching hydrate cores; Drilling fluid can erode the core and reduces its diameter, making it more difficult to capture the core; Mud must be designed with proper viscosity to lift larger cuttings; and The bottom 6 inches of core may need to be drilled dry to capture the core successfully.

John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

TMI-2 core shipping preparations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Core Analysis At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mcgee Mountain Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Additional...

146

Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date - 1992 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes...

147

Core Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Dobson, Et Al., 2003) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dobson, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Dobson, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

148

Core Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Carothers, Et Al., 1987...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carothers, Et Al., 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Newberry Caldera Area (Carothers, Et Al., 1987)...

149

Black holes at accelerators.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 05 11 12 8v 3 6 A pr 2 00 6 Black Holes at Accelerators Bryan Webber Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK In theories with large extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity, black holes... 2000 3000 Missing ET (GeV) Ar bi tra ry S ca le p p ? QCD SUSY 5 TeV BH (n=6) 5 TeV BH (n=2) (PT > 600 GeV) (SUGRA point 5) Figure 10: Missing transverse energy for various processes at the LHC. 4.2. Event Characteristics Turning from single...

Webber, Bryan R

150

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Page, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes From November 2008 to March 2009, Seabees from the Naval Construction Division (NCD) successfully completed fivetemperature gradient holes for the GPO. Samples taken from each hole were similar in nature; mixtures of sand and conglomerates with the occasional granite sections were typically encountered. Each hole varied slightly in depth, ranging from 600ft to 1,000ft; however, each hole has been completed to acceptable standards of the GPO. Upon completion of drilling, 3" metal tubing was inserted to

151

ACCU Core Sampling/Storage Device for VOC Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Accu Core sampler system consists of alternating cylindrical clear acrylic sections and one-inch cylindrical stainless steel sections arranged in clear shrink wrap. The set of alternating acrylic and stainless steel sections in the shrink wrap are designed to fit in a Geoprobe dual-tube penetrometer for collection of continuous soil cores. The clear acrylic sections can have 1/2-inch access holes for easy soil headspace screening without violating the integrity of the adjacent stainless steel sections. The Accu Core sampler system can be used to store a soil sample collected in the stainless steel section by capping the ends of the section so it becomes a sample storage container. The sampler system can also be used to collect a subsurface soil sample in one of the sections that can be directly extruded from the section into a container for storage during shipment to the laboratory. In addition, the soil in a sampler section can be quickly sub-sampled using a coring tool and extruded into a storage container so the integrity of the soil is not disrupted and the potential for VOC loss during sub-sampling is greatly reduced. A field validation study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the Accu Core sampler to store VOC soil samples during transportation to the laboratory for analysis and to compare the performance of the Accu Core with current sampling and storage techniques, all of which require sub-sampling when the soil sample is brought to the surface. During some of the validation testing, the acrylic sections having access holes for headspace screening were included in the Accu Core sampler configuration and soil in these sections was screened to show the usefulness of the sample screening capability provided by the Accu Core system. This report presents the results of the field validation study as well as recommendations for the Accu Core sampler system.

Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Mark M. Sanderson

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Inside a black hole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... interior. These models reveal several significantly different behaviours. The simplest model, of a 'Schwarzschild' black hole, which possesses mass but no charge or angular momentum, has an ... into account, seal off the 'tunnel', and yield an interior similar to the Schwarzschild model, with an all-encompassing crushing singularity. More recently, there have been attempts6- ...

William A. Hiscock

1991-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

153

Laser bottom hole assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Auger spectrum of a water molecule after single and double core ionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high intensity of free electron lasers opens up the possibility to perform single-shot molecule scattering experiments. However, even for small molecules, radiation damage induced by absorption of high intense x-ray radiation is not yet fully understood. One of the striking effects which occurs under intense x-ray illumination is the creation of double core ionized molecules in considerable quantity. To provide insight into this process, we have studied the dynamics of water molecules in single and double core ionized states by means of electronic transition rate calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. From the MD trajectories, photoionization and Auger transition rates were computed based on electronic continuum wavefunctions obtained by explicit integration of the coupled radial Schroedinger equations. These rates served to solve the master equations for the populations of the relevant electronic states. To account for the nuclear dynamics during the core hole lifetime, the calculated electron emission spectra for different molecular geometries were incoherently accumulated according to the obtained time-dependent populations, thus neglecting possible interference effects between different decay pathways. We find that, in contrast to the single core ionized water molecule, the nuclear dynamics for the double core ionized water molecule during the core hole lifetime leaves a clear fingerprint in the resulting electron emission spectra. The lifetime of the double core ionized water was found to be significantly shorter than half of the single core hole lifetime.

Inhester, L.; Burmeister, C. F.; Groenhof, G.; Grubmueller, H. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Slim Holes At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slim Holes At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Slim Holes At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Pueblo Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 1 well References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Slim_Holes_At_Jemez_Pueblo_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402648" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

156

Slim Holes At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Slim Holes At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Gabbs Valley Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 2 slim holes References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Slim_Holes_At_Gabbs_Valley_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402645" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities

157

Absorption of planar massless scalar waves by Bardeen regular black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accretion of fields by black holes is a subject of great interest in physics. It is known that accretion plays a fundamental role in active galactic nuclei and in the evolution of black holes. Accretion of fundamental fields is often related to the study of absorption cross section. Basically all black holes for which absorption of fields has been studied so far present singularities. However, even within general relativity, it is possible to construct regular black holes: objects with event horizons but without singularities. Many physically motivated regular black hole solutions have been proposed in the past years, demanding the understanding of their absorption properties. We study the absorption of planar massless scalar waves by Bardeen regular black holes. We compare the absorption cross section of Bardeen and Reissner--Nordstr\\"om black holes, showing that the former always have a bigger absorption cross section for fixed values of the field frequency and of the normalized black hole charge. We also show that it is possible for a Bardeen black hole to have the same high-frequency absorption cross section of a Reissner--Nordstr\\"om black hole. Our results suggest that, in mid-to-high-frequency regimes, regular black holes can have compatible properties with black holes with singularities, as far as absorption is concerned.

Caio F. B. Macedo; Lus C. B. Crispino

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

An indole derivative as a high triplet energy hole transport material for blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A thermally stable high triplet energy material derived from an indoloacridine core and indole hole transport units, 8,8-bis(4-(1H-indol-1-yl)phenyl)-8H-indolo[3,2,1-de]acridine (BIPIA), was synthesized as the hole transport material for deep blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes. The BIPIA hole transport material showed a high triplet energy of 2.95eV and high glass transition temperature of 142C. A high quantum efficiency of 19.3% was obtained in the deep blue device using BIPIA as the high triplet energy hole transport material.

Min Su Park; Jun Yeob Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Slim Holes At Salton Sea Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slim Holes At Salton Sea Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Slim Holes At Salton Sea Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Salton Sea Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes NAF El Centro work started as a consulting project in 2003. An overlapping TGH and geophysical target prompted GPO to follow up with drilling that was initiated in 2008. Technical problems with both holes has prompted GPO to drill one more deep, slim hole on this anomaly in the summer of 2010. The details of GPO's plans and prior work at NAFEC are available elsewhere in this volume. References Andrew Sabin, S. Bjornstad, M. Lazaro, D. Meade, C. Page, S. Alm, A.

160

Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The distribution of hydrothermally altered rocks was mapped over about 1 km2 in the Sevenmile Hole area. Two to four kilogram hand samples located by a handheld GPS were collected from many outcrops for laboratory analyses References Peter B. Larson, Allison Phillips, David John, Michael Cosca, Chad Pritchard, Allen Andersen, Jennifer Manion (2009) A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The

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161

Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A deep borehole was drilled at the summit of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, between April 6 and July 9, 1973. The hole is located approximately 1 km south of the edge of Halemaumau crater (Figs. 1 and 2), a crater within the summit caldera of the volcano. The total depth of the hole is 1262 m (4141 ft) measured from the derrick floor at an altitude of 1102 m (3616 ft). A description of the drilling program and some of the results obtained have

162

Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The distribution of hydrothermally altered rocks was mapped over about 1 km2 in the Sevenmile Hole area. Two to four kilogram hand samples located by a handheld GPS were collected from many outcrops K735for laboratory analyses References Peter B. Larson, Allison Phillips, David John, Michael Cosca, Chad Pritchard, Allen Andersen, Jennifer Manion (2009) A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The

163

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500' deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400' encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The

164

Supermassive Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supermassive black holes have generally been recognized as the most destructive force in nature. But in recent years, they have undergone a dramatic shift in paradigm. These objects may have been critical to the formation of structure in the early universe, spawning bursts of star formation and nucleating proto-galactic condensations. Possibly half of all the radiation produced after the Big Bang may be attributed to them, whose number is now known to exceed 300 million. The most accessible among them is situated at the Center of Our Galaxy. In the following pages, we will examine the evidence that has brought us to this point, and we will understand why many expect to actually image the event horizon of the Galaxy's central black hole within this decade.

Fulvio Melia

2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Black hole lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High frequency dispersion does not alter the low frequency spectrum of Hawking radiation from a single black hole horizon, whether the dispersion entails subluminal or superluminal group velocities. We show here that in the presence of an inner horizon as well as an outer horizon the superluminal case differs dramatically however. The negative energy partners of Hawking quanta return to the outer horizon and stimulate more Hawking radiation if the field is bosonic or suppress it if the field is fermionic. This process leads to exponential growth or damping of the radiated flux and correlations among the quanta emitted at different times, unlike in the usual Hawking effect. These phenomena may be observable in condensed matter black hole analogues that exhibit superluminal dispersion.

Steven Corley and Ted Jacobson

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

-The Core of CS -Curricula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Advanced Courses #12;The Core of CS Curricula #12;CS Body of Knowledge Area > Unit > Topic Core vs elective#12;ACM vs U S I #12;- The Core of CS - Curricula - Introductory Courses - Intermediate Courses Introductory Intermediate Advanced Core Elective Units #12;Courses Introductory Intermediate Advanced Core

Hauswirth, Matthias

167

Tilt and shift mode stability in a spheromak with a flux core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The stability of spheromak equilibria with a flux core or reversal coil is studied by means of an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. Results depend critically upon whether the flux hole region (the current free area just inside the separatrix) is treated as a perfectly conducting plasma or as a vacuum. This indicates that the tilt and shift modes persist as resistive instabilities if they are stable in ideal MHD. Specifically for nonoptimally shaped equilibria the flux core must nearly touch the current channel if the flux hole is a vacuum whereas the core may be slightly outside the separatrix if the flux hole has conducting plasma. A larger margin exists for optimally shaped equilibria.

John M. Finn

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Hole depletion of ladders in Sr14Cu24O41 induced by correlation effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hole distribution in Sr14Cu24O41 is studied by low-temperature polarization-dependent O K near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements and state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations that include core-hole and correlation effects in a mean-field approach. Contrary to all previous analysis, based on semiempirical models, we show that correlations and antiferromagnetic ordering favor the strong chain-hole attraction. For the remaining small number of holes accommodated on ladders, leg sites are preferred to rung sites. The small hole affinity of rung sites explains naturally the one-dimensional to two-dimensional crossover in the phase diagram of (La,Y,Sr,Ca)14Cu24O41.

V. Ilakovac; C. Gougoussis; M. Calandra; N. B. Brookes; V. Bisogni; S. G. Chiuzbaian; J. Akimitsu; O. Milat; S. Tomi?; C. F. Hague

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Core shroud corner joints  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

Oxygen to the core  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-01 1-01 For immediate release: 01/10/2013 | NR-13-01-01 Oxygen to the core Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly An artist's conception of Earth's inner and outer core. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- An international collaboration including researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has discovered that the Earth's core formed under more oxidizing conditions than previously proposed. Through a series of laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments at high pressure (350,000 to 700,000 atmospheres of pressure) and temperatures (5,120 to 7,460 degrees Fahrenheit), the team demonstrated that the depletion of siderophile (also known as "iron loving") elements can be produced by core formation under more oxidizing conditions than earlier

171

Core assembly storage structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

Jones, Jr., Charles E. (Northridge, CA); Brunings, Jay E. (Chatsworth, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Double-core excitations in formamide can be probed by X-ray double-quantum-coherence spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attosecond, time-resolved X-ray double-quantum-coherence four-wave mixing signals of formamide at the nitrogen and oxygen K-edges are simulated using restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory and the excited core hole approximation. These signals, induced by core exciton coupling, are particularly sensitive to the level of treatment of electron correlation, thus providing direct experimental signatures of electron and core-hole many-body effects and a test of electronic structure theories.

Zhang Yu; Healion, Daniel; Biggs, Jason D.; Mukamel, Shaul [Department of Chemistry, University of California, 450 Rowland Hall, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

2013-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

174

Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States)] [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Baird, Mark [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States)] [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6173 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Blondin, John [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)] [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No.  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole number one (CGEH-1) was drilled in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California, from September 2 to December 2, 1977. Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals and extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted to document the geologic character of the geothermal system as penetrated by CGEH-1. The major rock units encountered include a mafic metamorphic sequence and a

176

Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank & Neggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Brian D. Fairbank, Kim V. Niggemann (2004) Deep Blue No 1- A Slimhole Geothermal Discovery At Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Blue_Mountain_Area_(Fairbank_%26_Neggemann,_2004)&oldid=386709" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

177

AO Core Competency Worksheet  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AO Core Competency Worksheet AO Core Competency Worksheet 1 DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS Key Cyber Security Role: Authorizing Official (AO) Role Definition: The AO is the Senior DOE Management Federal official with the authority to formally assume responsibility and be held fully accountable for operating an information system at an acceptable level of risk. Competency Area: Incident Management Functional Requirement: Manage Competency Definition: Refers to the knowledge and understanding of the processes and procedures required to prevent, detect, investigate, contain, eradicate, and recover from incidents that impact the organizational mission as directed by the DOE Cyber Incident Response Capability (CIRC). Behavioral Outcome: Individuals fulfilling the role of AO will have a working knowledge of policies

178

Earth's Core Hottest Layer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth's Core Hottest Layer Earth's Core Hottest Layer Name: Alfred Status: Grade: 6-8 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Why is the inner core the hottest layer? How is that possible? Replies: There are two factors causing the center of the Earth hotter than various layers of the Earth's. First, the more dense is the layer. The denser layer, the hotter it will be. In addition, the source of the heating is due to heat produced by nuclear decay. These substances tend to be more dense than lower dense substances. So the source of heat (temperature) is higher, the greater will be the temperature. Having said all that, the reasons are rather more complicated in the "real" Earth. If the inner layers were less dense they would rise (bubble) to the "surface" leaving the inner layers more dense and thus hotter layers.

179

2000 BTS Core Databook  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

0 BTS CORE DATABOOK 0 BTS CORE DATABOOK 2000 BTS CORE DATABOOK OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY * U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY This version is dated: August 7, 2000 DISCLAIMER This document was designed for the internal use of the United States Department of Energy. This document was also designed to be occasionally updated and, therefore, this copy may not reflect the most current version. This document was prepared as account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that

180

Black Holes And Their Entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation covers two di erent but related topics: the construction of new black hole solutions and the study of the microscopic origin of black hole entropy. In the solution part, two di erent sets of new solutions are found. The rst...

Mei, Jianwei

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Black Hole Energy Extraction Problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... non-rotating black hole the particle can be lowered to no closer than 1.14 Schwarzschild radii, and the energy extracted can be no more than 63.2 per cent ... gram of matter-and the rope could be lowered no closer than 5 x 1011 Schwarzschild radii. This seems to rule out black holes as practical sources of energy. ...

1972-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

Optical black holes and solitons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We exhibit a static, cylindrically symmetric, exact solution to the Euler-Heisenberg field equations (EHFE) and prove that its effective geometry contains (optical) black holes. It is conjectured that there are also soliton solutions to the EHFE which contain black hole geometries.

Shawn Westmoreland

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

183

Entropy of Lovelock Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A general formula for the entropy of stationary black holes in Lovelock gravity theories is obtained by integrating the first law of black hole mechanics, which is derived by Hamiltonian methods. The entropy is not simply one quarter of the surface area of the horizon, but also includes a sum of intrinsic curvature invariants integrated over a cross section of the horizon.

Ted Jacobson; Robert C. Myers

1993-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

184

Status of core conversion with LEU silicide fuel in JRR-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) is a light water moderated and cooled, 93% enriched uranium ETR-type fuel used and swimming pool type reactor with thermal output of 3.5MW. Since the first criticality was achieved on January 28, 1965, JRR-4 has been used for shielding experiments, radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses, training for reactor engineers and so on for about 30 years. Within the framework of the RERTR Program, the works for conversion to LEU fuel are now under way, and neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations emphasizing on safety and performance aspects are being carried out. The design and evaluation for the core conversion are based on the Guides for Safety Design and Evaluation of research and testing reactor facilities in Japan. These results show that the JRR-4 will be able to convert to use LEU fuel without any major design change of core and size of fuel element. LEU silicide fuel (19.75%) will be used and maximum neutron flux in irradiation hole would be slightly decreased from present neutron flux value of 7x10{sup 13}(n/cm{sup 2}/s). The conversion works are scheduled to complete in 1998, including with upgrade of the reactor building and utilization facilities.

Nakajima, Teruo; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Shirai, Eiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hopper Multi-Core FAQ  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hopper Multi-Core FAQ Hopper Multi-Core FAQ Hopper Multi-Core FAQ Q. How is Hopper Different than Franklin? A. The new Hopper Phase-II system will have 24 cores per node. Franklin had only four. Q. What else is different? A. There is less memory per core. Hopper has 1.3 GB / core rather than 2.0 GB / core on Franklin. A code using MPI on Hopper may be more likely to exhaust available memory, causing an error. Additionally, Hopper's memory hierarchy is "deeper" and more non-uniform than Franklin's and this can have a big impact on performance in certain cases. Hopper's 24 cores per node are implemented on two sockets, each containing two six-core dies (see the image below). Each of the six-core dies has direct access to one-quarter of the node's total memory. Thus,

186

TMI-2 core examination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper.

Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

String-Corrected Black Holes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the geometry of four dimensional black hole solutions in the presence of stringy higher curvature corrections to the low energy effective action. For certain supersymmetric two charge black holes these corrections drastically alter the causal structure of the solution, converting seemingly pathological null singularities into timelike singularities hidden behind a finite area horizon. We establish, analytically and numerically, that the string-corrected two-charge black hole metric has the same Penrose diagram as the extremal four-charge black hole. The higher derivative terms lead to another dramatic effect -- the gravitational force exerted by a black hole on an inertial observer is no longer purely attractive! The magnitude of this effect is related to the size of the compactification manifold.

Hubeny, Veronika; Maloney, Alexander; Rangamani, Mukund

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project'S Hot Sulphur Springs Lease Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project'S Hot Sulphur Springs Lease Area Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Earth Power Resources, Inc. recently completed a combined rotary/core hole to a depth of 3,813 feet at it's Hot Sulphur Springs Tuscarora Geothermal Power Project Lease Area located 70-miles north of Elko, Nevada. Previous geothermal exploration data were combined with geologic mapping and newly acquired seismic-reflection data to identify a northerly tending horst-graben structure approximately 2,000 feet wide by

189

TMI-2 core damage: a summary of present knowledge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive fuel damage (oxidation and fragmentation) has occurred and the top approx. 1.5 m of the center portion of the TMI-2 core has relocated. The fuel fragmentation extends outward to slightly beyond one-half the core radius in the direction examined by the CCTV camera. While the radial extent of core fragmentation in other directions was not directly observed, control and spider drop data and in-core instrument data suggest that the core void is roughly symmetrical, although there are a few indications of severe fuel damage extending to the core periphery. The core material fragmented into a broad range of particle sizes, extending down to a few microns. APSR movement data, the observation of damaged fuel assemblies hanging unsupported from the bottom of the reactor upper plenum structure, and the observation of once-molten stainless steel immediately above the active core indicate high temperatures (up to at least 1720 K) extended to the very top of the core. The relative lack of damage to the underside of the plenum structure implies a sharp temperature demarcation at the core/plenum interface. Filter debris and leadscrew deposit analyses indicate extensive high temperature core materials interaction, melting of the Ag-In-Cd control material, and transport of particulate control material to the plenum and out of the vessel.

Owen, D.E.; Mason, R.E.; Meininger, R.D.; Franz, W.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Slim Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Slim Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry Caldera Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Slim_Holes_At_Newberry_Caldera_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402651" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities

191

Slim Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slim Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Slim Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes GPO drilled two deep, slim geophysical test holes on the western margin of the Hawthorne Army Depot in 2008/2009. These two holes, HWAD 2a and HWAD 3, were drilled on the perceived structural trend of this valley and immediately south and east, respectively, of the El Capitan well. The "El Cap" is a 1,000' well completed by an unsuccessful developer in 1980. The El Cap and several other wells in this region south of Walker Lake have long been admired and even discussed by industry and the military but no sustained exploration or development activities work have ever been

192

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes

193

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Springs Ranch Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley

194

Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

195

Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2009) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fairbank Engineering, 2009) Fairbank Engineering, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Fairbank Engineering, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes DEEP BLUE No.1, the first slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, was drilled under a cost-share program between the DOE and Noramex, under the DOE's Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition (GRED) program, (Noramex Corp., 2002). The hole was sited to test an area of projected high temperature at depth from gradients measured in shallow holes drilled in the central part of the lease area (Figure 3.1), and to test an area of low apparent resistivity interpreted to reflect possible

196

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The first and only Seabee drilling project was the installation of five TGHs at the Camp Wilson region of the MCAGCC Marine base near Twenty-Nine Palms, CA. While the program was a success and GPO identified an anomaly where a deep, slim hole is to be drilled in June, 2010, the Seabee rig was sent oversees soon after drilling was completed. If/when another rig

197

Thermal Gradient Holes At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Thermal Gradient Holes At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

198

Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Activities and events provide Residential Network members the opportunity to discuss similar needs and challenges, and to collectively identify effective strategies and useful resources.

199

Core Analysis At Dunes Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dunes Geothermal Area (1976) Dunes Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Dunes Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Dunes Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fracture analysis to determine if sealing or open fractures exist Notes Core samples show diagenesis superimposed on episodic fracturing and fracture sealing. The minerals that fill fractures show significant temporal variations. Fracture sealing and low fracture porosity imply that only the most recently formed fractures are open to fluids. References Michael L. Batzle; Gene Simmons (1 January 1976) Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas

200

SECA Core Technology Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 27 - January 27 - 28, 2005 Workshop Peer Review Rating Results Summary Donald Collins SECA Core January 2005 Workshop Peer Review Summary - DWC,PM-30,3-10-05 2 of 21 Review Process Summary * Core Technology Project Presentations - Project Objectives & Results - Non-proprietary Information - Industry, National Lab & University Participation * Verbal & Written Constructive Comments - Written Comments on Peer Review Forms - Industry Verbal Feedback at Workshop * Core Participant Review & Reply to Comments - Reply to Comment Issues * DOE NETL Redirect Projects as Needed M a t e r i a l s C o n t r o l s & D i a g n o s t i c s P o w e r E le c t r o n ic s F u e l P r o c e s s i n g Manufacturing M o d e li n g & S im u la ti o n SECA Core January 2005 Workshop Peer Review Summary - DWC,PM-30,3-10-05 3 of 21 Peer Review Questions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SECA Core Technology Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 12 - May 12 - 13, 2004 Workshop Peer Review Rating Results Summary Donald Collins SECA Core May 2004 Workshop Peer Review Summary - DWC,PM-30,5-21-04 2 of 16 Review Process Summary * Core Technology Project Presentations - Project Objectives & Results - Non-proprietary Information - Industry, National Lab & University Participation * Verbal & Written Constructive Comments - Written Comments on Peer Review Forms - Industry Verbal Feedback at Workshop * Core Participant Review & Reply to Comments - Reply to Comment Issues * DOE NETL Redirect Projects as Needed M a t e r i a l s C o n t r o l s & D i a g n o s t i c s P o w e r E le c t r o n ic s F u e l P r o c e s s i n g Manufacturing M o d e li n g & S im u la ti o n SECA Core May 2004 Workshop Peer Review Summary - DWC,PM-30,5-21-04 3 of 16 Peer Review Questions

202

Plan ?: core or cusp?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Article Plan beta: core or cusp? Thomas...Breddels (2013) for a detailed review of the more sophisticated numerical...is available for each star (standard technique). Large data sets...velocity space, we use the standard definition, for the velocity......

Thomas D. Richardson; Douglas Spolyar; Matthew D. Lehnert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Core competence (knowledge) (skill)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Core competence 8 5~8 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 PPS003 Ver. 1.1 2011/03/07 #12; 2 (knowledge) (skill) (attitude) Set of skill, knowledge or attitude which should be learned or acquired by each, 2000) (knowledge) (skill) (attitude) Set of skill, knowledge or attitude which should be learned

Wu, Yih-Min

204

Dynamics of core accretion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......formation, the accretor is of course a rocky planetary core, on to which gas accretion...both cases, the distributions are nearly flat at large distances (i.e.-R H...the evolution of the simulation, using a safety factor of J- 4. Nevertheless, at time......

Andrew F. Nelson; Maximilian Ruffert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Dynamics of core accretion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the accretor is of course a rocky planetary core, on to which...the distributions are nearly flat at large distances (i.e...numerically induced collapse through violation of the Jeans criterion (Truelove...of the simulation, using a safety factor of J- 4. Nevertheless......

Andrew F. Nelson; Maximilian Ruffert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Using Dublin Core application profiles to manage diverse metadata developments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of Dublin Core application profiles at the British Library as part of a resource discovery strategy. It shows how they can be used to control the proliferation of metadata formats in digitisation activity and provide interoperability ... Keywords: British library, Dublin Core application profiles, SRU, Z39.50, gateway, interoperability, metadata formats, resource discovery strategy

Robina Clayphan; Bill Oldroyd

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Thermal metastabilities in the solar core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linear stability analysis indicates that solar core is thermally stable for infinitesimal internal perturbations. For the first time, thermal metastabilities are found in the solar core when outer perturbations with significant amplitude are present. The obtained results show that hot bubbles generated by outer perturbations may travel a significant distance in the body of the Sun. These deep-origin hot bubbles have mass, energy, and chemical composition that may be related to solar flares. The results obtained may have remarkable relations to activity cycles in planets like Jupiter and also in extrasolar planetary systems.

Attila Grandpierre; Gabor Agoston

2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

208

The structure of black hole magnetospheres I. Schwarzschild black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2000 RAS, MNRAS 315, 89 97 force-free black hole magnetosphere...However, there is nothing fundamental about the paraboloidal shape...in stationary axisymmetric force-free magnetospheres. Therefore...Stegun I. A., 1972, Handbook of Mathematical Functions......

Pranab Ghosh

2000-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

Thermodynamics of Lifshitz black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We apply the recently extended conserved Killing charge definition of Abbott-Deser-Tekin formalism to compute, for the first time, the energies of analytic Lifshitz black holes in higher dimensions. We then calculate the temperature and the entropy of this large family of solutions, and study and discuss the first law of black hole thermodynamics. Along the way we also identify the possible critical points of the relevant quadratic curvature gravity theories. Separately, we also apply the generalized Killing charge definition to compute the energy and the angular momentum of the warped AdS3 black hole solution of the three-dimensional new massive gravity theory.

Deniz Olgu Devecio?lu and zgr Sar?o?lu

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

Core Measure Results  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Core Measure Core Measure Results FY 07 Results FY 08 Results FY 09 Results FY 10 Target FY 10 Customer Perspective: Customer Satisfaction: -Timeliness NM 81 NM NM NM -Quality NM 90 NM NM NM Effective Service Partnership: -Extent of Customer Satisfaction with the responsiveness, etc. NM 87 NM NM NM Internal Business Perspective: Acquisition Excellence: -Extent to which internal quality control systems are effective 86 87 84 87 88 Most Effective Use of Contracting Approaches to Maximize Efficiency and Cost Effectiveness: Use of Electronic Commerce: - % of delivery & purchase orders issued electronically as a % of total simplified actions 70 72 89 99 100 - % of new competitive transactions > $100K conducted through EC 70 72 91 100 95 Performance Based Service Contracts: - PBSCs awarded as a % of eligible new

211

Banded electromagnetic stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Gonzales, Aaron A. (San Jose, CA); Patel, Mahadeo R. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Banded electromagnetic stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Gonzales, Aaron A. (San Jose, CA); Patel, Mahadeo R. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Electromagnetic pump stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

214

Banded electromagnetic stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

215

Banded electromagnetic stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

216

Life in a Tree Hole  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tree Hole Tree Hole Nature Bulletin No. 581 November 21, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H Thompson, Senior Naturalist LIFE IN A TREE HOLE A forest is much more than just trees. It includes all of the underbrush, wildflowers and other vegetation that grow beneath these trees; as well as all of its animal life, both large and small. Sunshine, rain, wind, soil, and the leaf litter on the ground are part of it, too. A forest is a community -- a fabric in which the lives of its inhabitants are woven together and into their surroundings by a complex web of interrelations. Tree holes -- together with the birds, mammals and small life which they shelter -- furnish an important binding force in this forest community.

217

Thermodynamics of regular black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate thermodynamics for a magnetically charged regular black hole (MCRBH), which comes from the action of general relativity and nonlinear electromagnetics, comparing with the Reissner-Norstr\\"om (RN) black hole in both four and two dimensions after dimensional reduction. We find that there is no thermodynamic difference between the regular and RN black holes for a fixed charge $Q$ in both dimensions. This means that the condition for either singularity or regularity at the origin of coordinate does not affect the thermodynamics of black hole. Furthermore, we describe the near-horizon AdS$_2$ thermodynamics of the MCRBH with the connection of the Jackiw-Teitelboim theory. We also identify the near-horizon entropy as the statistical entropy by using the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence.

Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

CoreShell Catalysts in PEMFC Cathode Environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A wide variety of coreshell electrocatalysts have been investigated in recent years, showing benefits for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid electrolytes. Particularly high values of activity per gram o...

Sarah Ball

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ZnO-TiO2 Core-Shell Nanorod/P3HT Solar Cells Lori E. Greene, Matt Law, Benjamin D. Yuhas, and Peidong Yang*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diffusion bottleneck, has been addressed in organic and organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells by adoptingZnO-TiO2 Core-Shell Nanorod/P3HT Solar Cells Lori E. Greene, Matt Law, Benjamin D. Yuhas-inorganic solar cell architecture based on ZnO-TiO2 core-shell nanorod arrays encased in the hole

Yang, Peidong

220

Elastic anisotropy of core samples from the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP): direct 3-D measurements and weak anisotropy approximations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......samples from the same TCDP borehole. 2 Sampling and method...locations. The vertical drilling of TCDP Hole A in 2004...samples are cored from a large core retrieved at depth...measured velocities is quite large, from 1900 m s-1 at...although the location of the larger low velocity sector remains......

Laurent Louis; Christian David; Petr pa?ek; Teng-fong Wong; Jrme Fortin; Sheng Rong Song

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Of the Black Hole Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About thirty years ago, Bekenstein and Hawking introduced three basic concepts relating to black hole, namely, the "area entropy", "gravitation temperature" and "thermal radiation". The author analyzes these concepts systematically and concludes that they are mostly inadequate or wrong. He points out that a black hole's taking in thermal radiation from the space is an energy-gathering process. It is special, even extraordinary. It reduces entropy, violating Clausius' second law.

Xinyong Fu

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

222

Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9) 9) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1979 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Permitted the lateral and vertical extrapolation of core and test data and bridged the gap between surface geophysical data and core analyses. Notes 1) Microcracks were observed in core samples. A set of observable characteristics of microcracks were discovered in racks from geothermal regions that appears to be unique and to have considerable potential for exploration for geothermal regions. Both permeability and electrical conductivity were measured for a suite of samples with a range of microcracks characteristics. A partial set of samples were collected to study migration of radioactive elements. 2) Laboratory analyses of cores

223

Testing operations plan: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

operations plan: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) operations plan: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Testing operations plan: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) was drilled to investigate the potential of the Coso Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) in southeastern California. Detailed background information is contained in the drilling plan, Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), NVO-184, dated June 1977. The purpose of this supplement to NVO-184 is to establish a plan of operations for testing the resource after completion of well drilling activities. Major elements of this plan include

224

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The two gradient holes were sited on federal geothermal leases owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. and both were drilled into lakebed sediments some distance from the intense shallow geothermal anomaly located in the eastern half of Section 7, Township 25 South, Range 19 West. References Roy A. Cunniff, Roger L. Bowers (2005) Final Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I, Ii, And Iii For The Animas Valley, Nm Geothermal Resource Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Lightning_Dock_Area_(Cunniff_%26_Bowers,_2005)&oldid=387460"

225

Lattice Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the Hawking process on lattices falling into static black holes. The motivation is to understand how the outgoing modes and Hawking radiation can arise in a setting with a strict short distance cutoff in the free-fall frame. We employ two-dimensional free scalar field theory. For a falling lattice with a discrete time-translation symmetry we use analytical methods to establish that, for Killing frequency $\\omega$ and surface gravity $\\kappa$ satisfying $\\kappa\\ll\\omega^{1/3}\\ll 1$ in lattice units, the continuum Hawking spectrum is recovered. The low frequency outgoing modes arise from exotic ingoing modes with large proper wavevectors that "refract" off the horizon. In this model with time translation symmetry the proper lattice spacing goes to zero at spatial infinity. We also consider instead falling lattices whose proper lattice spacing is constant at infinity and therefore grows with time at any finite radius. This violation of time translation symmetry is visible only at wavelengths comparable to the lattice spacing, and it is responsible for transmuting ingoing high Killing frequency modes into low frequency outgoing modes.

Steven Corley; Ted Jacobson

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6) 6) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Fracture analysis to determine if sealing or open fractures exist Notes Core samples show diagenesis superimposed on episodic fracturing and fracture sealing. The minerals that fill fractures show significant temporal variations. Fracture sealing and low fracture porosity imply that only the most recently formed fractures are open to fluids. References Michael L. Batzle; Gene Simmons (1 January 1976) Microfractures in rocks from two geothermal areas Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Analysis_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=47383

227

Fallback and Black Hole Production in Massive Stars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compact remnants of core collapse supernovae--neutron stars and black holes--have properties that reflect both the structure of their stellar progenitors and the physics of the explosion. In particular, the masses of these remnants are sensitive to the density structure of the presupernova star and to the explosion energy. To a considerable extent, the final mass is determined by the ''fallback'', during the explosion, of matter that initially moves outwards, yet ultimately fails to escape. We consider here the simulated explosion of a large number of massive stars (10 to 100 M{sub {circle_dot}}) of Population I (solar metallicity) and III (zero metallicity), and find systematic differences in the remnant mass distributions. As pointed out by Chevalier (1989), supernovae in more compact progenitor stars have stronger reverse shocks and experience more fallback. For Population III stars above about 25 M{sub {circle_dot}} and explosion energies less than 1.5 x 10{sup 51} erg, black holes are a common outcome, with masses that increase monotonically with increasing main sequence mass up to a maximum hole mass of about 35 M{sub {circle_dot}}. If such stars produce primary nitrogen, however, their black holes are systematically smaller. For modern supernovae with nearly solar metallicity, black hole production is much less frequent and the typical masses, which depend sensitively on explosion energy, are smaller. We explore the neutron star initial mass function for both populations and, for reasonable assumptions about the initial mass cut of the explosion, find good agreement with the average of observed masses of neutron stars in binaries. We also find evidence for a bimodal distribution of neutron star masses with a spike around 1.2 M{sub {circle_dot}} (gravitational mass) and a broader distribution peaked around 1.4 M{sub {circle_dot}}.

Zhang, Wei-Qun; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Woosley, S.E.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Heger, A.; /UC, Santa Cruz /Los Alamos

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

228

Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles The OCIO has developed core competency worksheets for...

229

2001 BTS Core Databook  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 BTS CORE 1 BTS CORE DATABOOK OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY This version is dated: November 30, 2001 REVISED data tables on the web site that have been changed since November 30, 2001 include tables: 5.6.7 5.6.8 5.6.9 5.10.8 5.10.9 5.10.10 5.10.11 5.10.12 5.10.13 5.10.14 5.10.15 5.10.16 5.10.17 5.10.18 NEW data tables on the web site that have been added since July 13, 2001 include tables: 5.6.14 5.9.7 5.9.8 5.9.9 REVISED data tables on the web site that have been changed since July 13, 2001 include tables: 4.1.1 4.1.2 4.1.4 4.1.5 4.2.1 4.2.2 4.2.3 4.2.4 4.2.5 4.2.9 4.3.1 4.3.2 4.3.3 4.3.4 4.5.1 4.5.2 4.5.3 5.1.2 5.3.1 5.8.1 5.10.1 6.2.4 7.1.8 7.3.3 These tables are not included in this version of the 2001 BTS Core Databook. DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER

230

Core-tube data logger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wireline core drilling, increasingly used for geothermal exploration, employs a core-tube to capture a rock core sample during drilling. Three types of core-tube data loggers (CTDL) have been built and tested to date by Sandia national Laboratories. They are: (1) temperature-only logger, (2) temperature/inclinometer logger and (3) heat-shielded temperature/inclinometer logger. All were tested during core drilling operations using standard wireline diamond core drilling equipment. While these tools are designed for core-tube deployment, the tool lends itself to be adapted to other drilling modes and equipment. Topics covered in this paper include: (1) description on how the CTDLs are implemented, (2) the components of the system, (3) the type of data one can expect from this type of tool, (4) lessons learned, (5) comparison to its counterpart and (6) future work.

Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.; Knudsen, S.; Drumheller, D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area (Redirected from Seven Mile Hole Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Wyoming Exploration Region: Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase:

232

Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Wyoming Exploration Region: Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

233

Black hole quantum tunnelling and black hole entropy correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parikh-Wilczek tunnelling framework, which treats Hawking radiation as a tunnelling process, is investigated again. As the first order correction, the log-corrected entropy-area relation naturally emerges in the tunnelling picture if we consider the emission of a spherical shell. The second order correction of the emission rate for the Schwarzschild black hole is calculated too. In this level, the result is still in agreement with the unitary theory, however, the entropy of the black hole will contain three parts: the usual Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, the logarithmic term and the inverse area term. In our results the coefficient of the logarithmic term is -1. Apart from a coefficient, Our correction to the black hole entropy is consistent with that of loop quantum gravity.

Jingyi Zhang

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hole in the ozone layer?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hole in the ozone layer? Hole in the ozone layer? Name: Kelley Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is there really a hole in the ozone layer? Replies: That depends on what one means by a "hole". There is a thinning of the layer that is particularly severe during certain seasons at the poles. But the ozone layer is thinning most everywhere. The thinning around the south pole of earth is particularly stunning, and has been referred to as a hole even though some ozone still exists there, it is much less concentrated. As you may know, this ozone destruction is probably due to human release of pollutants such as clorofluorocarbons (CFCs) an due to natural sources such as chemicals from volcanic eruptions. CFCs are used is cooling systems such as refrigerators and air conditioning. There is an international agreement to phase out the use of these destructive chemicals but they won't be banned entirely for years for fears of losing money. Meanwhile the ozone layer thins and we are exposed to increasingly higher doses of cancer causing radiation

235

Next Generation Hole Injection/Transport Nano-Composites for High Efficiency OLED Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to use a novel nano-composite material system for the OLED anode coating/hole transport layer. The novel anode coating is intended to significantly increase not only hole injection/transport efficiency, but the device energy efficiency as well. Another goal of the Core Technologies Program is the optimization and scale-up of air-stable and cross-linkable novel HTL nano-composite materials synthesis and the development of low-cost, large-scale mist deposition processes for polymer OLED fabrication. This proposed technology holds the promise to substantially improve OLED energy efficiency and lifetime.

King Wang

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

The Cosmic MeV Neutrino Background as a Laboratory for Black Hole Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculations of the cosmic rate of core collapses, and the associated neutrino flux, commonly assume that a fixed fraction of massive stars collapse to black holes. We argue that recent results suggest that this fraction instead increases with redshift. With relatively more stars vanishing as "unnovae" in the distant universe, the detectability of the cosmic MeV neutrino background is improved due to their hotter neutrino spectrum, and expectations for supernova surveys are reduced. We conclude that neutrino detectors, after the flux from normal SNe is isolated via either improved modeling or the next Galactic SN, can probe the conditions and history of black hole formation.

Hasan Yuksel; Matthew D. Kistler

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Core Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

238

Dynamic core length in saturated core fault current limiters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A saturated core fault current limiter (SCFCL) is a non-linear core-reactor where the core is saturated by an external superconducting DC bias source to achieve a low core permeability at nominal AC currents. Fault current levels in the AC coils de-saturate the core and transform it to a higher permeability state, hence limiting the fault current. In this work we describe the transition between saturated and de-saturated states in three SCFCL configurations. The 'effective core length', Leff, of the SCFCL, defined as the length of the de-saturated AC core limb, is introduced for exploring this transition as a function of the current, I, in the AC coil. Practically, Leff allows one to see the SCFCL as an inductor with a variable core length, allowing calculations of the impedance of the SCFCL over the whole range of operating currents. The Leff(I) curve is further used to calculate the dynamics of the demagnetization factor in a SCFCL. We show that the strong change in the magnetic induction of a SCFCL at high current is the result of both increasing the effective core length and decreasing the demagnetization factor. The method and results presented here serve as an important tool for comparing between various SCFCL concepts not only by comparing their impedance values at the extreme fault and nominal current conditions but also by providing an insight into the full de-saturation process.

Y Nikulshin; Y Wolfus; A Friedman; Y Yeshurun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

3D Continuum radiative transfer in complex dust configurations around young stellar objects and active nuclei II. 3D Structure of the dense molecular cloud core Rho Oph D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraints on the density and thermal 3D structure of the dense molecular cloud core Rho Oph D are derived from a detailed 3D radiative transfer modeling. Two ISOCAM images at 7 and 15 micron are fitted simultaneously by representing the dust distribution in the core with a series of 3D Gaussian density profiles. Size, total density, and position of the Gaussians are optimized by simulated annealing to obtain a 2D column density map. The projected core density has a complex elongated pattern with two peaks. We propose a new method to calculate an approximate temperature in an externally illuminated complex 3D structure from a mean optical depth. This T(tau)-method is applied to a 1.3 mm map obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope to find the approximate 3D density and temperature distribution of the core Rho Oph D. The spatial 3D distribution deviates strongly from spherical symmetry. The elongated structure is in general agreement with recent gravo-turbulent collapse calculations for molecular clouds. We discuss possible ambiguities of the background determination procedure, errors of the maps, the accuracy of the T(tau)-method, and the influence of the assumed dust particle sizes and properties.

J. Steinacker; A. Bacmann; Th. Henning; R. Klessen; M. Stickel

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

240

Energy on black hole spacetimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the issue of defining energy for test particles on a background black hole spacetime. We revisit the different notions of energy as defined by different observers. The existence of a time-like isometry allows for the notion of a total conserved energy to be well defined, and subsequently the notion of a gravitational potential energy is also meaningful. We then consider the situation in which the test particle is adsorbed by the black hole, and analyze the energetics in detail. In particular, we show that the notion of horizon energy es defined by the isolated horizons formalism provides a satisfactory notion of energy compatible with the particle's conserved energy. As another example, we comment a recent proposal to define energy of the black hole as seen by an observer at rest. This account is intended to be pedagogical and is aimed at the level of and as a complement to the standard textbooks on the subject.

Alejandro Corichi

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Coherence effects in hole superconductivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss the behavior of various observables that depend on matrix elements of operators in the superconducting state within the model of hole superconductivity. In this model, the gap exhibits a linear dependence on the band energy, and the bandwidth depends on the carrier concentration and can become very small for low hole density. We study, in particular, the behavior of ultrasonic attenuation, NMR relaxation rate, and electromagnetic absorption, and present results for parameters expected to be in the range that describes the high-Tc oxides. It is found that the energy dependence of the gap does not give rise to qualitatively different behavior, but significant differences from weak-coupling BCS behavior occur at low hole concentration due to the extreme narrowness of the band.

F. Marsiglio and J. E. Hirsch

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Isotopic Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2009) 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The 40Ar/39Ar data were collected from a single fragment of alunite from sample Y-05-25, approximately 0.5 cm3 in size. References Peter B. Larson, Allison Phillips, David John, Michael Cosca, Chad Pritchard, Allen Andersen, Jennifer Manion (2009) A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_Seven_Mile_Hole_Area_(Larson,_Et_Al.,_2009)&oldid=68747

243

Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes twenty-three gold exploration holes were drilled by Newcrest Resources, Inc. during 2005 and 2006 along the range front. These holes approached or exceeded 300 m in depth and all holes encountered hot water and/or steam. Despite the high temperatures encountered at relatively shallow depths, there are no active geothermal features such as hot springs or steam vents at the surface. The presence of small outcrops of argillic alteration containing anomalous gold attracted the interest of exploration geologists. References Christopher Kratt, Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Robin

244

Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Pre-existing evidence includes heat gradients of upwards of 490mW/m2 from thermal-gradient wells, tepid spring waters (32oC) and silica geochemistry indicating thermal waters with a minimum of 82 degrees C at depth References Lara Owens, Richard Baars, David Norman, Harold Tobin (2005) New Methods In Exploration At The Socorro Peak Kgra- A Gred Iii Project Retrieved from

245

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Lazaro, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Navy recently completed a temperature gradient hole (TGH) drilling campaign. Results suggest multiple resources may exist on HAD lands. To further define the shallow resource, the Navy will drill one or two

246

Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two separate phases of geothermal exploratory drilling have occurred on the lower East Rift. The first was essentially a wildcat venture with relatively little surface exploratory data having been gathered, whereas the second was initiated after somewhat more geoscience information had been acquired under the Hawaii Geothermal Project. The results of the successful exploratory drilling program on the Kilauea

247

Thermal Gradient Holes At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Gradient Holes At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Crump's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 8 wells References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Crump%27s_Hot_Springs_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402699"

248

Slim Holes At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combs, Et Al., 1999) Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Alvord Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Anadarko Petroleum Corporation drilled two slimhole discoveries in the 1980s, one at Salt Wells, NV, and the other at Pueblo Valley, OR. Both of these slimholes were hot enough to discharge unassisted and were successfully flow tested. A slimhole at Pueblo Valley, in south-east Oregon was planned and permitted as a test well to evaluate an interval of fractured basalt which had been discovered while drilling an earlier thermal-gradient hole. Using a UDR1500 rig, the hole was rotary-drilled to

249

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Gradient Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 2 wells References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Gradient_Holes_At_Fish_Lake_Valley_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=511222" Categories:

250

Information loss in black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The question of whether information is lost in black holes is investigated using Euclidean path integrals. The formation and evaporation of black holes is regarded as a scattering problem with all measurements being made at infinity. This seems to be well formulated only in asymptotically AdS spacetimes. The path integral over metrics with trivial topology is unitary and information preserving. On the other hand, the path integral over metrics with nontrivial topologies leads to correlation functions that decay to zero. Thus at late times only the unitary information preserving path integrals over trivial topologies will contribute. Elementary quantum gravity interactions do not lose information or quantum coherence.

S. W. Hawking

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

252

COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report.  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report. COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report. (Coso Hot Springs KGRA) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: COSO Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1, CGEH No. 1. Completion report. (Coso Hot Springs KGRA) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH No. 1) is the first deep exploratory hole drilled in the Coso Hot Springs area of Southeastern California. CGEH No. 1 was drilled to a depth of 4,845 ft in the central area of a large thermal anomaly and was a continuation of investigative work in that locale to determine the existence of a geothermal resource. The drilling and completion of CGEH No. 1 is described. Also included are the daily drilling reports, drill bit records, descriptions of the casing,

253

Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2, RRGE-2. Completion report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 2 (RRGE-2) is the second exploratory hole drilled in the Raft River Valley location of the Idaho Geothermal R and D Project for the purpose of determining the existence of hot water in quantities suitable for commercial power generation and nonelectric applications. This well was drilled to a depth of 6,543 feet below ground level to obtain additional geological information for evaluation of the deep geothermal reservoir system. The drilling and completion of RRGE-2 are described. The daily drilling

254

Evaluation of Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Coso Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Coso Hot Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Coso Hot Springs: KGRA, China Lake, CA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation of Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Coso Hot Springs: KGRA, China Lake, CA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The well, Coso Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) was drilled at the China Lake Naval Weapons Center. Drilling was started on 2 September 1977, and the well completed on 1 December 1977 to 4845 ft. The well is an exploratory hole to determine geological and hydrothermal characteristics of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area). During drilling, numerous geophysical and temperature surveys were performed to evaluate the geological characteristics of CGEH-1. LBL

255

Black hole binary inspiral and trajectory dominance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral, plunge and merger of a black hole binary carry linear momentum. This results in an astrophysically important recoil to the final merged black hole, a kick that can eject ...

Price, Richard H.

256

Black hole Meissner effect and entanglement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extremal black holes tend to expel magnetic and electric fields. Fields are unable to reach the horizon because the length of the black hole throat blows up in the extremal limit. The length of the throat is related to the ...

Penna, Robert

257

Spray atomization characteristics of a GDI injector equipped with a group-hole nozzle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main purpose of this paper is to analyze the spray characteristics of a group-hole nozzle in terms of spray behavior and atomization process in comparison to the characteristics of a single-hole nozzle as reference. Spray visualization and PDPA (phase Doppler particle analyzer) experiments were performed using a GDI adjustable injector, which can adopt a different type of nozzle at free spray conditions. By analyzing the spray development behavior and distribution of droplet velocity and diameter based on a time series, and comparing these results with that of a single-hole nozzle, the effects of the group-hole nozzle on the spray characteristics in a GDI injection were elucidated. Experimental results showed that the development processes of spray behavior from a group-hole nozzle were similar to that of the single-hole nozzle. Both the sprays had similar spray tip penetration and dispersion at the same stages of development. However, owing to the constant spray momentum from a spray interaction, the spray behavior from the group-hole nozzle seemed to be more stable than that of the single-hole nozzle. In terms of the averaged droplet size, the group-hole nozzle held an advantage over the single-hole nozzle in decreasing Sauter mean diameter (SMD) by approximately 2?m. In addition, in comparison to the spatial distribution of droplet diameter and velocity between them, it can be confirmed that the group-hole nozzle has strong effects on reduction in diameter as well as rapid dispersion of droplet due to active air entrainment. These atomization characteristics are considered as an important advantages for improving mixture formation in GDI engine.

Sanghoon Lee; Sungwook Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Hawking Emission and Black Hole Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A brief review of Hawking radiation and black hole thermodynamics is given, based largely upon hep-th/0409024.

Don N. Page

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

High precision, rapid laser hole drilling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

260

Time (hole?) machines John Byron Manchak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time (hole?) machines John Byron Manchak Department of Philosophy, University of Washington, Box machines Hole machines Time travel General relativity a b s t r a c t Within the context of general relativity, we consider a type of "time machine" and introduce the related "hole machine". We review what

Manchak, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Absorption cross section in Lifshitz black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the absorption cross section of a minimally coupled scalar in the Lifshitz black hole obtained from the new massive gravity. The absorption cross section reduces to the horizon area in the low energy and massless limit of s-wave mode propagation, indicating that the Lifshitz black hole also satisfies the universality of low energy absorption cross section for black holes.

Taeyoon Moon; Yun Soo Myung

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

Signatures of black holes at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Signatures of black hole events at CERN's Large Hadron Collider are discussed. Event simulations are carried out with the Fortran Monte Carlo generator CATFISH. Inelasticity effects, exact field emissivities, color and charge conservation, corrections to semiclassical black hole evaporation, gravitational energy loss at formation and possibility of a black hole remnant are included in the analysis.

Marco Cavaglia; Romulus Godang; Lucien M. Cremaldi; Donald J. Summers

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2011) 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Explore for development of an EGS demonstration project Notes Core was obtained from RRG-3C. The sample is a brecciated and altered siltstone from the base of the Tertiary sequence and is similar to rocks at the base of the Tertiary deposits in RRG-9. The results of thermal and quasi-static mechanical property measurements that were conducted on the core sample are presented. References Jones, C.; Moore, J.; Teplow, W.; Craig, S. (1 January 2011) GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Analysis_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(2011)&oldid=473834

264

Core Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Core Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the heat transfer mechanism Notes In an investigation of the thermal regime of this Basin and Range geothermal area, temperature measurements were made in 25 shallow and 1 intermediate depth borehole. Thermal conductivity measurements were made on 312 samples from cores and drill cuttings. The actual process by which heat is transferred is rather complex; however, the heat flow determinations can be divided into two groups. The first group, less than 4.0 HFU, are indicative of regions with primarily conductive regimes, although

265

Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area Philippines (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent cooperative efforts with the Karaha-Bodas Co. LLC (a subsidiary of Caithness Energy) at Karaha-Telaga Bodas, Indonesia and with Philippine

266

Generating Unstructured Nuclear Reactor Core Meshes in Parallel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor core examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.

Rajeev Jain; Timothy J. Tautges

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Microsoft Word - IronCore  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November/December 2013 November/December 2013 Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix (much as water percolates through porous rock, or even coffee grinds) has been proposed as a possible model for core formation (Figure 1). Many previous experimental results have ruled out percolation as a major core formation mechanism for Earth at the relatively lower pressure conditions in the upper mantle, but

268

The Galactic Center Black Hole Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The super-massive 4 million solar mass black hole Sagittarius~A* (SgrA*) shows flare emission from the millimeter to the X-ray domain. A detailed analysis of the infrared light curves allows us to address the accretion phenomenon in a statistical way. The analysis shows that the near-infrared flare amplitudes are dominated by a single state power law, with the low states in SgrA* limited by confusion through the unresolved stellar background. There are several dusty objects in the immediate vicinity of SgrA*. The source G2/DSO is one of them. Its nature is unclear. It may be comparable to similar stellar dusty sources in the region or may consist predominantly of gas and dust. In this case a particularly enhanced accretion activity onto SgrA* may be expected in the near future. Here the interpretation of recent data and ongoing observations are discussed.

Eckart, A; Valencia-S., M; Straubmeier, C; Zensus, J A; Karas, V; Kunneriath, D; Alberdi, A; Sabha, N; Schdel, R; Puetzfeld, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Supermassive black holes from supermassive stars Supermassive stars in the early universe gave supermassive black holes a head start March 25, 2013 simulations suggest that star formation conditions back then allowed the first stars to become supermassive themselves In this simulation, a black hole that was just formed by the collapse of a supermassive star is surrounded by a distribution of gas (color indicates density). Because the black hole (located at the center but too small to see) grows by consuming the available gas, simulations like this one help determine how quickly the black hole can grow. The progenitor of this black

270

Operations plan Coso geothermal exploratory hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plan Coso geothermal exploratory hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) plan Coso geothermal exploratory hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Operations plan Coso geothermal exploratory hole No. 1 (CGEH-1) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: An investigative program is described, involving the drilling and testing of an exploratory hole to a nominal depth of 4,000 feet with an option to drill to a depth of 6,000 feet. The following are covered: management and organizational concept; program elements--description, detailed drilling program; materials, services, and equipment provided by ERDA, NWC; site selection; site access and security; health and safety; permits and approvals; reporting; environmental impact; funding; schedule of activities; and public information. The license and reporting forms are

271

Geology of the USW SD-12 drill hole Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drill hole USW SD-12 is one of several holes drilled under Site Characterization Plan Study 8.3.1.4.3.1, also known as the {open_quotes}Systematic Drilling Program,{close_quotes} as part of the U.S. Department of Energy characterization program at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which has been proposed as the potential location of a repository for high-level nuclear waste. The SD-12 drill hole is located in the central part of the potential repository area, immediately to the west of the Main Test Level drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility and slightly south of midway between the North Ramp and planned South Ramp declines. Drill hole USW SD-12 is 2166.3 ft (660.26 m) deep, and the core recovered essentially complete sections of ash-flow tuffs belonging to the lower half of the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, and the Topopah Spring Tuff, all of which are part of the Miocene Paintbrush Group. A virtually complete section of the Calico Hills Formation was also recovered, as was core from the entire Prow Pass Tuff formation of the Crater Flat Group.

Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engstrom, D.A. [Spectra Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Neutron Scattering Studies and Modeling of the HMG 14 Core Nucleosome Complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is considerable evidence relating the nonhistone proteins HMG 14 and HMG 17 with the structure of active or protentially active chromatin. In this study, bulk nucleosome core particles prepared from chicken...

E. C. Uberbacher; D. E. Olins; G. J. Bunick; W. C. Koehler

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Accelerating and rotating black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An exact solution of Einstein's equations which represents a pair of accelerating and rotating black holes (a generalised form of the spinning C-metric) is presented. The starting point is a form of the Plebanski-Demianski metric which, in addition to the usual parameters, explicitly includes parameters which describe the acceleration and angular velocity of the sources. This is transformed to a form which explicitly contains the known special cases for either rotating or accelerating black holes. Electromagnetic charges and a NUT parameter are included, the relation between the NUT parameter $l$ and the Plebanski-Demianski parameter $n$ is given, and the physical meaning of all parameters is clarified. The possibility of finding an accelerating NUT solution is also discussed.

J. B. Griffiths; J. Podolsky

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

274

Black Holes at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In these two lectures, we will address the topic of the creation of small black holes during particle collisions in a ground-based accelerator, such as LHC, in the context of a higher-dimensional theory. We will cover the main assumptions, criteria and estimates for their creation, and we will discuss their properties after their formation. The most important observable effect associated with their creation is likely to be the emission of Hawking radiation during their evaporation process. After presenting the mathematical formalism for its study, we will review the current results for the emission of particles both on the brane and in the bulk. We will finish with a discussion of the methodology that will be used to study these spectra, and the observable signatures that will help us identify the black-hole events.

Panagiota Kanti

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Down hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Primordial black hole minimum mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we revisit thermodynamic constraints on primordial black hole (PBH) formation in the early universe. Under the assumption that PBH mass is equal to the cosmological horizon mass, one can use the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics to put a lower limit on the PBH mass. In models of PBH formation, however, PBHs are created at some fraction of the horizon mass. We show that this thermodynamic constraint still holds for subhorizon PBH formation.

Chisholm, James R. [Institute for Fundamental Theory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8440 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Black Hole Thermodynamics and Electromagnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show a strong parallel between the Hawking, Beckenstein black hole Thermodynamics and electromagnetism: When the gravitational coupling constant transform into the electromagnetic coupling constant, the Schwarzchild radius, the Beckenstein temperature, the Beckenstein decay time and the Planck mass transform to respectively the Compton wavelength, the Hagedorn temperature, the Compton time and a typical elementary particle mass. The reasons underlying this parallalism are then discussed in detail.

Burra G. Sidharth

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

81) 81) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1981 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine fault and joint geometry Notes Core taken from less than 200 m above the decollement contains two sets of normal faults. The major set of faults dips between 500 and 70 0. These faults occur as conjugate pairs that are bisected by vertical extension fractures. The second set of faults dips 100 to 200 and may parallel part of the basal decollement or reflect the presence of listric normal faults in the upper plate. References Guth, L. R.; Bruhn, R. L.; Beck, S. L. (1 July 1981) Fault and

279

Quantum Geometry and Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an overall picture of the advances in the description of black hole physics from the perspective of loop quantum gravity. After an introduction that discusses the main conceptual issues we present some details about the classical and quantum geometry of isolated horizons and their quantum geometry and then use this scheme to give a natural definition of the entropy of black holes. The entropy computations can be neatly expressed in the form of combinatorial problems solvable with the help of methods based on number theory and the use of generating functions. The recovery of the Bekenstein-Hawking law and corrections to it is explained in some detail. After this, due attention is paid to the discussion of semiclassical issues. An important point in this respect is the proper interpretation of the horizon area as the energy that should appear in the statistical-mechanical treatment of the black hole model presented here. The chapter ends with a comparison between the microscopic and semiclassical app...

G., J Fernando Barbero

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Entanglement entropy of black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The entanglement entropy is a fundamental quantity which characterizes the correlations between sub-systems in a larger quantum-mechanical system. For two sub-systems separated by a surface the entanglement entropy is proportional to the area of the surface and depends on the UV cutoff which regulates the short-distance correlations. The geometrical nature of the entanglement entropy calculation is particularly intriguing when applied to black holes when the entangling surface is the black hole horizon. I review a variety of aspects of this calculation: the useful mathematical tools such as the geometry of spaces with conical singularities and the heat kernel method, the UV divergences in the entropy and their renormalization, the logarithmic terms in the entanglement entropy in 4 and 6 dimensions and their relation to the conformal anomalies. The focus in the review is on the systematic use of the conical singularity method. The relations to other known approaches such as 't Hooft's brick wall model and the Euclidean path integral in the optical metric are discussed in detail. The puzzling behavior of the entanglement entropy due to fields which non-minimally couple to gravity is emphasized. The holographic description of the entanglement entropy of the black hole horizon is illustrated on the two- and four-dimensional examples. Finally, I examine the possibility to interpret the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy entirely as the entanglement entropy.

Sergey N. Solodukhin

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

E-Print Network 3.0 - active region magnetic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND DYNAMICS OF INTERCONNECTING LOOPS AND CORONAL HOLES IN ACTIVE LONGITUDES Summary: Sun. All hot active region loops are visible in this wavelength. Eruptions of new' and...

282

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lake City site, which is located in far northeastern California, consists of a previously identified geothermal site that has been explored with both geophysics and drilling (Hedel, 1981), but has not been characterized adequately to allow accurate siting or drilling of production wells. Some deep wells, several seismic lines, limited gravity surveys, and geochemical and geological studies have suggested that the geothermal

283

Alkali solution treatment on sandstone cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was used for filtering the solution before the injection into the core. Hassler-t e Core Holder A stainless steel core holder was used to hold the core for treatment with the solutions. The core sample was positioned in the center of the core holder... and heat the water in the flask. Electric Heatin Ta e A silicone rubber embedded flexible heating tape was used to wrap the core holder to heat the core sample to the desired temperature. The maximum 0 continuous operating temperature of the tape...

Lee, Suk Jin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

Colorful quantum black holes at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the LHC phenomenology of quantum black holes in models of TeV gravity. By quantum black holes we mean black holes of the smallest masses and entropies, far from the semiclassical regime. These black holes are formed and decay over short distances, and typically carry SU(3) color charges inherited from their parton progenitors. Based on a few minimal assumptions, such as gauge invariance, we identify interesting signatures for quantum black hole decay such as 2 jets, jet + hard photon, jet + missing energy and jet + charged lepton, which should be readily visible above background. The detailed phenomenology depends heavily on whether one requires a Lorentz invariant, low-energy effective field theory description of black hole processes.

Xavier Calmet; Wei Gong; Stephen D. H. Hsu

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

285

Spinning Black Holes as Particle Accelerators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has recently been pointed out that particles falling freely from rest at infinity outside a Kerr black hole can in principle collide with an arbitrarily high center of mass energy in the limiting case of maximal black hole spin. Here we aim to elucidate the mechanism for this fascinating result, and to point out its practical limitations, which imply that ultraenergetic collisions cannot occur near black holes in nature.

Ted Jacobson and Thomas P. Sotiriou

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Black hole entropy: inside or out?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A trialogue. Ted, Don, and Carlo consider the nature of black hole entropy. Ted and Carlo support the idea that this entropy measures in some sense ``the number of black hole microstates that can communicate with the outside world.'' Don is critical of this approach, and discussion ensues, focusing on the question of whether the first law of black hole thermodynamics can be understood from a statistical mechanics point of view.

Ted Jacobson; Donald Marolf; Carlo Rovelli

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

287

Interaction of fermions with black holes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bekenstein and Meisels used statistical thermodynamic arguments to obtain the probability distribution of fermions emitted by a black hole when a fermion is incident. In contrast with Bekenstein and Meisels, we model the black hole as a perfect blackbody surrounded by a mirror. Our probability distribution for emitted fermions agrees with the probability distribution of Bekenstein and Meisels, but the interpretation of how fermions interact with the black hole is different from the interpreteation given by Bekenstein and Meisels.

Jones T.O. III

1986-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Electromagnetic Beams Overpass the Black Hole Horizon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the electromagnetic excitations of the Kerr black hole have very strong back reaction on metric. In particular, the electromagnetic excitations aligned with the Kerr congruence form the light-like beams which overcome horizon, forming the holes in it, which allows matter to escape interior. So, there is no information lost inside the black hole. This effect is based exclusively on the analyticity of the algebraically special solutions.

Alexander Burinskii

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

289

Absorption cross section of RN black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The behavior of a charged scalar field in the RN black hole space time is studied using WKB approximation. In the present work it is assumed that matter waves can get reflected from the event horizon. Using this effect, the Hawking temperature and the absorption cross section for RN black hole placed in a charged scalar field are calculated. The absorption cross section $\\sigma _{abs}$ is found to be inversely proportional to square of the Hawking temperature of the black hole.

Sini R.; V. C. Kuriakose

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

290

Preliminary stratigraphic and petrologic characterization of core samples from USW-G1, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation to determine their potential for long-term storage of radioactive waste. As part of this program, hole USW-G1 was drilled to a depth of 6000 ft below the surface, in the central part of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Petrographic study of the USW-G1 core is presented in this report and shows the tuffs (which generally were variably welded ash flows) are partly recrystallized to a variety of secondary minerals. The important alteration products are zeolites (heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite and analcime), smectite clays with minor interstratified illite, albite, micas, potassium feldspar, and various forms of silica. Iijima`s zeolite zones I through IV of burial metamorphism can be recognized in the core. Zeolites are first observed at about the 1300-ft depth, and the high-temperature boundary of zeolite stability in this core occurs at about 4350 ft. Analcime persists, either metastably or as a retrograde mineral, deeper in the core. The oxidation state of Fe-Ti oxide minerals, through most of the core, increases as the degree of welding decreases, but towards the bottom of the hole, reducing conditions generally prevail. Four stratigraphic units transected by the core may be potentially favorable sites for a waste repository. These four units, in order of increasing depth in the core, are (1) the lower cooling unit of the Topopah Spring Member, (2) cooling unit II of the Bullfrog Member, (3) the upper part of the Tram tuff, and (4) the Lithic-rich tuff.

Waters, A.C.; Carroll, P.R. (eds.)

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

David A. Strand

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermodynamics of dilaton-axion black holes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considering a generalized action for the Einstein-Maxwell theory in four dimensions coupled to scalar and pseudoscalar fields, the thermodynamic properties of asymptotically flat black hole solutions in such a background are investigated. Bekenstein-Hawking area-entropy law is verified for these class of black holes. From the property of specific heat, it is shown that such black holes can be stable for a certain choice of the parameters like charge, mass, and the scalar vacuum expectation value. The possibility of a black hole phase transition is discussed in this context.

Ghosh, Tanwi; SenGupta, Soumitra [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Calcutta-700 032 (India)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

Thomas W. Baumgarte

2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

294

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River area of Idaho contains a geothermal system of intermediate temperatures (approx. = 150 0C) at depths of about 1.5 km. Outside of the geothermal area, temperature measurements in three intermediate-depth drill holes (200 to 400 m) and one deep well (1500 m) indicate that the regional conductive heat flow is about 2.5 mucal/cm 2 sec or slightly higher and that temperature gradients range from 50 0 to 60

295

Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow From Four New Research Drill Holes In The Western Cascades, Oregon, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Conceptual models of the thermal structure of the Oregon Cascade Range propose either (1) a narrow zone of magmatic heat sources, flanked by shallow heat-flow anomalies caused by lateral ground-water flow; or (2) a wide zone of magmatic heat sources, with localized, generally negligible ground-water effects. The proposed narrow heat source coincides with the Quaternary volcanic arc, whereas the wider heat source would extend 10-30 km west of the arc. To test the models, four new heat-flow holes were sited

296

T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site 0: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks March 29, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks in ActiveSync Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: HP Diagnostics software: version(s) 7.5, 8.0 prior to 8.05.54.225 ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP Diagnostics. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely resulting in cross site scripting (XSS). reference LINKS: HP Document ID: c02770512 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025255 CVE-2011-0892 Security Focus Document ID: c02770512 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP Diagnostics. A remote user can conduct

297

A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area Of West-Central Alberta Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Statistical Analysis Of Bottom-Hole Temperature Data In The Hinton Area Of West-Central Alberta Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Considerable differences in the spread of bottom-hole temperature values from petroleum exploration well logs plotted as a function of depth are observed over a region of west-central Alberta. The spatial variation of the spread is investigated, and it is found to be greater toward the Rocky Mountain disturbed belt in the west. The spatial variation there does not seem to correspond directly to local topography, and may be partly due

298

T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site 0: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks March 29, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks in ActiveSync Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: HP Diagnostics software: version(s) 7.5, 8.0 prior to 8.05.54.225 ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP Diagnostics. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely resulting in cross site scripting (XSS). reference LINKS: HP Document ID: c02770512 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025255 CVE-2011-0892 Security Focus Document ID: c02770512 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP Diagnostics. A remote user can conduct

299

Locking Information in Black Holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that a central presumption in the debate over black-hole information loss is incorrect. Ensuring that information not escape during evaporation does not require that it all remain trapped until the final stage of the process. Using the recent quantum information-theoretic result of locking, we show that the amount of information that must remain can be very small, even as the amount already radiated is negligible. Information need not be additive: A small system can lock a large amount of information, making it inaccessible. Only if the set of initial states is restricted can information leak.

John A. Smolin and Jonathan Oppenheim

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

The black hole challenge in Randall-Sundrum II model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models postulating the existence of additional spacelike dimensions of macroscopic or even infinite size, while viewing our observable universe as merely a 3-brane living in a higher-dimensional bulk were a major breakthrough when proposed some 15 years ago. The most interesting among them both in terms of elegance of the setup and of the richness of the emerging phenomenology is the Randall-Sundrum II model where one infinite extra spacelike dimension is considered with an AdS topology, characterized by the warping effect caused by the presence of a negative cosmological constant in the bulk. A major drawback of this model is that despite numerous efforts no line element has ever been found that could describe a stable, regular, realistic black hole. Finding a smoothly behaved such solution supported by the presence of some more or less conventional fields either in the bulk and/or on the brane is the core of the black hole challenge. After a comprehensive presentation of the details of the model and the analysis of the significance and the utility of getting a specific analytic black hole solution, several (unsuccessful) analytic and numerical approaches to the problem developed over the years are presented with some discussion about their results. The chapter closes with the latest numerical results that actually consists a major advancement in the effort to address the challenge, the presentation of the most recent analytic work trying (and unfortunately failing) to build a solution assuming the existence of unconventional scalar fields and some ideas about the routes the forthcoming analytic approaches should explore.

Nikolaos D. Pappas

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Tidal Capture of Stars by Intermediate-Mass Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent X-ray observations and theoretical modelling have made it plausible that some ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULX) are powered by intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). N-body simulations have also shown that runaway merging of stars in dense star clusters is a way to form IMBHs. In the present paper we have performed N-body simulations of young clusters such as MGG-11 of M82 in which IMBHs form through runaway merging. We took into account the effect of tidal heating of stars by the IMBH to study the tidal capture and disruption of stars by IMBHs. Our results show that the IMBHs have a high chance of capturing stars through tidal heating within a few core relaxation times and we find that 1/3 of all runs contain a ULX within the age limits of MGG-11, a result consistent with the fact that a ULX is found in this galaxy. Our results strengthen the case for some ULX being powered by intermediate-mass black holes.

H. Baumgardt; C. Hopman; S. Portegies Zwart; J. Makino

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

Quasilinear Carbon Transport In An Impurity Hole Plasma In LHD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive electrostatic gyrokinetic linear stability calculations for ion-scale microinstabilities in an LHD plasma with an ion-ITB and carbon "impurity hole" are used to make quasilinear estimates of particle flux to explore whether microturbulence can explain the observed outward carbon fluxes that flow "up" the impurity density gradient. The ion temperature is not stationary in the ion-ITB phase of the simulated discharge, during which the core carbon density decreases continuously. To fully sample these varying conditions the calculations are carried out at three radial locations and four times. The plasma parameter inputs are based on experimentally measured profiles of electron and ion temperature, as well as electron and carbon density. The spectroscopic line-average ratio of hydrogen and helium densities is used to set the density of these species. Three ion species (H,He,C) and the electrons are treated kinetically, including collisions. Electron instability drive does enhance the growth rate significantly, but the most unstable modes have characteristics of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in all cases. As the carbon density gradient is scanned between the measured value and zero, the quasilinear carbon flux is invariably inward when the carbon density profile is hollow, so turbulent transport due to the instabilities considered here does not explain the observed outward flux of impurities in impurity hole plasmas. The stiffness of the quasilinear ion heat flux is found to be 1.7-2.3, which is lower than several estimates in tokamaks.

Mikkelsen, David R. [PPPL; Tanaka, K. [NIFS; Nunami, M. [NIFS; Watanabe, T-H. [Nagoya University; Sugama, H. [NIFS; Yoshinuma, M. [NIFS; Suzuki, Y. [NIFS; Goto, M. [NIFS; Morita, S. [NIFS; Wieland, B. [NIFS; Yamada, I. [NIFS; Yashura, R. [NIFS; Akiyama, T. [NIFS; Pablant, Novimir A. [PPPL

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Core Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1979) Coso Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Compare microcracks between Coso and Raft River geothermal areas Notes Microcracks were observed in core samples from Coso. Both permeability and electrical conductivity were measured for a suite of samples with a range of microcracks characteristics. A partial set of samples were collected to study migration of radioactive elements. References Simmons, G.; Batzle, M. L.; Shirey, S. (1 April 1979) Microcrack technology. Progress report, 1 October 1978--31 March 1979 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Analysis_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1979)&oldid=473689

304

Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoretical/computer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range geothermal systems. "The 300-meter heat flow holes are essentially useless for finding the "hidden" reservoirs. Clearly, the best results are obtained from the SP and MT surveys, with DC resistivity a close third. It is concluded that the best

305

Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Spencer Hot Springs Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Spencer Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the geothermal community. Exploration holes at Tungsten Mountain and McGuiness Hills (Spencer Hot Springs?) in 2004 and 2005 encountered hot water and steam at depths of meters with fluid geothermometry indicating reservoir temperatures of 170 to 200oC. More information can be obtained from the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology web

306

Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Chocolate Mountains Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Shallow temperature gradient drilling began at the CMAGR in January of 2010. 13 temperature gradient holes were completed to a depth of 500' below ground surface. Sites were selected based on the compilation of previous exploration and resulting data is being integrated into the most recent geologic model. This model will form the basis for the selection of a deeper (2000'-4000') temperature gradient drilling campaign at the CMAGR in

307

Slim Holes At International Geothermal Area, Japan (Combs, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Japan (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Japan (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At International Geothermal Area, Japan (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Japan Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on personal relationships between Maxwell scientists and Japanese geothermal developers, production and injection data from 64 slim holes and 79 large-diameter wells (see table below) at four Japanese geothermal fields (Oguni, Sumikaw~ Takigarni, and Kirishirna) have been obtained. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And

308

Slim Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes When the U. S. Army was in the planning stages for a geothermal exploration program at Ft. Bliss, they approached the Geothermal Research Department for input on the structure of this progrm, this consultation led to a Work-for-Others (WFO) contract from the Army to Sandia for assistance on the exploratory holes. That assistance included consultation and dmection of drilling operations, numerous temperature logs during and after drilling, and project documentation. This report comprises a summary of

309

Dynamics of oscillating relativistic tori around Kerr black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......angular momentum discs around Schwarzschild black holes, namely that...transmission of the signal recycling mirror (Shoemaker 2004)]. This...angular momentum discs around Schwarzschild black holes were considered...accretion solution on to a Schwarzschild black hole (Michel 1972......

Olindo Zanotti; Jos A. Font; Luciano Rezzolla; Pedro J. Montero

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Multi-core Performance Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

core Performance Analysis core Performance Analysis HPC Computation 1 Performance Analysis * Compiler Feedback * HWPC Data * Load Balance 2 Compiler Feedback * Before optimizing code, it's critical to know what the compiler does to your code - Loop optimizations - Vectorization - Prefetching - ... * Equally important to what the compiler does is what it doesn't do, and why - Data dependencies - Misplaced branches - Unknown loop counts - ... 3 Enabling Compiler Feedback * Portland Group - Minfo=all - Mneginfo - Minfo=ccff (Common Compiler Feedback Format) * Cray - rm (Fortran) - hlist=m (C/C++) * Intel - vec-report1 * Pathscale - LNO:simd_verbose=ON:vintr_verbose=ON:prefetch_v erbose=ON * GNU - ftree-vectorizer-verbose=1

311

Black holes cannot support conformal scalar hair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the only static asymptotically flat non-extrema black hole solution of the Einstein-conformally invariant scalar field equations having the scalar field bounded on the horizon, is the Schwarzschild one. Thus black holes cannot be endowed with conformal scalar hair of finite length.

T. Zannias

1994-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

312

Every BCG with a Strong Radio Agn has an X-Ray Cool Core: Is the Cool Core-Noncool Core Dichotomy Too Simple?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radio active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in X-ray cool cores has been proposed as a crucial ingredient in the evolution of baryonic structures. However, it has long been known that strong radio AGNs also exist in "noncool core" clusters, which brings up the question whether an X-ray cool core is always required for the radio feedback. In this work, we present a systematic analysis of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and strong radio AGNs in 152 groups and clusters from the Chandra archive. All 69 BCGs with radio AGN more luminous than 2 ? 1023 W Hz1 at 1.4 GHz are found to have X-ray cool cores. BCG cool cores can be divided into two classes: the large cool core (LCC) class and the corona class. Small coronae, easily overlooked at z > 0.1, can trigger strong heating episodes in groups and clusters, long before LCCs are formed. Strong radio outbursts triggered by coronae may destroy embryonic LCCs and thus provide another mechanism to prevent the formation of LCCs. However, it is unclear whether coronae are decoupled from the radio feedback cycles as they have to be largely immune to strong radio outbursts. Our sample study also shows the absence of groups with a luminous cool core while hosting a strong radio AGN, which is not observed in clusters. This points to a greater impact of radio heating on low-mass systems than clusters. Few L 1.4 GHz > 1024 W Hz1 radio AGNs (~16%) host an L 0.5-10 keV > 1042 erg s1 X-ray AGN, while above these thresholds, all X-ray AGNs in BCGs are also radio AGNs. As examples of the corona class, we also present detailed analyses of a BCG corona associated with a strong radio AGN (ESO 137-006 in A3627) and one of the faintest coronae known (NGC 4709 in the Centaurus cluster). Our results suggest that the traditional cool core/noncool core dichotomy is too simple. A better alternative is the cool core distribution function, with the enclosed X-ray luminosity or gas mass.

M. Sun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Dynamical friction in constant density cores: a failure of the Chandrasekhar formula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using analytic calculations and N-body simulations we show that in constant density (harmonic) cores, sinking satellites undergo an initial phase of very rapid (super-Chandrasekhar) dynamical friction, after which they experience no dynamical friction at all. For density profiles with a central power law profile of log-slope, $-\\alpha$, the infalling satellite heats the background and causes $\\alpha$ to decrease. For $\\alpha < 0.5$ initially, the satellite generates a small central constant density core and stalls as in the $\\alpha = 0$ case. We discuss some astrophysical applications of our results to decaying satellite orbits, galactic bars and mergers of supermassive black hole binaries. In a companion paper we show that a central constant density core can provide a natural solution to the timing problem for Fornax's globular clusters.

J. I. Read; Tobias Goerdt; Ben Moore; A. P. Pontzen; Joachim Stadel; George Lake

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

Category:Thermal Gradient Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in category "Thermal Gradient Holes" This category contains only the following page. T Thermal Gradient Holes Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCategory:T...

315

T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-623: HP Business Availability Center Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting...

316

Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues....

317

Black hole foraging: feedback drives feeding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest a new picture of supermassive black hole (SMBH) growth in galaxy centers. Momentum-driven feedback from an accreting hole gives significant orbital energy but little angular momentum to the surrounding gas. Once central accretion drops, the feedback weakens and swept-up gas falls back towards the SMBH on near-parabolic orbits. These intersect near the black hole with partially opposed specific angular momenta, causing further infall and ultimately the formation of a small-scale accretion disk. The feeding rates into the disk typically exceed Eddington by factors of a few, growing the hole on the Salpeter timescale and stimulating further feedback. Natural consequences of this picture include (i) the formation and maintenance of a roughly toroidal distribution of obscuring matter near the hole; (ii) random orientations of successive accretion disk episodes; (iii) the possibility of rapid SMBH growth; (iv) tidal disruption of stars and close binaries formed from infalling gas, resulting in visible fl...

Dehnen, Walter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Black Hole Superradiance in Dynamical Spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the superradiant scattering of gravitational waves by a nearly extremal black hole (dimensionless spin $a=0.99$) by numerically solving the full Einstein field equations, thus including backreaction effects. This allows us to study the dynamics of the black hole as it loses energy and angular momentum during the scattering process. To explore the nonlinear phase of the interaction, we consider gravitational wave packets with initial energies up to $10%$ of the mass of the black hole. We find that as the incident wave energy increases, the amplification of the scattered waves, as well as the energy extraction efficiency from the black hole, is reduced. During the interaction the apparent horizon geometry undergoes sizable nonaxisymmetric oscillations. The largest amplitude excitations occur when the peak frequency of the incident wave packet is above where superradiance occurs, but close to the dominant quasinormal mode frequency of the black hole.

William E. East; Fethi M. Ramazano?lu; Frans Pretorius

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1991) 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Several newer wells were cored, and the core analyses seemed to prove useful in most cases. At shallow depths in the caldera References Michael L. Sorey, Gene A. Suemnicht, Neil C. Sturchio, Gregg A. Nordquist (1991) New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Analysis_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Sorey,_Et_Al.,_1991)&oldid=386930

320

Core Analysis At Medicine Lake Area (Clausen Et Al, 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clausen Et Al, 2006) Clausen Et Al, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Medicine Lake Area (Clausen Et Al, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Medicine Lake Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A major challenge to energy production in the region has been locating high-permeability fracture zones in the largely impermeable volcanic host rock. An understanding of the fracture networks will be a key to harnessing geothermal resources in the Cascades. Medicine Lake site was selected for this study because of the extensive collection of core samples, lithologic, structural, geophysical and temperature data that are available. The sample collection totals about 15.8 km of core from 18 wells. Core samples are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Core Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes The samples used for this study were 43 hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from Yellowstone drill cores Y-5, Y-6, Y-7, Y-8, Y-11, Y-12, and Y-13 (Fig. 1). References N. C. Sturchio, T. E. C. Keith, K. Muehlenbachs (1990) Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Analysis_At_Yellowstone_Region_(Sturchio,_Et_Al.,_1990)&oldid=401307"

322

Antarctic Ice Sheet: Preliminary Results of First Core Hole to Bedrock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...unconsolidated sediment, such as glacial till, rather than solid rock. Glacial till underlies the Greenland ice sheet at Camp Century (4). Liquid water was encountered at the ice-rock interface, clear evidence that the bottom of the ice sheet is...

Anthony J. Gow; Herbert T. Ueda; Donald E. Garfield

1968-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

323

K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

zone. Six illitic clays within Quaternary caldera-fill debris flow, tuffaceous sediment, and ash-flow tuff (48 to 587 m depth) yield ages from 0.35 to 1.09 Ma. Illite from...

324

Core-log integration studies in hole-A of Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project Yun-Hao...Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP...involved in the large displacements...electrical borehole images and dipole-shear...energetics of a large earthquake from...Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project, Nature...Stress-induced borehole elongation......

Yun-Hao Wu; En-Chao Yeh; Jia-Jyun Dong; Li-Wei Kuo; Jui-Yu Hsu; Jih-Hao Hung

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Scientific Core Hole Valles Caldera No. 2B (VC-2B), New Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dennis L. Nielson, Pisto Larry, C.W. Criswell, R. Gribble, K. Meeker, J.A. Musgrave, T. Smith and D. Wilson Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Santa Rosa, CA; 19890101 Published...

326

A Core Hole in the Southwestern Moat of the Long Valley Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and serves as access for monitoring changes in water level, temperatures, and fluid chemistry. Authors Harold A. Wollenberg, Michael L. Sorey, Christopher D. Farrar, Art F....

327

Large core fiber optic cleaver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 {micro}m. 30 figs.

Halpin, J.M.

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Stability of Molten Core Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INLs LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Wright State University CORE Scholar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wright State University CORE Scholar Psychology Faculty Publications Psychology 10-1-2010 The Statistical Properties of the Survivor Interaction Contrast Joseph W. Houpt Wright State University - Main Campus, joseph.houpt@wright.edu James T. Townsend Follow this and additional works at: http://corescholar.libraries.wright

Townsend, James T.

330

A RADIO-SELECTED BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY CANDIDATE IN THE MILKY WAY GLOBULAR CLUSTER M62  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a candidate stellar-mass black hole in the Milky Way globular cluster M62. We detected the black hole candidate, which we call M62-VLA1, in the core of the cluster using deep radio continuum imaging from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. M62-VLA1 is a faint source with a flux density of 18.7 1.9 ?Jy at 6.2 GHz and a flat radio spectrum (? = 0.24 0.42, for S{sub ?} = ?{sup ?}). M62 is the second Milky Way cluster with a candidate stellar-mass black hole; unlike the two candidate black holes previously found in the cluster M22, M62-VLA1 is associated with a Chandra X-ray source, supporting its identification as a black hole X-ray binary. Measurements of its radio and X-ray luminosity, while not simultaneous, place M62-VLA1 squarely on the well-established radio-X-ray correlation for stellar-mass black holes. In archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging, M62-VLA1 is coincident with a star near the lower red giant branch. This possible optical counterpart shows a blue excess, H? emission, and optical variability. The radio, X-ray, and optical properties of M62-VLA1 are very similar to those for V404 Cyg, one of the best-studied quiescent stellar-mass black holes. We cannot yet rule out alternative scenarios for the radio source, such as a flaring neutron star or background galaxy; future observations are necessary to determine whether M62-VLA1 is indeed an accreting stellar-mass black hole.

Chomiuk, Laura; Ransom, Scott [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Maccarone, Thomas J. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Miller-Jones, James C. A. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Heinke, Craig [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, 4-183 CCIS, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Noyola, Eva [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), A. P. 70-264, 04510 (Mexico); Seth, Anil C., E-mail: chomiuk@pa.msu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Logging-while-coring method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

Goldberg, David S. (New York, NY); Myers, Gregory J. (Cornwall, NY)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

332

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area Thermal Gradient Holes At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The awardee conducted seismic, gravity, resistivity, and airborne magnetic surveys, drilled temperature-gradient wells, and selected a location for a test well (52-7). The test well was drilled to a total depth of 770 m during 2003. Maximum temperatures approached 140degrees C and a short flow test suggested that a production well could be drilled to 600 m and produce economic volumes of 130-140degrees C fluid. A final assessment of the resource is currently being performed. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

333

Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area Thermal Gradient Holes At Chocolate Mountains Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Chocolate Mountains Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In lieu of Seabee TGH drilling, GPO awarded a large IDIQ TGH drilling contract in December, 2009. Over the next two years, 90 500-ft TGHs will be installed at select sites in California and Nevada. Interim data from this campaign are already available for the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne. Results of these programs can be found in the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne papers also available in this volume. References Andrew Sabin, S. Bjornstad, M. Lazaro, D. Meade, C. Page, S. Alm, A. Tiedeman, W. C. Huang (2010) Navy's Geothermal Program Office: Overview

334

Black Hole Evaporation in an Expanding Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the quantum radiation power of black holes which are asymptotic to the Einstein-de Sitter universe at spatial and null infinities. We consider two limiting mass accretion scenarios, no accretion and significant accretion. We find that the radiation power strongly depends on not only the asymptotic condition but also the mass accretion scenario. For the no accretion case, we consider the Einstein-Straus solution, where a black hole of constant mass resides in the dust Friedmann universe. We find negative cosmological correction besides the expected redshift factor. This is given in terms of the cubic root of ratio in size of the black hole to the cosmological horizon, so that it is currently of order $10^{-5} (M/10^{6}M_{\\odot})^{1/3} (t/14 {Gyr})^{-1/3}$ but could have been significant at the formation epoch of primordial black holes. Due to the cosmological effects, this black hole has not settled down to an equilibrium state. This cosmological correction may be interpreted in an analogy with the radiation from a moving mirror in a flat spacetime. For the significant accretion case, we consider the Sultana-Dyer solution, where a black hole tends to increase its mass in proportion to the cosmological scale factor. In this model, we find that the radiation power is apparently the same as the Hawking radiation from the Schwarzschild black hole of which mass is that of the growing mass at each moment. Hence, the energy loss rate decreases and tends to vanish as time proceeds. Consequently, the energy loss due to evaporation is insignificant compared to huge mass accretion onto the black hole. Based on this model, we propose a definition of quasi-equilibrium temperature for general conformal stationary black holes.

Hiromi Saida; Tomohiro Harada; Hideki Maeda

2007-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

Slim Holes for Small Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal research study at Sandia National Laboratories has conducted a program in slimhole drilling research since 1992. Although our original interest focused on slim holes as an exploration method, it has also become apparent that they have substantial potential for driving small-scale, off-grid power plants. This paper summarizes Sandia's slim-hole research program, describes technology used in a ''typical'' slimhole drilling project, presents an evaluation of using slim holes for small power plants, and lists some of the research topics that deserve further investigation.

Finger, John T.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

R. Y. Chiao

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

Chaotic string-capture by black hole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider a macroscopic charge-current carrying (cosmic) string in the background of a Schwarzschild black hole. The string is taken to be circular and is allowed to oscillate and to propagate in the direction perpendicular to its plane (that is parallel to the equatorial plane of the black hole). Numerical investigations indicate that the system is non-integrable, but the interaction with the gravitational field of the black hole still gives rise to various qualitatively simple processes like `adiabatic capture' and `string transmutation'.

A L Larsen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The effect of injection hole geometry on flat plate film cooling and heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to thermal ly protect a gas turb ine blade f r om the hot gases w i th in a gas turbine engine by inject ion of a coo l ing f lu id th rough discrete holes i n the surface of the blade. Tests were conducted on a flat p late us ing the f i lm cool ing... surface w i th coo l ing a ir c i rculated w i th in the hol low core of the turb ine b lade. External cool ing employs co ld a ir inject ion th rough holes on the outer surface of the turb ine blade produc ing a f i lm of a i r that protects...

Madsen, Eric Perry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Extreme luminosities in ejecta produced by intermittent outflows around rotating black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme sources in the Transient Universe show evidence of relativistic outflows from intermittent inner engines, such as cosmological gamma-ray bursts. They probably derive from rotating back holes interacting with surrounding matter. We show that these interactions are enhanced inversely proportional to the duty cycle in advection of magnetic flux, as may apply at high accretion rates. We demonstrate the morphology and ballistic propagation of relativistic ejecta from burst outflows by numerical simulations in relativistic magnetohydrodynamics. Applied to stellar mass black holes in core-collapse of massive stars, it provides a robust explosion mechanism as a function of total energy output. At breakout, these ejecta may produce a low-luminosity GRB. A long GRB may ensue from an additional ultra-relativistic baryon-poor inner jet from a sufficiently long-lived intermittent inner engine. The simulations demonstrate a complex geometry in mergers of successive ejecta, whose mixing and shocks provide a pathway ...

van Putten, Maurice H P M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Binary Black Hole Accretion Flows From a Misaligned Circumbinary Disk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......mass-accretion-rate variation per binary...because each black hole passes across the circumbinary...mass-accretion-rate variation per binary...holes|black hole physics|Galaxies: nuclei...because each black hole passes across the circumbinary...the mass accretion rates is also independent......

Kimitake Hayasaki; Hideki Saito; Shin Mineshige

2013-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

(1) Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA(1) Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA (2) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 USA(2) Harvard Medical School, Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(1) Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA(1) Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA (2) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 USA(2) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 USA (3) Section on Auditory Mechanics, NIDCD

342

Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference. This pump is used in nuclear fission reactors. 19 figs.

Fanning, A.W.

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

343

Processing and geologic analysis of conventional cores from well ER-20-6 No. 1, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, Well Cluster ER-20-6 was drilled on Pahute Mesa in Area 20, in the northwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The three wells of the cluster are located from 166 to 296 meters (m) (544 to 971 feet [ft]) southwest of the site of the underground nuclear test code-named BULLION, conducted in 1990 in Emplacement Hole U-20bd. The well cluster was planned to be the site of a forced-gradient experiment designed to investigate radionuclide transport in groundwater. To obtain additional information on the occurrence of radionuclides, nature of fractures, and lithology, a portion of Well ER-20-6 No. 1, the hole closest to the explosion cavity, was cored for later analysis. Bechtel Nevada (BN) geologists originally prepared the geologic interpretation of the Well Cluster ER-20-6 site and documented the geology of each well in the cluster. However, the cores from Well ER-20-6 No. 1 were not accessible at the time of that work. As the forced-gradient experiment and other radio nuclide migration studies associated with the well cluster progressed, it was deemed appropriate to open the cores, describe the geology, and re-package the core for long-term air-tight storage. This report documents and describes the processing, geologic analysis, and preservation of the conventional cores from Well ER20-6 No. 1.

Prothro, L.B., Townsend, M.J.; Drellack, S.L. Jr. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Thermodynamics of the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole: Thermal stability of the Nariai black hole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the thermodynamics of the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole in five dimensions by introducing two temperatures based on the standard and Bousso-Hawking normalizations. We use the first-law of thermodynamics to derive thermodynamic quantities. The two temperatures indicate that the Nariai black hole is thermodynamically unstable. However, it seems that black hole thermodynamics favors the standard normalization and does not favor the Bousso-Hawking normalization.

Myung, Yun Soo [Institute of Basic Science and School of Computer Aided Science Inje University, Gimhae 621-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Thermodynamics of Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole: thermal stability of Nariai black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study thermodynamics of the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole in five dimensions by introducing two temperatures based on the standard and Bousso-Hawking normalizations. We use the first-law of thermodynamics to derive thermodynamic quantities. The two temperatures indicate that the Nariai black hole is thermodynamically unstable. However, it seems that black hole thermodynamics favors the standard normalization, and does not favor the Bousso-Hawking normalization.

Yun Soo Myung

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

Radial illite On the cores of the Soultz well EPS1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are quarries, abandoned or with activities. Six samples have been also collected among the granite cores and alteration halo (Ottenhöffen quarry, Germany) On these outcrops, we have measured planes of fracture

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

347

Phase transitions and Geometrothermodynamics of Regular black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the thermodynamics and state space geometry of regular black hole solutions such as Bardeen black hole, Ay\\'{o}n-Beato and Garc\\'{i}a black hole, Hayward black hole and Berej-Matyjasek-Trynieki-Wornowicz black hole. We find that all these black holes show second order thermodynamic phase transitions(SOTPT) by observing discontinuities in heat capacity-entropy graphs as well as the cusp type double point in free energy-temperature graph. Using the formulation of geometrothermodynamics we again find the singularities in the heat capacity of the black holes by calculating the curvature scalar of the Legendre invariant metric.

R. Tharanath; Jishnu Suresh; V. C. Kuriakose

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

348

HyCore | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HyCore Jump to: navigation, search Name: HyCore Place: Norway Sector: Hydro, Solar Product: JV between Umicore and Norsk Hydro to manufacture solar-grade silicon. References:...

349

Matrix Acidizing Parallel Core Flooding Apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and provide this information to the field. To conduct various experiments, core flooding setups are created. The setup consists of a core holder, accumulator, overburden pump, injection pump, accumulator, pressure sensors, and a back pressure regulator...

Ghosh, Vivek

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

350

Conserved quantities in a black hole collision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Newman-Penrose constants of the spacetime corresponding to the development of the Brill-Lindquist initial data are calculated by making use of a particular representation of spatial infinity due to H. Friedrich. The Brill-Lindquist initial data set represents the head-on collision of two non-rotating black holes. In this case one non-zero constant is obtained. Its value is given in terms of the product of the individual masses of the black holes and the square of a distance parameter separating the two black holes. This constant retains its value all along null infinity, and therefore it provides information about the late time evolution of the collision process. In particular, it is argued that the magnitude of the constants provides information about the amount of residual radiation contained in the spacetime after the collision of the black holes.

S. Dain; J. A. Valiente-Kroon

2001-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

351

Spectral line broadening in magnetized black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider weakly magnetized non-rotating black holes. In the presence of a regular magnetic field the motion of charged particles in the vicinity of a black hole is modified. As a result, the position of the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) becomes closer to the horizon. When the Lorentz force is repulsive (directed from the black hole) the ISCO radius can reach the gravitational radius. In the process of accretion charged particles (ions) of the accreting matter can be accumulated near their ISCO, while neutral particles fall down to the black hole after they reach $6M$ radius. The sharp spectral line Fe K$\\alpha$, emitted by iron ions at such orbits, is broadened when the emission is registered by a distant observer. In this paper we study this broadening effect and discuss how one can extract information concerning the strength of the magnetic field from the observed spectrum.

Valeri P. Frolov; Andrey A. Shoom; Christos Tzounis

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

352

Energy of 4-Dimensional Black Hole, etc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this letter I suggest possible redefinition of mass density, not depending on speed of the mass element, which leads to a more simple stress-energy for an object. I calculate energy of black hole.

Dmitriy Palatnik

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

353

Horizon Operator Approach to Black Hole Quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The $S$-matrix Ansatz for the construction of a quantum theory of black holes is further exploited. We first note that treating the metric tensor $g_{\\m\

G. 't Hooft

1994-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hydrothermal alteration in research drill hole Y-2, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Y-2, a US Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, was drilled to a depth of 157.4 meters. The hole penetrated interbedded siliceous sinter and travertine to 10.2 m, glacial sediments of the Pinedale Glaciation interlayered with pumiceous tuff from 10.2 to 31.7 m, and rhyolitic lavas of the Elephant Back flow of the Central Plateau Member and the Mallard Lake Member of the Pleistocene Plateau Rhyolite from 31.7 to 157.4 m. Hydrothermal alteration is pervasive in most of the nearly continuous drill core. Rhyolitic glass has been extensively altered to clay and zeolite minerals (intermediate heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite, montmorillonite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, and illite) in addition to quartz and adularia. Numerous veins, vugs, and fractures in the core contain these and other minerals: silica minerals (opal, ..beta..-cristobalite, ..cap alpha..-cristobalite, and chalcedony), zeolites (analcime, wairakite, dachiardite, laumontite, and yugawaralite), carbonates (calcite and siderite), clay (kaolinite and chlorite), oxides (hematite, goethite, manganite, cryptomelane, pyrolusite, and groutite), and sulfides (pyrhotite and pyrite) along with minor aegirine, fluorite, truscottite, and portlandite. Interbedded travertine and siliceous sinter in the upper part of the drill core indicate that two distinct types of thermal water are responsible for precipitation of the surficial deposits, and further that the water regime has alternated between the two thermal waters more than once since the end of the Pinedale Glaciation (approx. 10,000 years B.P.). Alternation of zones of calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the water chemistry in this drill hole varies with depth.

Bargar, K.E.; Beeson, M.H.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Both core and F proteins of hepatitis C virus could enhance cell proliferation in transgenic mice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: HCV core and F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice. ?-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by core protein in the transgenic mice. ?-Catenin signaling pathway was activated by myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. Expression of SMA protein was enhanced by core but not myc-F protein. -- Abstract: The role of the protein encoded by the alternative open reading frame (ARF/F/core+1) of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome in viral pathogenesis remains unknown. The different forms of ARF/F/core+1 protein were labile in cultured cells, a myc-tag fused at the N-terminus of the F protein made it more stable. To determine the role of core and F proteins in HCV pathogenesis, transgenic mice with either protein expression under the control of Albumin promoter were generated. Expression of core protein and F protein with myc tag (myc-F) could be detected by Western blotting analysis in the livers of these mice. The ratio of liver to body weight is increased for both core and myc-F transgenic mice compared to that of wild type mice. Indeed, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein, a proliferation marker, was up-regulated in the transgenic mice with core or myc-F protein. Further analyses by microarray and Western blotting suggested that ?-catenin signaling pathway was activated by either core or myc-F protein in the transgenic mice. These transgenic mice were further treated with either Diethynitrosamine (a tumor initiator) or Phenobarbital (a tumor promoter). Phenobarbital but not Diethynitrosamine treatment could increase the liver/body weight ratio of these mice. However, no tumor formation was observed in these mice. In conclusion, HCV core and myc-F proteins could induce hepatocyte proliferation in the transgenic mice possibly through ?-catenin signaling pathway.

Hu, Wen-Ta [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Li, Hui-Chun [Department of Biochemistry, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Biochemistry, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lee, Shen-Kao; Ma, Hsin-Chieh; Yang, Chee-Hing; Chen, Hung-Ling [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lo, Shih-Yen, E-mail: losylo@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China) [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan (China)

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

356

Jordan Algebras and Extremal Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review various properties of the exceptional Euclidean Jordan algebra of degree three. Euclidean Jordan algebras of degree three and their corresponding Freudenthal triple systems were recently shown to be intimately related to extremal black holes in N=2, d=4 homogeneous supergravities. Using a novel type of eigenvalue problem with eigenmatrix solutions, we elucidate the rich matrix geometry underlying the exceptional N=2, d=4 homogeneous supergravity and explore the relations to extremal black holes.

Michael Rios

2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

357

Black hole entropy and higher curvature interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A general formula for the entropy of stationary black holes in Lovelock higher-curvature gravity theories is obtained by integrating the first law of black hole mechanics, which is derived by Hamiltonian methods. The entropy is not simply one quarter of the surface area of the horizon, but also includes a sum of intrinsic curvature invariants integrated over a cross section of the horizon.

Ted Jacobson and Robert C. Myers

1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

Mutiny at the white-hole district  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The white-hole sector of Kruskal's solution is almost never used in physical applications. However, it might contain the solution to many of the problems associated with gravitational collapse and evaporation. This essay tries to draw attention to some bouncing geometries that make a democratic use of the black- and white-hole sectors. We will argue that these types of behaviour could be perfectly natural in some approaches to the next physical level beyond classical general relativity.

Carlos Barcel; Ral Carballo-Rubio; Luis J. Garay

2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

359

Thermodynamics and evaporation of the noncommutative black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the thermodynamics of the noncommutative black hole whose static picture is similar to that of the nonsingular black hole known as the de Sitter-Schwarzschild black hole. It turns out that the final remnant of extremal black hole is a thermodynamically stable object. We describe the evaporation process of this black hole by using the noncommutativity-corrected Vaidya metric. It is found that there exists a close relationship between thermodynamic approach and evaporation process.

Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

360

The SimCore/Alpha Functional Simulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a function-level processor simulator, SimCore/Alpha Functional Simulator Version 2.0 (SimCore Version 2.0), for processor architecture research and processor education. This paper describes the design and implementation of SimCore Version ...

Kenji Kise; Takahiro Katagiri; Hiroki Honda; Toshitsugu Yuba

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

OCIO has developed core competency worksheets for significant cyber roles to assist training personnel, curricula developers, supervisors, etc. with identifying core skills needed to perform their functional roles. Core competencies can be used to develop training objectives for site or organization-specific role-based training.

362

GCFR core thermal-hydralic design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approach for developing the thermal-hydraulic core assembly designs for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) is reviewed, and key considerations for improving the core performance at all power and flow conditions are discussed. It is shown how the thermal-hydraulic core assembly designs evolve from evaluations of plant size, material limitations, safety criteria, and structural performance considerations.

Schleuter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Bennett, F.O.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Russian techniques for more productive core drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a short discussion of the trends and technology being used in Russia to increase the production of core drilling. The currently used rigs are given with the plans for improvement in drive methods and to reduce trip time in the recovery of cores. The recommendations by the Russians to improve the core recovery quality and quantity are also given.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Solar Wind Forecasting with Coronal Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An empirical model for forecasting solar wind speed related geomagnetic events is presented here. The model is based on the estimated location and size of solar coronal holes. This method differs from models that are based on photospheric magnetograms (e.g., Wang-Sheeley model) to estimate the open field line configuration. Rather than requiring the use of a full magnetic synoptic map, the method presented here can be used to forecast solar wind velocities and magnetic polarity from a single coronal hole image, along with a single magnetic full-disk image. The coronal hole parameters used in this study are estimated with Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope He I 1083 nm spectrograms and photospheric magnetograms. Solar wind and coronal hole data for the period between May 1992 and September 2003 are investigated. The new model is found to be accurate to within 10% of observed solar wind measurements for its best one-month periods, and it has a linear correlation coefficient of ~0.38 for the full 11 years studied. Using a single estimated coronal hole map, the model can forecast the Earth directed solar wind velocity up to 8.5 days in advance. In addition, this method can be used with any source of coronal hole area and location data.

S. Robbins; C. J. Henney; J. W. Harvey

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Electrical resistance of metallized via?holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The resistance of a via?hole laser?drilled through an alumina substrate depends on the hole geometry the type of probe the deposition technique and the properties of the film. If the walls of the hole constitute a truncated cone the resistance is R s/?[ln(d 2/d 1)]{1/4 + [h/(d 2 ? d 1)]2}1/2 where R s is the sheet resistance h is the substrate thickness and d 1 and d 2 are the diameters. Increasing the larger diameter helps by (a) reducing the rim?to?rim resistance (b) reducing the spreading resistance and (c) making the walls more accessible for metallization. A four?point probe on the other hand measures the rim?to?rim resistance as approximately (R s/?) ln cosh (h/d) where d is an average diameter. If the hole is partially bare the four?point reading will depend on probe orientation. A comparison of calculation and measurement indicates R s in the hole to be between two and forty times R s outside depending on the thickness. Electrical probing of broken?open holes showed this to be due to thickness differences not roughness or ledge resistance.

Peter M. Hall

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Initial data for black hole evolutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the initial value problem of general relativity in its recently unified Lagrangian and Hamiltonian pictures and present a multi-domain pseudo-spectral collocation method to solve the resulting coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Using this code, we explore several approaches to construct initial data sets containing one or two black holes: We compute quasi-circular orbits for spinning equal mass black holes and unequal mass (nonspinning) black holes using the effective potential method with Bowen-York extrinsic curvature. We compare initial data sets resulting from different decompositions, and from different choices of the conformal metric with each other. Furthermore, we use the quasi-equilibrium method to construct initial data for single black holes and for binary black holes in quasi-circular orbits. We investigate these binary black hole data sets and examine the limits of large mass-ratio and wide separation. Finally, we propose a new method for constructing spacetimes with superposed gravitational waves of possibly very large amplitude.

Harald P. Pfeiffer

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

367

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY...

368

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. Key Cyber...

369

Core Coupling in Nb-99  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be good. NUCLEAR REACTIONS, NUCLEAR STRUCTURE '"Mop, 'He), E =40.7 Mev, measured o(8) 99Nb levels deduced S. Calculated levels, 4, n', 8 NNb, particle- core-coupling model. The proton configurations of nuclei in the Zr-Mo region have been the subject... of much experimental interest. ' ' The only information available on ~Nb, however, was obtained by measurement of y decay following 99Zr P decay, ~ and is rather lim- ited. We have studied the levels of "Nb with the Mo(d, 'He) reaction at 40.7-Me...

Bindal, P. K.; Youngblood, David H.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

SoCore Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SoCore Energy SoCore Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name SoCore Energy Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60601 Sector Solar Product Chicago-based solar installer and mounting solution company that also arranges for solar loans and PPAs. References SoCore Energy[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. SoCore Energy is a company located in Chicago, Illinois . References ↑ "SoCore Energy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=SoCore_Energy&oldid=351218" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs

371

Slim Holes At Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Slim_Holes_At_Blue_Mountain_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=387371" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - active galaxy demography Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... Source: Arcetri Osservatorio Astrofisico di (Italy), Collection: Physics 9 Nature Review The role of black holes in galaxy formation and evolution Summary: activity50,51 . The...

373

Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Geothermal Area International Geothermal Area Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent cooperative efforts with the Karaha-Bodas Co. LLC (a subsidiary of Caithness Energy) at Karaha-Telaga Bodas, Indonesia and with Philippine

374

Black hole fireworks: quantum-gravity effects outside the horizon spark black to white hole tunneling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that there is a classical metric satisfying the Einstein equations outside a finite spacetime region where matter collapses into a black hole and then emerges from a white hole. We compute this metric explicitly. We show how quantum theory determines the (long) time for the process to happen. A black hole can thus quantum-tunnel into a white hole. For this to happen, quantum gravity should affect the metric also in a small region outside the horizon: we show that contrary to what is commonly assumed, this is not forbidden by causality or by the semiclassical approximation, because quantum effects can pile up over a long time. This scenario alters radically the discussion on the black hole information puzzle.

Hal M. Haggard; Carlo Rovelli

2014-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Results Of An Experimental Drill Hole At The Summit Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Details Activities (9) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A borehole has been drilled to a depth of 1262 m (4141 ft) beneath the summit of Kilauea volcano, on the island of Hawaii. The purpose was to test predictions made from surface-based geophysical surveys and seek evidence of a hydrothermal system over a known magma body. Nearly all rocks penetrated by the borehole are olivine basalt, with minor amounts of olivine diabase, picrite diabase and olivine-poor basalt. While the rocks are petrographically uniform, their physical properties vary widely from

376

A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preliminary Study Of Older Hot Spring Alteration In Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon Of The Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Erosion in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera (640 ka), Wyoming, has exposed a cross section of older hydrothermal alteration in the canyon walls. The altered outcrops of the post-collapse tuff of Sulphur Creek (480 ka) extend from the canyon rim to more than 300 m beneath it. The hydrothermal minerals are zoned, with an advanced argillic alteration consisting of an association of quartz (opal)

377

Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Raft River Geothermal Exploratory Hole No. 1 (RRGE-1). Completion report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; BOREHOLES; WELL DRILLING; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL WELLS; IDAHO; EQUIPMENT; GEOLOGICAL SURVEYS; WELL CASINGS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; DRILLING; EXPLORATION; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA; WELLS Author(s): Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Las Vegas, Nev. (USA) Published: DOE Information Bridge, 10/1/1975 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5091938 Source: View Original Report Exploratory Well At Raft River Geothermal Area (1975) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from

378

ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE CORES OF RADIO SOURCES AND THEIR EXTENDED RADIO EMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work in this paper aims at determining the evolution and possible co-evolution of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and their cores via their radio luminosity functions (i.e., total and core RLFs, respectively). Using a large combined sample of 1063 radio-loud AGNs selected at low radio frequency, we investigate the RLF at 408 MHz of steep-spectrum radio sources. Our results support a luminosity-dependent evolution. Using core flux density data of the complete sample 3CRR, we investigate the core RLF at 5.0 GHz. Based on the combined sample with incomplete core flux data, we also estimate the core RLF using a modified factor of completeness. Both results are consistent and show that the comoving number density of radio cores displays a persistent decline with redshift, implying a negative density evolution. We find that the core RLF is obviously different from the total RLF at the 408 MHz band which is mainly contributed by extended lobes, implying that the cores and extended lobes could not be co-evolving at radio emission.

Yuan Zunli; Wang Jiancheng, E-mail: yuanzunli@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

379

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Although not part of the current effort, two deep (approximately 2000 m) exploratory wells were drilled on the north flank of Hualalai near Puu Waawaa cinder cone. The geophysical data used for siting these wells were proprietary and hence unavailable for publication; however, the temperatures measured at the bottoms of the wells were reported to be below 20degrees C. Chemical analysis of water samples taken from these wells did not provide useful geothermal data due to contamination of the well water with drilling muds References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In

380

Thermal Gradient Holes At Coso Geothermal Area (1974) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1974) Coso Geothermal Area (1974) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1974 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Use heat flow studies for the first time at Coso to indicate the presence or absence of abnormal heat Notes Located 10 sites for heat flow boreholes using available seismic ground noise and electrical resistivity data; data collected from 9 of 10; thermal conductivity measurements were completed using both the needle probe technique and the divided bar apparatus with a cell arrangement. In the upper few hundred meters of the subsurface heat is being transferred by a conductive heat transfer mechanism with a value of ~ 15 µcal/cm2sec; the background heat flow is ~ 3.5 HFU.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Black Hole Evaporation in an Expanding Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the quantum radiation power of black holes which are asymptotic to the Einstein-de Sitter universe at spatial and null infinities. We consider two limiting mass accretion scenarios, no accretion and significant accretion. We find that the radiation power strongly depends on not only the asymptotic condition but also the mass accretion scenario. For the no accretion case, we consider the Einstein-Straus solution, where a black hole of constant mass resides in the dust Friedmann universe. We find negative cosmological correction besides the expected redshift factor. This is given in terms of the cubic root of ratio in size of the black hole to the cosmological horizon, so that it is currently of order $10^{-5} (M/10^{6}M_{\\odot})^{1/3} (t/14 {Gyr})^{-1/3}$ but could have been significant at the formation epoch of primordial black holes. Due to the cosmological effects, this black hole has not settled down to an equilibrium state. This cosmological correction may be interpreted in an analogy with th...

Saida, Hiromi; Maeda, Hideki

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Solar Activity Index: Validity Supported by Oxygen Isotope Dating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CENTURIES OF CLIMATIC RECORD FROM CAMP CENTURY ON GREENLAND ICE SHEET, SCIENCE...sup> concentration in Greenland Camp Century ice core, correlation with solar...activity absolute age Arctic region Camp Century ice core dates general listing...

J. R. Bray

1970-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures Injection of Electrons and Holes into Nanostructures This program targets fundamental understanding of nanoscale charge transfer processes. The proposed work draws on the strengths of the Brookhaven Chemistry Department in the areas of electron transfer experiment and theory, and extends the area of inquiry to nanoscale processes. Electron/hole injection into a wire, a nanocrystal, a nanotube or other nanostructure in solution may be brought about by light absorption, by an electron pulse (pulse radiolysis, LEAF), by a chemical reagent, or through an electrode. These processes are being studied by transient methods by following conductivity, current, but most generally, spectroscopic changes in the solutions to determine the dynamics of charge injection. The observed transient spectra can also provide values for electron-transfer coupling elements and energetics. Theoretical/computational studies can help in materials design and in the interpretation of the experimental results. The experimental systems being examined include molecular wires and metal nanoclusters.

384

Black Hole Complementarity in Gravity's Rainbow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the required energy for duplication of information in the context of black hole complementarity in the rainbow Schwarzschild black hole. The resultant energy can be written as the well-defined limit given by the conventional result for the vanishing rainbow parameter which characterizes the deformation of the relativistic dispersion relation in the freely falling frame. It shows that the duplication of information in quantum mechanics could be not allowed below a certain critical value of the rainbow parameter; however, it could be possible above the critical value of the rainbow parameter, so that the consistent formulation in the rainbow Schwarzschild black hole requires additional constraints or any other resolutions for the latter case.

Gim, Yongwan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Nonperturbative black hole entropy and Kloosterman sums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-perturbative quantum corrections to supersymmetric black hole entropy often involve nontrivial number-theoretic phases called Kloosterman sums. We show how these sums can be obtained naturally from the functional integral of supergravity in asymptotically AdS_2 space for a class of black holes. They are essentially topological in origin and correspond to charge-dependent phases arising from the various gauge and gravitational Chern-Simons terms and boundary Wilson lines evaluated on Dehn-filled solid 2-torus. These corrections are essential to obtain an integer from supergravity in agreement with the quantum degeneracies, and reveal an intriguing connection between topology, number theory, and quantum gravity. We give an assessment of the current understanding of quantum entropy of black holes.

Dabholkar, Atish; Murthy, Sameer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Black hole chromosphere at the CERN LHC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If the scale of quantum gravity is near a TeV, black holes will be copiously produced at the CERN LHC. In this work we study the main properties of the light descendants of these black holes. We show that the emitted partons are closely spaced outside the horizon, and hence they do not fragment into hadrons in vacuum but more likely into a kind of quark-gluon plasma. Consequently, the thermal emission occurs far from the horizon, at a temperature characteristic of the QCD scale. We analyze the energy spectrum of the particles emerging from the chromosphere, and find that the hard hadronic jets are almost entirely suppressed. They are replaced by an isotropic distribution of soft photons and hadrons, with hundreds of particles in the GeV range. This provides a new distinctive signature for black hole events at LHC.

Luis Anchordoqui and Haim Goldberg

2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

387

Extremal limits and black hole entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taking the extremal limit of a non-extremal Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black hole (by externally varying the mass or charge), the region between the inner and outer event horizons experiences an interesting fate -- while this region is absent in the extremal case, it does not disappear in the extremal limit but rather approaches a patch of $AdS_2\\times S^2$. In other words, the approach to extremality is not continuous, as the non-extremal Reissner-Nordstr\\"om solution splits into two spacetimes at extremality: an extremal black hole and a disconnected $AdS$ space. We suggest that the unusual nature of this limit may help in understanding the entropy of extremal black holes.

Sean M. Carroll; Matthew C. Johnson; Lisa Randall

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

388

Strings as solitons & black holes as strings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supersymmetric closed string theories contain an infinite tower of BPS-saturated, oscillating, macroscopic strings in the perturbative spectrum. When these theories have dual formulations, this tower of states must exist nonperturbatively as solitons in the dual theories. We present a general class of exact solutions of low-energy supergravity that corresponds to all these states. After dimensional reduction they can be interpreted as supersymmetric black holes with a degeneracy related to the degeneracy of the string states. For example, in four dimensions we obtain a point-like solution which is asymptotic to a stationary, rotating, electrically-charged black hole with Regge-bounded angular momentum and with the usual ring-singularity replaced by a string source. This further supports the idea that the entropy of supersymmetric black holes can be understood in terms of counting of string states. We also discuss some applications of these solutions to string duality.

Atish Dabholkar; Jerome P. Gauntlett; Jeffrey A. Harvey; Daniel Waldram

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Core Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the Western Hemisphere. Photons are accelerated to over 99% of the speed of light around its ring, which is the size of a baseball stadium. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. The Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne is a premier user facility, providing expertise, instruments, and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Core Capabilities Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time. Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time:

390

Test report -- Prototype core sampler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this test is to determine the adequacy of the prototype sampler, provided to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by DOE-RL. The sampler was fabricated for DOE-RL by the Concord Company by request of DOE-RL. This prototype sampler was introduced as a technology that can be easily deployed (similar to the current auger system) and will reliably collect representative samples. The sampler is similar to the Universal Sampler i.e., smooth core barrel and piston with an O-ring seal, but lacks a rotary valve near the throat of the sampler. This makes the sampler inappropriate for liquid sampling, but reduces the outside diameter of the sampler considerably, which should improve sample recovery. Recovery testing was performed with the supplied sampler in three different consistencies of Kaolin sludge simulants.

Linschooten, C.G.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nuclear core and fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fast flux nuclear core of a plurality of rodded, open-lattice assemblies having a rod pattern rotated relative to a rod support structure pattern. Elongated fuel rods are oriented on a triangular array and laterally supported by grid structures positioned along the length of the assembly. Initial inter-assembly contact is through strongbacks at the corners of the support pattern and peripheral fuel rods between adjacent assemblies are nested so as to maintain a triangular pitch across a clearance gap between the other portions of adjacent assemblies. The rod pattern is rotated relative to the strongback support pattern by an angle .alpha. equal to sin .sup.-1 (p/2c), where p is the intra-assembly rod pitch and c is the center-to-center spacing among adjacent assemblies.

Downs, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Comparison of Intermediate Mass Black Hole Candidate ULXs and Stellar-Mass Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cool thermal emission components have recently been revealed in the X-ray spectra of a small number of ultra-luminous X-ray (ULX) sources with L_X > 1 E+40 erg/s in nearby galaxies. These components can be well fitted with accretion disk models, with temperatures approximately 5-10 times lower than disk temperatures measured in stellar-mass Galactic black holes when observed in their brightest states. Because disk temperature is expected to fall with increasing black hole mass, and because the X-ray luminosity of these sources exceeds the Eddington limit for 10 Msun black holes (L_Edd = 1.3 E+39 erg/s), these sources are extremely promising intermediate-mass black hole candidates (IMBHCs). In this Letter, we directly compare the inferred disk temperatures and luminosities of these ULXs, with the disk temperatures and luminosities of a number of Galactic black holes. The sample of stellar-mass black holes was selected to include different orbital periods, companion types, inclinations, and column densities. These ULXs and stellar-mass black holes occupy distinct regions of a L_X -- kT diagram, suggesting these ULXs may harbor IMBHs. We briefly discuss the important strengths and weaknesses of this interpretation.

J. M. Miller; A. C. Fabian; M. C. Miller

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modern Records of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and a 2000-year Ice-core  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) » Ice Cores Carbon Dioxide (CO2) » Ice Cores Modern Records of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations over the last 2000 years, emphasizing large data bases each representing many currently active stations. Records since about 1960 (depending on location) have been obtained from samples of ambient-air at remote stations, which represent changing global atmospheric concentrations rather than influences of local sources. The longer (2000-year) record is from the Law Dome ice core in Antarctica. The ice-core record has been merged with modern annual data from Cape Grim, Tasmania to provide a 2000-year record ending with the most recent data. A

394

Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(CH4) » Ice Cores (CH4) » Ice Cores Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric methane (CH4) over the last 2000 years, emphasizing large data bases each representing currently active stations. Records in recent decades (time period depending on location) have been obtained from samples of ambient-air at remote locations, which represent global atmospheric conditions rather than influences of local sources. The longer (2000-year) record is from the Law Dome ice core in Antarctica. The ice-core record has been merged with modern annual data from Cape Grim, Tasmania to provide a 2000-year record ending with the most recent data. A spline function has

395

How red is a quantum black hole?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiating black holes pose a number of puzzles for semiclassical and quantum gravity. These include the transplanckian problem -- the nearly infinite energies of Hawking particles created near the horizon, and the final state of evaporation. A definitive resolution of these questions likely requires robust inputs from quantum gravity. We argue that one such input is a quantum bound on curvature. We show how this leads to an upper limit on the redshift of a Hawking emitted particle, to a maximum temperature for a black hole, and to the prediction of a Planck scale remnant.

Viqar Husain; Oliver Winkler

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

The effects of fastener hole defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) August 1991 ABSTRACT The Effects of Fastener Hole Defects. (August 1991) Scot D. Andrews, B. S. , Texas A8rM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Orden O. Ochoa The influence of drilling-induced defects, such as delamination, on the fatigue... Of Delaminated Zone Elements . . Figure 34. Enlarged View Of Area Near Hole 58 59 61 Page Figure 35. Example Finite Element Mesh Figure 36. Selected Elements For Stress Distribution Graphs . . Figure 37. Example Of o? Stress Distribution For 18 Ply Tape...

Andrews, Scot D.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

CHARYBDIS: A Black Hole Event Generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARYBDIS is an event generator which simulates the production and decay of miniature black holes at hadronic colliders as might be possible in certain extra dimension models. It interfaces via the Les Houches accord to general purpose Monte Carlo programs like HERWIG and PYTHIA which then perform the parton evolution and hadronization. The event generator includes the extra-dimensional `grey-body' effects as well as the change in the temperature of the black hole as the decay progresses. Various options for modelling the Planck-scale terminal decay are provided.

C. M. Harris; P. Richardson; B. R. Webber

2003-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

398

BLACK HOLE ENTROPY IN HIGHER CURVATURE GRAVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss some recent results on black hole thermodynamics within the context of effective gravitational actions including higher-curvature interactions. Wald's derivation of the First Law demonstrates that black hole entropy can always be expressed as a local geometric density integrated over a space-like cross-section of the horizon. In certain cases, it can also be shown that these entropy expressions satisfy a Second Law. One such simple example is considered from the class of higher curvature theories where the Lagrangian consists of a polynomial in the Ricci scalar.

TED JACOBSON; GUNGWON KANG; ROBERT C. MYERS

1995-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

399

Quasilocal first law for black hole thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We first show that stationary black holes satisfy an extremely simple quasilocal form of the first law, ?E=?8??A, where the (quasilocal) energy E=A/(8??) and (local) surface gravity ?=1/?, with A the horizon area and ? is a proper length characterizing the distance to the horizon of a preferred family of quasilocal observers suitable for thermodynamical considerations. Our construction is extended to the more general framework of isolated horizons. The local surface gravity is universal. This has important implications for semiclassical considerations of black hole physics as well as for the fundamental quantum description arising in the context of loop quantum gravity.

Ernesto Frodden; Amit Ghosh; Alejandro Perez

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

400

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hawthorne Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Hawthorne Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In lieu of Seabee TGH drilling, GPO awarded a large IDIQ TGH drilling contract in December, 2009. Over the next two years, 90 500-ft TGHs will be installed at select sites in California and Nevada. Interim data from this campaign are already available for the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne. Results of these programs can be found in the Chocolate Mountains and Hawthorne papers also available in this volume. References Andrew Sabin, S. Bjornstad, M. Lazaro, D. Meade, C. Page, S. Alm, A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2002) Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. Drilling of the test well was completed in the fall of 2001 and results are currently being evaluated. The total depth of the well is 598 m with a

402

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bidwell Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Four wells have been successfully drilled into this resource since the early 1980s using a combination of funds provided by the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the United State Department of Energy (USDOE). The first three wells, FB-1, -2 and -3 have been discussed in a previous paper (Barker et al., 2005). The current status of the FBIC project to evaluate the potential geothermal resource under the reservation is that a deep

403

Slim Holes At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese River Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Well RR 56-4, was not successful in intersecting an exploitable geothermal resource. However, the lack of temperature reversal in the well and the geochemistry information obtained from fluid sampling point towards a large resource of moderate temperature. The encouraging results from 56-4 have lead to continued exploration on the project. The geologic and hydrologic information collected from 56-4 has proved an invaluable aid when combined

404

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Standard X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analyses were used in the laboratory to confirm the PIMA mineral identifications and to look for minerals that have poor SWIR response (e.g., quartz and feldspars) or were not present in great enough concentrations to be detected by the PIMA. Petrographic and electron microprobe analyses of selected samples were conducted in the laboratories of the GeoAnalytical Laboratory at Washington State

405

Large Pitch Hollow Core Honeycomb Fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new kind of hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) for broadband guidance is introduced. Structural and optical properties of a fabricated example are detailed.

Beaudou, Benot; Couny, Franois; Benabid, Fetah; Roberts, Peter John

406

Steady and unsteady calibration of multi-hole probes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the development of a data crographics. reduction algorithm for multi-hole pressure probes. The algorithm has been developed for the reduction of calibration data from miniature non-nulling multi-hole probes in compressible...

Johansen, Espen S

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

What is the topology of a Schwarzschild black hole?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the topology of Schwarzschild's black hole through the immersion of this space-time in spaces of higher dimension. Through the immersions of Kasner and Fronsdal we calculate the extension of the Schwarzschild's black hole.

Edmundo M. Monte

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

Chapter 3 Topology and Uniqueness of Higher Dimensional Black Holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization...asymptotically flat vacuum black holes in...of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization...asymptotically flat vacuum black holes in......

Daisuke Ida; Akihiro Ishibashi; Tetsuya Shiromizu

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thought Experiment to resolve the Black Hole Information Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a combination of two mechanisms that can resolve the black hole information paradox. The first process is that the black hole shrinks by a first order transition, since we assume the entropy is discontinuous. The black hole disappears. The second type of processes conserves unitarity. We assume that within the black hole micro-reversible quantum mechanical processes take place. These are ordinary particle processes, e.g. the decay of an electron and a positron into two photons.

Kay zum Felde

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

411

Particles and scalar waves in noncommutative charged black hole spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we have discussed geodesics and the motion of test particle in the gravitational field of noncommutative charged black hole spacetime. The motion of massive and massless particle have been discussed seperately. A comparative study of noncommutative charged black hole and usual Reissner-Nordstrom black hole has been done. The study of effective potential has also been included. Finally, we have examined the scattering of scalar waves in noncommutative charged black hole spacetime.

Bhar, Piyali; Biswas, Ritabrata; Mondal, U F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Core Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, Core Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Aside from two core fragments from Thermal well No. 7 and one each from Lakoma Fame wells Nos. 8 and 9, all rock and mineral samples were available as cuttings. Cuttings samples were taken during drilling typically at 12-m intervals by the Union Oil Company of California (now UNOCAL), each sample covering a 6-m depth interval. The grains in cuttings fractions were millimeter- to centimetersized. References Steven J. Lambert, Samuel Epstein (1992) Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California

413

Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Long Valley Caldera Area (Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Sample for the present investigation consist of drill core and cuttings from all lithologic units identified in LVEW, cuttings from volcanic rocks in LV 13-21, core samples of Early Rhyolite and Bishop Tuff from LV13-26 and core samples of Bishop Tuff from SF38-32, LV48-29 and LV66-28 (Figs. 1 and 2). Surface samples of Early Rhyolite, Bishop Tuff and Paleozoic metasediments (Fig. 1) were also selected for comparative analysis and processed by the same procedures as the well samples. This oxygen isotope and fluid inclusion study has allowed us to determine the pathways of fluid

414

The nascent Coso metamorphic core complex, east-central California, brittle  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

nascent Coso metamorphic core complex, east-central California, brittle nascent Coso metamorphic core complex, east-central California, brittle upper plate structure revealed by reflection seismic data Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The nascent Coso metamorphic core complex, east-central California, brittle upper plate structure revealed by reflection seismic data Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The relationships between upper crustal faults, the brittle-ductile transition zone, and underlying magmatic features imaged by multifold seismic reflection data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Coso geothermal field, which lies within an extensional step-over between dextral faults, is a young, actively developing metamorphic core complex. The reflection images were processed using a non-linear simulated

415

Searches for sterile neutrinos with IceCube DeepCore  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that study of the atmospheric neutrinos in the 10100GeV energy range by DeepCore subarray of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory can substantially constrain the mixing of sterile neutrinos of mass ?1??eV with active neutrinos. In the scheme with one sterile neutrino we calculate ?? and ?? oscillation probabilities as well as zenith angle distributions of ??CC (charge current) events in different energy intervals in DeepCore. The distributions depend on the mass hierarchy of active neutrinos. Therefore, in principle, the hierarchy can be identified, if ?s exists. After a few years of exposure the DeepCore data will allow us to exclude the mixing of |U?4|2?0.02 indicated by the LSND/MiniBooNE results. Combination of the DeepCore and high-energy IceCube data will further improve sensitivity to ?s mixing parameters.

Soebur Razzaque and A. Yu. Smirnov

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

416

The third law of thermodynamics for Kerr black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles The third law of thermodynamics for Kerr black holes Isao...condition under which the third law of black-hole thermodynamics for Kerr holes is not violated...diverge to infinity as a power law for , and therefore no Kerr......

Isao Okamoto; Osamu Kaburaki

1991-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Natural thorium isotopes in marine sediment core off Labuan port  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediment core was collected from Labuan port and analyzed to determine the radioactivity of thorium (Th) isotopes. The objectives of this study are to determine the possible sources of Th isotopes at Labuan port and estimates the sedimentation rate based on {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The results suggest the {sup 230}Th and {sup 232}Th might be originated from terrestrial sedimentary rock while {sup 228}Th originated by authigenic origin. High ratio value of {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th detected at the top surface sediment indicates the increasing of {sup 230}Th at the recent years which might be contributed from the anthropogenic sources. The sedimentation rate of core sediment from Labuan Port was successfully estimated by using {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The result show high sedimentation rate with 4.67 cm/year indicates rapid deposition occurred at this study area due to the high physical activity at the Labuan port. By assume the constant sedimentation rate at this area; we estimated the age of 142 cm core sediment obtained from Labuan port is 32 years started from 1981 to 2012. This chronology will be used in forthcoming research to investigate the historical profile of anthropogenic activities affecting the Labuan port.

Hafidz, B. Y.; Asnor, A. S.; Terence, R. C.; Mohamed, C. A. R. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

419

Geodesic study of a charged black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The behavior of the timelike and null geodesics of charged E. Ay$\\acute{o}$n-Beato and A. Garcia (ABG) black hole are investigated. For circular and radial geodesics, we investigate all the possible motions by plotting the effective potentials for different parameters. In conclusion, we have shown that there is no phenomenon of \\textit{superradiance} in this case.

Mehedi Kalam; Nur Farhad; Sk. Monowar Hossein

2013-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

420

Black Holes and Sub-millimeter Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, a new framework for solving the hierarchy problem was proposed which does not rely on low energy supersymmetry or technicolor. The fundamental Planck mass is at a TeV and the observed weakness of gravity at long distances is due the existence of new sub-millimeter spatial dimensions. In this letter, we study how the properties of black holes are altered in these theories. Small black holes---with Schwarzschild radii smaller than the size of the new spatial dimensions---are quite different. They are bigger, colder, and longer-lived than a usual $(3+1)$-dimensional black hole of the same mass. Furthermore, they primarily decay into harmless bulk graviton modes rather than standard-model degrees of freedom. We discuss the interplay of our scenario with the holographic principle. Our results also have implications for the bounds on the spectrum of primordial black holes (PBHs) derived from the photo-dissociation of primordial nucleosynthesis products, distortion of the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum, overcl...

Argyres, Philip C; March-Russell, John David; Argyres, Philip C.; Dimopoulos, Savas; March-Russell, John

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we present an exact solution of Einstein's field equations describing the Schwarzschild black hole in dark energy background. It is also regarded as an embedded solution that the Schwarzschild black hole is embedded into the dark energy space producing Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole. It is found that the space-time geometry of Schwarzschild-dark energy solution is non-vacuum Petrov type $D$ in the classification of space-times. We study the energy conditions (like weak, strong and dominant conditions) for the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution. We also find that the energy-momentum tensor of the Schwarzschild-dark energy solution violates the strong energy condition due to the negative pressure leading to a repulsive gravitational force of the matter field in the space-time. It is shown that the time-like vector field for an observer in the Schwarzschild-dark energy space is expanding, accelerating, shearing and non-rotating. We investigate the surface gravity and the area of the horizons for the Schwarzschild-dark energy black hole.

Ngangbam Ishwarchandra; Ng. Ibohal; K. Yugindro Singh

2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

Supermassive Black Hole Binaries: The Search Continues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitationally bound supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs) are thought to be a natural product of galactic mergers and growth of the large scale structure in the universe. They however remain observationally elusive, thus raising a question about characteristic observational signatures associated with these systems. In this conference proceeding I discuss current theoretical understanding and latest advances and prospects in observational searches for SBHBs.

Tamara Bogdanovic

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

423

Chapter 8 Black Holes in Braneworld Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......to the four-dimensional Schwarzschild solution, there is no room...deformed from an ordinary Schwarzschild black hole and the radiation...gravitational attraction from its mirror image on the other side of...The attraction from the mirror image will not be larger than......

Norihiro Tanahashi; Takahiro Tanaka

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

SS433a massive black hole?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... thin ring in a circular orbit at radius R = r GM/c2 around a Schwarzschild black hole of mass M, the two emission peaks will be at wavelengths given ... we would expect the profiles of the emission peaks at any given time to be mirror images of each other (at least on timescales longer than the orbital time). ...

R. J. TERLEVICH; J. E. PRINGLE

1979-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

Remote down-hole well telemetry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Origin of the Core Francis Nimmo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Origin of the Core Francis Nimmo Dept. Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz F. Nimmo, Dept. Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA (fnimmo@es.ucsc.edu), tel. 831-459-1783, fax. 831-459-3074 1 #12;Origin of the Core All major bodies of the inner solar

Nimmo, Francis

427

Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments Christiane Jablonowski (University of Michigan-13/2006 #12;Motivation · Test cases for 3D dynamical cores on the sphere ­ are hard to find in the literature groups ­ lack standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases

Jablonowski, Christiane

428

Experto Universitario Java Sesin 1: Spring core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core Puntos a tratar 2 #12;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core

Escolano, Francisco

429

Module Handbook Core Univ. of Oldenburg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Mechanical and Electrical Systems of the WEC Content: Energy conversion process in Wind Turbines · Wind/EUREC Course 2008/2009 #12;EUREC Core Courses at University of Oldenburg, 1st Semester Wind Energy Module Module Description: Wind Energy Field: Core Oldenburg Courses: Wind Energy Wind Energy

Habel, Annegret

430

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

Farritor, Shane

431

Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess from Dark Matter Annihilation: Is There a Black Hole Spike?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If the supermassive black hole Sgr A* at the center of the Milky Way grew adiabatically from an initial seed embedded in a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter (DM) halo, then the DM profile near the hole has steepened into a spike. We calculate the dramatic enhancement to the gamma-ray flux from the Galactic center (GC) from such a spike if the 13GeV excess observed in Fermi data is due to DM annihilations. We find that for the parameter values favored in recent fits, the point-source-like flux from the spike is 35 times greater than the flux from the inner 1 of the halo, far exceeding all Fermi point source detections near the GC. We consider the dependence of the spike signal on astrophysical and particle parameters and conclude that if the GC excess is due to DM, then a canonical adiabatic spike is disfavored by the data. We discuss alternative Galactic histories that predict different spike signals, including (i)the nonadiabatic growth of the black hole, possibly associated with halo and/or black hole mergers, (ii)gravitational interaction of DM with baryons in the dense core, such as heating by stars, or (iii)DM self-interactions. We emphasize that the spike signal is sensitive to a different combination of particle parameters than the halo signal and that the inclusion of a spike component to any DM signal in future analyses would provide novel information about both the history of the GC and the particle physics of DM annihilations.

Brian D. Fields; Stuart L. Shapiro; Jessie Shelton

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

432

Core File Settings | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Core File Settings Core File Settings The following environment variables control core file creation and contents. Specify regular (non-script) jobs using the qsub argument --env (Note: two dashes). Specify script jobs (--mode script) using the --envs (Note: two dashes) or --exp_env (Note: two dashes) options of runjob. For additional information about setting environment variables in your job, visit http://www.alcf.anl.gov/user-guides/running-jobs#environment-variables. Generation The following environment variables control conditions of core file generation and naming: BG_COREDUMPONEXIT=1 Creates a core file when the application exits. This is useful when the application performed an exit() operation and the cause and location of the exit() is not known. BG_COREDUMPONERROR=1

433

Heating and cooling in the Perseus cluster core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that the radiative cooling time of the hot X-ray emitting gas in the cores of most clusters of galaxies is less than 10^10 yr. In many clusters the gas temperature also drops towards the centre. If we draw a causal connection between these two properties then we infer the presence of a cooling flow onto the central galaxy. High spectral resolution XMM-Newton data and high spatial resolution Chandra data, show however a lack of X-ray emitting gas below about one third of the cluster virial temperature. The explanation is that some form of heating balances cooling. The smoothness and similarity of the cooling time profiles and the flatness of the required heating profiles all indicate that we must seek a relatively gentle, quasi-continuous (on timescales heat source. The likely such source is the central black hole and its powerful jets which create bubble-like cavities in the inner hot gas. We briefly review the general heating and cooling statistics in an X-ray bright sample of cluster before we discuss the detailed situation in the Perseus cluster, the X-ray brightest cluster in the Sky.

A. C. Fabian; J. S. Sanders

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Geodesics and Geodesic Deviation in static Charged Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The radial motion along null geodesics in static charged black hole space-times, in particular, the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om and stringy charged black holes are studied. We analyzed the properties of the effective potential. The circular photon orbits in these space-times are investigated. We found that the radius of circular photon orbits in both charged black holes are different and differ from that given in Schwarzschild space-time. We studied the physical effects of the gravitational field between two test particles in stringy charged black hole and compared the results with that given in Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes.

Ragab M. Gad

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

435

1p3/2 Proton-Hole State in Sn132 and the Shell Structure Along N=82  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A low-lying state in In82131, the one-proton hole nucleus with respect to double magic Sn132, was observed by its ? decay to the I?=1/2? ?-emitting isomer. We identify the new state at an excitation energy of Ex=1353??keV, which was populated both in the ? decay of Cd13183 and after ?-delayed neutron emission from Cd13284, as the previously unknown ?p3/2 single-hole state with respect to the Sn132 core. Exploiting this crucial new experimental information, shell-model calculations were performed to study the structure of experimentally inaccessible N=82 isotones below Sn132. The results evidence a surprising absence of proton subshell closures along the chain of N=82 isotones. The consequences of this finding for the evolution of the N=82 shell gap along the r-process path are discussed.

J. Taprogge et al.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Chena Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes MULTI-STAGE DRILLING Once a hole is drilled the natural-state pressure distribution with depth is essentially unrecoverable (Grant et al., 1982). One of the best ways to mitigate this effect is to use multi-stage drilling (White et al., 1975; Grant et al., 1982). This type of drilling was applied at Chena and its usefulness in understanding the natural flow regimes is demonstrated. Here, we illustrate how high-quality equilibrium temperature logs can often be used to identify permeable fractures. The independent interpretations of flow regimes based on temperature-depth curves and the

437

Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the geothermal community. Exploration holes at Tungsten Mountain and McGuiness Hills (Figure 1) in 2004 and 2005 encountered hot water and steam at depths of meters with fluid geothermometry indicating reservoir temperatures of 170 to 200oC. More information can be obtained from the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology web site (www.nbmg.unr.edu/geothermal/gtmap.pdf), and from a PowerPoint presentation titled 'Geothermal Exploration Short Stories' posted on the Geothermal Resources Council web site

438

Spectral hole burnings at high energy tails in spontaneous emission and hot carrier relaxation in InGaAsP lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectral hole burnings in spontaneous emission spectra from 1.3 ..mu..m InGaAsP lasers were found. The results are understood on the basis of population burnings of holes associated with the saturation of intervalence-band absorption. Theoretical results on hot carrier relaxation are shown to explain the population burnings, pointing out an importance of nonequilibrium optical phonon populations in the active layers of long wavelength InGaAsP lasers and light emitting diodes (LED's).

Yamanishi, M.; Mikoshiba, N.; Nonomura, K.; Suemune, I.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Hole transport in the rare-gas solids Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports an investigation of the drift mobility of excess holes in solid Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Thin-crystal specimens (50-500 ?m thick) were grown from the liquid between parallel-plate electrodes in a chamber attached to a miniature cryostat after purification of the starting gas. As in previous work on the electron transport in rare-gas solids and liquids, an electron-beam technique was used to generate excess carriers near one of the electrodes. Holes were extracted by the applied field and their transit time was measured directly, leading to the drift mobility ?h. Close to the triple points, ?h values in the above crystals lie between 1 10-2 and 4 10-2 cm2 V-1 sec-1, several orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding electron mobilities. The form of the temperature dependence of ?h changes progressively from Xe(?h?T-1.6) to an essentially activated mobility in Ar and Ne. The experimental results have been analyzed in terms of small-polaron theory, using both the adiabatic and nonadiabatic approximations. The theory can account for the different forms of the temperature dependence and possible ranges of values for the predominant phonon energy, the polaron binding energy and the transfer energy for holes have been deduced in each case. These quantities, characterizing the hole hopping transport, vary systematically from Xe to Ne and their correlation is discussed in some detail.

P. G. Le Comber; R. J. Loveland; W. E. Spear

1975-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Armstrong, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., Et Al., 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Armstrong, Et Al., 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In preparation for this work, 103 core samples were collected at 3-m ( IO ft) intervals from the Madera Limestone and underlying Sandia Formation (both of Pennsylvanian age) intersected in the depth interval 1296.1-1556.9 m (4252.5-5108.2 ft) in CSDP corehole VC-2B, completed in 1988 in the Sulphur Springs area of the Valles caldera (Hulen and Gardner, 1989). These samples were prepared as polished thin sections, and studied by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Pribnow, Et Al., 2003) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pribnow, Et Al., 2003) Pribnow, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Pribnow, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Here we present a detailed thermal conductivity profile for LVEW (Fig. 5a). Measurements were performed at the geothermal laboratory of the USGS on chips and core samples using divided bar and needle probe instruments. Detailed descriptions of these instruments and measurement procedures are given in Sass et al. (1971a,b). At shallow depths in the caldera References Daniel F. C. Pribnow, Claudia Schutze, Suzanne J. Hurter, Christina

442

Laser stabilization using spectral hole burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have frequency stabilized a Coherent CR699-21 dye laser to a transient spectral hole on the 606 nm transition in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5. A frequency stability of 1 kHz has been obtained on the 10 microsecond timescale together with a long-term frequency drift below 1 kHz/s. RF magnetic fields are used to repopulate the hyperfine levels allowing us to control the dynamics of the spectral hole. A detailed theory of the atomic response to laser frequency errors has been developed which allows us to design and optimize the laser stabilization feedback loop, and specifically we give a stability criterion that must be fulfilled in order to obtain very low drift rates. The laser stability is sufficient for performing quantum gate experiments in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5.

L. Rippe; B. Julsgaard; A. Walther; S. Krll

2006-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

443

Geometric description of BTZ black holes thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the properties of the space of thermodynamic equilibrium states of the Ba\\~nados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole in (2+1)-gravity. We use the formalism of geometrothermodynamics to introduce in the space of equilibrium states a $2-$dimensional thermodynamic metric whose curvature is non-vanishing, indicating the presence of thermodynamic interaction, and free of singularities, indicating the absence of phase transitions. Similar results are obtained for generalizations of the BTZ black hole which include a Chern-Simons term and a dilatonic field. Small logarithmic corrections of the entropy turn out to be represented by small corrections of the thermodynamic curvature, reinforcing the idea that thermodynamic curvature is a measure of thermodynamic interaction.

Hernando Quevedo; Alberto Sanchez

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hybrid black-hole binary initial data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional black-hole binary puncture initial data is conformally flat. This unphysical assumption is coupled with a lack of radiation signature from the binary's past life. As a result, waveforms extracted from evolutions of this data display an abrupt jump. In Kelly et al. [Class.Quant.Grav.27:114005,2010], a new binary black-hole initial data with radiation contents derived in the post-Newtonian (PN) calculation was adapted to puncture evolutions in numerical relativity. This data satisfies the constraint equations to the 2.5PN order, and contains a transverse-traceless "wavy" metric contribution, violating the standard assumption of conformal flatness. Although the evolution contained less spurious radiation, there were undesired features; the unphysical horizon mass loss and the large initial orbital eccentricity. Introducing a hybrid approach to the initial data evaluation, we significantly reduce these undesired features.

Bruno C. Mundim; Bernard J. Kelly; Yosef Zlochower; Hiroyuki Nakano; Manuela Campanelli

2010-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

445

The high energy emission from black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The origin of the high energy emission (X-rays and gamma-rays) from black holes is still a matter of debate. We present new evidence that hard X-ray emission in the low/hard state may not be dominated by thermal Comptonization. We present an alternative scenario for the origin of the high energy emission that is well suited to explain the high energy emission from GRO J1655-40.

M. D. Caballero-Garcia; J. M. Miller; E. Kuulkers

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

446

Black hole remnants in the early universe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the production of primordial micro black holes (MBH) remnants in the early Universe. These objects induce the Universe to be in a matter-dominated era before the onset of inflation. Effects of such an epoch on the CMB power spectrum are discussed and computed both analytically and numerically. By comparison with the latest observational data from the WMAP collaboration, we find that our model appears to explain the quadrupole anomaly of the CMB power spectrum.

Fabio Scardigli; Christine Gruber; Pisin Chen

2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

447

Comparing quantum black holes and naked singularities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are models of gravitational collapse in classical general relativity which admit the formation of naked singularities as well as black holes. These include fluid models as well as models with scalar fields as matter. Even if fluid models were to be regarded as unphysical in their matter content, the remaining class of models (based on scalar fields) generically admit the formation of visible regions of finite but arbitrarily high curvature. Hence it is of interest to ask, from the point of view of astrophysics, as to what a stellar collapse leading to a naked singularity (or to a visible region of very high curvature) will look like, to a far away observer. The emission of energy during such a process may be divided into three phases - (i) the classical phase, during which matter and gravity can both be treated according to the laws of classical physics, (ii) the semiclassical phase, when gravity is treated classically but matter behaves as a quantum field, and (iii) the quantum gravitational phase. In this review, we first give a summary of the status of naked singularities in classical relativity, and then report some recent results comparing the semiclassical phase of black holes with the semiclassical phase of spherical collapse leading to a naked singularity. In particular, we ask how the quantum particle creation during the collapse leading to a naked singularity compares with the Hawking radiation from a star collapsing to form a black hole. It turns out that there is a fundamental difference between the two cases. A spherical naked star emits only about one Planck energy during its semiclassical phase, and the further evolution can only be determined by the laws of quantum gravity. This contrasts with the semiclassical evaporation of a black hole.

T. P. Singh

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

448

Electromagnetic wave scattering by Schwarzschild black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the scattering of a planar monochromatic electromagnetic wave incident upon a Schwarzschild black hole. We obtain accurate numerical results from the partial wave method for the electromagnetic scattering cross section, and show that they are in excellent agreement with analytical approximations. The scattering of electromagnetic waves is compared with the scattering of scalar, spinor and gravitational waves. We present a unified picture of the scattering of all massless fields for the first time.

Lus C. B. Crispino; Sam R. Dolan; Ednilton S. Oliveira

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

510 Plant Disease / Vol. 97 No. 4 Etiology of Moldy Core, Core Browning, and Core Rot of Fuji Apple in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

510 Plant Disease / Vol. 97 No. 4 Etiology of Moldy Core, Core Browning, and Core Rot of Fuji Apple, and core rot of Fuji apple in China. Plant Dis. 97:510-516. `Fuji' apple fruit were collected in Shaanxi to species. Pathogenicity was determined by cutting apple fruit into halves and daubing spore suspensions

Biggs, Alan R.

450

Tank 241-AP-105, cores 208, 209 and 210, analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-AP-105. Push mode core segments were removed from Risers 24 and 28 between July 2, 1997, and July 14, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-AP-105 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997) and Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, or total organic carbon (TOC) analysis exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP and DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Two cores, each consisting of four segments, were expected from Tank 241-AP-105. Three cores were sampled, and complete cores were not obtained. TSAP states core samples should be transported to the laboratory within three calendar days from the time each segment is removed from the tank. This requirement was not met for all cores. Attachment 1 illustrates subsamples generated in the laboratory for analysis and identifies their sources. This reference also relates tank farm identification numbers to their corresponding 222-S Laboratory sample numbers.

Nuzum, J.L.

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

451

Spectral hole burning for stopping light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a protocol for storage and retrieval of photon wave packets in a {lambda}-type atomic medium. This protocol derives from spectral hole burning and takes advantages of the specific properties of solid-state systems at low temperature, such as rare-earth ion-doped crystals. The signal pulse is tuned to the center of the hole that has been burnt previously within the inhomogeneously broadened absorption band. The group velocity is strongly reduced, being proportional to the hole width. This way the optically carried information and energy are carried over to the off-resonance optical dipoles. Storage and retrieval are performed by conversion to and from ground-state Raman coherence by using brief {pi} pulses. The protocol exhibits some resemblance with the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency process. It also presents distinctive features such as the absence of coupling beam. In this paper we detail the various steps of the protocol, summarize the critical parameters, and theoretically examine the recovery efficiency.

Lauro, R.; Chaneliere, T.; Le Goueet, J.-L. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS UPR3321, Universite Paris Sud, Batiment 505, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay (France)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Light Loop Echoes and Blinking Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation emitted near a black hole reaches the observer by multiple paths; and when this radiation varies in time, the time-delays between the various paths generate a "blinking" effect in the observed light curve L(t) or its auto-correlation function xi(T)= . For the particularly important "face-on" configuration (in which the hole is viewed roughly along its spin axis, while the emission comes roughly from its equatorial plane -- e.g. from the inner edge of its accretion disk, or from the violent flash of a nearby/infalling star) we calculate the blinking in detail by computing the time delay Delta t_{j}(r,a) and magnification mu_{j}(r,a) of the jth path (j=1,2,3,...), relative to the primary path (j=0), as a function of the emission radius r and black hole spin 0

453

Dark jets in solar coronal holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new solar feature termed a dark jet is identified from observations of an extended solar coronal hole that was continuously monitored for over 44 hours by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode spacecraft in 2011 February 8-10. Line-of-sight velocity maps derived from the coronal Fe XII $\\lambda$195.12 emission line, formed at 1.5 MK, revealed a number of large-scale, jet-like structures that showed significant blueshifts. The structures had either weak or no intensity signal in 193 A filter images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, suggesting that the jets are essentially invisible to imaging instruments. The dark jets are rooted in bright points and occur both within the coronal hole and at the quiet Sun-coronal hole boundary. They exhibit a wide range of shapes, from narrow columns to fan-shaped structures, and sometimes multiple jets are seen close together. A detailed study of one dark jet showed line-of-sight speeds increasing along the jet axis fr...

Young, Peter R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Quantization of rotating linear dilaton black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we firstly prove that the adiabatic invariant quantity, which is commonly used in the literature for quantizing the rotating black holes (BHs) is fallacious. We then show how its corrected form should be. The main purpose of this paper is to study the quantization of 4-dimensional rotating linear dilaton black hole (RLDBH) spacetime describing with an action, which emerges in the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion (EMDA) theory. The RLDBH spacetime has a non-asymptotically flat (NAF) geometry. They reduces to the linear dilaton black hole (LDBH) metric when vanishing its rotation parameter $a$. While studying its scalar perturbations, it is shown that the Schr\\"odinger-like wave equation around the event horizon reduces to a confluent hypergeometric differential equation. Then the associated complex frequencies of the quasinormal modes (QNMs) are computed. By using those QNMs in the true definition of the rotational adiabatic invariant quantity, we obtain the quantum spectra of entropy/area for the RLDBH. It is found out that both spectra are discrete and equidistant. Besides, we reveal that the quantum spectra do not depend on $a$ in spite of the QNMs are modulated by it.

I. Sakalli

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Bayesian modelling of the cool core galaxy group NGC 4325  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an X-ray analysis of the radio-quiet cool-core galaxy group NGC 4325 (z=0.026) based on Chandra and ROSAT observations. The Chandra data were analysed using XSPEC deprojection, 2D spectral mapping and forward-fitting with parametric models. Additionally, a Markov chain Monte Carlo method was used to perform a joint Bayesian analysis of the Chandra and ROSAT data. The results of the various analysis methods are compared, particularly those obtained by forward-fitting and deprojection. The spectral mapping reveals the presence of cool gas displaced up to 10 kpc from the group centre. The Chandra X-ray surface brightness shows the group core to be highly disturbed, and indicates the presence of two small X-ray cavities within 15 kpc of the group core. The XSPEC deprojection analysis shows that the group has a particularly steep entropy profile, suggesting that an AGN outburst may be about to occur. With the evidence of prior AGN activity, but with no radio emission currently observed, we suggest that the group in in a pre-outburst state, with the cavities and displaced gas providing evidence of a previous, weak AGN outburst.

Paul A. Russell; Trevor J. Ponman; Alastair J. R. Sanderson

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Dynamic Inductance in Saturated Cores Fault Current Limiters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The saturated cores Fault Current Limiter (FCL) is one of the leading ... for providing a commercial robust solution to the fault current problem. Basically, the saturated cores FCL ... its saturated cores state ...

Y. Nikulshin; Y. Wolfus; A. Friedman

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

TCEQ-CoreDataForm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TCEQ-CoreDataForm Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: TCEQ-CoreDataForm Abstract This is the core data form from the Texas Commission on...

458

Unearthing the Composition of Our Planet's Core  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Unearthing the Composition of Our Planet's Core Unearthing the Composition of Our Planet's Core The chemical composition of the Earth's core is surprisingly complicated, according to high-temperature, high-pressure experiments conducted by University of Chicago scientists using the William M. Keck High Pressure Laboratory at the GSECARS facility, APS sector 13. This research has produced experimental evidence suggesting that the Earth's inner core largely consists of two exotic forms of iron (rather than one as previously thought) that appear to be alloyed with silicon. Backscattered electron image of the quenched laser-heated diamond anvil cell sample from 31 GPa and 1976K. ( J.-F. Lin et al.) Above: Backscattered electron image of the quenched laser-heated diamond anvil cell sample from 31 GPa and 1976K. ( J.-F. Lin et al.)

459

GreenCore Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreenCore Capital GreenCore Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: GreenCore Capital Name GreenCore Capital Address 10509 Vista Sorrento Parkway Place San Diego, California Zip 92121 Region Southern CA Area Product Invests in developing promising renewable energy companies Website http://www.greencorecapital.co Coordinates 32.898095°, -117.215736° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.898095,"lon":-117.215736,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

A New Greenland Deep Ice Core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isotopic profile with that from camp Century and with a deep-sea foraminifera...deep-sea cores. The redated Camp Century record suggests a dramatic termination...CENTURIES OF CLIMATIC RECORD FROM CAMP CENTURY ON GREENLAND ICE SHEET, SCIENCE...

W. Dansgaard; H. B. Clausen; N. Gundestrup; C. U. Hammer; S. F. Johnsen; P. M. Kristinsdottir; N. Reeh

1982-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ICE CORE RECORDS | Greenland Stable Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Greenland ice cores contain a wealth of information on past climatic conditions throughout the Northern Hemisphere. A historical perspective on the climatic interpretation of stable isotopes in water and ice is presented in the introduction, while the remainder of the article is devoted to the current interpretation of stable isotope data from Greenland ice cores. The progress in our understanding of stable isotope signals, on timescales from seasons to glacial cycles, is discussed and evaluated through numerous examples from Greenland ice cores. Stable isotope profiles from the Camp Century, Dye-3, GISP2, GRIP, NGRIP, and Renland deep ice cores are emphasized, as they all provide climatic information dating back into the Eemian period.

B.M. Vinther; S.J. Johnsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Bacterial Fouling in a Model Core System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to reduce permeability. Therefore...aspects of reservoir rock, without...an "open" sandstone. Thus, especially...changes in permeability that occurred...22). The porosity of the cores...liquid storage reservoir with a capacity...

J. C. Shaw; B. Bramhill; N. C. Wardlaw; J. W. Costerton

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Crystallization of the crenarchaeal SRP core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conserved ribonucleoprotein core of the signal recognition particle (SRP) has been crystallized. Both crystal forms are highly twinned and an explanation for the possible tetartohedral twinning is presented.

Rosendal, K.R.

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

464

Xenon Oscillations in a VVR-1000 Core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Xenon oscillations periodic redistribution of the power over ... the large size of this core. The xenon oscillations can be conventionally divided into axial, radial ... paper, methods are described for initiat...

V. A. Tereshonok; V. S. Stepanov; V. P. Povarov; O. V. Lebedev

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Environmental impact of various kayak core materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis compares the environmental impact of fiberglass, Kevlar, carbon fiber, and cork. A kayak company is interested in using cork as a core material, and would like to claim that it is the most environmentally ...

Kirkland, David R. (David Roger)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

PRELIMINARY TIME ESTIMATES FOR CORING OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EQUATIONS 17 FIGURE 1. DRILL STRING ROUND TRIP 19 FIGURE 2. STANDARD ROTARY CORING (RCB) WIRELINE TRIP 21) WIRELINE TRIP 25 FIGURE 5. ESTIMATED RIGGING, WIRELINE, AND SCANNING TIME FOR REENTRY. 27 #12;Preliminary

467

MagLab - Magnetic Core Memory Tutorial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

grid is made up of wires. The purpose of the horizontal and vertical X and Y Address Lines is to direct current to a specific core. The purpose of the diagonal Sense Lines is to...

468

Armor systems including coated core materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

469

Armor systems including coated core materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

Uranium - thorium series study on Yucatan slope cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

substance and a corresponding enrichment in another. Soils, on being eroded, 14 adhorb dissolved uranium from runoff and ocean water and show a progressive change in U "/U activity ratios from 0. 9 in soils to 0, 95 in river muds to 1. 15 in recently... URANIUM ? THORIUM SERIES STUDY ON YUCATAN SLOPE CORES A Thesis by Mary Elizabeth Exner Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1972...

Exner, Mary Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

471

Active negative-index metamaterial powered by an electron beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An active negative index metamaterial that derives its gain from an electron beam is introduced. The metamaterial consists of a stack of equidistant parallel metal plates perforated by a periodic array of holes shaped as ...

Shapiro, Michael

472

Panelized wall system with foam core insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

473

NETL: Control Technology: ElectroCore Separator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ElectroCore Separator ElectroCore Separator LSR Technologies and its subcontractors designed and installed a 8,500 m3/hr (5,000 acfm) Advanced ElectroCore system and a dry sulfur scrubber to test it using an exhaust gas slipstream at Alabama Power Company's Gaston Steam Plant. Shakedown is scheduled for August 15, 2001. The exhaust gas will be from Unit #4 of a 270 MWe sub-critical, pulverized coal boiler burning a low-sulfur bituminous coal. The Advanced ElectroCore system will consist of a conventional upstream ESP, a dry SO2 scrubber, a particle precharger and an Advanced ElectroCore separator. Particle concentrations and size distributions will be measured at the ESP inlet, at the dry scrubber outlet and at the ElectroCore outlet. The concentration of 12 common HAPs will be measured at these locations as well. For purposes of project organization and monitoring, the work will be divided into nine (9) tasks described below.

474

Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

475

Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

476

Early Type Galaxy Core Phase Densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early type galaxies, ellipticals and S0's, have two distinct core density profiles, either a power law or nearly flat in projection. The two core types are distributed with substantial overlap in luminosity, radius, mass and velocity dispersion, however, the cores separate into two distinct distributions in their coarse grain phase density, Q_0 = rho/sigma^3,suggesting that dynamical processes played a dominant role in their origin. The transition phase density separating the two elliptical types is approximately 0.003 M_sun pc^-3 km^-3 s^3,. The Q_0*M_c^2 vs M_c diagram shows that globular clusters, nuclear star clusters and power-law cores fall on what is likely a "collisional" sequence of inspiralling globular clusters. on which the relative core mass excess varies as the bulk stellar mass to the -0.34+/-0.08 power, close to predictions, albeit with a correlation coefficient of -0.46. Both power-law and cored galaxies lie on a single sequence of approximately Q_0 ~r_c^-2.2, suggesting that transport proces...

Carlbeg, Raymond

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Modern Records of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide (N2O) and a 2000-year Ice-core  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide (N2O) and a 2000-year Ice-core Modern Records of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide (N2O) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) over the last 2000 years, emphasizing large data bases each representing currently active stations. Records in recent decades (time period depending on location) have been obtained from samples of ambient-air at remote locations, which represent changing global atmospheric conditions rather than influences of local sources. The longer (2000-year) record is from the Law Dome ice core in Antarctica. The ice-core record has been merged with modern annual data from Cape Grim, Tasmania to provide a 2000-year time series of annual values. A spline function has been fit to the data to provide a continuous time series of

478

Tank 241-BY-111, cores 168 and 171 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-BY-111. Push mode core segments were removed from risers 15 and 12A between August 13, 1996, and September 3, 1996. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-BY-111 Rotary Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Kruger, 1996) and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO. Two cores of nine segments were expected from this tank. Sampling problems prevented the acquisition of complete cores. Attachment 1 illustrates subsamples generated in the laboratory for analysis and identifies their sources. This reference also relates tank farm identification numbers to their corresponding 222-S Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) sample numbers.

Nuzum, J.L.

1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

479

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC No. 1 and Addendum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145, Wells and Storage Holes in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for the six CASs within CAU 145. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from August 1, 2005, through November 8, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 145 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. Analytes detected during the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) were evaluated against appropriate final action levels to identify the contaminants of concern for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified contaminants of concern at one of the six CASs in CAU 145 and required the evaluation of corrective action alternatives. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 145 revealed the following: CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13 do not contain contamination; and CAS 03-25-01 has pentachlorophenol and arsenic contamination in the subsurface soils. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the six CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 145. No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13. Close in place is the preferred corrective action for CAS 03-25-01. The preferred corrective action alternatives were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternatives meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposure pathways to the contaminated media to an acceptable level at CAU 145.

David Strand

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Synthesis of Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activity core holes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA Cybersecurity Program Manager (CSPM...

482

Smart Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Smart Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core Gold-Shell Nanoparticle Synthesis. Smart Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core Gold-Shell...

483

OpenStudio Core Development and Deployment Support - 2014 BTO...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Core Development and Deployment Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review OpenStudio Core Development and Deployment Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Larry Brackney, National...

484

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-suspended solid-core fibers Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solid core subwavelength ber (a) and suspended porous core... December 2011 | 41 TERAHERTZ Suspended Core Subwavelength Plastic ... Source: Skorobogatiy, Maksim -...

485

K-Shell-Hole Production, Multiple-Hole Production, Charge-Transfer, and Antisymmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-shell electron can occur. For example, after making a K-shell hole an L-shell electron may be knocked into it, or an L-shell vacancy may be produced and the K-shell electron promoted to that vacancy in the "Fermi sea" of the target-atom orbitals, In 1973 a.... If one is working in first-order pertur- bation theory E-shell-hole production is correctly obtained by calculating the process for the K elec- tron to be lifted above the "Fermi sea" of occupied target orbitals, i.e., the other electrons play a...

Reading, John F.; Ford, A. Lewis.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

RECOILING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN SPIN-FLIP RADIO GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical relativity simulations predict that coalescence of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries leads not only to a spin flip but also to a recoiling of the merger remnant SMBHs. In the literature, X-shaped radio sources are popularly suggested to be candidates for SMBH mergers with spin flip of jet-ejecting SMBHs. Here we in