Sample records for activity core analysis

  1. Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date - 2003 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Here we...

  2. Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes See linked...

  3. Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1985 - 1988 Usefulness useful...

  4. Processing of Activated Core Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

  5. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis identifies core Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    what their analysis of a mock core has revealed... on information obtained from ice core analysis. Higher thinking skills goals for this activity: Standards... for...

  7. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date - 1995 Usefulness could be useful with more improvements...

  8. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date - 1992 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes...

  9. Multi-core Performance Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification andinterface1JUN 2 5core Performance Analysis

  10. Core Analysis At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological Survey, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date...

  11. Active Cores in Deep Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Hasinger; A. Mueller

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep field observations are an essential tool to probe the cosmological evolution of galaxies. In this context, X-ray deep fields provide information about some of the most energetic cosmological objects: active galactic nuclei (AGN). Astronomers are interested in detecting sufficient numbers of AGN to probe the accretion history at high redshift. This talk gives an overview of the knowledge resulting from a highly complete soft X-ray selected sample collected with ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Chandra deep fields. The principal outcome based on X-ray luminosity functions and space density evolution studies is that low-luminosity AGN evolve in a dramatically different way from high-luminosity AGN: The most luminous quasars perform at significantly earlier cosmic times and are most numerous in a unit volume at cosmological redshift z~2. In contrast, low-luminosity AGN evolve later and their space density peaks at z~0.7. This finding is also interpreted as an anti-hierarchical growth of supermassive black holes in the Universe. Comparing this with star formation rate history studies one concludes that supermassive black holes enter the cosmic stage before the bulk of the first stars. Therefore, first solutions of the so-called hen-egg problem are suggested. Finally, status developments and expectations of ongoing and future extended observations such as the XMM-COSMOS project are highlighted.

  12. IS ACTIVE REGION CORE VARIABILITY AGE DEPENDENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of both steady and transient loops in active region cores has been reported from soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet observations of the solar corona. The relationship between the different loop populations, however, remains an open question. We present an investigation of the short-term variability of loops in the core of two active regions in the context of their long-term evolution. We take advantage of the nearly full Sun observations of STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft to track these active regions as they rotate around the Sun multiple times. We then diagnose the variability of the active region cores at several instances of their lifetime using EIS/Hinode spectral capabilities. We inspect a broad range of temperatures, including for the first time spatially and temporally resolved images of Ca XIV and Ca XV lines. We find that the active region cores become fainter and steadier with time. The significant emission measure at high temperatures that is not correlated with a comparable increase at low temperatures suggests that high-frequency heating is viable. The presence, however, during the early stages, of an enhanced emission measure in the ''hot'' (3.0-4.5 MK) and ''cool'' (0.6-0.9 MK) components suggests that low-frequency heating also plays a significant role. Our results explain why there have been recent studies supporting both heating scenarios.

  13. Multi-core Performance Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification andinterface1JUN 2 5core Performance

  14. Core analysis workstation development and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, C.W.; Kochendarfer, R.A.; Mays, B.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering workstation utilizing a three-dimensional reactor simulator along with a series of auxiliary programs has been developed for use in predicting core reactivity and power distributions. This workstation can be used by both core analysis and core operations personnel. Expected applications are power distribution analyses, technical specification limit verification, and various types of reactivity analyses. Reactor operations personnel can quickly simulate load follow or other reactor maneuvers and, through the interactive graphics capability of the personal computer, the reactor responses, such as power distribution and control rod position, can be displayed and understood by operations personnel.

  15. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor With Results from FY-2011 Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

  16. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  17. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  18. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  19. Category:Core Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascade SierraStatus Status ofCore Analysis page? For

  20. Geologic analysis of Devonian Shale cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company was awarded a DOE contract in December 1977 for field retrieval and laboratory analysis of cores from the Devonian shales of the following eleven states: Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. The purpose of this project is to explore these areas to determine the amount of natural gas being produced from the Devonian shales. The physical properties testing of the rock specimens were performed under subcontract at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The study also included LANDSAT information, geochemical research, structural sedimentary and tectonic data. Following the introduction, and background of the project this report covers the following: field retrieval procedures; laboratory procedures; geologic analysis (by state); references and appendices. (ATT)

  1. Rollover analysis of rotary mode core sampler truck No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziada, H.H.

    1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides estimate of limiting speed and rollover analysis of rotary mode core sampler truck No. 2 (RMCST No. 2).

  2. THE COLD SHOULDER: EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS OF ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The coronal heating mechanism for active region core loops is difficult to determine because these loops are often not resolved and cannot be studied individually. Rather, we concentrate on the 'inter-moss' areas between loop footpoints. We use observations from the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer and the X-Ray Telescope to calculate the emission measure distributions of eight inter-moss areas in five different active regions. The combined data sets provide both high- and low-temperature constraints and ensure complete coverage in the temperature range appropriate for active regions. For AR 11113, the emission can be modeled with heating events that occur on timescales less than the cooling time. The loops in the core regions appear to be close to equilibrium and are consistent with steady heating. The other regions studied, however, appear to be dominated by nanoflare heating. Our results are consistent with the idea that active region age is an important parameter in determining whether steady or nanoflare heating is primarily responsible for the core emission, that is, older regions are more likely to be dominated by steady heating, while younger regions show more evidence of nanoflares.

  3. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its...

  4. Analysis of tru-fueled vhtr prismatic core performance domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Tom Goslee

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulatory Commission ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory P&T Partitioning and Transmutation PUREX Plutonium Uranium Reduction and Oxidation PWR Pressurized Water Reactor RGPu Reactor Grade Plutonium SCWCR Super-critical Water Cooled Reactor SFR Sodium.... The neutronics analysis using the 3D, whole-core VHTR model was performed using the ORNL SCALE (Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation) code system. The standard SCALE 5.1 TRITON sequence has been upgraded to allow fuel cycle modeling...

  5. Neutronic analysis of pebble-bed cores with transuranics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Megan Leigh

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (ORNL). This Department of Energy sponsored center is authorized to collect, maintain, analyze, and distribute computer software and data sets in the area of radiation transport and safety. The full-core VHTR pebble-bed model was developed... II.A SCALE 5.0 The 3D full-core pebble-bed VHTR model was initially built using SCALE version 5.0. The modular code system is developed and maintained by ORNL and is readily validated and accepted for use in thermal reactor analysis around...

  6. SAS4A LMFBR whole core accident analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, D.P.; Birgersson, G.; Bordner, G.L.; Briggs, L.L.; Cahalan, J.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Kalimullah; Miles, K.J.; Prohammer, F.G.; Tentner, A.M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure that public health and safety are protected even under accident conditions in an LMFBR, many accidents are analyzed for their potential consequences. Extremely unlikely accidents that might lead to melting of reactor fuel and release of radioactive fission products are referred to as hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDAs). The evaluation of such accidents involves the simultaneous evaluation of thermal, mechanical, hydraulic and neutronic processes and their interactions. The complexity of this analysis requires the use of large, integrated computer codes which address the response of the reactor core and several important systems. The SAS family of codes, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, provides such an analysis capability. The SAS4A code, the latest generation of this series of codes, has recently been completed and released for use to the LMFBR safety community. This paper will summarize the important new capabilitites of this analysis tool and illustrate an application of the integrated capability, while highlighting the importance of specific phenomenological models.

  7. Application of Covariances to Fast Reactor Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishikawa, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), O-arai, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)], E-mail: ishikawa.makoto@jaea.go.jp

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper, the current status of covariance applications to fast reactor analysis and design is summarized with actual examples. The covariance applications are classified into three fields. First, covariances are used to quantify the uncertainty of nuclear core parameters such as criticality, control rod worth, reaction rate ratio, power distribution, sodium void reactivity, etc. The special features of the Japanese case are to include both the burnup-related parameters such as burnup reactivity loss or fuel composition changes, and the temperature-related parameter, that is, the Doppler reactivity. Second, covariances are used to select the important nuclides, reactions and energy ranges which are dominant to the uncertainty of core parameters, and to give nuclear scientists recommendations to improve the accuracy of the data. Finally, covariances are used to improve the accuracy of core design values by adopting the integral data such as the critical experiments and the power reactor operation data. The way toward improvement is classified into the conventional E/C (Experiment/Calculation) bias method and the more comprehensive cross section adjustment based on the Bayesian theorem and the generalized least square method. In Japan, an adjusted group-constant set, ADJ2000R, is now being used in the design work for future fast reactors.

  8. Design and analysis of PCRV core cavity closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, T.T.; Schwartz, A.A.; Koopman, D.C.A.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design requirements and considerations for a core cavity closure which led to the choice of a concrete closure with a toggle hold-down as the design for the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) plant are discussed. A procedure for preliminary stress analysis of the closure by means of a three-dimensional finite element method is described. A limited parametric study using this procedure indicates the adequacy of the present closure design and the significance of radial compression developed as a result of inclined support reaction.

  9. Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory Presentation on INEENL's...

  10. Criticality safety analysis on fissile materials in Fukushima reactor cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xudong; Lemaitre-Xavier, E.; Ahn, Joonhong [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hirano, Fumio [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Geological Isolation Research and Development Directorate, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study focuses on the criticality analysis for geological disposal of damaged fuels from Fukushima reactor cores. Starting from the basic understanding of behaviors of plutonium and uranium, a scenario sequence for criticality event is considered. Due to the different mobility of plutonium and uranium in geological formations, the criticality safety is considered in two parts: (1) near-field plutonium system and (2) far-field low enriched uranium (LEU) system. For the near-field plutonium system, a mathematical analysis for pure-solute transport was given, assuming a particular buffer material and waste form configuration. With the transport and decay of plutonium accounted, the critical mass of plutonium was compared with the initial load of a single canister. Our calculation leads us to the conclusion that our system with the initial loading being the average mass of plutonium in an assembly just before the accident is very unlikely to become critical over time. For the far-field LEU system, due to the uncertainties in the geological and geochemical conditions, calculations were made in a parametric space that covers the variation of material compositions and different geometries. Results show that the LEU system could not remain sub-critical within the entire parameter space assumed, although in the iron-rich rock, the neutron multiplicity is significantly reduced.

  11. 100-KE REACTOR CORE REMOVAL PROJECT ALTERNATIVE ANALYSIS WORKSHOP REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARRINGTON RA

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 15-16, 2009, a 100-KE Reactor Core Removal Project Alternative Analysis Workshop was conducted at the Washington State University Consolidated Information Center, Room 214. Colburn Kennedy, Project Director, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the workshop and Richard Harrington provided facilitation. The purpose of the session was to select the preferred Bio Shield Alternative, for integration with the Thermal Shield and Core Removal and develop the path forward to proceed with project delivery. Prior to this workshop, the S.A. Robotics (SAR) Obstruction Removal Alternatives Analysis (565-DLV-062) report was issued, for use prior to and throughout the session, to all the team members. The multidisciplinary team consisted ofrepresentatives from 100-KE Project Management, Engineering, Radcon, Nuclear Safety, Fire Protection, Crane/Rigging, SAR Project Engineering, the Department of Energy Richland Field Office, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board, and Deactivation and Decommission subject matter experts from corporate CH2M HILL and Lucas. Appendix D contains the workshop agenda, guidelines and expectations, opening remarks, and attendance roster going into followed throughout the workshop. The team was successful in selecting the preferred alternative and developing an eight-point path forward action plan to proceed with conceptual design. Conventional Demolition was selected as the preferred alternative over two other alternatives: Diamond Wire with Options, and Harmonic Delamination with Conventional Demolition. The teams preferred alternative aligned with the SAR Obstruction Removal Alternative Analysis report conclusion. However, the team identified several Path Forward actions, in Appendix A, which upon completion will solidify and potentially enhance the Conventional Demolition alternative with multiple options and approaches to achieve project delivery. In brief, the Path Forward was developed to reconsider potential open air demolition areas; characterize to determine if any zircaloy exists, evaluate existing concrete data to determine additional characterization needs, size the new building to accommodate human machine interface and tooling, consider bucket thumb and use ofshape-charges in design, and finally to utilize complex-wide and industry explosive demolition lessons learned in the design approach. Appendix B documents these results from the team's use ofValue Engineering process tools entitled Weighted Analysis Alternative Matrix, Matrix Conclusions, Evaluation Criteria, and Alternative Advantages and Disadvantages. These results were further supported with the team's validation of parking-lot information sheets: memories (potential ideas to consider), issues/concerns, and assumptions, contained in Appendix C. Appendix C also includes the recorded workshop flipchart notes taken from the SAR Alternatives and Project Overview presentations. The SAR workshop presentations, including a 3-D graphic illustration demonstration video have been retained in the CHPRC project file, and were not included in this report due to size limitations. The workshop concluded with a round robin close-out where each member was engaged for any last minute items and meeting utility. In summary, the team felt the session was value added and looked forward to proceeding with the recommended actions and conceptual design.

  12. ANALYSIS OF THE SALT FEED TANK CORE SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Cheng, W.

    2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) immobilizes and disposes of low-level radioactive and hazardous liquid waste (salt solution) remaining from the processing of radioactive material at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Low-level waste (LLW) streams from processes at SRS are stored in Tank 50 until the LLW can be transferred to the SPF for treatment and disposal. The Salt Feed Tank (SFT) at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) holds approximately 6500 gallons of low level waste from Tank 50 as well as drain water returned from the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) vaults. Over the past several years, Saltstone Engineering has noted the accumulation of solids in the SFT. The solids are causing issues with pump performance, agitator performance, density/level monitoring, as well as taking up volume in the tank. The tank has been sounded at the same location multiple times to determine the level of the solids. The readings have been 12, 25 and 15 inches. The SFT is 8.5 feet high and 12 feet in diameter, therefore the solids account for approximately 10 % of the tank volume. Saltstone Engineering has unsuccessfully attempted to obtain scrape samples of the solids for analysis. As a result, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with developing a soft core sampler to obtain a sample of the solids and to analyze the core sample to aid in determining a path forward for removing the solids from the SFT. The source of the material in the SFT is the drain water return system where excess liquid from the Saltstone disposal vaults is pumped back to the SFT for reprocessing. It has been shown that fresh grout from the vault enter the drain water system piping. Once these grout solids return to the SFT, they settle in the tank, set up, and can't be reprocessed, causing buildup in the tank over time. The composition of the material indicates that it is potentially toxic for chromium and mercury and the primary radionuclide is cesium-137. Qualitative measurements show that the material is not cohesive and will break apart with some force.

  13. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basehore, K.L.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries.

  14. Core analysis in a low permeability sandstone reservoir: Results from the Multiwell Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, A.R.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 4100 ft (1100 ft oriented) of Mesaverde core was taken during the drilling of the three Multiwell Experiment (MWX) wells, for study in a comprehensive core analysis program. This core traversed five separate depositional environments (shoreline/marine, coastal, paludal, fluvial, and paralic), and almost every major sand in the Mesaverde at the site was sampled. This paper summarizes MWX core analysis and describes the petrophysical properties at the MWX site; reservoir parameters, including permeabilities of naturally fractured core; and mechanical rock properties including stress-related measurements. Some correlations are made between reservoir properties and mineralogy/petrology data. Comparisons are made between the properties of lenticular and blanket sandstone morphologies existing at the site. This paper provides an overview of a complete core analysis in a low-permeability sandstone reservoir. 66 refs., 17 figs. , 9 tabs.

  15. Tank 241-SY-101 push mode core sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNER, J.M.

    1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for push mode core samples from tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101). It is written in accordance with Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue (Bauer 1998), Low Activity Waste Feed Data Quality Objectives (Wiemers and Miller 1997 and DOE 1998), Data Quality Objectives for TWRS Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T is an Appropriate Feed Source for Low-Activity Waste Feed Batch X (Certa 1998), and the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow et al. 1995). The Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis document (Brown et al. 1998) indicates that these issues apply to tank SY-101 for this sampling event. Brown et al. also identifies high-level waste, regulatory, pretreatment and disposal issues as applicable issues for this tank. However, these issues will not be addressed via this sampling event.

  16. Model for LMFBR core transient analysis in real time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant safety as well as plant availability can be significantly improved if functions such as data validation, plant state verification, and fault identification are automated. A methodology for automation of these functions was presented in an earlier paper. To implement this methodology, plant models that run significantly faster than real transient time are needed. Such models for the intermediate heat exchanger and a once-through liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) steam generator have been presented. This paper discusses the modeling of LMFBR core transients. It is shown that, with a proper choice of shape functions, a nodal approximation of the coolant, cladding, and fuel temperature distributions leads to adequately accurate power and temperature predictions, as well as adequately short computation times. From the point of view of operational safety, it is desirable to terminate a transient before sodium boiling is initiated in the core. Thus, only the modeling of the preboiling phase of core transients is discussed.

  17. CO2 & global temperature: Analysis of ice core and marine sediment data in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    CO2 & global temperature: Analysis of ice core and marine sediment data in combination with modeling of marine reservoir ages Gerrit Lohmann & Martin Butzin #12;Deglaciation CO2 vs. global temperature Ice cores: Temperature leads CO2 People (mainly outside the scientific comunity) use

  18. Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Madagascar)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Université d'Orléans, BP 6759, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2, France Abstract Seven samples from a 1 m long peat core targets because of their dominant or even exclusive OM content, peat deposits have received relatively

  19. Model for LMFBR core transient analysis in real-time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the modeling of LMFBR core transients. It is shown that with a proper choice of shape functions a nodal approximation of the coolant, cladding, and fuel temperature distributions leads to adequately accurate power and temperature predictions, as well as adequately short computation times.

  20. Supplemental Text Analysis of the ice core samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    into a continuous sequence of samples (NIF2, 2197 samples; NIF3, 1980 samples; SIF1, 706 samples; SIF2, 834 samples and the sixth core, NIF1 (drilled one meter from NIF2) has been reserved for other measurements such as AMS 14 C. These comments follow the dating discussion in chronological order. The net down wasting of the NIF (as discussed

  1. Thermal hydraulic performance analysis of a small integral pressurized water reactor core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, Stuart R. (Stuart Ryan), 1972-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal hydraulic analysis of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) core has been performed. Thermal margins for steady state and a selection of Loss Of Flow Accidents have been assessed using three ...

  2. Effect of optical pumping on the refractive index and temperature in the core of active fibre

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gainov, V V; Ryabushkin, Oleg A [V.A.Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Fryazino Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the refractive index change (RIC) induced in the core of Yb{sup 3+}-doped active silica fibres by pulsed pumping. RIC kinetic measurements with a Mach - Zehnder interferometer make it possible to separately assess the contributions of the electronic and thermal mechanisms to the RIC and evaluate temperature nonuniformities in the fibre.

  3. Application of an artificial neural network to reactor core analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seung Hwan Seong; Un Chul Lee [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To analyze three-dimensional reactor core behaviors, the finite difference or the finite element method have generally been used. Nodal method is adopted as another tool for analyzing transient core characteristics. These methods, however, require much calculation time to solve very complicated iterations for better convergence. Especially when the transient states are to be predicted, none of these methods can meet the requirements within the time span in which the operator can react. To overcome these difficulties, a new analytic model based on the artificial neural networks (ANNs) is suggested. Because trained ANNs are capable of modeling the input/output relationships of a nonlinear system without complex analogy, they are able to map the power distributions and calculate the eigenvalue corresponding to the core conditions in a short time and utilize the previous results by updating the weights of inter-connection between input and output patterns. To confirm the accuracy and capability, daily load-follow operation in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is simulated using the new analytic model.

  4. Documented Safety Analysis Addendum for the Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility Core Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility (NRAD) is a Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics (TRIGA) reactor which was installed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) in the mid 1970s. The facility provides researchers the capability to examine both irradiated and non-irradiated materials in support of reactor fuel and components programs through non-destructive neutron radiography examination. The facility has been used in the past as one facet of a suite of reactor fuels and component examination facilities available to researchers at the INL and throughout the DOE complex. The facility has also served various commercial research activities in addition to the DOE research and development support. The reactor was initially constructed using Fuel Lifetime Improvement Program (FLIP)- type highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel obtained from the dismantled Puerto Rico Nuclear Center (PRNC) reactor. In accordance with international non-proliferation agreements, the NRAD core will be converted to a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and will continue to utilize the PRNC control rods, control rod drives, startup source, and instrument console as was previously used with the HEU core. The existing NRAD Safety Analysis Report (SAR) was created and maintained in the preferred format of the day, combining sections of both DOE-STD-3009 and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.70. An addendum was developed to cover the refueling and reactor operation with the LEU core. This addendum follows the existing SAR format combining required formats from both the DOE and NRC. This paper discusses the project to successfully write a compliant and approved addendum to the existing safety basis documents.

  5. Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Analysis Activities at National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on NREL’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  7. Analysis Activities at Sandia National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on SNL’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  8. Analysis Activities at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on PNNL’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  9. Analysis Activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Lawrence Livermore’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  10. Analysis Activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on ORNL’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  11. Analysis Activities at Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Argonne’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  12. Core image analysis of matrix porosity in The Geysers reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson, Dennis L.; Nash, Greg; Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Tripp, Alan C.

    1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption is potentially an important consideration when calculating reserves at The Geysers. Our investigations of the mineralogical relationships in core samples have shown matrix pore spaces to be largely associated with fractures. Dissolution of calcite from hydrothermal veins increases porosity in the graywacke reservoir. The high relative surface area of secondary alteration phases could promote adsorption. In order to quantify porosity distribution and surface area, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images were analyzed using software developed for the interpretation of satellite imagery, This software classifies the images as either crystal or pore and then accumulates data on pore size, total porosity and surface area of the mineral-pore interface. Review of literature shows that data on thickness of adsorbed water layer does not exist for many of the mineral phases of interest in The Geysers. We have assumed thicknesses of 10, 100, and 5300 Angstroms for the adsorbed layer and calculated the relative proportions of adsorbed water. These calculations show 0.005%, 0.05%, and 2.5% of total water would be adsorbed using the above thicknesses.

  13. PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S. [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Inst., No. 29, Hongcao Road, Shanghai, 200233 (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade {sup 233}U-Thorium (U{sub 3}ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade {sup 233}U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U{sub 3}ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core, the well designed U{sub 3}ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly {sup 233}U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U{sub 3}ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U{sub 3}ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U{sub 3}ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no visible impacts on neutronic characteristics compared with reference full UOX core. The fuel cycle analysis has shown that {sup 233}U mono-recycling with U{sub 3}ThOX fuel could save 13% of natural uranium resource compared with UOX once through fuel cycle, slightly more than that of Plutonium single-recycling with MOX fuel. If {sup 233}U multi-recycling with U{sub 3}ThOX fuel is implemented, more natural uranium resource would be saved. (authors)

  14. Experimental ferrite core circuit analysis and design applied to an analog/digital converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Robert William

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPKRflIENTAL FERRITE CORE CIRCUIT ANALYSIS A/4i) CESIGN APPLI ED' TO AN ANALOG+I QITAL -CCWERTER I I 'O' Thaaka RCSERT, NI. LL'I AN HQQAKS:-. , ";, , '. . :. . '. -:. '"":, , ':-. ', . -' ". ' t, . I I I' I, ' . Sobalttad, ta tb ~ Qra... , Na'fir. Sabjaat& ' Eiaktr leal EnCInaaring . EXPERIIIENTAL FERRITE CORE CIRCUIT ANALYSIS AND DESIGN APPLIED TO 'AN AMALGG/DIGITAL CONVERTER f 1 A, . Thea I'a t ROBERT Wl LI. I Al'Jl. HUGHES (Goober, ) ' (Me@bar) ' A'yprived . a'o . . to a4...

  15. Lattice-Strain Control of the Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasser, Peter; Shirlaine, Koh; Anniyev, Toyli; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; More, Karren L.; Yu, Chengfei; Liu, Zengcai; Kaya, Sarp; Nordlund, Dennis; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Toney, Michael F.; Nilsson, Anders R.

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrocatalysis will play a key role in future energy conversion and storage technologies, such as water electrolysers, fuel cells and metal–air batteries. Molecular interactions between chemical reactants and the catalytic surface control the activity and efficiency, and hence need to be optimized; however, generalized experimental strategies to do so are scarce. Here we show how lattice strain can be used experimentally to tune the catalytic activity of dealloyed bimetallic nanoparticles for the oxygen-reduction reaction, a key barrier to the application of fuel cells and metal–air batteries. We demonstrate the core–shell structure of the catalyst and clarify the mechanistic origin of its activity. The platinum-rich shell exhibits compressive strain, which results in a shift of the electronic band structure of platinum and weakening chemisorption of oxygenated species. We combine synthesis, measurements and an understanding of strain from theory to generate a reactivity–strain relationship that provides guidelines for tuning electrocatalytic activity.

  16. Lattice-Strain Control of the Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasser, P. [Berlin Institute of Technology (Technische Universitat Berlin); Koh, Shirlaine [University of Houston, Houston; Anniyev, Toyli [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Greeley, Jeff [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Yu, Chengfei [University of Houston, Houston; Liu, Zengcai [University of Houston, Houston; Kaya, Sarpa [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Nordlund, Dennis [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Ogasawara, Hirohito [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Toney, Michael F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Anders, Nilsson [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrocatalysis will play a key role in future energy conversion and storage technologies, such as water electrolysers, fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Molecular interactions between chemical reactants and the catalytic surface control the activity and efficiency, and hence need to be optimized; however, generalized experimental strategies to do so are scarce. Here we show how lattice strain can be used experimentally to tune the catalytic activity of dealloyed bimetallic nanoparticles for the oxygen-reduction reaction, a key barrier to the application of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. We demonstrate the core-shell structure of the catalyst and clarify the mechanistic origin of its activity. The platinum-rich shell exhibits compressive strain, which results in a shift of the electronic band structure of platinum and weakening chemisorption of oxygenated species. We combine synthesis, measurements and an understanding of strain from theory to generate a reactivity-strain relationship that provides guidelines for tuning electrocatalytic activity.

  17. Thermal hydraulic aspects in the analysis of LMFBR disrupted-core situations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tentner, A.M.; Wider, H.U.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the thermal-hydraulic aspects of current interest in the modeling of LMFBR hypothetical core-disruptive accidents, with special emphasis on the Loss of Flow situations. The models presented have been incorporated in LEVITATE, a code for the analysis of fuel and cladding dynamics under LOF conditions, which has recently become part of the SAS4A code system. The influence of different thermal-hydraulic models on fuel motion is illustrated by a comparison between the results calculated by LEVITATE, the data from the L7-TREAT experiment and the results calculated by SLUMPY. The results calculated by LEVITATE are in fair agreement with the experimentally observed early fuel dispersal. The marginally acceptable energetic events obtained in the analysis of high void-worth LMFBR cores during Loss-of-Flow transients coupled with uncertainties about some of the thermal-hydraulic parameters motivate, among other factors, the need for the design low void-worth LMFBR cores.

  18. Safety analysis for operating the Annular Core Research Reactor with Cintichem-type targets installed in the central region of the core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PARMA JR.,EDWARD J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of the molybdenum-99 isotope at the Annular Core Research Reactor requires highly enriched, uranium oxide loaded targets to be irradiated for several days in the high neutron-flux region of the core. This report presents the safety analysis for the irradiation of up to seven Cintichem-type targets in the central region of the core and compares the results to the Annular Core Research Reactor Safety Analysis Report. A 19 target grid configuration is presented that allows one to seven targets to be irradiated, with the remainder of the grid locations filled with aluminum ''void'' targets. Analyses of reactor, neutronic, thermal hydraulics, and heat transfer calculations are presented. Steady-state operation and accident scenarios are analyzed with the conclusion that the reactor can be operated safely with seven targets in the grid, and no additional risk to the public.

  19. Determination of power distribution in the VVER-440 core on the basis of data from in-core monitors by means of a metric analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryanev, A. V.; Udumyan, D. K. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPHI,” (Russian Federation); Kurchenkov, A. Yu., E-mail: s327@vver.kiae.ru; Gagarinskiy, A. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems associated with determining the power distribution in the VVER-440 core on the basis of a neutron-physics calculation and data from in-core monitors are considered. A new mathematical scheme is proposed for this on the basis of a metric analysis. In relation to the existing mathematical schemes, the scheme in question improves the accuracy and reliability of the resulting power distribution.

  20. Stability analysis of a nonlinear coupled-core reactor control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsay, T.S.; Han, K.W.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, stability-equation method is applied to the analysis of a large coupled-core reactor control system having multiple nonlinearities and adjustable parameters. The characteristics of the limit-cycle and the asymptotically stable regions can be easily defined in a parameter plane. A numerical example is given and comparisons with other methods in current literature are made.

  1. Development of integrated core disruptive accident analysis code for FBR - ASTERIA-FBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishizu, T.; Endo, H.; Tatewaki, I.; Yamamoto, T. [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization JNES, Toranomon Towers Office, 4-1-28, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Shirakawa, N. [Inst. of Applied Energy IAE, Shimbashi SY Bldg., 14-2 Nishi-Shimbashi 1-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaluation of consequence at the severe accident is the most important as a safety licensing issue for the reactor core of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), since the LMFBR core is not in an optimum condition from the viewpoint of reactivity. This characteristics might induce a super-prompt criticality due to the core geometry change during the core disruptive accident (CDA). The previous CDA analysis codes have been modeled in plural phases dependent on the mechanism driving a super-prompt criticality. Then, the following event is calculated by connecting different codes. This scheme, however, should introduce uncertainty and/or arbitrary to calculation results. To resolve the issues and obtain the consistent calculation results without arbitrary, JNES is developing the ASTERIA-FBR code for the purpose of providing the cross-check analysis code, which is another required scheme to confirm the validity of the evaluation results prepared by applicants, in the safety licensing procedure of the planned high performance core of Monju. ASTERIA-FBR consists of the three major calculation modules, CONCORD, dynamic-GMVP, and FEMAXI-FBR. CONCORD is a three-dimensional thermal-hydraulics calculation module with multi-phase, multi-component, and multi-velocity field model. Dynamic-GMVP is a space-time neutronics calculation module. FEMAXI-FBR calculates the fuel pellet deformation behavior and fuel pin failure behavior. This paper describes the needs of ASTERIA-FBR development, major module outlines, and the model validation status. (authors)

  2. Tunable synthesis of TiO{sub 2}/SrO core/shell nanowire arrays with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wenqi [Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang, Jie, E-mail: flyyangj@163.com [Faculty of Mechanical and Electronic Information, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [Faculty of Mechanical and Electronic Information, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gong, Yingpeng, E-mail: ypgong@jhust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hong, Hanlie [Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanowires with tunable SrO shell layer are easily fabricated. The core/shell structure can enhance the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanowires and restrict the recombination of the electrons/holes. Display Omitted Highlights: ? A facile method to fabricate TiO{sub 2}/SrO core-shell nanowire array is reported. ? The thickness of SrO shell layer can be tunable by adjusting the dipping time. ? TiO{sub 2}/SrO core/shell nanowires shows enhanced photocatalytic activity. -- Abstract: We report a simple method to fabricate well-aligned TiO{sub 2}/SrO core/shell nanowire arrays. The core/shell structure is confirmed to have crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanowires core and amorphous SrO shell layer. The shell is composed of SrO with tunable thickness. Photocatalytic activity measurement shows that TiO{sub 2}/SrO core/shell nanowire arrays outperform uncovered TiO{sub 2} nanowires. Such core/shell nanowire arrays have potential applications for photovoltaic devices and as high performance photocatalyst.

  3. The Neutronics Design and Analysis of a 200-MW(electric) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinkler, Daniel R.; Downar, Thomas J. [Purdue University (United States)

    2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A 200-MW(electric) simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR) was designed and analyzed under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative program. The compact size of a 200-MW(electric) reactor makes it attractive for countries with a less well developed engineering infrastructure, as well as for developed countries seeking to tailor generation capacity more closely to the growth of their electricity demand. The 200-MW(electric) core design reported here is based on the 600-MW(electric) General Electric SBWR core, which was first analyzed in the work performed here in order to qualify the computer codes used in the analysis. Cross sections for the 8 x 8 fuel assembly design were generated with the HELIOS lattice physics code, and core simulation was performed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission codes RELAP5/PARCS. In order to predict the critical heat flux, the Hench-Gillis correlation was implemented in the RELAP5 code. An equilibrium cycle was designed for the 200-MW(electric) core, which provided a cycle length of more than 2 yr and satisfied the minimum critical power ratio throughout the core life.

  4. Core–shell TiO{sub 2} microsphere with enhanced photocatalytic activity and improved lithium storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Hong, E-mail: guohongcom@126.com [School of Chemistry Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, No. 2, Green Lake North Road, Kunming 650091, Yunnan (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qujing Normal University, Qujing 655000, Yunnan (China); Tian, Dongxue; Liu, Lixiang; Wang, Yapeng; Guo, Yuan; Yang, Xiangjun [School of Chemistry Science and Engineering, Yunnan University, No. 2, Green Lake North Road, Kunming 650091, Yunnan (China)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inorganic hollow core–shell spheres have attracted considerable interest due to their singular properties and wide range of potential applications. Herein a novel facile generic strategy of combining template assisted and solvothermal alcoholysis is employed to prepare core–void–shell anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle aggregates with an excellent photocatalytic activity, and enhanced lithium storage in large quantities. Amorphous carbon can be loaded on the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles uniformly under a suitably formulated ethanol/water system in the solvothermal alcoholysis process, and the subsequent calcination results of the formation of core–shell–shell anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle aggregates. The intrinsic core–void–shell nature as well as high porosity of the unique nanostructures contributes greatly to the superior photocatalytic activity and improved performance as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: A novel strategy of combining template assisted and solvothermal alcoholysis is employed to prepare unique core–void–shell anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle aggregates with the superior photocatalytic activity and improved lithium storage. Highlights: ? TiO{sub 2} mesospheres are synthesized by solvothermal alcoholysis. ? It is core–void–shell structure and the thickness of shell is estimated to 80 nm. ? It exhibits a remarkable photocatalytic activity and improved lithium storage.

  5. Image patch analysis of sunspots and active regions. I. Intrinsic dimension and correlation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Kevin R; Delouille, Veronique; De Visscher, Ruben; Watson, Fraser; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complexity of an active region is related to its flare-productivity. Mount Wilson or McIntosh sunspot classifications measure such complexity but in a categorical way, and may therefore not use all the information present in the observations. Moreover, such categorical schemes hinder a systematic study of an active region's evolution for example. We propose fine-scale quantitative descriptors for an active region's complexity and relate them to the Mount Wilson classification. We analyze the local correlation structure within continuum and magnetogram data, as well as the cross-correlation between continuum and magnetogram data. We compute the intrinsic dimension, partial correlation, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) of image patches of continuum and magnetogram active region images taken from the SOHO-MDI instrument. We use masks of sunspots derived from continuum as well as larger masks of magnetic active regions derived from the magnetogram to analyze separately the core part of an active region fr...

  6. DIAGNOSING THE TIME DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. II. NANOFLARE TRAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The time dependence of heating in solar active regions can be studied by analyzing the slope of the emission measure distribution coolward of the peak. In a previous study we showed that low-frequency heating can account for 0% to 77% of active region core emission measures. We now turn our attention to heating by a finite succession of impulsive events for which the timescale between events on a single magnetic strand is shorter than the cooling timescale. We refer to this scenario as a 'nanoflare train' and explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. Our conclusions are (1) nanoflare trains are consistent with 86% to 100% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are properly accounted for; (2) steeper slopes are found for larger values of the ratio of the train duration {Delta} {sub H} to the post-train cooling and draining timescale {Delta} {sub C}, where {Delta} {sub H} depends on the number of heating events, the event duration and the time interval between successive events ({tau} {sub C}); (3) {tau} {sub C} may be diagnosed from the width of the hot component of the emission measure provided that the temperature bins are much smaller than 0.1 dex; (4) the slope of the emission measure alone is not sufficient to provide information about any timescale associated with heating-the length and density of the heated structure must be measured for {Delta} {sub H} to be uniquely extracted from the ratio {Delta} {sub H}/{Delta} {sub C}.

  7. OUTFLOWS AND DARK BANDS AT ARCADE-LIKE ACTIVE REGION CORE BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tarr, L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode have revealed outflows and non-thermal line broadening in low intensity regions at the edges of active regions (ARs). We use data from Hinode's EIS, Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer instrument to investigate the boundaries of arcade-like AR cores for NOAA ARs 11112, 10978, and 9077. A narrow, low intensity region that is observed at the core's periphery as a dark band shows outflows and increased spectral line broadening. This dark band is found to exist for days and appears between the bright coronal loop structures of different coronal topologies. We find a case where the dark band region is formed between the magnetic field from emerging flux and the field of the pre-existing flux. A magnetic field extrapolation indicates that this dark band is coincident with the spine lines or magnetic separatrices in the extrapolated field. This occurs over unipolar regions where the brightened coronal field is separated in connectivity and topology. This separation does not appear to be infinitesimal and an initial estimate of the minimum distance of separation is found to be Almost-Equal-To 1.5-3.5 Mm.

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - active region core Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the core is controlled... by the rate at which the mantle can remove heat. Rapid core cooling favours the operation of a geodynamo Source: Nimmo, Francis - Department of Earth...

  9. Transportation activity analysis using smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yu

    Transportation activity surveys investigate when, where and how people travel in urban areas to provide information necessary for urban transportation planning. In Singapore, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) carries out ...

  10. Analysis of volume distribution of power loss in ferrite cores M. LoBue, V. Loyau, and F. Mazaleyrat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Analysis of volume distribution of power loss in ferrite cores M. LoBue, V. Loyau, and F the section of ferrite cores under AC excitation. The technique is based on two distinct calorimetric methods the procedure to an industrial sample of Mn-Zn ferrite under controlled sinusoidal excitation with a peak

  11. Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Peach Bottom, Unit 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Ferrell, W.L.; Cathey, N.G.; Najafi, B.; Harper, F.T.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the internal event initiated accident sequence analyses for Peach Bottom, Unit 2; one of the reference plants being examined as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 will document the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. As part of that work, this report contains the overall core damage frequency estimate for Peach Bottom, Unit 2, and the accompanying plant damage state frequencies. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provided additional insights regarding the dominant contributors to the Peach Bottom core damage frequency estimate. The mean core damage frequency at Peach Bottom was calculated to be 8.2E-6. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) were found to dominate the overall results. Anticipated Transient Without Scram accidents were also found to be non-negligible contributors. The numerical results are largely driven by common mode failure probability estimates and to some extent, human error. Because of significant data and analysis uncertainties in these two areas (important, for instance, to the most dominant scenario in this study), it is recommended that the results of the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses be considered before any actions are taken based on this analysis.

  12. Low time resolution analysis of polar ice cores cannot detect impulsive nitrate events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smart, D F; Melott, A L; Laird, C M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice cores are archives of climate change and possibly large solar proton events (SPEs). Wolff et al. (2012) used a single event, a nitrate peak in the GISP2-H core, which McCracken et al. (2001a) time associated with the poorly quantified 1859 Carrington event, to discredit SPE-produced, impulsive nitrate deposition in polar ice. This is not the ideal test case. We critique the Wolff et al. analysis and demonstrate that the data they used cannot detect impulsive nitrate events because of resolution limitations. We suggest re-examination of the top of the Greenland ice sheet at key intervals over the last two millennia with attention to fine resolution and replicate sampling of multiple species. This will allow further insight into polar depositional processes on a sub-seasonal scale, including atmospheric sources, transport mechanisms to the ice sheet, post-depositional interactions, and a potential SPE association.

  13. Analysis of Fracture in Cores from the Tuff Confining Unit beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Prothro

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role fractures play in the movement of groundwater through zeolitic tuffs that form the tuff confining unit (TCU) beneath Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, is poorly known. This is an important uncertainty, because beneath most of Yucca Flat the TCU lies between the sources of radionuclide contaminants produced by historic underground nuclear testing and the regional carbonate aquifer. To gain a better understanding of the role fractures play in the movement of groundwater and radionuclides through the TCU beneath Yucca Flat, a fracture analysis focusing on hydraulic properties was performed on conventional cores from four vertical exploratory holes in Area 7 of Yucca Flat that fully penetrate the TCU. The results of this study indicate that the TCU is poorly fractured. Fracture density for all fractures is 0.27 fractures per vertical meter of core. For open fractures, or those observed to have some aperture, the density is only 0.06 fractures per vertical meter of core. Open fractures are characterized by apertures ranging from 0.1 to 10 millimeter, and averaging 1.1 millimeter. Aperture typically occurs as small isolated openings along the fracture, accounting for only 10 percent of the fracture volume, the rest being completely healed by secondary minerals. Zeolite is the most common secondary mineral occurring in 48 percent of the fractures observed.

  14. Thermal hydraulic method for whole core design analysis of an HTGR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huning, A. J.; Garimella, S. [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new thermal hydraulic method and initial results are presented for core-wide steady state analysis of prismatic High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR). The method allows for the complete solution of temperature and coolant mass flow distribution by solving quasi-steady energy balances for the discretized core. Assembly blocks are discretized into unit cells for which the average temperature of each unit cell is determined. Convective heat removal is coupled to the unit cell energy balances by a 1-D axial flow model. The flow model uses established correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number. Bypass flow is explicitly calculated by using an initial guess for mass flow distribution and determining the exit pressure of each flow channel. The mass flow distribution is updated until a uniform core exit pressure condition is reached. Results are obtained for the MHTGR-350 with emphasis on the change in thermal hydraulic parameters due to various steady state power profiles and bypass gap widths. Steady state temperature distribution and its variations are discussed. (authors)

  15. TRACE/PARCS Core Modeling of a BWR/5 for Accident Analysis of ATWS Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuadra A.; Baek J.; Cheng, L.; Aronson, A.; Diamond, D.; Yarsky, P.

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The TRACE/PARCS computational package [1, 2] isdesigned to be applicable to the analysis of light water reactor operational transients and accidents where the coupling between the neutron kinetics (PARCS) and the thermal-hydraulics and thermal-mechanics (TRACE) is important. TRACE/PARCS has been assessed for itsapplicability to anticipated transients without scram(ATWS) [3]. The challenge, addressed in this study, is to develop a sufficiently rigorous input model that would be acceptable for use in ATWS analysis. Two types of ATWS events were of interest, a turbine trip and a closure of main steam isolation valves (MSIVs). In the first type, initiated by turbine trip, the concern is that the core will become unstable and large power oscillations will occur. In the second type,initiated by MSIV closure,, the concern is the amount of energy being placed into containment and the resulting emergency depressurization. Two separate TRACE/PARCS models of a BWR/5 were developed to analyze these ATWS events at MELLLA+ (maximum extended load line limit plus)operating conditions. One model [4] was used for analysis of ATWS events leading to instability (ATWS-I);the other [5] for ATWS events leading to emergency depressurization (ATWS-ED). Both models included a large portion of the nuclear steam supply system and controls, and a detailed core model, presented henceforth.

  16. Analysis of MSE Cores Tuba City, Arizona, Site | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysis of Crossover PointsMSE Cores

  17. ESPP Functional Genomics and Imaging Core: Cell wide analysis of Metal-Reducing Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL Program throughESPP Functional Genomics and Imaging Core: Cell widemetals. The Functional Genomics and Imaging Core (FGIC)

  18. Lattice-Strain Control of Exceptional Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strasser, Peter

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical approach to demonstrate how lattice strain can be used to continuously tune the catalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on bimetallic nanoparticles that have been dealloyed. The sluggish kinetics of the ORR is a key barrier to the adaptation of fuel cells and currently limits their widespread use. Dealloyed Pt-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles, however, have been shown to exhibit uniquely high reactivity for this reaction. We first present evidence for the formation of a core-shell structure during dealloying, which involves removal of Cu from the surface and subsurface of the precursor nanoparticles. We then show that the resulting Pt-rich surface shell exhibits compressive strain that depends on the composition of the precursor alloy. We next demonstrate the existence of a downward shift of the Pt d-band, resulting in weakening of the bond strength of intermediate oxygenated species due to strain. Finally, we combine synthesis, strain, and catalytic reactivity in an experimental/theoretical reactivity-strain relationship which provides guidelines for the rational design of strained oxygen reduction electrocatalysts. The stoichiometry of the precursor, together with the dealloying conditions, provides experimental control over the resulting surface strain and thereby allows continuous tuning of the surface electrocatalytic reactivity - a concept that can be generalized to other catalytic reactions.

  19. Coupling the core analysis program DeCART to the fuel performance application BISON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleicher, F. N.; Spencer, B.; Novascone, S.; Williamson, R.; Martineau, R. C. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Rose, M.; Downar, T. J.; Collins, B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3D neutron transport and core analysis program DeCART was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the method of characteristics) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate 3D problems. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during burnup or a fast transient. BISON implicitly solves coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter level finite element mesh. A method was developed for mapping the fission rate density and fast neutron flux from DeCART to BISON. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from DeCART to BISON. The one-way data transfer of fission rate density is shown to agree with the fission rate density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON. One-way data transfer was also demonstrated in a 3D case in which azimuthal asymmetry was induced in the fission rate density profile of a fuel rod modeled in DeCART. Two-way data transfer was established by mapping the temperature distribution from BISON to DeCART. A Picard iterative algorithm was developed for the loose coupling with two-way data transfer. (authors)

  20. Measurement and analysis of fractures in vertical, slant, and horizontal core, with examples from the Mesaverde formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Hill, R.E. (CER Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimum analysis of natural fracture characteristics and distributions in reservoirs requires conscientious supervision of coring operations, on-site core processing, careful layout and marketing of the core, and detailed measurement of fracture characteristics. Natural fractures provide information on the in situ permeability system, and coring-induced fractures provide data on the in situ stresses. Fracture data derived from vertical core should include fracture height, type and location of fracture terminations with respect to lithologic heterogeneity, fracture planatary and roughness, and distribution with depth. Fractures in core from either a vertical or a deviated well will yield information on dip, dip azimuth, strike, mineralization, and the orientation of fractures relative to the in situ stresses. Only measurements of fractures in core from a deviated/horizontal well will provide estimates of fracture spacing and porosity. These data can be graphed and cross-plotted to yield semi-quantitative fracture characteristics for reservoir models. Data on the orientations of fractures relative to each other in unoriented core can be nearly as useful as the absolute orientations of fractures. A deviated pilot hole is recommended for fracture assessment prior to a drilling horizontal production well because it significantly enhances the chances of fracture intersection, and therefore of fracture characterization. 35 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. SASI ACTIVITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL NEUTRINO-HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF SUPERNOVA CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanke, Florian; Mueller, Bernhard; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Marek, Andreas; Janka, Hans-Thomas, E-mail: fhanke@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: annop@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: amarek@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The relevance of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) compared to neutrino-driven convection in three-dimensional (3D) supernova-core environments is still highly controversial. Studying a 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor, we demonstrate, for the first time, that violent SASI activity can develop in 3D simulations with detailed neutrino transport despite the presence of convection. This result was obtained with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code with the same sophisticated neutrino treatment so far used only in one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) models. While buoyant plumes initially determine the nonradial mass motions in the postshock layer, bipolar shock sloshing with growing amplitude sets in during a phase of shock retraction and turns into a violent spiral mode whose growth is only quenched when the infall of the Si/SiO interface leads to strong shock expansion in response to a dramatic decrease of the mass accretion rate. In the phase of large-amplitude SASI sloshing and spiral motions, the postshock layer exhibits nonradial deformation dominated by the lowest-order spherical harmonics (l = 1, m = 0, {+-}1) in distinct contrast to the higher multipole structures associated with neutrino-driven convection. We find that the SASI amplitudes, shock asymmetry, and nonradial kinetic energy in three dimensions can exceed those of the corresponding 2D case during extended periods of the evolution. We also perform parameterized 3D simulations of a 25 M{sub Sun} progenitor, using a simplified, gray neutrino transport scheme, an axis-free Yin-Yang grid, and different amplitudes of random seed perturbations. They confirm the importance of the SASI for another progenitor, its independence of the choice of spherical grid, and its preferred growth for fast accretion flows connected to small shock radii and compact proto-neutron stars as previously found in 2D setups.

  2. Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Permana, Sidik; Novitrian,; Waris, Abdul [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Ismail [Center for Technical Assessment of Nuclear Installation and Materials, Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory (Indonesia); Suzuki, Mitsutoshi [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Japan); Saito, Masaki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by conversion ratio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loading scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

  3. Near Real-time Data Analysis of Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations With Bellerophon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lingerfelt, Eric J [ORNL] [ORNL; Messer, Bronson [ORNL] [ORNL; Desai, Sharvari S [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Holt, Chastity A [Appalachian State University] [Appalachian State University; Lentz, Eric J [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of a software system, Bellerophon, built to support a production-level HPC application called CHIMERA, which simulates core-collapse supernova events at the petascale. Developed over the last four years, Bellerophon enables CHIMERA s geographically dispersed team of collaborators to perform data analysis in near real-time. Its n-tier architecture provides an encapsulated, end-to-end software solution that enables the CHIMERA team to quickly and easily access highly customizable animated and static views of results from anywhere in the world via a web-deliverable, cross-platform desktop application. In addition, Bellerophon addresses software engineering tasks for the CHIMERA team by providing an automated mechanism for performing regression testing on a variety of supercomputing platforms. Elements of the team s workflow management needs are met with software tools that dynamically generate code repository statistics, access important online resources, and monitor the current status of several supercomputing resources.

  4. Analysis of core damage frequency due to external events at the DOE (Department of Energy) N-Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambright, J.A.; Bohn, M.P.; Daniel, S.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Baxter, J.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Johnson, J.J.; Ravindra, M.K.; Hashimoto, P.O.; Mraz, M.J.; Tong, W.H.; Conoscente, J.P. (EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Brosseau, D.A. (ERCE, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete external events probabilistic risk assessment has been performed for the N-Reactor power plant, making full use of all insights gained during the past ten years' developments in risk assessment methodologies. A detailed screening analysis was performed which showed that all external events had negligible contribution to core damage frequency except fires, seismic events, and external flooding. A limited scope analysis of the external flooding risk indicated that it is not a major risk contributor. Detailed analyses of the fire and seismic risks resulted in total (mean) core damage frequencies of 1.96E-5 and 4.60E-05 per reactor year, respectively. Detailed uncertainty analyses were performed for both fire and seismic risks. These results show that the core damage frequency profile for these events is comparable to that found for existing commercial power plants if proposed fixes are completed as part of the restart program. 108 refs., 85 figs., 80 tabs.

  5. Measurements and analysis of control rod worths in large heterogeneous LMFBR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, P.J.; Brumbach, S.B.; Carpenter, S.G.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ZPPR-13 program provides basic physics data for heterogeneous LMFBR cores of 700 MW(e) size. A number of internal blanket variations were studied and measurements of control rod worths were made in each configuration. The cores are sensitive to asymmetric perturbations and have strong interaction effects between control rods. Calculations with ENDF/B-IV data are within about 5% of experimental values but show systematic variations in accuracy of prediction with location in the core.

  6. AN ANALYSIS OF THE DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION OF STAR-FORMING CORES IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friesen, R. K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Kirk, H. M. [Origins Institute, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)] [Origins Institute, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Shirley, Y. L., E-mail: friesen@di.utoronto.ca [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a pointed survey of N{sub 2}D{sup +} 2-1 and N{sub 2}D{sup +} 3-2 emission toward 64 N{sub 2}H{sup +}-bright starless and protostellar cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the Arizona Radio Observatory Submillimeter Telescope and Kitt Peak 12 m telescope. We find a mean deuterium fractionation in N{sub 2}H{sup +}, R{sub D} = N(N{sub 2}D{sup +})/N(N{sub 2}H{sup +}), of 0.08, with a maximum R{sub D} = 0.2. In detected sources, we find no significant difference in the deuterium fractionation between starless and protostellar cores, nor between cores in clustered or isolated environments. We compare the deuterium fraction in N{sub 2}H{sup +} with parameters linked to advanced core evolution. We only find significant correlations between the deuterium fraction and increased H{sub 2} column density, as well as with increased central core density, for all cores. Toward protostellar sources, we additionally find a significant anticorrelation between R{sub D} and bolometric temperature. We show that the Perseus cores are characterized by low CO depletion values relative to previous studies of star-forming cores, similar to recent results in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud. We suggest that the low average CO depletion is the dominant mechanism that constrains the average deuterium fractionation in the Perseus cores to small values. While current equilibrium and dynamic chemical models are able to reproduce the range of deuterium fractionation values we find in Perseus, reproducing the scatter across the cores requires variation in parameters such as the ionization fraction or the ortho-to-para-H{sub 2} ratio across the cloud, or a range in core evolution timescales.

  7. WWER Expert System for Fuel Failure Analysis Using Data on Primary Coolant Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Likhanskii, V.V.; Evdokimov, I.A.; Sorokin, A.A.; Khromov, A.G.; Kanukova, V.D.; Apollonova, O.V. [SRC RF TRINITI, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow Reg. (Russian Federation); Ugryumov, A.V. [JSC TVEL, 119017, 24/26 Bolshaya Ordynka st., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The computer expert system for fuel failure analysis of WWER during operation is presented. The diagnostics is based on the measurement of specific activity of reference nuclides in reactor primary coolant and application of a computer code for the data interpretation. The data analysis includes an evaluation of tramp uranium mass in reactor core, detection of failures by iodine and caesium spikes, evaluation of burnup of defective fuel. Evaluation of defective fuel burnup was carried out by applying the relation of caesium nuclides activity in spikes and relations of activities of gaseous fission products for steady state operational conditions. The method of burnup evaluation of defective fuel by use of fission gas activity is presented in detail. The neural-network analysis is performed for determination of failed fuel rod number and defect size. Results of the expert system application are illustrated for several fuel campaigns on operating WWER NPPs. (authors)

  8. Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and Control, Final Report Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work Planning and...

  9. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis of Some Geological Samples of Different Origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duliu, O. G. [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125, Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania); Cristache, C. I. [National Institute of Research and Development for Physics and Nuclear Engineering Horia-Hulubei, P.O. Box MG-6, 077125, Magurele (Ilfov) (Romania); Oaie, G. [National Institute of Research and Development for Geology and Marine Geoecologylogy, 34 Dimitrie Onciul str., 024504 Bucharest (Romania); Ricman, C. [Geological Institute of Romania, 1 Caransebes Street, 012271 Bucharest (Romania); Culicov, O. A.; Frontasyeva, M. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 6, Joliot-Curie str. 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumental Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis was used to investigate the distribution of six major elements and 34 trace elements in a set of eight igneous and metamorphic rocks collected from Carpathian and Macin Mountainsas well as unconsolidated sediments collected from anoxic zone of the Black Sea. All experimental data were interpreted within the Upper Continental Core and Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt model system that allowed getting more information concerning samples origin as well as the environmental peculiarities.

  10. New aspects in the analysis of loss-of-flow transients for homogeneous and heterogeneous LMFBR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tentner, A.M.; Wider, H.U.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of analyses of unprotected loss-of-flow (LOF) transients which have been performed to date using the new SAS4A code system. Accident histories for homogeneous and heterogeneous demo-sized cores (300 MWe) are compared and emphasis is placed on phenomena occurring after the initiation of fuel motion as described by LEVITATE. LEVITATE is the SAS4A model for the analysis of fuel and cladding dynamics under loss-of-flow (LOF) conditions and is believed to be the most-sophisticated computational tool currently available for fuel-motion analysis. The results of this analysis indicate that the initiation phase of an unprotected loss-of-flow accident has a considerably lower energetics potential in a heterogeneous core than in a homogeneous core. The difference is larger than previously indicated by SAS3D. Better phenomenological models implemented in SAS4A provide increased confidence in this aspect of safety evaluation of LMFBR cores.

  11. Analysis Activities at Fossil Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on NETL’s analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004.

  12. Radio Sources in Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei. I. VLA Detections of Compact, Flat-Spectrum Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil M. Nagar; Heino Falcke; Andrew S. Wilson; Luis C. Ho

    2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a 0.2" resolution, 15 GHz survey of a sample of 48 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei with the Very Large Array. Compact radio emission has been detected in 57% (17 of 30) of LINERs and low-luminosity Seyferts, at least 15 of which have a flat to inverted radio spectrum (alpha > -0.3). The compact radio cores are found in both type 1 (i.e. with broad Halpha) and type 2 (without broad Halpha) nuclei. The 2 cm radio power is significantly correlated with the emission-line ([OI] lambda6300) luminosity. While the present observations are consistent with the radio emission originating in star-forming regions, higher resolution radio observations of 10 of the detected sources, reported in a companion paper (Falcke et al. 2000), show that the cores are very compact (= 10^8K) and probably synchrotron self-absorbed, ruling out a starburst origin. Thus, our results suggest that at least 50% of low-luminosity Seyferts and LINERs in the sample are accretion powered, with the radio emission presumably coming from jets or advection-dominated accretion flows. We have detected only 1 of 18 `transition' (i.e. LINER + HII) nuclei observed, indicating their radio cores are significantly weaker than those of `pure' LINERs.

  13. Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Madagascar): diagenesis appraisal and consequences for palaeoenvironmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake and petrographical work [2], we applied such an approach to the analysis of a peat core section to get additional (saturated and unsaturated n-FAs, plus i-C16) at the surface of the peat sequence and low amounts

  14. Analysis of fuel options for the breakeven core configuration of the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauff, N.E.; Klim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Fiorina, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Franceschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC., Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A trade-off study is performed to determine the impacts of various fuel forms on the core design and core physics characteristics of the sodium-cooled Toshiba- Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR). The fuel forms include oxide, nitride, and metallic forms of U and Th. The ARR core configuration is redesigned with driver and blanket regions in order to achieve breakeven fissile breeding performance with the various fuel types. State-of-the-art core physics tools are used for the analyses. In addition, a quasi-static reactivity balance approach is used for a preliminary comparison of the inherent safety performances of the various fuel options. Thorium-fueled cores exhibit lower breeding ratios and require larger blankets compared to the U-fueled cores, which is detrimental to core compactness and increases reprocessing and manufacturing requirements. The Th cores also exhibit higher reactivity swings through each cycle, which penalizes reactivity control and increases the number of control rods required. On the other hand, using Th leads to drastic reductions in void and coolant expansion coefficients of reactivity, with the potential for enhancing inherent core safety. Among the U-fueled ARR cores, metallic and nitride fuels result in higher breeding ratios due to their higher heavy metal densities. On the other hand, oxide fuels provide a softer spectrum, which increases the Doppler effect and reduces the positive sodium void worth. A lower fuel temperature is obtained with the metallic and nitride fuels due to their higher thermal conductivities and compatibility with sodium bonds. This is especially beneficial from an inherent safety point of view since it facilitates the reactor cool-down during loss of power removal transients. The advantages in terms of inherent safety of nitride and metallic fuels are maintained when using Th fuel. However, there is a lower relative increase in heavy metal density and in breeding ratio going from oxide to metallic or nitride Th fuels relative to the U counterpart fuels. (authors)

  15. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

  16. Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals, 6-Year Exposure Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subsurface radioactive disposal site located at the Idaho National Laboratory contains neutronactivated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term underground corrosion test is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in the surrounding arid vadose zone environment. The test uses nonradioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated materials buried at the disposal location, namely, Type 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403), Type 316L stainless steel (S31603), nickel-chromium alloy (UNS NO7718), beryllium, aluminum 6061-T6 (A96061), and a zirconium alloy (UNS R60804). In addition, carbon steel (the material presently used in the cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and a duplex stainless steel (UNS S32550) are also included in the test. This paper briefly describes the ongoing test and presents the results of corrosion analysis from coupons exposed underground for 1, 3, and 6 years.

  17. Evaluation of Counter-Based Dynamic Load Balancing Schemes for Massive Contingency Analysis on Over 10,000 Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yousu; Huang, Zhenyu; Rice, Mark J.

    2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Contingency analysis studies are necessary to assess the impact of possible power system component failures. The results of the contingency analysis are used to ensure the grid reliability, and in power market operation for the feasibility test of market solutions. Currently, these studies are performed in real time based on the current operating conditions of the grid with a set of pre-selected contingency list, which might result in overlooking some critical contingencies caused by variable system status. To have a complete picture of a power grid, more contingencies need to be studied to improve grid reliability. High-performance computing techniques hold the promise of being able to perform the analysis for more contingency cases within a much shorter time frame. This paper evaluates the performance of counter-based dynamic load balancing schemes for a massive contingency analysis program on 10,000+ cores. One million N-2 contingency analysis cases with a Western Electricity Coordinating Council power grid model have been used to demonstrate the performance. The speedup of 3964 with 4096 cores and 7877 with 10240 cores are obtained. This paper reports the performance of the load balancing scheme with a single counter and two counters, describes disk I/O issues, and discusses other potential techniques for further improving the performance.

  18. Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report Number 1 Page 1 of 26 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Distribution authorized to all. Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report at the University of Southern California #12;Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report Number 1

  19. Developing Fully Coupled Dynamical Reactor Core Isolation System Models in RELAP-7 for Extended Station Black-Out Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup water to the reactor vessel for core cooling when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. It was one of the very few safety systems still available during the Fukushima Daiichi accidents after the tsunamis hit the plants and the system successfully delayed the core meltdown for a few days for unit 2 & 3. Therefore, detailed models for RCIC system components are indispensable to understand extended station black-out accidents (SBO) for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the new generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, major components to simulate the RCIC system have been developed. This paper describes the models for those components such as turbine, pump, and wet well. Selected individual component test simulations and a simplified SBO simulation up to but before core damage is presented. The successful implementation of the simplified RCIC and wet well models paves the way to further improve the models for safety analysis by including more detailed physical processes in the near future.

  20. Validation of a model for faster than real time LMFBR core transient analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly describes experimental validation of a computer model used to analyze LMFBR type core transients. This model is used to predict coolant, cladding, and fuel temperature distributions during transient overpower accidents. (JDH)

  1. Development of optimized core design and analysis methods for high power density BWRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirvan, Koroush

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy is vital to its future. Improving the economics of BWRs is the main goal of this work, focusing on designing cores with higher power density, to reduce the BWR ...

  2. Intrinsic reactivity feedback characteristics for safety analysis of heterogeneous and homogeneous LMFBR core designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doncals, R.A.; Lake, J.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a comparison of the intrinsic reactivity feedback characteristics of homogeneous and heterogeneous LMFBR designs. The comparisons are shown for a 1000 MWth LMFBR core design. However, the applicability of the conclusions drawn from these comparisons are generic to larger LMFBRs. Consistent sodium void worth distributions have been calculated for heterogeneous and homogeneous 1000 MWth LMFBR core designs. The basic calculations were performed with three dimensional models using ENDF/B-III cross section data and first order perturbation theory.

  3. EVALUATION OF CORE PHYSICS ANALYSIS METHODS FOR CONVERSION OF THE INL ADVANCED TEST REACTOR TO LOW-ENRICHMENT FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark DeHart; Gray S. Chang

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR.

  4. Evaluation of core physics analysis methods for conversion of the INL advanced test reactor to low-enrichment fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, M. D.; Chang, G. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Street, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3870 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR. (authors)

  5. Time-resolved characterization and energy balance analysis of implosion core in shock-ignition experiments at OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florido, R., E-mail: ricardo.florido@ulpgc.es; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved temperature and density conditions in the core of shock-ignition implosions have been determined for the first time. The diagnostic method relies on the observation, with a streaked crystal spectrometer, of the signature of an Ar tracer added to the deuterium gas fill. The data analysis confirms the importance of the shell attenuation effect previously noted on time-integrated spectroscopic measurements of thick-wall targets [R. Florido et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 066408 (2011)]. This effect must be taken into account in order to obtain reliable results. The extracted temperature and density time-histories are representative of the state of the core during the implosion deceleration and burning phases. As a consequence of the ignitor shock launched by the sharp intensity spike at the end of the laser pulse, observed average core electron temperature and mass density reach T???1100?eV and ????2?g/cm{sup 3}; then temperature drops to T???920?eV while density rises to ????3.4?g/cm{sup 3} about the time of peak compression. Compared to 1D hydrodynamic simulations, the experiment shows similar maximum temperatures and smaller densities. Simulations do not reproduce all observations. Differences are noted in the heating dynamics driven by the ignitor shock and the optical depth time-history of the compressed shell. Time-histories of core conditions extracted from spectroscopy show that the implosion can be interpreted as a two-stage polytropic process. Furthermore, an energy balance analysis of implosion core suggests an increase in total energy greater than what 1D hydrodynamic simulations predict. This new methodology can be implemented in other ICF experiments to look into implosion dynamics and help to understand the underlying physics.

  6. Advanced BWR core component designs and the implications for SFD analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, L.J.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to the DF-4 boiling water reactor (BWR) severe fuel damage (SFD) experiment conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories in 1986, no experimental data base existed for guidance in modeling core component behavior under postulated severe accident conditions in commercial BWRs. This paper will present the lessons learned from the DF-4 experiment (and subsequent German CORA BWR SFD tests) and the impact on core models in the current generation of SFD codes. The DF-4 and CORA BWR test assemblies were modeled on the core component designs circa 1985; that is, the 8 x 8 fuel assembly with two water rods and a cruciform control blade constructed of B{sub 4}C-filled tubelets. Within the past ten years, the state-of-the-art with respect to BWR core component development has out-distanced the current SFD experimental data base and SFD code capabilities. For example, modern BWR control blade design includes hafnium at the tips and top of each control blade wing for longer blade operating lifetimes; also water rods have been replaced by larger water channels for better neutronics economy; and fuel assemblies now contain partial-length fuel rods, again for better neutronics economy. This paper will also discuss the implications of these advanced fuel assembly and core component designs on severe accident progression and on the current SFD code capabilities.

  7. Stress analysis of jacks, frame and bearing connections, and drill rod for core sampler truck No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziada, H.H.

    1995-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis evaluates the structural design adequacy of several components and connections for the rotary mode core sampler truck (RMCST) No. 2. This analysis was requested by the Characterization Equipment Group (WHC 1994a). The components addressed in this report are listed below: front jack assembly and connection to the truck chassis; rear jack assembly and connection to the truck chassis; center outrigger jacks and connection to the truck chassis; lower frame assembly and connection to the truck chassis; bolt connections for bearing plate assembly (for path of maximum load); traverse slide brackets and mounting of the traverse jack cylinders; and drill rod (failure loads).

  8. Evaluation of storing Shippingport Core II spent blanket fuel assemblies in the T Plant PWR Core II fuel pool without active cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, E.R.; Lanning, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dana, C.M.; Hedengren, D.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PWR Core II fuel pool chiller-off test was conducted because it appeared possible that acceptable pool-water temperatures could be maintained without operating the chillers, thus saving hundreds of thousands of dollars in maintenance and replacement costs. Test results showed that the water-cooling capability is no longer needed to maintain pool temperature below 38{degrees}C (100{degrees}F).

  9. DIAGNOSING THE TIME-DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. I. LOW-FREQUENCY NANOFLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, S. J.; Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational measurements of active region emission measures contain clues to the time dependence of the underlying heating mechanism. A strongly nonlinear scaling of the emission measure with temperature indicates a large amount of hot plasma relative to warm plasma. A weakly nonlinear (or linear) scaling of the emission measure indicates a relatively large amount of warm plasma, suggesting that the hot active region plasma is allowed to cool and so the heating is impulsive with a long repeat time. This case is called low-frequency nanoflare heating, and we investigate its feasibility as an active region heating scenario here. We explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. For each model run, we calculate the slope {alpha} of the emission measure distribution EM(T){proportional_to}T {sup {alpha}}. Our conclusions are: (1) low-frequency nanoflare heating is consistent with about 36% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are not accounted for; (2) proper consideration of uncertainties yields a range in which as many as 77% of observed active regions are consistent with low-frequency nanoflare heating and as few as zero; (3) low-frequency nanoflare heating cannot explain observed slopes greater than 3; (4) the upper limit to the volumetric energy release is in the region of 50 erg cm{sup -3} to avoid unphysical magnetic field strengths; (5) the heating timescale may be short for loops of total length less than 40 Mm to be consistent with the observed range of slopes; (6) predicted slopes are consistently steeper for longer loops.

  10. An investigation of the correlation of core analysis data with original core saturations in the Kelly-Snyder Field, Scurry County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Meter, Orville Everett, Jr

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    " . . . . . . . ? . *. . . . ~ . . ~ 1$ III, Summary of Mud Propertiee ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i ~ t ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ t ~ ~ Io 16 XV. Sample Permeability Caloulationsi ~ . . . ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i ~ ~ i ~ 26 V. Basic Data on Canyon Reef Cores'. ~ . ". i ~ . ~ . i. . i. . 27 VI & Summary of Oi 1... kpparatus?~~ Capillary Pressure Curves on Carxyon Reef Cores Nos 1 end No ~ 2 ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t o 1 e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 11 4 ~ 17 i ~ 1$ ~ ~ 22 5. 10+ Sohematio Drawing of Cell Connected for Permeability Neasurementsoo...

  11. ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, M E

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

  12. Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density… (more)

  13. ANALYSIS OF GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES AND DRUG ACTIVITY PATTERNS BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are more related to the kind of cancer than to drug activity patterns. Dependency analysis using Bayesian1 11 ANALYSIS OF GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES AND DRUG ACTIVITY PATTERNS BY CLUSTERING AND BAYESIAN of data produced from up- to-date biological experimental processes needs appropriate data mining

  14. CHARACTERISTICS AND EVOLUTION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD AND CHROMOSPHERIC EMISSION IN AN ACTIVE REGION CORE OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R., E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [Department of Physics, Alabama A and M, 4900 Meridian Street, Normal, AL 35762 (United States)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the characteristics and evolution of the magnetic field and chromospheric emission in an active region core observed by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the moss is unipolar, the spatial distribution of magnetic flux evolves slowly, and that the magnetic field is only moderately inclined. We also show that the field-line inclination and horizontal component are coherent, and that the magnetic field is mostly sheared in the inter-moss regions where the highest magnetic flux variability is seen. Using extrapolations from spectropolarimeter magnetograms, we show that the magnetic connectivity in the moss is different from that in the quiet Sun because most of the magnetic field extends to significant coronal heights. The magnetic flux, field vector, and chromospheric emission in the moss also appear highly dynamic but actually show only small-scale variations in magnitude on timescales longer than the cooling times for hydrodynamic loops computed from our extrapolations, suggesting high-frequency (continuous) heating events. Some evidence is found for flux (Ca II intensity) changes on the order of 100-200 G (DN) on timescales of 20-30 minutes that could be taken as indicative of low-frequency heating. We find, however, that only a small fraction (10%) of our simulated loops would be expected to cool on these timescales, and we do not find clear evidence that the flux changes consistently produce intensity changes in the chromosphere. Using observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), we also determine that the filling factor in the moss is {approx}16%, consistent with previous studies and larger than the size of an SOT pixel. The magnetic flux and chromospheric intensity in most individual SOT pixels in the moss vary by less than {approx}20% and {approx}10%, respectively, on loop cooling timescales. In view of the high energy requirements of the chromosphere, we suggest that these variations could be sufficient for the heating of 'warm' EUV loops, but that the high basal levels may be more important for powering the hot core loops rooted in the moss. The magnetic field and chromospheric emission appear to evolve gradually on spatial scales comparable to the cross-field scale of the fundamental coronal structures inferred from EIS measurements.

  15. Benchmark analysis of high temperature engineering test reactor core using McCARD code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Jo, Chang Keun; Lee, Hyun Chul; Noh, Jae Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A benchmark calculation has been performed for a startup core physics test of Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The calculation is carried out by the McCARD code, which adopts the Monte Carlo method. The cross section library is ENDF-B/VII.0. The fuel cell is modeled by the reactivity-equivalent physical transform (RPT) method. Effective multiplication factors with different numbers of fuel columns have been analyzed. The calculation shows that the HTTR becomes critical with 19 fuel columns with an excess reactivity of 0.84% ?k/k. The discrepancies between the measurements and Monte Carlo calculations are 2.2 and 1.4 % ?k/k for 24 and 30 columns, respectively. The reasons for the discrepancy are thought to be the current version of cross section library and the impurity in the graphite which is represented by the boron concentration. In the future, the depletion results will be proposed for further benchmark calculations. (authors)

  16. Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jean Ragusa; Karen Vierow

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

  17. SIMMER-II: A computer program for LMFBR disrupted core analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohl, W.R.; Luck, L.B.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMMER-2 (Version 12) is a computer program to predict the coupled neutronic and fluid-dynamics behavior of liquid-metal fast reactors during core-disruptive accident transients. The modeling philosophy is based on the use of general, but approximate, physics to represent interactions of accident phenomena and regimes rather than a detailed representation of specialized situations. Reactor neutronic behavior is predicted by solving space (r,z), energy, and time-dependent neutron conservation equations (discrete ordinates transport or diffusion). The neutronics and the fluid dynamics are coupled via temperature- and background-dependent cross sections and the reactor power distribution. The fluid-dynamics calculation solves multicomponent, multiphase, multifield equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation in (r,z) or (x,y) geometry. A structure field with nine density and five energy components; a liquid field with eight density and six energy components; and a vapor field with six density and on energy component are coupled by exchange functions representing a modified-dispersed flow regime with a zero-dimensional intra-cell structure model.

  18. Analysis of the Activation and Heterolytic Dissociation of H2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dissociation of H2 by Frustrated Lewis Pairs: NH3BX3 (X H, F, and Cl) . Analysis of the Activation and Heterolytic Dissociation of H2 by Frustrated Lewis Pairs: NH3...

  19. activation analysis naa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  20. activation analysis caracterizacao: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  1. analysis activation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  2. activation analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  3. activation analysis pgaa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  4. activation analysis avaliacao: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  5. activation analysis metod: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  6. activation analysis analise: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  7. activation analysis wth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  8. activation analysis enaa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  9. activation analysis determinacao: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treated cocoa, and untreatec, cocoa) and a total analyze'1 by activation sr'tn thermal reactor neutrons gamma ? ray spec . rometry . The ana' ysis o-. cccc- in... Analysis...

  10. Application of thermal analysis techniques in activated carbon production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnals, G.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Brady, T.A. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several current research programs at the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) relate to the development of activated carbons from Illinois coal, fly ash, and scrap tires. Preparation of activated carbons involves thermal processing steps that include preoxidation, pyrolysis and activation. Reaction time, temperature and gas composition during these processing steps ultimately determine the nature of the activated carbon produced. Thermal analysis plays a significant role in developing carbons by providing fundamental and engineering data that are useful in carbon production and characterization for process development.

  11. Prognostic Importance of Gleason 7 Disease Among Patients Treated With External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Detailed Biopsy Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spratt, Daniel E.; Zumsteg, Zach; Ghadjar, Pirus; Pangasa, Misha; Pei, Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Fine, Samson W. [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of primary Gleason (pG) grade among a large cohort of Gleason 7 prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From May 1989 to January 2011, 1190 Gleason 7 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT at a single institution. Of these patients, 613 had a Gleason 7 with a minimum of a sextant biopsy with nonfragmented cores and full biopsy core details available, including number of cores of cancer involved, percentage individual core involvement, location of disease, bilaterality, and presence of perineural invasion. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 1-16 years). The prognostic implication for the following outcomes was analyzed: biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). Results: The 8-year bRFS rate for pG3 versus pG4 was 77.6% versus 61.3% (P<.0001), DMFS was 96.8% versus 84.3% (P<.0001), and PCSM was 3.7% versus 8.1% (P=.002). On multivariate analysis, pG4 predicted for significantly worse outcome in all parameters. Location of disease (apex, base, mid-gland), perineural involvement, maximum individual core involvement, and the number of Gleason 3+3, 3+4, or 4+3 cores did not predict for distant metastases. Conclusions: Primary Gleason grade 4 independently predicts for worse bRFS, DMFS, and PCSM among Gleason 7 patients. Using complete core information can allow clinicians to utilize pG grade as a prognostic factor, despite not having the full pathologic details from a prostatectomy specimen. Future staging and risk grouping should investigate the incorporation of primary Gleason grade when complete biopsy core information is used.

  12. Behavior of an heterogeneous annular FBR core during an unprotected loss of flow accident: Analysis of the primary phase with SAS-SFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massara, S.; Schmitt, D.; Bretault, A.; Lemasson, D.; Darmet, G.; Verwaerde, D. [EDF R and D, 1, Avenue du General de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France); Struwe, D.; Pfrang, W.; Ponomarev, A. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie KIT, Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Gebaude 521, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of a substantial improvement on FBR core safety connected to the development of a new Gen IV reactor type, heterogeneous core with innovative features are being carefully analyzed in France since 2009. At EDF R and D, the main goal is to understand whether a strong reduction of the Na-void worth - possibly attempting a negative value - allows a significant improvement of the core behavior during an unprotected loss of flow accident. Also, the physical behavior of such a core is of interest, before and beyond the (possible) onset of Na boiling. Hence, a cutting-edge heterogeneous design, featuring an annular shape, a Na-plena with a B{sub 4}C plate and a stepwise modulation of fissile core heights, was developed at EDF by means of the SDDS methodology, with a total Na-void worth of -1 $. The behavior of such a core during the primary phase of a severe accident, initiated by an unprotected loss of flow, is analyzed by means of the SAS-SFR code. This study is carried-out at KIT and EDF, in the framework of a scientific collaboration on innovative FBR severe accident analyses. The results show that the reduction of the Na-void worth is very effective, but is not sufficient alone to avoid Na-boiling and, hence, to prevent the core from entering into the primary phase of a severe accident. Nevertheless, the grace time up to boiling onset is greatly enhanced in comparison to a more traditional homogeneous core design, and only an extremely low fraction of the fuel (<0.1%) enters into melting at the end of this phase. A sensitivity analysis shows that, due to the inherent neutronic characteristics of such a core, the gagging scheme plays a major role on the core behavior: indeed, an improved 4-zones gagging scheme, associated with an enhanced control rod drive line expansion feed-back effect, finally prevents the core from entering into sodium boiling. This major conclusion highlights both the progress already accomplished and the need for more detailed future analyses, particularly concerning: the neutronic burn-up scheme, the modeling of the diagrid effect and the control rod drive line expansion feed-backs, as well as the primary/secondary systems thermal-hydraulics behavior. (authors)

  13. INDUSTRIAL/MILITARY ACTIVITY-INITIATED ACCIDENT SCREENING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.A. Kalinich

    1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts due to nearby installations and operations were determined in the Preliminary MGDS Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1996) to be potentially applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of the potential activities ongoing on or off the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is intended that the Industrial/Military Activity-Initiated Accident Screening Analysis provided herein will meet the requirements of the ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987) in establishing whether this external event can be screened from further consideration or must be included as a design basis event (DBE) in the development of accident scenarios for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis only considers issues related to preclosure radiological safety. Issues important to waste isolation as related to impact from nearby installations will be covered in the MGR performance assessment.

  14. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Thermal metastabilities in the solar core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attila Grandpierre; Gabor Agoston

    2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear stability analysis indicates that solar core is thermally stable for infinitesimal internal perturbations. For the first time, thermal metastabilities are found in the solar core when outer perturbations with significant amplitude are present. The obtained results show that hot bubbles generated by outer perturbations may travel a significant distance in the body of the Sun. These deep-origin hot bubbles have mass, energy, and chemical composition that may be related to solar flares. The results obtained may have remarkable relations to activity cycles in planets like Jupiter and also in extrasolar planetary systems.

  16. Formation and Collapse of Nonaxisymmetric Protostellar Cores in Planar Magnetic Interstellar Clouds: Formulation of the Problem and Linear Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn E. Ciolek; Shantanu Basu

    2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate the problem of the formation and collapse of nonaxisymmetric protostellar cores in weakly ionized, self-gravitating, magnetic molecular clouds. In our formulation, molecular clouds are approximated as isothermal, thin (but with finite thickness) sheets. We present the governing dynamical equations for the multifluid system of neutral gas and ions, including ambipolar diffusion, and also a self-consistent treatment of thermal pressure, gravitational, and magnetic (pressure and tension) forces. The dimensionless free parameters characterizing model clouds are discussed. The response of cloud models to linear perturbations is also examined, with particular emphasis on length and time scales for the growth of gravitational instability in magnetically subcritical and supercritical clouds. We investigate their dependence on a cloud's initial mass-to-magnetic-flux ratio (normalized to the critical value for collapse), the dimensionless initial neutral-ion collision time, and also the relative external pressure exerted on a model cloud. Among our results, we find that nearly-critical model clouds have significantly larger characteristic instability lengthscales than do more distinctly sub- or supercritical models. Another result is that the effect of a greater external pressure is to reduce the critical lengthscale for instability. Numerical simulations showing the evolution of model clouds during the linear regime of evolution are also presented, and compared to the results of the dispersion analysis. They are found to be in agreement with the dispersion results, and confirm the dependence of the characteristic length and time scales on parameters such as the initial mass-to-flux ratio and relative external pressure.

  17. Forces in bolted joints: analysis methods and test results utilized for nuclear core applications (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crescimanno, P.J.; Keller, K.L.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical methods and test data employed in the core design of bolted joints for the LWBR core are presented. The effects of external working loads, thermal expansion, and material stress relaxation are considered in the formulation developed to analyze joint performance. Extensions of these methods are also provided for bolted joints having both axial and bending flexibilities, and for the effect of plastic deformation on internal forces developed in a bolted joint. Design applications are illustrated by examples.

  18. Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1989 - 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The purpose of this study was to analyze deep core...

  19. Petrography Analysis At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Quane...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Petrography Analysis Activity Date 1989 - 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The purpose of this study was to analyze deep core...

  20. Viscoelastic Analysis of Sandwich Beams Having Aluminum and Fiber-reinforced Polymer Skins with a Polystyrene Foam Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts-Tompkins, Altramese L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandwich beams are composite systems having high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios and are used as light weight load bearing components. The use of thin, strong skin sheets adhered to thicker, lightweight core materials has allowed...

  1. Intrinsic Shapes of Molecular Cloud Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Jones; Shantanu Basu; John Dubinski

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We conduct an analysis of the shapes of molecular cloud cores using recently compiled catalogs of observed axis ratios of individual cores mapped in ammonia or through optical selection. We apply both analytical and statistical techniques to deproject the observed axis ratios in order to determine the true distribution of cloud core shapes. We find that neither pure oblate nor pure prolate cores can account for the observed distribution of core shapes. Intrinsically triaxial cores produce distributions which agree with observations. The best-fit triaxial distribution contains cores which are more nearly oblate than prolate.

  2. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  3. Please cite this article in press as: Shuffler, C., et al., Thermal hydraulic analysis for grid supported pressurized water reactor cores. Nucl. Eng. Des. (2009), doi:10.1016/j.nucengdes.2008.12.028

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malen, Jonathan A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Please cite this article in press as: Shuffler, C., et al., Thermal hydraulic analysis for grid.elsevier.com/locate/nucengdes Thermal hydraulic analysis for grid supported pressurized water reactor cores C. Shuffler , J. Trant, J online xxx a b s t r a c t This paper presents the methodology and results for thermal hydraulic analysis

  4. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high TRU content and high burn-up).

  5. Core - Corona Model analysis of the Low Energy Beam Scan at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) in Brookhaven (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gemard; J. Aichelin

    2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The centrality dependence of spectra of identified particles in collisions between ultrarelativistic heavy ions with a center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) of 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ is analyzed in the core - corona model. We show that at these energies the spectra can be well understood assuming that they are composed of two components whose relative fraction depends on the centrality of the interaction: The core component which describes an equilibrated quark gluon plasma and the corona component which is caused by nucleons close to the surface of the interaction zone which scatter only once and which is identical to that observed in proton-proton collisions. The success of this approach at 39 and 11.5 $AGeV$ shows that the physics does not change between this energy and $\\sqrt{s}=200~ AGeV$ for which this model has been developed (Aichelin 2008). This presents circumstantial evidence that a quark gluon plasma is also created at center of mass energies as low as 11.5 $AGeV$.

  6. Measurement and analysis of neutron flux distribution of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter. Contract research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murazaki, M; Uno, Y

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured neutron flux distribution around the core tank of STACY heterogeneous core by position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) to develop the method to measure reactivity for subcritical systems. The neutron flux distribution data in the position accuracy of +-13 mm have been obtained in the range of uranium concentration of 50g/L to 210g/L both in critical and in subcritical state. The prompt neutron decay constant, alpha, was evaluated from the measurement data of pulsed neutron source experiments. We also calculated distribution of neutron flux and sup 3 He reaction rates at the location of PSPC by using continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP. The measurement data was compared with the calculation results. As results of comparison, calculated values agreed generally with measurement data of PSPC with Cd cover in the region above half of solution height, but the difference between calculated value and measurement data was large in the region below half of solution height. On the other hand, ...

  7. Tank Vapor Sampling and Analysis Data Package for Tank 241-Z-361 Sampled 09/22/1999 and 09/271999 During Sludge Core Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VISWANATH, R.S.

    1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the September 22 and 27, 1999, headspace vapor sampling of Hanford Site Tank 241-2-361 during sludge core removal. The Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) sampling team collected the samples and Waste Management Laboratory (WML) analyzed the samples in accordance with the requirements specified in the 241-2361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan, (SAP), HNF-4371, Rev. 1, (Babcock and Wilcox Hanford Corporation, 1999). Six SUMMA{trademark} canister samples were collected on each day (1 ambient field blank and 5 tank vapor samples collected when each core segment was removed). The samples were radiologically released on September 28 and October 4, 1999, and received at the laboratory on September 29 and October 6, 1999. Target analytes were not detected at concentrations greater than their notification limits as specified in the SAP. Analytical results for the target analytes and tentatively identified compounds (TICs) are presented in Section 2.2.2 starting on page 2B-7. Three compounds identified for analysis in the SAP were analyzed as TICs. The discussion of this modification is presented in Section 2.2.1.2.

  8. Analysis by neutron activation analysis a some ancient ceramics from Romanian territories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agata Olariu

    1999-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have analyzed samples of Neolithic ceramics from Cucuteni-Scanteia - Vaslui county and Neolithic and Dacian ceramics from Magurele - Bucharest, by the method of neutron activation analysis. The following elements have been observed: Fe, K, La, Mn, Na, Sc and Sm. It has been noticed a relative and a slight clusterization of the analyzed items on the ratios of concentrations Na/Mn, La/Sc and La/Sm.

  9. Core Specialization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCoolWhyCopyTheCore

  10. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  11. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIACs staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. As analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  12. Results of transient /accident analysis for the HEU, first mixed HEU-LEU and for the first full LEU cores of the WWR-SM reactor at INP AS RUZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baytelesov, S.A.; Dosimbaev, A.A.; Kungurov, F.R.; Salikhbaev, U.S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ulugbek, 100214 Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The WWR-SM reactor in Uzbekistan is preparing for the conversion from HEU (36%) fuel to LEU (19.8%) fuel. During this conversion, the HEU fuel assemblies (IRT-3M FA) being discharged at the end of each cycle will be replaced by LEU fuel assemblies (IRT-4M FA); this gradual conversion requires 9 cycles. The safety analysis report for this conversion process has been prepared. This paper presents selected results for postulated transient/accidents during this conversion process; results for transient analysis for the HEU core, the 1st mixed (HEU-LEU) core, and for the first full LEU core are presented for the following initiators: control rod motion (2 cases), loss of power, and FA blockage. These results show that safety is maintained for all transients analyzed and that the behavior of all the analyzed cores is essentially the same. (author)

  13. Direct chemical analysis of frozen ice cores by UV-laser ablation ICPMS Wolfgang Muller,*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    mm long ice (b, c); its `tongue-like' extension through the cell door has a Peltier element clamped DOI: 10.1039/c1ja10242g Cryo-cell UV-LA-ICPMS is a new technique for direct chemical analysis analysis at cell UV-LA-ICPMS setup used

  14. Comparative Analysis of the 15.5kD Box C/D snoRNP Core Protein in the Primitive Eukaryote Giardia lamblia Reveals Unique Structural and Functional Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Shyamasri; Buhrman, Greg; Gagnon, Keith; Mattos, Carla; Brown, II, Bernard A.; Maxwell, E. Stuart (NCSU); (UTSMC)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Box C/D ribonucleoproteins (RNP) guide the 2'-O-methylation of targeted nucleotides in archaeal and eukaryotic rRNAs. The archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD box C/D RNP core protein homologues initiate RNP assembly by recognizing kink-turn (K-turn) motifs. The crystal structure of the 15.5kD core protein from the primitive eukaryote Giardia lamblia is described here to a resolution of 1.8 {angstrom}. The Giardia 15.5kD protein exhibits the typical {alpha}-{beta}-{alpha} sandwich fold exhibited by both archaeal L7Ae and eukaryotic 15.5kD proteins. Characteristic of eukaryotic homologues, the Giardia 15.5kD protein binds the K-turn motif but not the variant K-loop motif. The highly conserved residues of loop 9, critical for RNA binding, also exhibit conformations similar to those of the human 15.5kD protein when bound to the K-turn motif. However, comparative sequence analysis indicated a distinct evolutionary position between Archaea and Eukarya. Indeed, assessment of the Giardia 15.5kD protein in denaturing experiments demonstrated an intermediate stability in protein structure when compared with that of the eukaryotic mouse 15.5kD and archaeal Methanocaldococcus jannaschii L7Ae proteins. Most notable was the ability of the Giardia 15.5kD protein to assemble in vitro a catalytically active chimeric box C/D RNP utilizing the archaeal M. jannaschii Nop56/58 and fibrillarin core proteins. In contrast, a catalytically competent chimeric RNP could not be assembled using the mouse 15.5kD protein. Collectively, these analyses suggest that the G. lamblia 15.5kD protein occupies a unique position in the evolution of this box C/D RNP core protein retaining structural and functional features characteristic of both archaeal L7Ae and higher eukaryotic 15.5kD homologues.

  15. RELIABILITY ANALYSIS IN A FAULT TOLERANT CONTROL STRATEGY DEDICATED TO ACTIVE POWER FILTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RELIABILITY ANALYSIS IN A FAULT TOLERANT CONTROL STRATEGY DEDICATED TO ACTIVE POWER FILTER P. WEBER on reliability analysis dedicated to an active power filter. Once a fault has been detected and isolated, all reliability indicate the optimal structure. Keywords: Fault Tolerant Control, System Reliability, Active power

  16. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David S. (New York, NY); Myers, Gregory J. (Cornwall, NY)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  17. TITAN : an advanced three dimensional coupled neutronicthermal-hydraulics code for light water nuclear reactor core analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griggs, D. P.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate analysis of nuclear reactor transients frequently requires that neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and feedback be included. A number of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics codes have been developed for this ...

  18. activation analysis technique: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Remote...

  19. activation analysis techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Remote...

  20. The investigation of spices by use of instrumental neutron activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Jatara Rob

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    contaminants. For this research, instrumental neutron-activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine the activities of U-235 fission products in common spices. Using this information, the concentrations of natural uranium in these spices and the doses...

  1. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at ORNL. Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between dmaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur beause of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A parametric study was done for several uncertain variables. The study included investigating effects of plate contact area, convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity on fuel swelling, and initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects of damage propagation. Results provide useful insights into how variouss uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - activity based analysis Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences 4 Reasoning about Repairability of Workflows at Design Time Summary: activities can be provided by the workflow designer based on the analysis of different aspects...

  3. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Flow and Crossflow in the Prismatic Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Nuclear Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Huhu 1985-

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    if the large portion of the coolant flows into bypass gaps instead of coolant channels in which the cooling efficiency is much higher. A preliminary three dimensional steady-state CFD analysis was performed with commercial code STARCCM+ 6.04 to investigate...

  4. Development code for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input on the MCNPX for neutronic calculation in PWR core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartini, Entin, E-mail: entin@batan.go.id; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan, E-mail: entin@batan.go.id [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics - National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was carried out on the development of code for uncertainty analysis is based on a statistical approach for assessing the uncertainty input parameters. In the butn-up calculation of fuel, uncertainty analysis performed for input parameters fuel density, coolant density and fuel temperature. This calculation is performed during irradiation using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport. The Uncertainty method based on the probabilities density function. Development code is made in python script to do coupling with MCNPX for criticality and burn-up calculations. Simulation is done by modeling the geometry of PWR terrace, with MCNPX on the power 54 MW with fuel type UO2 pellets. The calculation is done by using the data library continuous energy cross-sections ENDF / B-VI. MCNPX requires nuclear data in ACE format. Development of interfaces for obtaining nuclear data in the form of ACE format of ENDF through special process NJOY calculation to temperature changes in a certain range.

  5. Scaling Turbo Boost to a 1000 cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S, Ananth Narayan; Fedorova, Alexandra

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intel Core i7 processor code named Nehalem provides a feature named Turbo Boost which opportunistically varies the frequencies of the processor's cores. The frequency of a core is determined by core temperature, the number of active cores, the estimated power consumption, the estimated current consumption, and operating system frequency scaling requests. For a chip multi-processor(CMP) that has a small number of physical cores and a small set of performance states, deciding the Turbo Boost frequency to use on a given core might not be difficult. However, we do not know the complexity of this decision making process in the context of a large number of cores, scaling to the 100s, as predicted by researchers in the field.

  6. HINODE/EIS SPECTROSCOPIC VALIDATION OF VERY HOT PLASMA IMAGED WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY IN NON-FLARING ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Reale, Fabio, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use coronal imaging observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) spectral data to explore the potential of narrowband EUV imaging data for diagnosing the presence of hot (T {approx}> 5 MK) coronal plasma in active regions. We analyze observations of two active regions (AR 11281, AR 11289) with simultaneous AIA imaging and EIS spectral data, including the Ca XVII line (at 192.8 A), which is one of the few lines in the EIS spectral bands sensitive to hot coronal plasma even outside flares. After careful co-alignment of the imaging and spectral data, we compare the morphology in a three-color image combining the 171, 335, and 94 A AIA spectral bands, with the image obtained for Ca XVII emission from the analysis of EIS spectra. We find that in the selected active regions the Ca XVII emission is strong only in very limited areas, showing striking similarities with the features bright in the 94 A (and 335 A) AIA channels and weak in the 171 A band. We conclude that AIA imaging observations of the solar corona can be used to track hot plasma (6-8 MK), and so to study its spatial variability and temporal evolution at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  7. Status of the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code for the analysis of transient spreading of core debris melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Chu, C.C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transient, one dimensional, finite difference computer code (MELTSPREAD-1) has been developed to predict spreading behavior of high temperature melts flowing over concrete and/or steel surfaces submerged in water, or without the effects of water if the surface is initially dry. This paper provides a summary overview of models and correlations currently implemented in the code, code validation activities completed thus far, LWR spreading-related safety issues for which the code has been applied, and the status of documentation for the code.

  8. Status of the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code for the analysis of transient spreading of core debris melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.; Chu, C.C.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transient, one dimensional, finite difference computer code (MELTSPREAD-1) has been developed to predict spreading behavior of high temperature melts flowing over concrete and/or steel surfaces submerged in water, or without the effects of water if the surface is initially dry. This paper provides a summary overview of models and correlations currently implemented in the code, code validation activities completed thus far, LWR spreading-related safety issues for which the code has been applied, and the status of documentation for the code.

  9. Switching Activity Analysis and Pre-Layout Activity Prediction for FPGAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    activity on a net changes when delays are zero (zero delay activity) versus when logic delays values. Our approach is novel in that it estimates each net's routed delay activity using only zero activity). Low-power synthesis and early power esti- mation are typically done on the basis of zero delay

  10. Switching Activity Analysis and PreLayout Activity Prediction for FPGAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    activity on a net changes when delays are zero (zero delay activity) versus when logic delays values. Our approach is novel in that it estimates each net's routed delay activity using only zero activity). Low­power synthesis and early power esti­ mation are typically done on the basis of zero delay

  11. UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

  12. Composition and On Demand Deployment of Distributed Brain Activity Analysis Application on Global Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramson, David

    1 Composition and On Demand Deployment of Distributed Brain Activity Analysis Application on Global are brain science and high-energy physics. The analysis of brain activity data gathered from the MEG and analyze brain functions and requires access to large-scale computational resources. The potential platform

  13. Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ã?lveczky, Peter Csaba

    Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite to the specification and analy- sis of the AER/NCA suite of active network multicast protocol compo- nents, AER/NCA poses challenging new problems for its formal specification and analysis. Real-Time Maude

  14. analysis activities reporting: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ability of Penn State researchers to compete Lee, Dongwon 26 NOAA ARL Monthly Activity Report October 2000 Geosciences Websites Summary: for Climate Monitoring 8. CMDP CBRAMS...

  15. activation analysis summary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HURRICANE FORECASTS FOR 2011 activity. 3 12;DEFINITIONS AND ACRONYMS Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) - A measure of a named storm 146 SUMMARY OF 2014 ATLANTIC TROPICAL...

  16. activation analysis rates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pressure signal. Although it is known rate analysis often replaces electrocardiogram (ECG) devices with the advantage that it does a device, worn at the wrist for a great...

  17. activation instrumental analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    car electronics industry. There are currently many electronic systems improving the safety Wieringa, Roel 17 Runtime Instrumentation for Precise Flow-Sensitive Type Analysis...

  18. On the determination of trace elements in cocoa and coffee by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adanuvor, Prosper Kwasi

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . Charlene Helton for her helpful and productive suggestions, and, of course, for undertaking the laborious task or. typing the final manuscript. DEDICATION To mv parents. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter ~Pa e INTRODUCTION THEORY Neutron Activation..., commercial cocoa. CHAPTER II THEORY Neutron Activation Analysis Neutron Activation Analysis was proposed by Von Hevesy and Levi in 1936 (32). hey irradiated a yttrium sample with neutrons from a radium-beryllium source and determined the im urity...

  19. Hanford 100-N Area In Situ Apatite and Phosphate Emplacement by Groundwater and Jet Injection: Geochemical and Physical Core Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate emplacement of phosphate into subsurface sediments in the Hanford Site 100-N Area by two different technologies: groundwater injection of a Ca-citrate-PO4 solution and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate and/or fish-bone apatite. In situ emplacement of phosphate and apatite adsorbs, then incorporates Sr-90 into the apatite structure by substitution for calcium. Overall, both technologies (groundwater injection of Ca-citrate-PO4) and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate/fish-bone apatite) delivered sufficient phosphate to subsur¬face sediments in the 100-N Area. Over years to decades, additional Sr-90 will incorporate into the apatite precipitate. Therefore, high pressure water jetting is a viable technology to emplace phosphate or apatite in shallow subsurface sediments difficult to emplace by Ca-citrate-PO4 groundwater injections, but further analysis is needed to quantify the relevant areal extent of phosphate deposition (in the 5- to 15-ft distance from injection points) and cause of the high deposition in finer grained sediments.

  20. Unsupervised Activity Analysis and Monitoring Algorithms for Effective Surveillance Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in escalators and at platforms as well as human presence at lift ) that provide a global view of the activ- ity of sensors deployed in the real world, being it in large scale sensor networks or closed-circuit television

  1. Tank 241-BY-111, cores 168 and 171 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-BY-111. Push mode core segments were removed from risers 15 and 12A between August 13, 1996, and September 3, 1996. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-BY-111 Rotary Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Kruger, 1996) and Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT) or differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded the notification limits stated in DQO. Two cores of nine segments were expected from this tank. Sampling problems prevented the acquisition of complete cores. Attachment 1 illustrates subsamples generated in the laboratory for analysis and identifies their sources. This reference also relates tank farm identification numbers to their corresponding 222-S Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) sample numbers.

  2. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal floods during mid-loop operations. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of the Surry internal flood analysis was to provide an improved understanding of the core damage scenarios arising from internal flood-related events. The mean core damage frequency of the Surry plant due to internal flood events during mid-loop operations is 4.8E-06 per year, and the 5th and 95th percentiles are 2.2E-07 and 1.8E-05 per year, respectively. Some limited sensitivity calculations were performed on three plant improvement options. The most significant result involves modifications of intake-level structure on the canal, which reduced core damage frequency contribution from floods in mid-loop by about 75%.

  3. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  4. Multi-core Performance Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification andinterface1JUN 2 5

  5. Core Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information NewAdvisors Jump to: navigation, search

  6. Design and analysis of active vibration control in a microgravity environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwood, Clay Brian

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ACTIVE VIBRATION CONTROL IN A MICROGRAVITY ENVIRONMENT A Thesis by CLAY BRIAN ATWOOD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DESXGN AND ANALYSIS OF ACTIVE VIBRATION CONTROL XN A MXCROGRAVXTY ENVIRONMENT A Thesis by CLAY BRIAN ATWOOD Approved as to style and content by: Richard'Alexander (Chair...

  7. Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablonowski, Christiane

    Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments Christiane Jablonowski (University of Michigan-13/2006 #12;Motivation · Test cases for 3D dynamical cores on the sphere ­ are hard to find in the literature groups ­ lack standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases

  8. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ACTIVE ANKLE-FOOT ORTHOSIS AND GAIT ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustakerov, Ivan

    CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ACTIVE ANKLE-FOOT ORTHOSIS AND GAIT ANALYSIS CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ACTIVE ANKLE system has mounted into two basic components: insole for the healthy leg and ankle-foot orthoses. Proposed ankle-foot orthosis is with one degree of freedom which foot segment is connected to the shank

  9. Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic Controlled Variable Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test-bed benchmark simulation model no structure that leads to optimal economic operation, while promptly rejecting disturbances at lower layers

  10. Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouch, Matthew J.

    E Analysis of Seismic Activity near Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Arizona, during the Occupation, and Lepolt Linkimer Online Material: Plot of viable focal mechanisms and table of regional seismic velocity model. INTRODUCTION Rate and distribution of seismic activity are important indica- tors of the overall

  11. Analysis of the Seismic Activity Associated with the 20101 Eruption of Merapi Volcano, Java2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Analysis of the Seismic Activity Associated with the 20101 Eruption of Merapi Volcano, Java2 3 4 Keywords16 Merapi Volcano, Volcano Seismology, Eruption Forecasting, Pre-eruptive Seismicity,17 RSAM. The main features of the seismic activity during the23 pre-eruptive period and the crisis are presented

  12. Water Research 36 (2002) 11811192 Accuracy analysis of a respirometer for activated sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Research 36 (2002) 1181­1192 Accuracy analysis of a respirometer for activated sludge dynamic transfer, pH, and the influence of sludge condition on ``start-up'' behaviour. It is shown to what extent Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Respirometry; Oxygen uptake rate; Activated sludge

  13. Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ã?lveczky, Peter Csaba

    Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in Real­Time Maude Peter and the Maude formal methodology to the specification and analy­ sis of the AER/NCA suite of active network and the composability of its components, AER/NCA poses challenging new problems for its formal specification

  14. Utilization of neutron activation analysis in groundwater analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beal, J.W. (Fairfield Univ., CT (United States)); Olmez, I. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Nuclear Reactor Laboratory is basically research oriented, over the past number of years, numerous neutron activation analyses (NAAs) have been performed for commercial purposes. This has been true particularly in cases where other analytical techniques have been found to be insufficient or in cases where special sample considerations are involved. The requests for these analyses came from a wide range of institutions, including government laboratories, medical centers, utilities, and commercial companies. In most cases, instrumental NAA (INAA) was the method of choice because of the method's extremely low detection limits, multielement characteristics, nondestructive nature, and ability to work with different sample sizes.

  15. Flow instabilities in the core and the coolant circuit of advances low-boiling light water reacto: classification of causes and development of simulator for the future analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezvyi, Aleksey

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters due to closed loop system feedback. In turn, these cause over-circuit instability in the reactor. Core power generation changes are carried out by means of influencing the nuclear fission process through changing the multiplication factor...

  16. Analysis of chemical competition for binding sites on activated charcoal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallerani, Susan Jane

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chanical and physical adsorptixm are ~ defined. Yet, in ~ce they are not so le. Physical adsorption will occur in any gas-solid system when the heat of adsorption is of the same order as the latent heat of condensation. A multi molecular layer is always... Research Hypothesis 10 12 15 Vapor Generation. Exper~ Procedure. Sample Analysis. 15 19 21 23 DISCUSS IGN. 02XLUSIGNS AND REKXMMENQATIGNS. 29 33 35 37 TABLE A-1 Calihration of Wilkes Miran Gas Analyzer. . . . . . . 38 TABLE A-2 Pump...

  17. Analysis of Integrated Safety Management at the Activity Level: Work

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysis of Crossover Points forNEPA

  18. Iodine-129 separation and determination by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bate, L.C.; Stokely, J.R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for analysis of /sup 129/I in fission product mixtures originating from fuel reprocessing studies and low-level wastes. The method utilizes conventional iodine valence adjustment and solvent extraction techniques to chemically separate /sup 129/I from most fission products. The /sup 129/I is determined by neutron irradiation and measurement of the 12.4 h /sup 130/I produced by the neutron capture reaction. Special techniques were devised for neutron irradiation of /sup 129/I samples in the pneumatic tube irradiation facilities at the High Flux Isotope (HFIR) and Oak Ridge Research (ORR) Reactors. Chemically separated /sup 129/I is adsorbed on an anion exchange resin column made from an irradiation container. The loaded resin is then irradiated in either of the pneumatic facilities to produce /sup 130/I. Sensitivity of the analysis with the HFIR facility (flux: 5 x 10/sup 14/ n/cm/sup 2//sec) and a 100-second irradiation time is approximately 0.03 nanograms. Samples up to 250 ml in volume can be easily processed.

  19. Determination of isotopic thorium in biological samples by combined alpha spectrometry and neutron activation analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, S. E. (Samuel E.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thorium is a naturally occurring element for whom all isotopes are radioactive . Many of these isotopes are alpha emitting radionuclides, some of which have limits for inhalation lower than plutonium in current regulations . Neutron activation analysis can provide for the low-level determination of 232Th but can not determine other isotopes of dosimetric importance . Biological and environmental samples often have large quantities of materials which activate strongly, limiting the capabilities of instrumental neutron activiation analysis . This paper will discuss the application of a combined technique using alpha spectrometry and radiochemical neutron activiation analysis for the determination of isotopic thorium .

  20. The Nature of the Dense Core Population in the Pipe Nebula: Thermal Cores Under Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles J. Lada; August A. Muench; Jill M. Rathborne; Joao F. Alves; Marco Lombardi

    2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the results of a systematic investigation of an entire population of starless dust cores within a single molecular cloud. Analysis of extinction data shows the cores to be dense objects characterized by a narrow range of density. Analysis of C18O and NH3 molecular-line observations reveals very narrow lines. The non-thermal velocity dispersions measured in both these tracers are found to be subsonic for the large majority of the cores and show no correlation with core mass (or size). Thermal pressure is thus the dominate source of internal gas pressure and support for most of the core population. The total internal gas pressures of the cores are found to be roughly independent of core mass over the entire range of the core mass function (CMF) indicating that the cores are in pressure equilibrium with an external source of pressure. This external pressure is most likely provided by the weight of the surrounding Pipe cloud within which the cores are embedded. Most of the cores appear to be pressure confined, gravitationally unbound entities whose nature, structure and future evolution are determined by only a few physical factors which include self-gravity, the fundamental processes of thermal physics and the simple requirement of pressure equilibrium with the surrounding environment. The observed core properties likely constitute the initial conditions for star formation in dense gas. The entire core population is found to be characterized by a single critical Bonnor-Ebert mass. This mass coincides with the characteristic mass of the Pipe CMF indicating that most cores formed in the cloud are near critical stability. This suggests that the mass function of cores (and the IMF) has its origin in the physical process of thermal fragmentation in a pressurized medium.

  1. Functional analysis of oxidative stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheen, Jen

    , AtMPK3 and AtMPK6. Constitutively active ANP1 mimics the H2O2 effect and initiates the MAPK cascade previously de- scribed drought, cold, and abscisic acid signaling pathways. Thus, manipulation of key multiple stress tolerance that may greatly benefit agriculture. Destined to reside in the habitats

  2. Core Drilling Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tank Farms workers demonstrate core drilling capabilities for Hanford single-shell tanks. Core drilling is used to determine the current condition of each tank to assist in the overall assessment...

  3. Activation Analysis of the Final Optics Assemblies at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauffy, L S; Khater, H Y; Sitaraman, S; Brereton, S J

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissioning shots have commenced at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Within a year, the 192 laser beam facility will be operational and the experimental phase will begin. At each shot, the emitted neutrons will interact in the facility's surroundings, activating them, especially inside the target bay where the neutron flux is the highest. We are calculating the dose from those activated structures and objects in order to plan and minimize worker exposures during maintenance and normal NIF operation. This study presents the results of the activation analysis of the optics of the Final Optics Assemblies (FOA), which are a key contributor to worker exposure. Indeed, there are 48 FOAs weighting three tons each, and routine change-out and maintenance of optics and optics modules is expected. The neutron field has been characterized using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNP with subsequent activation analysis performed using the activation code, ALARA.

  4. At tank Low Activity Feed Homogeneity Analysis Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOUGLAS, J.G.

    2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the merit of selecting sodium, aluminum, and cesium-137 as analytes to indicate homogeneity of soluble species in low-activity waste (LAW) feed and recommends possible analytes and physical properties that could serve as rapid screening indicators for LAW feed homogeneity. The three analytes are adequate as screening indicators of soluble species homogeneity for tank waste when a mixing pump is used to thoroughly mix the waste in the waste feed staging tank and when all dissolved species are present at concentrations well below their solubility limits. If either of these conditions is violated, then the three indicators may not be sufficiently chemically representative of other waste constituents to reliably indicate homogeneity in the feed supernatant. Additional homogeneity indicators that should be considered are anions such as fluoride, sulfate, and phosphate, total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon, and total alpha to estimate the transuranic species. Physical property measurements such as gamma profiling, conductivity, specific gravity, and total suspended solids are recommended as possible at-tank methods for indicating homogeneity. Indicators of LAW feed homogeneity are needed to reduce the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (ORP) Program's contractual risk by assuring that the waste feed is within the contractual composition and can be supplied to the waste treatment plant within the schedule requirements.

  5. TMI-2 core shipping preparations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, L.J.; (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Barkanic, R.J. (Bechtel North American Power Corporation (United States)); Conaway, W.T. II (GPU Nuclear Corporation, Three Mile Island, Middletown, PA (United States)); Schmoker, D.S. (Nuclear Packaging, Inc., Federal Way, WA (United States))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

  6. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eichelberger, Et Al., 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger, Et...

  7. TOBUREN, MARK CHRISTOPHER. Power Analysis and Instruction Schedul-ing for Reduced di/dt in the Execution Core of High-Performance Microprocessors.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conte, Thomas M.

    to a processor's average peak power dissipation is the pres- ence of high di=dt in its execution core. High-energy-cycle energy constraints. This thesis proposes a novel approach to instruction scheduling based on the con- cept of schedule slack, which builds energy e cient schedules by limiting the energy dissipated

  8. Determination of thorium in seawater by neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, Chih-An

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of /sup 232/Th in seawater has made possible rapid sampling and analysis of this long-lived, non-radiogenic thorium isotope on small-volume samples. The marine geochemical utility of /sup 232/Th, whose concentration in seawater is extremely low, warrants the development of these sensitive techniques. The analytical methods and some results are presented and discussed in this article. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  10. Interferogram Analysis using Active Instance-Based Olac Fuentes and Thamar Solorio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuentes, Olac

    accurate predic- tions. To further reduce the running time, we use a principal component analysis experiments show very accurate results using both noiseless and noisy interferograms. Key Words: active, are combined an made to interfere, which results in a pattern, called interfero- gram, that characterizes

  11. Performance Analysis of a Hybrid Asymmetric Multilevel Inverter for High Voltage Active Power Filter Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    Performance Analysis of a Hybrid Asymmetric Multilevel Inverter for High Voltage Active Power voltage-source inverters connected in series (known as cascaded hybrid asymmetric multilevel inverter scheme is developed to allow the operation of the inverter modules at different voltages and switching

  12. Ten channel background alpha radiometer for nondestructive analysis of low activity samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugatch, V.M.; Pavlenko, Y.N.; Vasiliev, Y.O.; Nenakhov, A.N.; Tkatch, N.M.; Barabash, L.I.; Berdnichenko, S.V.; Litovchenko, P.G.; Rosenfeld, A.B.; Zinets, O.S. (Inst. for Nuclear Research, Kiev (USSR))

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The description of a ten-channel alpha-radiometer based on large-area semiconductor detectors is presented in this paper. The radiometer is intended for determination of soil pollution by alpha-active radionuclides using thick samples. The analysis of isotopes is also provided. The concentrations of Pu and Am isotopes in soil samples are determined.

  13. Analysis of patent activity in the field of quantum information processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryszard Winiarczyk; Piotr Gawron; Jaros?aw Adam Miszczak; ?ukasz Pawela; Zbigniew Pucha?a

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an analysis of patent activity in the field of quantum information processing. Data from the PatentScope database from the years 1993-2011 was used. In order to predict the future trends in the number of filed patents time series models were used.

  14. Analysis of patent activity in the field of quantum information processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winiarczyk, Ryszard; Miszczak, Jaros?aw Adam; Pawela, ?ukasz; Pucha?a, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an analysis of patent activity in the field of quantum information processing. Data from the PatentScope database from the years 1993-2011 was used. In order to predict the future trends in the number of filed patents time series models were used.

  15. Efficiency of static core turn-off in a system-on-a-chip with variation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cher, Chen-Yong; Coteus, Paul W; Gara, Alan; Kursun, Eren; Paulsen, David P; Schuelke, Brian A; Sheets, II, John E; Tian, Shurong

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A processor-implemented method for improving efficiency of a static core turn-off in a multi-core processor with variation, the method comprising: conducting via a simulation a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's design stage includes a first output corresponding to a first multi-core processor core to turn off; conducting a turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage, wherein the turn-off analysis of the multi-core processor at the multi-core processor's testing stage includes a second output corresponding to a second multi-core processor core to turn off; comparing the first output and the second output to determine if the first output is referring to the same core to turn off as the second output; outputting a third output corresponding to the first multi-core processor core if the first output and the second output are both referring to the same core to turn off.

  16. Cognitive tasks in information analysis: Use of event dwell time to characterize component activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Slavich, Antoinette L.; Littlefield, Rik J.; Littlefield, Janis S.; Cowley, Paula J.

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology-based enhancement of information analysis requires a detailed understanding of the cognitive tasks involved in the process. The information search and report production tasks of the information analysis process were investigated through evaluation of time-stamped workstation data gathered with custom software. Model tasks simulated the search and production activities, and a sample of actual analyst data were also evaluated. Task event durations were calculated on the basis of millisecond-level time stamps, and distributions were plotted for analysis. The data indicate that task event time shows a cyclic pattern of variation, with shorter event durations (< 2 sec) reflecting information search and filtering, and longer event durations (> 10 sec) reflecting information evaluation. Application of cognitive principles to the interpretation of task event time data provides a basis for developing “cognitive signatures” of complex activities, and can facilitate the development of technology aids for information intensive tasks.

  17. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events during mid-loop operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1) and the other at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf). Both the Brookhaven and Sandia projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults--so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling shutdown conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Surry Unit 1. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human error rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Surry have been adopted here, so that the results of the two studies can be as comparable as possible. Both the Brookhaven study and this study examine only two shutdown plant operating states (POSs) during refueling outages at Surry, called POS 6 and POS 10, which represent mid-loop operation before and after refueling, respectively. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POSs 6 and 10. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency of earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 6 and POS 10 is found to be low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}6}/year.

  18. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  19. Sensitivity analysis in linear programming applied to the problems of activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloan, Thomas Orville

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results were right-nand-side ranging and the assigning to the obJective function a ratio of cost coefficients so each charnel assume as much importance in fitting a curve to the Activation Analvsis data as any other channel iv A CKii0'1LZD GM!'. ITS... CHAPTER III DATA DIFFERENCES AND THE ZFFECTS OF CHANNEL SUMMING CHAPTER IV PROCEDURE QF RIGHT-HAND-SIDE RANGI NG 16 CHAPTER V RATIO COST COEFFICIENTS PROCEDURE CHAPTER VI ANALYS1S GF OUTPUT TO DETERMINE SEIISITIVITY CHAPTER VII UNIFORM VARIATIONS...

  20. Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manolios, Panagiotis "Pete"

    Interactive Termination Proofs using Termination Cores Panagiotis Manolios and Daron Vroon College@ccs.neu.edu, daron.vroon@gmail.com Abstract. Recent advances in termination analysis have yielded new methods and determining how to proceed. In this paper, we address the issue of building termination analysis engines

  1. -The Core of CS -Curricula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauswirth, Matthias

    - Advanced Courses #12;The Core of CS Curricula #12;CS Body of Knowledge Area > Unit > Topic Core vs elective#12;ACM vs U S I #12;- The Core of CS - Curricula - Introductory Courses - Intermediate Courses Introductory Intermediate Advanced Core Elective Units #12;Courses Introductory Intermediate Advanced Core

  2. Applying observations of work activity in designing prototype data analysis tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springmeyer, R.R.

    1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Designers, implementers, and marketers of data analysis tools typically have different perspectives than users. Consequently, data analysis often find themselves using tools focused on graphics and programming concepts rather than concepts which reflect their own domain and the context of their work. Some user studies focus on usability tests late in development; others observe work activity, but fail to show how to apply that knowledge in design. This paper describes a methodology for applying observations of data analysis work activity in prototype tool design. The approach can be used both in designing improved data analysis tools, and customizing visualization environments to specific applications. We present an example of user-centered design for a prototype tool to cull large data sets. We revisit the typical graphical approach of animating a large data set from the point of view of an analysis who is culling data. Field evaluations using the prototype tool not only revealed valuable usability information, but initiated in-depth discussions about user`s work, tools, technology, and requirements.

  3. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia); Yahya, Redzuan [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi 43000, Kajang (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  4. Neuroscience Instrumentation and Distributed Analysis of Brain Activity Data: A Case for eScience on Global Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    1 Neuroscience Instrumentation and Distributed Analysis of Brain Activity Data: A Case for e commonly observed in scientific disciplines. Two popular scientific disciplines of this nature are brain science and high-energy physics. The analysis of brain activity data gathered from the MEG

  5. Articulated Motion Modeling for Activity Analysis Jiang Gao, Robert T. Collins, Alexander G. Hauptmann and Howard D. Wactlar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wactlar, Howard D.

    on blobs and trajectories output from this tracking system. In Zelnik-Manor and Irani (2001), dynamicArticulated Motion Modeling for Activity Analysis Jiang Gao, Robert T. Collins, Alexander G at a nursing home. 1. Introduction Much recent research has been focused on activity analysis in videos

  6. Core shroud corner joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  7. Tank 241-S-106, cores 183, 184 and 187 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-S-106 push mode core segments collected between February 12, 1997 and March 21, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP), the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Safety DQO), the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) and the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO). The analytical results are included in Table 1. Six of the twenty-four subsamples submitted for the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis exceeded the notification limit of 480 Joules/g stated in the DQO. Appropriate notifications were made. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyses were performed on all samples that produced exotherms during the DSC analysis. All results were less than the notification limit of three weight percent TOC. No cyanide analysis was performed, per agreement with the Tank Safety Program. None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. Statistical evaluation of results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. No core composites were created because there was insufficient solid material from any of the three core sampling events to generate a composite that would be representative of the tank contents.

  8. 1 Evaluation of the Intel ® Core ™ i7 Turbo Boost feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Charles; Preet Jassi; Ananth Narayan S; Abbas Sadat; Ra Fedorova

    Abstract—The Intel ® Core ™ i7 processor code named Nehalem has a novel feature called Turbo Boost which dynamically varies the frequencies of the processor’s cores. The frequency of a core is determined by core temperature, the number of active cores, the estimated power and the estimated current consumption. We perform an extensive analysis of the Turbo Boost technology to characterize its behavior in varying workload conditions. In particular, we analyze how the activation of Turbo Boost is affected by inherent properties of applications (i.e., their rate of memory accesses) and by the overall load imposed on the processor. Furthermore, we analyze the capability of Turbo Boost to mitigate Amdahl’s law by accelerating sequential phases of parallel applications. Finally, we estimate the impact of the Turbo Boost technology on the overall energy consumption. We found that Turbo Boost can provide (on average) up to a 6% reduction in execution time but can result in an increase in energy consumption up to 16%. Our results also indicate that Turbo Boost sets the processor to operate at maximum frequency (where it has the potential to provide the maximum gain in performance) when the mapping of threads to hardware contexts is sub-optimal. I.

  9. The computerized identification of reactor-produced isotopes in an activation analysis environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlueter, Daniel John

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ability of a complete, positive identification appears small. How- ever, with the addition of a least squares method of resolving interferences and the application of a figure indicating the value (figure-of-merit) placed on each elimination test...THE COMPUTERIZED IDENTIFICATION OF REACTOR-PRODUCED ISOTOP ' S IN AN ACTIVATION ANALYSIS ENVIRON&vIENT A Thesi. s by DANIEI. aOIIN SCHLUETER Submitted to the Grec'u&ate College of Texas ARM University in pa. tial fulfillment o...

  10. Determination of selected trace elements in human head hair by neutron activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courson, Leonard Austin

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    barber shops and beauty salons in the Bryan-College Station Met- ropolitan Area. The locations of the prospective collection sites were selected at random from the local telephone directory. Though some of these sites did not elect to participate... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering DETERMINATION OF SELECTEO TRACE ELEMENTS IN HUMAN HEAD HAIR BY NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS A Thesis by LEONARD AUSTIN COURSON Approved as to style and content by Chai r...

  11. Methods for preparing comparative standards and field samples for neutron activation analysis of soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasgow, D.C.; Dyer, F.F.; Robinson, L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the more difficult problems associated with comparative neutron activation analysis (CNAA) is the preparation of standards which are tailor-made to the desired irradiation and counting conditions. Frequently, there simply is not a suitable standard available commercially, or the resulting gamma spectrum is convoluted with interferences. In a recent soil analysis project, the need arose for standards which contained about 35 elements. In response, a computer spreadsheet was developed to calculate the appropriate amount of each element so that the resulting gamma spectrum is relatively free of interferences. Incorporated in the program are options for calculating all of the irradiation and counting parameters including activity produced, necessary flux/bombardment time, counting time, and appropriate source-to-detector distance. The result is multi-element standards for CNAA which have optimal concentrations. The program retains ease of use without sacrificing capability. In addition to optimized standard production, a novel soil homogenization technique was developed which is a low cost, highly efficient alternative to commercially available homogenization systems. Comparative neutron activation analysis for large scale projects has been made easier through these advancements. This paper contains details of the design and function of the NAA spreadsheet and innovative sample handling techniques.

  12. ANALYSIS OF CDTE ACTIVATION TREATMENT WITH A NOVEL APPROACH Andrei Salavei^, Ivan Rimmaudo^, Fabio Piccinelli*, Daniele Menossi+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    ANALYSIS OF CDTE ACTIVATION TREATMENT WITH A NOVEL APPROACH Andrei Salavei^, Ivan Rimmaudo^, Fabio approach for CdTe activation treatment. Starting from a baseline of CdTe devices made with CdCl2 activation­voltage characteristics) of finished devices. Keywords: CdTe, CdCl2, High-Efficiency. 1 INTRODUCTION CdTe thin film solar

  13. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki [Quantum Optics Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

  14. Emergency core cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  15. Regulatory impact analysis of environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title I of the Act pertains to tailings at inactive sites for which the Agency has developed standards as part of a separate rulemaking. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards developed under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the operations standards is very limited.

  16. Regulatory impact analysis of final environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards promulgated under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public health and environment after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the standards during mill operations is very limited.

  17. Analysis of a rod withdrawal in a PWR core with the neutronic- thermalhydraulic coupled code RELAP/PARCS and RELAP/VALKIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miro, R.; Maggini, F.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera, 14, 46022, Valencia (Spain); Gomez, A.; Ortego, A. [IBERINCO, Avenida de Burgos, Madrid (Spain); Murillo, J. C. [CNAT, Av. Manoteras, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reactor Ejection Accident (REA) belongs to the Reactor Initiated Accidents (RIA) category of accidents and it is part of the licensing basis accident analyses required for pressure water reactors (PWR). The REA at hot zero power (HZP) is characterized by a single rod ejection from a core position with a very low power level. The evolution consists basically of a continuous reactivity insertion. The main feature limiting the consequences of the accident in a PWR is the Doppler Effect. To check the performance of the coupled code RELAP5/PARCS2.5 and RELAP5/VALKIN a REA in Trillo NPP is simulated. These analyses will allow knowing more accurately the PWR real plant phenomenology in the RIA most limiting conditions. (authors)

  18. TMI-2 core examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper.

  19. Tank 241-TX-104, cores 230 and 231 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, L.A.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-104 push mode core segments collected between February 18, 1998 and February 23, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-104 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (McCain, 1997), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al., 1995) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et.al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table. None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Alpha Activity (AT) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Attachment 1 is a cross reference to relate the tank farm identification numbers to the 222-S Laboratory LabCore/LIMS sample numbers. The subsamples generated in the laboratory for analyses are identified in these diagrams with their sources shown. Core 230: Three push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-TX-104 riser 9A on February 18, 1998. Segments were received by the 222-S Laboratory on February 19, 1998. Two segments were expected for this core. However, due to poor sample recovery, an additional segment was taken and identified as 2A. Core 231: Four push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-TX-104 riser 13A between February 19, 1998 and February 23, 1998. Segments were received by the 222-S Laboratory on February 24, 1998. Two segments were expected for this core. However, due to poor sample recovery, additional segments were taken and identified as 2A and 2B. The TSAP states the core samples should be transported to the laboratory within three calendar days from the time each segment is removed from the tank; this requirement was not met for the segments from Core 231.

  20. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  1. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  2. Model-driven multi-omic data analysis elucidates metabolic immunomodulators of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Mo, Monica L.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Metz, Thomas O.; Jones, Marcus B.; Frank, Bryan C.; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Macrophages are central players in the immune response, manifesting divergent phenotypes to control inflammation and innate immunity through the release of cytokines and other regulatory factor-dependent signaling pathways. In recent years, the focus on metabolism has been reemphasized as critical signaling and regulatory pathways of human pathophysiology, ranging from cancer to aging, often converge on metabolic responses. Here, we used genome-scale modeling and multi-omics (transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) analysis to assess metabolic features critical for macrophage functions. We constructed a genome-scale metabolic network for the RAW 264.7 cell line to determine metabolic modulators of macrophage activation. Metabolites well-known to be associated with immunoactivation (e.g., glucose and arginine) and immunosuppression (e.g., tryptophan and vitamin D3) were amongst the most critical effectors. Intracellular metabolic mechanisms linked to critical suppressive effectors were then assessed, identifying a suppressive role for de novo nucleotide synthesis. Finally, the underlying metabolic mechanisms of macrophage activation are identified by analyzing multi-omic data obtained from LPS-stimulated RAW cells in the context of our flux-based predictions. Our study demonstrates metabolism's role in regulating activation may be greater than previously anticipated and elucidates underlying metabolic connections between activation and metabolic effectors.

  3. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

    2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop XRF analytical methods that provide the rapid turnaround time (<8 hours) requested by the WTP, while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine waste composition variations. For Phase 1a, SRNL (1) evaluated, selected, and procured an XRF instrument for WTP installation, (2) investigated three XRF sample methods for preparing the LAW sub-sample for XRF analysis, and (3) initiated scoping studies on AN-105 (Envelope A) simulant to determine the instrument's capability, limitations, and optimum operating parameters. After preliminary method development on simulants and the completion of Phase 1a activities, SRNL received approval from WTP to begin Phase 1b activities with the objective of optimizing the XRF methodology. Three XRF sample methods used for preparing the LAW sub-sample for XRF analysis were studied: direct liquid analysis, dried spot, and fused glass. The direct liquid method was selected because its major advantage is that the LAW can be analyzed directly without any sample alteration that could bias the method accuracy. It also is the fastest preparation technique--a typical XRF measurement could be completed in < 1hr after sample delivery. Except for sodium, the method detection limits (MDLs) for the most important analytes in solution, the hold point elements, were achieved by this method. The XRF detection limits are generally adequate for glass former batching and product composition reporting, but may be inadequate for some species (Hg, Cd, and Ba) important to land disposal restrictions. The long term precision (24-hr) also was good with percent relative standard deviations (%RSDs) < 10 % for most elements in filtered solution. There were some issues with a few elements precipitating out of solution over time affecting the long term precision of the method. Additional research will need to be performed to resolve this sample stability problem. Activities related to methodology optimization in the Phase 1b portion of the study were eliminated as a result of WTP request to discontinue remaining activities due to funding reduction. These preliminary studies demonstrate that developing an XRF method to support the LAW vitrification plant is feasible. When funding is restored for the WTP, it is recommended that optimization of this technology should be pursued.

  4. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Design and Analysis Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by the Department of Energy's Energy Storage area at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the battery testing, design, and analysis activity.

  6. TMI-2 core damage: a summary of present knowledge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, D.E.; Mason, R.E.; Meininger, R.D.; Franz, W.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive fuel damage (oxidation and fragmentation) has occurred and the top approx. 1.5 m of the center portion of the TMI-2 core has relocated. The fuel fragmentation extends outward to slightly beyond one-half the core radius in the direction examined by the CCTV camera. While the radial extent of core fragmentation in other directions was not directly observed, control and spider drop data and in-core instrument data suggest that the core void is roughly symmetrical, although there are a few indications of severe fuel damage extending to the core periphery. The core material fragmented into a broad range of particle sizes, extending down to a few microns. APSR movement data, the observation of damaged fuel assemblies hanging unsupported from the bottom of the reactor upper plenum structure, and the observation of once-molten stainless steel immediately above the active core indicate high temperatures (up to at least 1720 K) extended to the very top of the core. The relative lack of damage to the underside of the plenum structure implies a sharp temperature demarcation at the core/plenum interface. Filter debris and leadscrew deposit analyses indicate extensive high temperature core materials interaction, melting of the Ag-In-Cd control material, and transport of particulate control material to the plenum and out of the vessel.

  7. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Olich, Eugene E. (Aptos, CA); Dahl, Leslie R. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  8. Global analysis of active longitudes of solar X-ray flares L. Zhang a,b,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China c Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, Chinese AcademyGlobal analysis of active longitudes of solar X-ray flares L. Zhang a,b,c , K. Mursula a,Ã, I of Sciences, Beijing, China d University of Oulu, Sodankyl¨a Geophysical Observatory, Oulu, Finland a r t i c

  9. Teacher's activity analysis within a didactic perspective Patrice Venturini, Chantal AmadeEscot UMR EFTS Universit de Toulouse 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Teacher's activity analysis within a didactic perspective Patrice Venturini, Chantal AmadeEscot UMR framework (the Joint Action Theory in Didactics) we use to analyse ordinary teaching/learning activities in science classrooms. This theory has been developed in French didactic research and takes

  10. Tank 241-A-101, cores 154 and 156 analytical results for the 45 day report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steen, F.H.

    1996-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the 45-day laboratory report for tank 241 -A-101 push mode core segments collected between July II, 1996 and July 25, 1996. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-A-101 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Field, 1996) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO)(Dukelow, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity (AT) or Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analyses exceeded notification limits as stated in the Safety Screening DQO (Dukelow, et al., 1995). Statistical evaluation on results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. Primary safety screening results and the raw data from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and DSC analyses are included in this report.

  11. Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in Real-Time Maude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ã?lveczky, Peter Csaba

    Specification and Analysis of the AER/NCA Active Network Protocol Suite in Real-Time Maude Peter-Time Maude tool and the Maude formal methodology to the specification and analysis of the AER/NCA suite-sensitive behavior, the presence of probabilistic algorithms, and the composability of its components, AER/NCA poses

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - active network analysis Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activity of coupled networks. The neurons... and activity propagation in coupled neural networks from rat cortical cells grown on a micro-electrode array... for parallel activity...

  13. Tank 241-TX-118, core 236 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ESCH, R.A.

    1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-118 push mode core segments collected between April 1, 1998 and April 13, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-118 Push Mode Core sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Benar, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al, 1995) and the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) (Sipson, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Benar, 1997). One sample exceeded the Total Alpha Activity (AT) analysis notification limit of 38.4{micro}Ci/g (based on a bulk density of 1.6), core 236 segment 1 lower half solids (S98T001524). Appropriate notifications were made. Plutonium 239/240 analysis was requested as a secondary analysis. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report.

  14. Radio Galaxies in Cooling Cores: Insights from a Complete Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Eilek; F. N. Owen

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed a new, complete, cooling-core sample with the VLA, in order to understand how the massive black hole in the central galaxy interacts with the local cluster plasma. We find that every cooling core is currently being energized by an active radio jet, which has probably been destabilized by its interaction with the cooling core. We argue that current models of cooling-core radio galaxies need to be improved before they can be used to determine the rate at which the jet is heating the cooling core. We also argue that the extended radio haloes we see in many cooling-core clusters need extended, in situ re-energization, which cannot be supplied solely by the central galaxy.

  15. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  16. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  17. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  18. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Duncan, A.

    2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    During the month of September 2008, grout core samples were collected from the Saltstone Disposal Facility, Vault 4, cell E. This grout was placed during processing campaigns in December 2007 from Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment Batch 2 salt solution. The 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria sample collected on 11/16/07 represents the salt solution in the core samples. Core samples were retrieved to initiate the historical database of properties of emplaced Saltstone and to demonstrate the correlation between field collected and laboratory prepared samples. Three samples were collected from three different locations. Samples were collected using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit. In April 2009, the core samples were removed from the evacuated sample container, inspected, transferred to PVC containers, and backfilled with nitrogen. Samples furthest from the wall were the most intact cylindrically shaped cored samples. The shade of the core samples darkened as the depth of coring increased. Based on the visual inspection, sample 3-3 was selected for all subsequent analysis. The density and porosity of the Vault 4 core sample, 1.90 g/cm{sup 3} and 59.90% respectively, were comparable to values achieved for laboratory prepared samples. X-ray diffraction analysis identified phases consistent with the expectations for hydrated Saltstone. Microscopic analysis revealed morphology features characteristic of cementitious materials with fly ash and calcium silicate hydrate gel. When taken together, the results of the density, porosity, x-ray diffraction analysis and microscopic analysis support the conclusion that the Vault 4, Cell E core sample is representative of the expected waste form.

  20. Tank 241-AN-103, cores 166 and 167 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steen, F.H.

    1997-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-AN-103 [Hydrogen Watch Listed] push mode core segments collected between September 13, 1996 and September 23, 1996. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-AN-103 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) and the Flammable Gas Data Quality Objective (DQO). The analytical results are included in the data summary table. The raw data are included in this document. None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity (AT), Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Plutonium analyses exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. One sample submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis exceeded the notification limit of 480 Joules/g (dry weight basis) as stated in the Safety Screening DQO. Appropriate notifications were made. Statistical evaluation of results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Attachment 1 is a cross reference to relate the tank farm identification numbers to the 222-S Laboratory LabCore/LIMS sample numbers. The subsamples generated in the laboratory for analyses are identified in these diagrams with their sources shown. The diagrams identifying the core composites are also included. Core 166 Nineteen push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-AN-103 riser 12A between September 13, 1996 and September 17, 1996. Segments were received by the 222-S Laboratory between September 20, 1996 and September 30, 1996. Table 2 summarizes the extrusion information. Selected segments (2, 5 and 14) were sampled using the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) and extruded by the Process Chemistry and Statistical Analysis Group. Core 167 Eighteen push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-AN-103 riser 21A between September 18, 1996 and September 23, 1996. Tank Farm Operations were unsuccessful in obtaining segment 19 due to the high downforce encountered during sampling. Segments were received by the 222-S Laboratory between September 23, 1996 and September 30, 1996. Table 3 summarizes the extrusion information.

  1. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  2. COBRA-IV PC: A personal computer version of COBRA-IV-I for thermal-hydraulic analysis of rod bundle nuclear fuel elements and cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, B.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COBRA-IV PC is a modified version of COBRA-IV-I, adapted for use with most IBM PC and PC-compatible desktop computers. Like COBRA-IV-I, COBRA-IV PC uses the subchannel analysis approach to determine the enthalpy and flow distribution in rod bundles for both steady-state and transient conditions. The steady-state and transient solution schemes used in COBRA-IIIC are still available in COBRA-IV PC as the implicit solution scheme option. An explicit solution scheme is also available, allowing the calculation of severe transients involving flow reversals, recirculations, expulsions, and reentry flows, with a pressure or flow boundary condition specified. In addition, several modifications have been incorporated into COBRA-IV PC to allow the code to run on the PC. These include a reduction in the array dimensions, the removal of the dump and restart options, and the inclusion of several code modifications by Oregon State University, most notably, a critical heat flux correlation for boiling water reactor fuel and a new solution scheme for cross-flow distribution calculations. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Statistical Analysis and Geologic Evaluation of Laboratory-Derived Physical Property Data for Selected Nevada Test Site Core Samples of Non-Zeolitized Tuffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical analysis and geologic evaluation of recently acquired laboratory-derived physical property data are being performed to better understand and more precisely correlate physical properties with specific geologic parameters associated with non-zeolitized tuffs at the Nevada Test Site. Physical property data include wet and dry bulk density, grain density (i.e., specific gravity), total porosity, and effective porosity. Geologic parameters utilized include degree of welding, lithology, stratigraphy, geographic area, and matrix mineralogy (i.e., vitric versus devitrified). Initial results indicate a very good correlation between physical properties and geologic parameters such as degree of welding, lithology, and matrix mineralogy. However, physical properties appear to be independent of stratigraphy and geographic area, suggesting that the data are transferrable with regards to these two geologic parameters. Statistical analyses also indicate that the assumed grain density of 2.65 grams per cubic centimeter used to calculate porosity in some samples is too high. This results in corresponding calculated porosity values approximately 5 percent too high (e.g., 45 percent versus 40 percent), which can be significant in the lower porosity rocks. Similar analyses and evaluations of zeolitic tuffs and carbonate rock physical properties data are ongoing as well as comparisons to geophysical log values.

  4. Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles Core Competency Worksheets for Significant Cybersecurity Roles The OCIO has developed core competency worksheets for...

  5. A Visual Analytics Approach to Structured Data Analysis to Enhance Nonproliferation and Arms Control Verification Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillen, David S.

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis activities for Nonproliferation and Arms Control verification require the use of many types of data. Tabular structured data, such as Excel spreadsheets and relational databases, have traditionally been used for data mining activities, where specific queries are issued against data to look for matching results. The application of visual analytics tools to structured data enables further exploration of datasets to promote discovery of previously unknown results. This paper discusses the application of a specific visual analytics tool to datasets related to the field of Arms Control and Nonproliferation to promote the use of visual analytics more broadly in this domain. Visual analytics focuses on analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces (Wong and Thomas 2004). It promotes exploratory analysis of data, and complements data mining technologies where known patterns can be mined for. Also with a human in the loop, they can bring in domain knowledge and subject matter expertise. Visual analytics has not widely been applied to this domain. In this paper, we will focus on one type of data: structured data, and show the results of applying a specific visual analytics tool to answer questions in the Arms Control and Nonproliferation domain. We chose to use the T.Rex tool, a visual analytics tool developed at PNNL, which uses a variety of visual exploration patterns to discover relationships in structured datasets, including a facet view, graph view, matrix view, and timeline view. The facet view enables discovery of relationships between categorical information, such as countries and locations. The graph tool visualizes node-link relationship patterns, such as the flow of materials being shipped between parties. The matrix visualization shows highly correlated categories of information. The timeline view shows temporal patterns in data. In this paper, we will use T.Rex with two different datasets to demonstrate how interactive exploration of the data can aid an analyst with arms control and nonproliferation verification activities. Using a dataset from PIERS (PIERS 2014), we will show how container shipment imports and exports can aid an analyst in understanding the shipping patterns between two countries. We will also use T.Rex to examine a collection of research publications from the IAEA International Nuclear Information System (IAEA 2014) to discover collaborations of concern. We hope this paper will encourage the use of visual analytics structured data analytics in the field of nonproliferation and arms control verification. Our paper outlines some of the challenges that exist before broad adoption of these kinds of tools can occur and offers next steps to overcome these challenges.

  6. Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) ; Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned low enriched uranium conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part… (more)

  7. Core Measure Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate EarthEnergyDistrict EnergyCensus,Core Measure Results

  8. Core-tube data logger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.; Knudsen, S.; Drumheller, D.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireline core drilling, increasingly used for geothermal exploration, employs a core-tube to capture a rock core sample during drilling. Three types of core-tube data loggers (CTDL) have been built and tested to date by Sandia national Laboratories. They are: (1) temperature-only logger, (2) temperature/inclinometer logger and (3) heat-shielded temperature/inclinometer logger. All were tested during core drilling operations using standard wireline diamond core drilling equipment. While these tools are designed for core-tube deployment, the tool lends itself to be adapted to other drilling modes and equipment. Topics covered in this paper include: (1) description on how the CTDLs are implemented, (2) the components of the system, (3) the type of data one can expect from this type of tool, (4) lessons learned, (5) comparison to its counterpart and (6) future work.

  9. Measurement of chromium VI and chromium III in stainless steel welding fumes with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and neutron activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lautner, Gerald Myron

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of Chromium YI and Chromium III in Stainless Steel Welding Fumes with Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis and Neutron Activation Analysis (December 1977) Gerald Myron Lautner; B. S. , Louisiana State University; Co-Chairmen of Advisory... steel plates sized 15. 2 by 26. 7 by 0. 64 centimeters (6. 0 by 10. 5 by 0. 25 inches). The manufacturer lists the following typical analysis for Type 304 stainless plate; C ? 0. 08 percent; Mn - 2. 00 percent; Si - 1 00 percent; Cr = 18. 00 - 20. 00...

  10. activity-based cost analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Le Time Driven Activity Based Costing (TDABC): "New Wine, or Just New Bottles?" Physics Websites Summary: Le Time Driven Activity Based...

  11. Analysis of the interaction between air transportation and economic activity : a worldwide perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishutkina, Mariya A. (Mariya Aleksandrovna)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air transportation usage and economic activity are interdependent. Air transportation provides employment and enables certain economic activities which are dependent on the availability of air transportation services. The ...

  12. Soft-core Processor Customization using the Design of Experiments David Sheldon, Frank Vahid*, Stefano Lonardi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lonardi, Stefano

    by the analysis in turn drives a soft-core tuning heuristic. We show that using DoE to sort the parameters by 40-45% by using predictive tuning methods already built into a DoE tool. 1. Introduction Soft-coreSoft-core Processor Customization using the Design of Experiments Paradigm David Sheldon, Frank

  13. Critical analysis of the Hanford spent nuclear fuel project activity based cost estimate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, R.N.

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, the SNFP developed a baseline change request (BCR) and submitted it to DOE-RL for approval. The schedule was formally evaluated to have a 19% probability of success [Williams, 1998]. In December 1997, DOE-RL Manager John Wagoner approved the BCR contingent upon a subsequent independent review of the new baseline. The SNFP took several actions during the first quarter of 1998 to prepare for the independent review. The project developed the Estimating Requirements and Implementation Guide [DESH, 1998] and trained cost account managers (CAMS) and other personnel involved in the estimating process in activity-based cost (ABC) estimating techniques. The SNFP then applied ABC estimating techniques to develop the basis for the December Baseline (DB) and documented that basis in Basis of Estimate (BOE) books. These BOEs were provided to DOE in April 1998. DOE commissioned Professional Analysis, Inc. (PAI) to perform a critical analysis (CA) of the DB. PAI`s review formally began on April 13. PAI performed the CA, provided three sets of findings to the SNFP contractor, and initiated reconciliation meetings. During the course of PAI`s review, DOE directed the SNFP to develop a new baseline with a higher probability of success. The contractor transmitted the new baseline, which is referred to as the High Probability Baseline (HPB), to DOE on April 15, 1998 [Williams, 1998]. The HPB was estimated to approach a 90% confidence level on the start of fuel movement [Williams, 1998]. This high probability resulted in an increased cost and a schedule extension. To implement the new baseline, the contractor initiated 26 BCRs with supporting BOES. PAI`s scope was revised on April 28 to add reviewing the HPB and the associated BCRs and BOES.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation analysis approach Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Approach Analysis of business process graph (before business process execution) Data mining (during... business process execution) 3 12;Optimization Approach: Analysis A B C D E...

  15. Tank 241-AX-103, cores 212 and 214 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steen, F.H.

    1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-AX-103 push mode core segments collected between July 30, 1997 and August 11, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-AX-103 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Comer, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995) and the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT), plutonium 239 (Pu239), and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Conner, 1997). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and not considered in this report.

  16. Tank 241-T-112, cores 185 and 186 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steen, F.H.

    1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-T-112 push mode core segments collected between February 26, 1997 and March 19, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-T-112 Push Mode Core Samplings and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO). The analytical results are included in the data summary table. None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Total Alpha Activity (AT) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding and are not considered in this report.

  17. Analysis of the Interaction Between Air Transportation and Economic Activity: A Worldwide Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishutkina, Mariya A.

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Air transportation usage and economic activity are interdependent. Air transportation provides employment

  18. Analysis of the Interaction Between Air Transportation and Economic Activity: A Worldwide Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansman, R. John

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Air transportation usage and economic activity are interdependent. Air transportation provides employment

  19. Report on INL Activities for Uncertainty Reduction Analysis of FY11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Plamiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the status of activities performed at INL under the ARC Work Package on 'Uncertainty Reduction Analyses' that has a main goal the reduction of uncertainties associated with nuclear data on neutronic integral parameters of interest for the design of advanced fast reactors under consideration by the ARC program. First, an analysis of experiments was carried out. For both JOYO (the first Japanese fast reactor) and ZPPR-9 (a large size zero power plutonium fueled experiment performed at ANL-W in Idaho) the performance of ENDF/B-VII.0 is quite satisfying except for the sodium void configurations of ZPPR-9, but for which one has to take into account the approximation of the modeling. In fact, when one uses a more detailed model (calculations performed at ANL in a companion WP) more reasonable results are obtained. A large effort was devoted to the analysis of the irradiation experiments, PROFIL-1 and -2 and TRAPU, performed at the French fast reactor PHENIX. For these experiments a pre-release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 cross section files was also used, in order to provide validation feedback to the CSWEG nuclear data evaluation community. In the PROFIL experiments improvements can be observed for the ENDF/B-VII.1 capture data in 238Pu, 241Am, 244Cm, 97Mo, 151Sm, 153Eu, and for 240Pu(n,2n). On the other hand, 240,242Pu, 95Mo, 133Cs and 145Nd capture C/E results are worse. For the major actinides 235U and especially 239Pu capture C/E's are underestimated. For fission products, 105,106Pd, 143,144Nd and 147,149Sm are significantly underestimated, while 101Ru and 151Sm are overestimated. Other C/E deviations from unity are within the combined experimental and calculated statistical uncertainty. From the TRAPU analysis, the major improvement is in the predicted 243Cm build-up, presumably due to an improved 242Cm capture evaluation. The COSMO experiment was also analyzed in order to provide useful feedback on fission cross sections. It was found out that ENDF/B-VII.1 238,240Pu fission cross sections have improved with respect to VII.0 files while 242Pu's fission cross section has not.

  20. Cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis, a non-destructive technique for hydrogen level assessment in zirconium alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    embrittlement by decreasing overall corrosion and/or by decreasing the amount of hydrogen ingress for a givenCold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis, a non-destructive technique for hydrogen level to quantitatively assess hydrogen concentration in zirconium alloys. The technique, called Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma

  1. Preparation and characterization of nanodiamond cores coated with a thin Ni-Zn-P alloy film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Rui; Ye Weichun; Ma Chuanli [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, 730000 Lanzhou (China); Wang Chunming [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, 730000 Lanzhou (China)], E-mail: wangcm@lzu.edu.cn

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanodiamond cores coated with a thin Ni-Zn-P alloy film were prepared by an electroless deposition method under the conditions of tin chloride sensitization and palladium chloride activation. The prepared materials were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The nanostructure of the materials was then characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The alloy film composition was characterized by Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The results indicated the approximate composition 49.84%Ni-37.29%Zn-12.88%P was obtained.

  2. Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takaki, Naoyuki; Namekawa, Azuma; Yoda, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Tokai University, Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); AISA, Fuchu, Ishioka, Ibaraki 315-0013 (Japan); Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper, it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result, it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part, an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled, metal fuel, 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature, pressure drop, linear heat rate, and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding, fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CANDLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

  3. Experimental studies of 6000-litre LMFBR cores at ZPPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, S.G.; Collins, P.J.; Beck, C.L.; Gasidlo, J.M.; Goin, R.W.; Kaiser, R.E.; Maddison, D.W.; Olsen, D.N.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ZPPR-10 program has provided basic physics data for large two-zone conventional LMFBR cores. The early assemblies, 10A and 10B, had core volumes of 4600 litres. The assemblies reported here have core volumes of 6000 litres and represent 900 MW(e) reactors. The measurements emphasized the spatial variation of reaction rate distribution and control rod worths for configurations having 19 and 31 control rod positions. Two configurations with rods inserted were made critical by fuel additions in the later phases. A number of sodium void reactivities were measured. Analysis was made with ENDF/B-IV data.

  4. Screening potato genotypes for antioxidant activity, identification of the responsible compounds, and differentiating Russet Norkotah strains using AFLP and microsatellite marker analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Anna Louise

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    SCREENING POTATO GENOTYPES FOR ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY, IDENTIFICATION OF THE RESPONSIBLE COMPOUNDS, AND DIFFERENTIATING RUSSET NORKOTAH STRAINS USING AFLP AND MICROSATELLITE MARKER ANALYSIS A Dissertation by ANNA LOUISE HALE... FOR ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY, IDENTIFICATION OF THE RESPONSIBLE COMPOUNDS, AND DIFFERENTIATING RUSSET NORKOTAH STRAINS USING AFLP AND MICROSATELLITE MARKER ANALYSIS A Dissertation by ANNA LOUISE HALE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation analysis study Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Kansas Collection: Chemistry 12 SOM CENTER FOR CLINICAL TRIALS CLINICAL RESEARCH ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW Summary: activities ...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation analysis applied Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flexible and Reliable Electronic Commerce Systems Summary: and the underlying TP facility form a framework for dynamic transactional activity processing. By applying the...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation analysis body Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to some degree to maintain body temperature as heat production through activity and heat loss... remote-sensing logging units to study changes in body temperature as a...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation analysis estudo Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dinmica Espacial SER-410-3 Processamento... , A Microwave remote sensing: active and passive. Boston, MA: Artech House, 1981. v.13. Warner, T.A.; Nellis, M... .; Collins,...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation analysis uso Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REMOTO Coordenador Acadmico Summary: , A Microwave remote sensing: active and passive. Boston, MA: Artech House, 1981. v.13. Warner, T.A.; Nellis, M... .; Collins,...

  10. Analysis of Microbial Activity Under a Supercritical CO{sub 2} Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Janelle

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Because the extent and impact of microbial activity in deep saline aquifers during geologic sequestration is unknown, the objectives of this proposal were to: (1) characterize the growth requirements and optima of a biofilm-producing supercritical CO{sub 2}-tolerant microbial consortium (labeled MIT0212) isolated from hydrocarbons recovered from the Frio Ridge, TX carbon sequestration site; (2) evaluate the ability of this consortium to grow under simulated reservoir conditions associated with supercritical CO{sub 2} injection; (3) isolate and characterize individual microbial strains from this consortium; and (4) investigate the mechanisms of supercritical CO{sub 2} tolerance in isolated strains and the consortium through genome-enabled studies. Molecular analysis of genetic diversity in the consortium MIT0212 revealed a predominance of sequences closely related to species of the spore-forming genus Bacillus. Strain MIT0214 was isolated from this consortium and characterized by physiological profiling and genomic analysis. We have shown that the strain MIT0214 is an aerobic spore-former and capable of facultative anaerobic growth under both reducing N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} atmospheres by fermentation and possibly anaerobic respiration. Strain MIT0214 is best adapted to anaerobic growth at pressures of 1 atm but is able to growth at elevated pressures After 1 week growth was observed at pressures as high as 27 atm (N{sub 2}) or 9 atm (CO{sub 2}) and after 26-30 days growth can be observed under supercritical CO{sub 2}. In addition, we have determined that spores of strain B. cereus MIT0214 are tolerant of both direct and indirect exposure to supercritical CO{sub 2}. Additional physiological characterization under aerobic conditions have revealed MIT0214 is able to grow from temperature of 21 to 45 °C and salinities 0.01 to 40 g/L NaCl with optimal growth occurring at 30°C and from 1 - 5 g NaCl/L. The genome sequence of B. cereus MIT0214 shared 89 to 91% of genes with other genome-sequenced strains with 93.3 to 97.8% nucleotide identity among shared genes. Comparison of the sequence of MIT0214 or a B. cereus strain isolated from an oil well in China to B. cereus isolates from surface environments revealed a higher proportion of genes involved in Cell wall and capsule biosynthesis and metabolism, metabolism of aromatic compounds, and stress response. Since Bacillus species, including B. cereus strains, have commonly been recovered from other “extreme” environments including the deep subsurface – the scCO{sub 2} tolerance of spores and growth under high pCO{sub 2} conditions is consistent with persistence in a subsurface environment after CO{sub 2} injection.

  11. Core Values | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. | EMSL Coordinatively-4Core FileCoreCore

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation analysis caracterizacion Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences 4 ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR ANALYSIS AND FORECAST OF AIR POLLUTION (APPLICATION TO SANTIAGO DE CHILE) Summary: ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cell Analysis, Modeling, and Prototyping (CAMP) Facility Research Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cell analysis,...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Impact Analysis: VTO Baseline and Scenario (BaSce) Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about impact analysis...

  15. Development of a database for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis: Summary report of the third research coordination meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, Richard M.; Firestone, Richard B.; Pavi, ???

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main discussions and conclusions from the Third Co-ordination Meeting on the Development of a Database for Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis are summarized in this report. All results were reviewed in detail, and the final version of the TECDOC and the corresponding software were agreed upon and approved for preparation. Actions were formulated with the aim of completing the final version of the TECDOC and associated software by May 2003.

  16. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

  17. A SYSTEMATIC SURVEY OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE EMISSION IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent analysis of observations taken with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer and X-Ray Telescope instruments on Hinode suggests that well-constrained measurements of the temperature distribution in solar active regions can finally be made. Such measurements are critical for constraining theories of coronal heating. Past analysis, however, has suffered from limited sample sizes and large uncertainties at temperatures between 5 and 10 MK. Here we present a systematic study of the differential emission measure distribution in 15 active region cores. We focus on measurements in the 'inter-moss' region, that is, the region between the loop footpoints, where the observations are easier to interpret. To reduce the uncertainties at the highest temperatures we present a new method for isolating the Fe XVIII emission in the AIA/SDO 94 A channel. The resulting differential emission measure distributions confirm our previous analysis showing that the temperature distribution in an active region core is often strongly peaked near 4 MK. We characterize the properties of the emission distribution as a function of the total unsigned magnetic flux. We find that the amount of high-temperature emission in the active region core is correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, while the emission at lower temperatures, in contrast, is inversely related. These results provide compelling evidence that high-temperature active region emission is often close to equilibrium, although weaker active regions may be dominated by evolving million degree loops in the core.

  18. Persistence of activity on Twitter triggered by a natural disaster: A data analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note, we list the results of a simple analysis of a Twitter dataset: the complete dataset of Japanese tweets in the 1-week period after the Great East Japan earthquake, which occurred on March 11, 2011. Our data analysis shows how people reacted to the earthquake on Twitter and how some users went inactive in the long-term.

  19. Alkali solution treatment on sandstone cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Suk Jin

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    was used for filtering the solution before the injection into the core. Hassler-t e Core Holder A stainless steel core holder was used to hold the core for treatment with the solutions. The core sample was positioned in the center of the core holder... and heat the water in the flask. Electric Heatin Ta e A silicone rubber embedded flexible heating tape was used to wrap the core holder to heat the core sample to the desired temperature. The maximum 0 continuous operating temperature of the tape...

  20. Fuel Breeding and Core Behavior Analyses on In Core Fuel Management of Water Cooled Thorium Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Permana, Sidik [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-17, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-17, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Waris, Abdul; Subhki, Muhamad Nurul [Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Ismail, [BAPETEN (Indonesia)

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Thorium fuel cycle with recycled U-233 has been widely recognized having some contributions to improve the water-cooled breeder reactor program which has been shown by a feasible area of breeding and negative void reactivity which confirms that fissile of 233U contributes to better fuel breeding and effective for obtaining negative void reactivity coefficient as the main fissile material. The present study has the objective to estimate the effect of whole core configuration as well as burnup effects to the reactor core profile by adopting two dimensional model of fuel core management. About more than 40 months of cycle period has been employed for one cycle fuel irradiation of three batches fuel system for large water cooled thorium reactors. All position of fuel arrangement contributes to the total core conversion ratio which gives conversion ratio less than unity of at the BOC and it contributes to higher than unity (1.01) at the EOC after some irradiation process. Inner part and central part give the important part of breeding contribution with increasing burnup process, while criticality is reduced with increasing the irradiation time. Feasibility of breeding capability of water-cooled thorium reactors for whole core fuel arrangement has confirmed from the obtained conversion ratio which shows higher than unity. Whole core analysis on evaluating reactivity change which is caused by the change of voided condition has been employed for conservative assumption that 100% coolant and moderator are voided. It obtained always a negative void reactivity coefficient during reactor operation which shows relatively more negative void coefficient at BOC (fresh fuel composition), and it becomes less negative void coefficient with increasing the operation time. Negative value of void reactivity coefficient shows the reactor has good safety properties in relation to the reactivity profile which is the main parameter in term of criticality safety analysis. Therefore, this evaluation has confirmed that breeding condition and negative coefficient can be obtained simultaneously for water-cooled thorium reactor obtains based on the whole core fuel arrangement.

  1. Design and analysis of active fluid-and-cellular solid composites for controllable stiffness robotic elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Nadia G. (Nadia Gen San)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the use of a new class of materials for realizing soft robots. Specifically, meso-scale composites--composed of cellular solids impregnated with active fluids-were be designed ...

  2. Graphical Models for Wide-Area Activity Analysis in Continuous Videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayak, Nandita Miyar

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Multi-person Activity Recognition in Wide-area Videos 2.1Context Modeling in Continuous Videos Using Graphical Modelsmethod. Given a continuous video with computed tracklets, a

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation analysis principles Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 5 1 emerging Principles: The U of R Campus will 12;Actively lead... May 11, 2010 Open House Presentation 12;where we re at consolidated outcomes: vision ... Source: Argerami,...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation dose analysis Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    65 AJR:176, February 2001 289 Estimated Risks of Radiation- Summary: dose at CT in pediatric patients. Radiology 1997;203:417-422 22. Olerud HM. Analysis of factors... ....

  5. analysis charged-particle activation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at center-of-mass energy sqrtsNN200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between gammadir and pi0....

  6. The Nature of Blue Cores in Spheroids: a Possible Connection with AGN and Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felipe Menanteau; Andre R. Martel; Paolo Tozzi; Brenda Frye; Holland C. Ford; Leopoldo Infante; Narciso Benitez; Gaspar Galaz; Daniel Coe; Garth D. Illingworth; George F. Hartig; Marc Clampin

    2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the physical nature of blue cores in early-type galaxies through the first multi-wavelength analysis of a serendipitously discovered field blue-nucleated spheroid in the background of the deep ACS/WFC griz multicolor observations of the cluster Abell 1689. The resolved g-r, r-i and i-z color maps reveal a prominent blue core identifying this galaxy as a ``typical'' case study, exhibiting variations of 0.5-1.0 mag in color between the center and the outer regions, opposite to the expectations of reddened metallicity induced gradients in passively evolved ellipticals. From a Magellan-Clay spectrum we secure the galaxy redshift at $z=0.624$. We find a strong X-ray source coincident with the spheroid galaxy. Spectral features and a high X-ray luminosity indicate the presence of an AGN in the galaxy. However, a comparison of the X-ray luminosity to a sample derived from the Chandra Deep Field South displays Lx to be comparable to Type I/QSO galaxies while the optical flux is consistent with a normal star-forming galaxy. We conclude that the galaxy's non-thermal component dominates at high-energy wavelengths while we associate the spheroid blue light with the stellar spectrum of normal star-forming galaxies. We argue about a probable association between the presence of blue cores in spheroids and AGN activity.

  7. Tank 241-T-203, core 190 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steen, F.H.

    1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-T-203 push mode core segments collected on April 17, 1997 and April 18, 1997. The segments were subsainpled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-T-203 Push Mode Core Sampling andanalysis Plan (TSAP) (Schreiber, 1997a), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO)(Dukelow, et al., 1995) and Leffer oflnstructionfor Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI)(Hall, 1997). The analytical results are included in the data summary report (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Schreiber, 1997a). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997b) and not considered in this report.

  8. Ring diagram analysis of the characteristics of solar oscillation modes in active regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Rajaguru; Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of intense magnetic fields in and around sunspots is expected to modify the solar structure and oscillation frequencies. Applying the ring diagram technique to data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we analyze the characteristics of high-degree f and p modes near active regions and compare them with the characteristics of the modes in quiet regions. As expected from earlier results, the f- and p-mode frequencies of high degree modes are found to be significantly larger in magnetically active regions. In addition, we find that the power in both f and p modes is lower in active regions, while the widths of the peaks are larger, indicating smaller lifetimes. We also find that the oscillation modes are more asymmetric in active regions than those in quiet regions, indicating that modes in active regions are excited closer to the surface. While the increase in mode frequency is monotonic in frequency, all other characteristics show more complex frequency dependences.

  9. Transportation impact analysis for the shipment of low specific activity nitric acid. Revisison 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.R.

    1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This is in support of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility Low Specific Activity (LSA) Nitric Acid Shipment Environmental Assessment. It analyzes potential toxicological and radiological risks associated with transportation of PUREX Facility LSA Nitric Acid from the Hanford Site to Portsmouth VA, Baltimore MD, and Port Elizabeth NJ.

  10. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: Design, analysis, and sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, K. D., E-mail: kdhahn@sandia.gov; Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Smelser, R. M.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Diagnostics and Target Physics, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Diagnostics and Target Physics, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratories, Plasma Physics Group, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratories, Plasma Physics Group, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r{sup 2} decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm{sup 2} and is ? 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

  11. Conservation Cores: Reducing the Energy of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    1 Conservation Cores: Reducing the Energy of Mature Computations Ganesh Venkatesh, Jack Sampson! Dark Silicon #12;9 Conservation Cores Specialized cores for reducing energy ­ Automatically generated Conservation Core Architecture & Synthesis Patchable Hardware Results Conclusions #12;12 Constructing a C

  12. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, F.E.

    1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom. 1 figure.

  13. Reactor core isolation cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor core isolation cooling system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core, a drywell vessel, a containment vessel, and an isolation pool containing an isolation condenser. A turbine is operatively joined to the pressure vessel outlet steamline and powers a pump operatively joined to the pressure vessel feedwater line. In operation, steam from the pressure vessel powers the turbine which in turn powers the pump to pump makeup water from a pool to the feedwater line into the pressure vessel for maintaining water level over the reactor core. Steam discharged from the turbine is channeled to the isolation condenser and is condensed therein. The resulting heat is discharged into the isolation pool and vented to the atmosphere outside the containment vessel for removing heat therefrom.

  14. Donaldson Active Regeneration PM System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Modeling - FEA * Failure Mode Analysis & Life Prediction - Reliability Analysis * FMEA, Fault Tree Analysis, Risk Assessment, etc. Active System Durability & Reliability...

  15. Analysis methods for solar heating and cooling applications: passive and active systems. 2nd edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief descriptions of analysis methods and design tools which are valuable in performing parametric studies of candidate designs are presented in this brochure. The methods included range from rules-of-thumb for builders to the simulation packages used by researchers. (MHR)

  16. Electrocatalysts having gold monolayers on platinum nanoparticle cores, and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to gold-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of an electrocatalytically active core at least partially encapsulated by an outer shell of gold or gold alloy. The invention more particularly relates to such particles having a noble metal-containing core, and more particularly, a platinum or platinum alloy core. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  17. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results. 4 figs.

  18. Core-melt source reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A core-melt source reduction system for ending the progression of a molten core during a core-melt accident and resulting in a stable solid cool matrix. The system includes alternating layers of a core debris absorbing material and a barrier material. The core debris absorbing material serves to react with and absorb the molten core such that containment overpressurization and/or failure does not occur. The barrier material slows the progression of the molten core debris through the system such that the molten core has sufficient time to react with the core absorbing material. The system includes a provision for cooling the glass/molten core mass after the reaction such that a stable solid cool matrix results.

  19. Core Universities | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. | EMSL Coordinatively-4Core FileCore

  20. Determination of oxygen in molten alkali halide salts by proton activation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wai, C.M.; Dysart, M.E.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have recently used a lanthanum fluoride precipitation method to separate /sup 18/F produced from proton activation of /sup 18/O in alkali chloride and fluoride salts. The procedure was developed for studying dissolved oxide species in alkali halide melts. Determination of oxygen in these systems is important for research in batteries and in extractive metallurgy utilizing molten salts as solvents. The details are given oxygen determination in alkali chloride and fluoride systems.

  1. Next Generation Sequencing at the University of Chicago Genomics Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Pieter [University of Chicago

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Chicago Genomics Core provides University of Chicago investigators (and external clients) access to State-of-the-Art genomics capabilities: next generation sequencing, Sanger sequencing / genotyping and micro-arrays (gene expression, genotyping, and methylation). The current presentation will highlight our capabilities in the area of ultra-high throughput sequencing analysis.

  2. Chemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    Advanced chemistry laboratory I CHM 335 3 Advanced chemistry laboratory II Mat 33 3 Engineering materialsChemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core CHM 40, 41 (or CHM 30, 31) 8 Introductory chemistry CHM 110,111,112,113 8 Organic chemistry CHM 332 3 Analytical chemistry CHM 201*** 2 Technical writing CHM

  3. Wright State University CORE Scholar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, James T.

    Wright State University CORE Scholar Psychology Faculty Publications Psychology 10-1-2010 The Statistical Properties of the Survivor Interaction Contrast Joseph W. Houpt Wright State University - Main Campus, joseph.houpt@wright.edu James T. Townsend Follow this and additional works at: http://corescholar.libraries.wright

  4. The determination of titanium, germanium and gallium by charged particle activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novak, Leo Robert

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V FWHM for the 1. 332 MeV y-ray of Co; Peak-to-Compton ratio: 20. 1; 60 Efficiency relative to a 3 x 3 inch NaI (Tl) detector for the 1. 332 MeV y-ray measured at 25 cm distance: 3 05%%d Data Ac uisition and Processin Data was acquired via a 4096... of the reaction had to be sufficiently high to make measurements of ppm level concentrations feasible. The thick target yields were calculated by correlating the activities of the particular Y-rays 16 back to the time at the end of the irradiation...

  5. Quality assurance guidance for laboratory assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one of several guidance documents developed to support the EM (DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management) Analytical Services program. Its purpose is to introduce assessment plates that can be used to conduct performance assessments of an organization`s or project`s ability to meet quality goals for analytical laboratory activities. These assessment plates are provided as non-prescriptive guidance to EM-support organizations responsible for collection of environmental data for remediation and waste management programs at DOE facilities. The assessments evaluate objectively all components of the analytical laboratory process to determine their proper selection and use.

  6. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The x-ray fluorescence laboratory (XRF) in the Analytical Development Directorate (ADD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop an XRF analytical method that provides rapid turnaround time (<8 hours), while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine variations in waste.

  7. Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Enginesthewith RationalActivity| Department of

  8. Facile synthesis of mesoporous core-shell TiO{sub 2} nanostructures from TiCl{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Bin, E-mail: bxue@shou.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, College of Food Science and Technology, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 201306 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, College of Food Science and Technology, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 201306 (China); Sun, Tao; Mao, Fang; Sun, Li-Chun; Yang, Wei [Department of Chemistry, College of Food Science and Technology, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 201306 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, College of Food Science and Technology, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 201306 (China); Xu, Zhu-De [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, Xin [Chemical Engineering College, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Hohhot 010051 (China)] [Chemical Engineering College, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Hohhot 010051 (China)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} Stable TiCl{sub 3} solution is adopted as Ti sources. {yields} Low-cost glucose assisted facile solvothermal reactions. {yields} Exquisite core-shell morphology and mesoporous structure of TiO{sub 2} nanostructures. {yields} Superior photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanostructures in UV light irradiation. -- Abstract: The present study reports the synthesis and formation process of mesoporous core-shell TiO{sub 2} nanostructures by employing a glucose-assisted solvothermal process using water-ethanol mixture as solvent and subsequent calcination process at 550 {sup o}C for 4 h. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis were used to investigate the structural properties of these nanostructures. By optimizing the preparation conditions, especially the contents of water and ethanol in the mixture solvent, mesoporous core-shell TiO{sub 2} nanostructures were obtained. These mesoporous nanostructures have anatase phase and exhibit the superior photocatalytic activity. This synthesis route is facile due to the usage of stable and low-cost Ti precursor such as TiCl{sub 3} and is thus applicable for large-scale production.

  9. Core Capabilities and Technical Enhancement -- FY-98 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David Lynn

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Core Capability and Technical Enhancement (CC&TE) Program, a part of the Verification, Validation, and Engineering Assessment Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening the technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Office of Environmental Management (EM). An analysis of EM's science and technology needs as well as the technology investments currently being made by EM across the complex was used to formulate a portfolio of research activities designed to address EM's needs without overlapping work being done elsewhere. An additional purpose is to enhance and maintain the technical capabilities and research infrastructure at the INEEL. This is a progress report for fiscal year 1998 for the five CC&TE research investment areas: (a) transport aspects of selective mass transport agents, (b) chemistry of environmental surfaces, (c) materials dynamics, (d) characterization science, and (e) computational simulation of mechanical and chemical systems. In addition to the five purely technical research areas, this report deals with the science and technology foundations element of the CC&TE from the standpoint of program management and complex-wide issues. This report also provides details of ongoing and future work in all six areas.

  10. Core capabilities and technical enhancement, FY-98 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.L.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Core Capability and Technical Enhancement (CCTE) Program, a part of the Verification, Validation, and Engineering Assessment Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening the technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). An analysis of EM's science and technology needs as well as the technology investments currently being made by EM across the complex was used to formulate a portfolio of research activities designed to address EM's needs without overlapping work being done elsewhere. An additional purpose is to enhance and maintain the technical capabilities and research infrastructure at the INEEL. This is a progress report for fiscal year 1998 for the five CCTE research investment areas: (a) transport aspects of selective mass transport agents, (b) chemistry of environmental surfaces, (c) materials dynamics, (d) characterization science, and (e) computational simulation of mechanical and chemical systems. In addition to the five purely technical research areas, this report deals with the science and technology foundations element of the CCTE from the standpoint of program management and complex-wide issues. This report also provides details of ongoing and future work in all six areas.

  11. Resolving piping analysis issues to minimize impact on installation activities during refueling outage at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhavnani, D. [Public Service Electric and Gas Co., Hancocks Bridge, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While it is required to maintain piping code compliance for all phases of installation activities during outages at a nuclear plant, it is equally essential to reduce challenges to the installation personnel on how plant modification work should be performed. Plant betterment activities that incorporate proposed design changes are continually implemented during the outages. Supporting analysis are performed to back these activities for operable systems. The goal is to reduce engineering and craft man-hours and minimize outage time. This paper outlines how plant modification process can be streamlined to facilitate construction teams to do their tasks that involve safety related piping. In this manner, installation can proceed by minimizing on the spot analytical effort and reduce downtime to support the proposed modifications. Examples are provided that permit performance of installation work in any sequence. Piping and hangers including the branch lines are prequalified and determined operable. The system is up front analyzed for all possible scenarios. The modification instructions in the work packages is flexible enough to permit any possible installation sequence. The benefit to this approach is large enough in the sense that valuable outage time is not extended and on site analytical work is not required.

  12. Shape defect detection in ferrite cores Judit Verest'oy and Dmitry Chetverikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chetverikov, Dmitry

    Shape defect detection in ferrite cores Judit Verest'oy and Dmitry Chetverikov Computer. The method is applied to the visual inspection and dimensional measurement of ferrite cores. An optical shape defects may deteriorate any of the dimensions. Key words: image analysis, industrial inspection, ferrite

  13. Tank 241-BY-109, cores 201 and 203, analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final laboratory report for tank 241-BY-109 push mode core segments collected between June 6, 1997 and June 17, 1997. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (Bell, 1997), the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow, et al, 1995). The analytical results are included.

  14. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  15. Elemental characterization of the Avogadro silicon crystal WASO 04 by neutron activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Agostino, Giancarlo; Giordani, Laura; Mana, Giovanni; Massa, Enrico; Oddone, Massimo; 10.1088/0026-1394/49/6/696

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical measurements of the 28Si crystal used for the determination of the Avogadro constant are essential to prevent biased results or under-estimated uncertainties. A review of the existing data confirms the high-purity of silicon with respect to a large number of elements. In order to obtain a direct evidence of purity, we developed a relative analytical method based on neutron activation. As a preliminary test, this method was applied to a sample of the Avogadro crystal WASO 04. The investigation concerned twenty-nine elements. The mass fraction of Au was quantified to be 1.03(18) x 10-12. For the remaining twenty-eight elements, the mass fractions are below the detection limits, which range between 1 x 10-12 and 1 x 10-5.

  16. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

  17. EARLY EVOLUTION OF PRESTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horedt, G. P., E-mail: g.horedt@online.de [Kronwinkler 50, D-81245, Munich (Germany)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prestellar cores are approximated by singular polytropic spheres. Their early evolution is studied analytically with a Bondi-like scheme. The considered approximation is meaningful for polytropic exponents {gamma} between 0 and 6/5, implying radial power-law density profiles between r {sup -1} and r {sup -2.5}. Gravitationally unstable Jeans and Bonnor-Ebert masses differ at most by a factor of 3.25. Tidally stable prestellar cores must have a mean density contrast {approx}> 8 with respect to the external parent cloud medium. The mass-accretion rate relates to the cube of equivalent sound speed, as in Shu's seminal paper. The prestellar masses accreted over 10{sup 5} years cover the whole stellar mass spectrum; they are derived in simple closed form, depending only on the polytropic equation of state. The stellar masses that can be formed via strict conservation of angular momentum are at most of the order of a brown dwarf.

  18. Laminated electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, A.W.

    1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially abutting tapered laminations extending radially outwardly from a centerline axis to collectively define a radially inner bore and a radially outer circumference. Each of the laminations includes radially inner and outer edges and has a thickness increasing from the inner edge toward the outer edge to provide a substantially continuous path adjacent the circumference. This pump is used in nuclear fission reactors. 19 figs.

  19. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF NGC 4178: A BULGELESS GALAXY WITH AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secrest, N. J.; Satyapal, S.; Gliozzi, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, MS 3F3, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Moran, S. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cheung, C. C. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Bergmann, M. P. [NOAO Gemini Science Center, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Seth, A. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Gemini longslit optical spectroscopy and Very Large Array radio observations of the nuclear region of NGC 4178, a late-type bulgeless disk galaxy recently confirmed to host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) through infrared and X-ray observations. Our observations reveal that the dynamical center of the galaxy is coincident with the location of the Chandra X-ray point source discovered in a previous work, providing further support for the presence of an AGN. While the X-ray and IR observations provide robust evidence for an AGN, the optical spectrum shows no evidence for the AGN, underscoring the need for the penetrative power of mid-IR and X-ray observations in finding buried or weak AGNs in this class of galaxy. Finally, the upper limit to the radio flux, together with our previous X-ray and IR results, is consistent with the scenario in which NGC 4178 harbors a deeply buried AGN accreting at a high rate.

  20. Heatup of the TMI-2 lower head during core relocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis has been carried out to assess the potential of a melting attack upon the reactor vessel lower head and incore instrument nozzle penetration weldments during the TMI core relocation event at 224 minutes. Calculations were performed to determine the potential for molten corium to undergo breakup into droplets which freeze and form a debris bed versus impinging upon the lower head as one or more coherent streams. The effects of thermal-hydraulic interactions between corium streams and water inside the lower plenum, the effects of the core support assembly structure upon the corium, and the consequences of corium relocation by way of the core former region were examined. 19 refs., 24 figs.

  1. Radial illite On the cores of the Soultz well EPS1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are quarries, abandoned or with activities. Six samples have been also collected among the granite cores and alteration halo (Ottenhöffen quarry, Germany) On these outcrops, we have measured planes of fracture

  2. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Matrix Acidizing Parallel Core Flooding Apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Vivek

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    and provide this information to the field. To conduct various experiments, core flooding setups are created. The setup consists of a core holder, accumulator, overburden pump, injection pump, accumulator, pressure sensors, and a back pressure regulator...

  4. GCFR core thermal-hydralic design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schleuter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Bennett, F.O.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The approach for developing the thermal-hydraulic core assembly designs for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) is reviewed, and key considerations for improving the core performance at all power and flow conditions are discussed. It is shown how the thermal-hydraulic core assembly designs evolve from evaluations of plant size, material limitations, safety criteria, and structural performance considerations.

  5. Russian techniques for more productive core drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a short discussion of the trends and technology being used in Russia to increase the production of core drilling. The currently used rigs are given with the plans for improvement in drive methods and to reduce trip time in the recovery of cores. The recommendations by the Russians to improve the core recovery quality and quantity are also given.

  6. FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: core-barrel vibra-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: core-barrel vibra- tions, in-core neutron noise, shell- mode vibrations CALCULATION OF THE NEUTRON NOISE INDUCED BY SHELL-MODE CORE-BARREL VIBRATIONS IN A 1-D, TWO-GROUP, TWO-REGION SLAB REACTOR MODEL CARL SUNDE,* CHRISTOPHE DEMAZI�RE, and IMRE PÁZSIT Chalmers University of Technology

  7. ANALYSIS OF OPTICAL Fe II EMISSION IN A SAMPLE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovacevic, Jelena; Popovic, Luka C.; Dimitrijevic, Milan S., E-mail: jkovacevic@aob.bg.ac.r [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of optical Fe II emission in 302 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We group the strongest Fe II multiplets into three groups according to the lower term of the transition (b{sup 4} F, a{sup 6} S, and a{sup 4} G terms). These approximately correspond to the blue, central, and red parts, respectively, of the 'iron shelf' around H{beta}. We calculate an Fe II template that takes into account transitions into these three terms and an additional group of lines, based on a reconstruction of the spectrum of I Zw 1. This Fe II template gives a more precise fit of the Fe II lines in broad-line AGNs than other templates. We extract Fe II, H{alpha}, H{beta}, [O III], and [N II] emission parameters and investigate correlations between them. We find that Fe II lines probably originate in an intermediate line region. We note that the blue, red, and central parts of the iron shelf have different relative intensities in different objects. Their ratios depend on continuum luminosity, FWHM H{beta}, the velocity shift of Fe II, and the H{alpha}/H{beta} flux ratio. We examine the dependence of the well-known anti-correlation between the equivalent widths of Fe II and [O III] on continuum luminosity. We find that there is a Baldwin effect for [O III] but an inverse Baldwin effect for the Fe II emission. The [O III]/Fe II ratio thus decreases with L {sub {lambda}5100}. Since the ratio is a major component of the Boroson and Green Eigenvector 1 (EV1), this implies a connection between the Baldwin effect and EV1 and could be connected with AGN evolution. We find that spectra are different for H{beta} FWHMs greater and less than {approx}3000 km s{sup -1}, and that there are different correlation coefficients between the parameters.

  8. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

  9. Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schultz

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

  10. DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. Key Cyber...

  11. Analysis of closed-pool boilup using the TRANSIT-HYDRO code. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graff, D.L.

    1983-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The benign termination of the transition phase of a hypothetical LMFBR accident rests on the avoidance of highly energetic recriticalities prior to escape of bottled molten core materials from the active core region. In scenarios where molten fuel is trapped due to axial blockages, the maintenance of subcritical configurations until radial flow paths develop requires stable boil-up of the molten fuel/steel mixture. This paper describes the analysis of an experiment investigating the behavior of closed boiling pools using the two-fluid hydrodynamics module of TRANSIT-HYDRO, a deterministic transition-phase analysis code.

  12. The core legion object model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, M.; Grimshaw, A. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legion project at the University of Virginia is an architecture for designing and building system services that provide the illusion of a single virtual machine to users, a virtual machine that provides secure shared object and shared name spaces, application adjustable fault-tolerance, improved response time, and greater throughput. Legion targets wide area assemblies of workstations, supercomputers, and parallel supercomputers, Legion tackles problems not solved by existing workstation based parallel processing tools; the system will enable fault-tolerance, wide area parallel processing, inter-operability, heterogeneity, a single global name space, protection, security, efficient scheduling, and comprehensive resource management. This paper describes the core Legion object model, which specifies the composition and functionality of Legion`s core objects-those objects that cooperate to create, locate, manage, and remove objects in the Legion system. The object model facilitates a flexible extensible implementation, provides a single global name space, grants site autonomy to participating organizations, and scales to millions of sites and trillions of objects.

  13. ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE CORES OF RADIO SOURCES AND THEIR EXTENDED RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan Zunli; Wang Jiancheng, E-mail: yuanzunli@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The work in this paper aims at determining the evolution and possible co-evolution of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and their cores via their radio luminosity functions (i.e., total and core RLFs, respectively). Using a large combined sample of 1063 radio-loud AGNs selected at low radio frequency, we investigate the RLF at 408 MHz of steep-spectrum radio sources. Our results support a luminosity-dependent evolution. Using core flux density data of the complete sample 3CRR, we investigate the core RLF at 5.0 GHz. Based on the combined sample with incomplete core flux data, we also estimate the core RLF using a modified factor of completeness. Both results are consistent and show that the comoving number density of radio cores displays a persistent decline with redshift, implying a negative density evolution. We find that the core RLF is obviously different from the total RLF at the 408 MHz band which is mainly contributed by extended lobes, implying that the cores and extended lobes could not be co-evolving at radio emission.

  14. Multi-core and Many-core Shared-memory Parallel Raycasting Volume Rendering Optimization and Tuning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howison, Mark

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the computing industry trend of increasing processing capacity by adding more cores to a chip, the focus of this work is tuning the performance of a staple visualization algorithm, raycasting volume rendering, for shared-memory parallelism on multi-core CPUs and many-core GPUs. Our approach is to vary tunable algorithmic settings, along with known algorithmic optimizations and two different memory layouts, and measure performance in terms of absolute runtime and L2 memory cache misses. Our results indicate there is a wide variation in runtime performance on all platforms, as much as 254% for the tunable parameters we test on multi-core CPUs and 265% on many-core GPUs, and the optimal configurations vary across platforms, often in a non-obvious way. For example, our results indicate the optimal configurations on the GPU occur at a crossover point between those that maintain good cache utilization and those that saturate computational throughput. This result is likely to be extremely difficult to predict with an empirical performance model for this particular algorithm because it has an unstructured memory access pattern that varies locally for individual rays and globally for the selected viewpoint. Our results also show that optimal parameters on modern architectures are markedly different from those in previous studies run on older architectures. And, given the dramatic performance variation across platforms for both optimal algorithm settings and performance results, there is a clear benefit for production visualization and analysis codes to adopt a strategy for performance optimization through auto-tuning. These benefits will likely become more pronounced in the future as the number of cores per chip and the cost of moving data through the memory hierarchy both increase.

  15. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Welding and Joining Research); Kelly, T.J. (General Electric Aircraft Engines, Evendale, OH (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  16. Cool core cycles: Cold gas and AGN jet feedback in cluster cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad, Deovrat; Babul, Arif

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using high-resolution 3-D and 2-D (axisymmetric) hydrodynamic simulations in spherical geometry, we study the evolution of cool cluster cores heated by feedback-driven bipolar active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets. Condensation of cold gas, and the consequent enhanced accretion, is required for AGN feedback to balance radiative cooling with reasonable efficiencies, and to match the observed cool core properties. A feedback efficiency (mechanical luminosity $\\approx \\epsilon \\dot{M}_{\\rm acc} c^2$; where $\\dot{M}_{\\rm acc}$ is the mass accretion rate at 1 kpc) as small as $5 \\times 10^{-5}$ is sufficient to reduce the cooling/accretion rate by $\\sim 10$ compared to a pure cooling flow. This value is smaller compared to the ones considered earlier, and is consistent with the jet efficiency and the fact that only a small fraction of gas at 1 kpc is accreted on to the supermassive black hole (SMBH). We find hysteresis cycles in all our simulations with cold mode feedback: {\\em condensation} of cold gas when the ratio...

  17. Test report -- Prototype core sampler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linschooten, C.G.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this test is to determine the adequacy of the prototype sampler, provided to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by DOE-RL. The sampler was fabricated for DOE-RL by the Concord Company by request of DOE-RL. This prototype sampler was introduced as a technology that can be easily deployed (similar to the current auger system) and will reliably collect representative samples. The sampler is similar to the Universal Sampler i.e., smooth core barrel and piston with an O-ring seal, but lacks a rotary valve near the throat of the sampler. This makes the sampler inappropriate for liquid sampling, but reduces the outside diameter of the sampler considerably, which should improve sample recovery. Recovery testing was performed with the supplied sampler in three different consistencies of Kaolin sludge simulants.

  18. A benchmark for investigating the radial dependence of C/E for control rod worths in large decoupled cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvatores, M. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)); Orechwa, Y. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Collins, P.J. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first physics measurements of a heterogeneous core on the critical assembly ZPPR-7 at ANL showed that the C/E ratios with ENDF/B data for the worths of the control rods in the outer bank were several percent higher than those at the inner bank positions. This radial variation in the C/E for the rod worths was further confirmed in the analysis of the large conventional core ZPPR-10, and again in the analysis of the large heterogeneous core series ZPPR-13. In the design of a power reactor, the number of control rods, and their disposition, are determined by calculations. Misprediction of the worth of the control rods can lead to serious economic penalties by restricting the operation of the core. Retrofitting a core to accommodate more worth will be costly and is likely to lead to a non-optimized core. This document provides a discussion of these calculations. 7 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Application of neutron activation analysis and high resolution x-ray spectrometry for the determination of trace quantities of elements with short-lived activation products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John Richard

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion Interferences and Errors 3, PROCEDURES AND EXPERIMENTAL SETUP Sample Preparation Pneumatic Sample Transfer System Sample Irradiation X-ray Spectrometry Data Reduction 4. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS System Analysis Analysis Problems.... C. Roentgen made the classic observation that a highly penatrative radiation, unknown at that time, was produced when fast electrons impinged on matter. This radiation, which h called x-rays, was being studied in all parts of the world less than...

  20. Material with core-shell structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhrs, Claudia (Rio Rancho, NM); Richard, Monique N. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dehne, Aaron (Maumee, OH); Phillips, Jonathan (Rio Rancho, NM); Stamm, Kimber L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Fanson, Paul T. (Brighton, MI)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  1. Coupled Full-Core Problem witssh VERA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inc Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Core Physics, Inc. Southern States Energy Board City University of New York Texas A&M University Florida State University University of...

  2. Natural thorium isotopes in marine sediment core off Labuan port

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafidz, B. Y.; Asnor, A. S.; Terence, R. C.; Mohamed, C. A. R. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment core was collected from Labuan port and analyzed to determine the radioactivity of thorium (Th) isotopes. The objectives of this study are to determine the possible sources of Th isotopes at Labuan port and estimates the sedimentation rate based on {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The results suggest the {sup 230}Th and {sup 232}Th might be originated from terrestrial sedimentary rock while {sup 228}Th originated by authigenic origin. High ratio value of {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th detected at the top surface sediment indicates the increasing of {sup 230}Th at the recent years which might be contributed from the anthropogenic sources. The sedimentation rate of core sediment from Labuan Port was successfully estimated by using {sup 228}Th/{sup 232}Th model. The result show high sedimentation rate with 4.67 cm/year indicates rapid deposition occurred at this study area due to the high physical activity at the Labuan port. By assume the constant sedimentation rate at this area; we estimated the age of 142 cm core sediment obtained from Labuan port is 32 years started from 1981 to 2012. This chronology will be used in forthcoming research to investigate the historical profile of anthropogenic activities affecting the Labuan port.

  3. New insights on the solar core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, R A; Ballot, J; Eff-Darwich, A; Garrido, R; Jimenez, A; Mathis, S; Mathur, S; Moya, A; Palle, P L; Regulo, C; Sato, K; Suarez, J C; Turck-Chieze, S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the detection of the asymptotic properties of the dipole gravity modes in the Sun, the quest to find individual gravity modes has continued. An extensive and deeper analysis of 14 years of continuous GOLF/SoHO observational data, unveils the presence of a pattern of peaks that could be interpreted as individual dipole gravity modes in the frequency range between 60 and 140 microHz, with amplitudes compatible with the latest theoretical predictions. By collapsing the power spectrum we have obtained a quite constant splitting for these patterns in comparison to regions where no g modes were expected. Moreover, the same technique applied to simultaneous VIRGO/SoHO data unveils some common signals between the power spectra of both instruments. Thus, we are able to identify and characterize individual g modes with their central frequencies, amplitudes and splittings allowing to do seismic inversions of the rotation profile inside the solar core. These results open a new light on the physics and dynamics of t...

  4. Comparison of IUPAC k0 Values and Neutron Cross Sections to Determine a Self-consistent Set of Data for Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Richard B; Revay, Zsolt

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Independent databases of nuclear constants for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) have been independently maintained by the physics and chemistry communities for many year. They contain thermal neturon cross sections s0, standardization values k0, and transition probabilities Pg. Chemistry databases tend to rely upon direct measurements of the nuclear constants k0 and Pg which are often published in chemistry journals while the physics databases typically include evaluated s0 and Pg data from a variety of experiments published mainly in physics journals. The IAEA/LBNL Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) also contains prompt and delayed g-ray cross sections sg from Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) measurements that can also be used to determine k0 and s0 values. As a result several independent databases of fundamental constants for NAA have evolved containing slightly different and sometimes discrepant results. An IAEA CRP for a Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis was established to compare these databases and investigate the possibilitiy of producing a self-consistent set of s0, k0, sg, and Pg values for NAA and other applications. Preliminary results of this IAEA CRP comparison are given in this paper.

  5. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by ?-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nault, Rance, E-mail: naultran@msu.edu [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Abdul-Fattah, Hiba [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Moon, Thomas W. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist ?-naphthoflavone (?NF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 ?M ?NF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: • Energetic costs of AhR activation by ?NF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. • Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. • Exposure to ?NF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. • Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism.

  6. Core Science Requirement Final Document Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagalante, Anthony F.

    Core Science Requirement ­ Final Document ­ Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and MENDEL SCIENCE EXPERIENCE COURSES Core requirement of 2 semesters of science with laboratory; requirement to be met by the end of the sophomore year Rationale Science literacy is an integral part of the intellectual

  7. Experto Universitario Java Sesin 1: Spring core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core Puntos a tratar 2 #12;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA;Experto Universitario Java Enterprise Spring © 2012-2013 Depto. Ciencia de la Computación e IA Spring core

  8. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  9. The Formation and Evolution of Prestellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe André; Shantanu Basu; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving our understanding of the initial conditions and earliest stages of star formation is crucial to gain insight into the origin of stellar masses, multiple systems, and protoplanetary disks. We review the properties of low-mass dense cores as derived from recent millimeter/submillimeter observations of nearby molecular clouds and discuss them in the context of various contemporary scenarios for cloud core formation and evolution. None of the extreme scenarios can explain all observations. Pure laminar ambipolar diffusion has relatively long growth times for typical ionization levels and has difficulty satisfying core lifetime constraints. Purely hydrodynamic pictures have trouble accounting for the inefficiency of core formation and the detailed velocity structure of individual cores. A possible favorable scenario is a mixed model involving gravitational fragmentation of turbulent molecular clouds close to magnetic criticality. The evolution of the magnetic field and angular momentum in individual cloud cores after the onset of gravitational collapse is also discussed. In particular, we stress the importance of radiation-magnetohydrodynamical processes and resistive MHD effects during the protostellar phase. We also emphasize the role of the formation of the short-lived first (protostellar) core in providing a chance for sub-fragmentation into binary systems and triggering MHD outflows. Future submillimeter facilities such as Herschel and ALMA will soon provide major new observational constraints in this field. On the theoretical side, an important challenge for the future will be to link the formation of molecular clouds and prestellar cores in a coherent picture.

  10. Enrollment for Core Infrastructure Customer Datasheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    the Core Infrastructure Suite (CIS) Datacenter or Standard Edition, or a mix of both. Either edition offers), with each Datacenter Edition license the number of virtual OSEs is unlimited. Core Infrastructure Suites of your IT environment. CIS Suite Datacenter Supports an unlimited number of virtual OSEs CIS Suite

  11. Origin of the Core Francis Nimmo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nimmo, Francis

    Origin of the Core Francis Nimmo Dept. Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz F. Nimmo, Dept. Earth Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA (fnimmo@es.ucsc.edu), tel. 831-459-1783, fax. 831-459-3074 1 #12;Origin of the Core All major bodies of the inner solar

  12. Module Handbook Core Univ. of Oldenburg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    Energy Conversion Process · Location Dependence of Wind Energy Potential and Wind Energy Forecasting/EUREC Course 2008/2009 #12;EUREC Core Courses at University of Oldenburg, 1st Semester Wind Energy Module Module Description: Wind Energy Field: Core Oldenburg Courses: Wind Energy Wind Energy

  13. CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandvik, Tobias

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    cores with 4 · 106 transistors each gives 10 times the performance as 1 big core 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 x 108Number of transistors P e r f o r m a n c e CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors – p.8/36 Everyone is going parallel Every major chip vendor... on Many-core Processors – p.22/36 Stencil operations Evaluate ?2u?x2 on a regular grid: DO K=2,NK-1 DO J=2,NJ-1 DO I=2,NI-1 D2UDX2(I,J,K) = (U(I+1,J,K) - 2.0*U(I,J,K) + & U(I-1,J,K))/(DX*DX) END DO END DO END DO CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors – p.23...

  14. Experimental studies of a large heterogeneous LMFBR benchmark core, ZPPR-13A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumbach, S.B.; Collins, P.J.; Carpenter, S.G.; Suzuki, S.; Kawashima, M.

    1983-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The ZPPR-13 program provides basic physics information for testing calculations of radially heterogeneous cores of about 700 MWe size. ZPPR-13 is part of the JUPITER cooperative program between Japan and the US. The results are presented of measurements and analysis for the first assembly, ZPPR-13A. These are the first data for heterogeneous cores of this size available in the US and complement results from ZPPR-9, a conventional LMFBR of similar size.

  15. Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core–Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki K.; Kuttiyiel, K.A.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.R.

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

  16. ON THE INTERNAL DYNAMICS OF STARLESS CORES: STABILITY OF STARLESS CORES WITH INTERNAL MOTIONS AND COLLAPSE DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Young Min; Shirley, Yancy L. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Hong, Seung Soo [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the collapse dynamics of observed low-mass starless cores, we revise the conventional stability condition of hydrostatic Bonnor-Ebert spheres to take internal motions into account. Because observed starless cores resemble Bonnor-Ebert density structures, the stability and dynamics of the starless cores are frequently analyzed by comparing to the conventional stability condition of a hydrostatic Bonnor-Ebert sphere. However, starless cores are not hydrostatic but have observed internal motions. In this study, we take gaseous spheres with a homologous internal velocity field and derive stability conditions of the spheres utilizing a virial analysis. We propose two limiting models of spontaneous gravitational collapse: the collapse of critical Bonnor-Ebert spheres and uniform density spheres. The collapse of these two limiting models is intended to provide the lower and the upper limits, respectively, of the infall speeds for a given density structure. The results of our study suggest that the stability condition sensitively depends on internal motions. A homologous inward motion with a transonic speed can reduce the critical size compared to the static Bonnor-Ebert sphere by more than a factor of two. As an application of the two limiting models of spontaneous gravitational collapse, we compare the density structures and infall speeds of the observed starless cores L63, L1544, L1689B, and L694-2 to the two limiting models. L1689B and L694-2 seem to have been perturbed to result in faster infall motions than for spontaneous gravitational collapse.

  17. Advances in fuel management and on-line core monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, R.B.; Hansen, L.E.; Patten, T.W.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Nuclear Fuels Corporation (ANF) has developed and implemented advanced core power distribution monitoring methods for BWRs and PWRs based on the three dimensional nodal simulator codes used for incore fuel management design and analysis. The use of these methods has resulted in a more accurate assessment of the core power distribution and corresponding increased operating margins. These increased margins allow for more economical fuel cycle designs. Since the initial application in 1982, ANF has made enhancements to the incore monitoring system. These enhancements have permitted more rapid analysis of local power changes, power distribution projections during ascent to full power and on-line statistical analysis of the incore detector signal. The on-line analysis implemented in BWRs has also been developed for application PWRs. In the future, reactors are expected to operate with longer fuel cycles, more aggressive low radial leakage loadings, load follow and use higher burnup fuel. These advances will require more burnable neutron absorbers and more sophisticated fuel designs. To accommodate these advances, the fuel management methodologies and measurement system will require improvements. The state-of-the-art methods provided by ANF provide incore monitoring systems compatible with these expected needs.

  18. Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 46GTR-NRS-P-105 IMAGE-BASED CHANGE ESTIMATION FOR LAND COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 46GTR-NRS-P-105 IMAGE are core to applications including: carbon accounting, greenhouse gas emission reporting, biomass effects of natural disturbances and human activities. By extension, our ability to understand and model

  19. The effect of graded doses of corticosteroids on regional body calcium in the cebus monkey: an analysis with in vivo neutron activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loeffler, Scott Howard

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    followed by a 5-week, daily treatment with aqueous hydrocortisone succinate at a dose of 26 mg/kg b. w. /day. All drugs were given by intramuscular injection. Body calcium in the leg and spinal regions was monitored by regional activation analysis... Experimentals - Spine Position Normalized Calcium . . . . . . 8 Controls - Spine Position Normalized Calcium . 9 Monkey 52A - Leg Position. 10 Monkey 36A ? Leg Position. 11 Monkey 128 - Leg Position. 12 Monkey 98 - Leg Position 13 Nonkey 38 - Leg...

  20. A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

  1. Multicriteria Analysis of Economic Activity for Two Groups of European Countries by Decision Support System MKA-1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    . Five macro-economic criteria have been considered in the analysis: GDP per capita; Exports (% of GDP); Imports (% of GDP); Inflation rate (consumer prices); Unemployment rate. Keywords: multicriteria analysis of multicriteria sorting. Many real life problems in management practice may be formulated as problems of choice

  2. Assembly of large metagenome data sets using a Convey HC-1 hybrid core computer (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Copeland, Alex [DOE JGI

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Alex Copeland on "Assembly of large metagenome data sets using a Convey HC-1 hybrid core computer" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  3. {sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Incorporation of silica into baroplastic core-shell nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewlett, Sheldon A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core-shell baroplastics are nanophase materials that exhibit pressure-induced flow at low temperatures and high pressures. Core-shell baroplastics used in this work are comprised of a low Tg poly(butyl acrylate) (PBA) core ...

  5. Magnetic core studies at LBNL and LLNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molvik, A.W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL) and DE-AC03-76SF00098 (LBNL). References Wayne Meier,Magnetic Core Studies at LBNL and LLNL A. W. Molvik a,* , A.Livermore, CA 94550, USA LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA c

  6. Armor systems including coated core materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  7. Armor systems including coated core materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  8. Multiple network interface core apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Keith D. (Albuquerque, NM); Hemmert, Karl Scott (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A network interface controller and network interface control method comprising providing a single integrated circuit as a network interface controller and employing a plurality of network interface cores on the single integrated circuit.

  9. PRELIMINARY TIME ESTIMATES FOR CORING OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EQUATIONS 17 FIGURE 1. DRILL STRING ROUND TRIP 19 FIGURE 2. STANDARD ROTARY CORING (RCB) WIRELINE TRIP 21) WIRELINE TRIP 25 FIGURE 5. ESTIMATED RIGGING, WIRELINE, AND SCANNING TIME FOR REENTRY. 27 #12;Preliminary

  10. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at 8 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  11. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trend was identified in the HPCI results. Statistically significant decreasing trends were identified for RCIC start-only and 8-hour trends.

  12. Facile approach to prepare hollow core–shell NiO microspherers for supercapacitor electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Dandan [Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Jilin Institute of Chemical Technology, Jilin 132022 (China); Xu, Pengcheng [College of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Jilin Institute of Chemical Technology, Jilin 132022 (China); Jing, Xiaoyan [Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Jun, E-mail: zhqw1888@sohu.com [Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Institute of Advanced Marine Materials, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Song, Dalei; Liu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Milin [Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A facile lamellar template method (see image) has been developed for the preparation of uniform hollow core–shell structure NiO (HCS–NiO) with a nanoarchitectured wall structure. The prepared NiO was found to be highly crystalline in uniform microstructures with high specific surface area and pore volume. The results indicated that ethanol interacted with trisodium citrate played an important role for the formation of hollow core–shell spheres. On the basis of the analysis of the composition and the morphology, a possible formation mechanism was investigated. NiO microspheres with hollow core–shell showed excellent capacitive properties. The exceptional cyclic, structural and electrochemical stability with ?95% coulombic efficiency, and very low ESR value from impedance measurements promised good utility value of hollow core–shell NiO material in fabricating a wide range of high-performance electrochemical supercapacitors. - The hollow core–shell NiO was prepared with a facile lamellar template method. The prepared NiO show higher capacitance, lower ion diffusion resistance and better electroactive surface utilization for Faradaic reactions. - Highlights: • Formation of hollow core–shell NiO via a novel and facile precipitation route. • Exhibited uniform feature sizes and high surface area of hollow core–shell NiO. • Synthesized NiO has high specific capacitance ( 448 F g{sup 1}) and very low ESR value. • Increased 20% of long life cycles capability after 500 charge–discharge cycles.

  13. The origin of complex organic molecules in prestellar cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vastel, Charlotte; Lefloch, Bertrand; Bachiller, Raphael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been detected in a variety of environments, including cold prestellar cores. Given the low temperature of these objects, these last detections challenge existing models. We report here new observations towards the prestellar core L1544. They are based on an unbiased spectral survey of the 3mm band at the IRAM-30m telescope, as part of the Large Program ASAI. The observations allow us to provide the full census of the oxygen bearing COMs in this source. We detected tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, ketene, and propyne with abundances varying from 5e-11 to 6e-9. The non-LTE analysis of the methanol lines shows that they are likely emitted at the border of the core, at a radius of ~8000 AU where T~10 K and nH2~2e4 cm-3. Previous works have shown that water vapour is enhanced in the same region because of the photodesorption of water ices. We propose that a non-thermal desorption mechanism is also responsible for the observed emission of methanol and CO...

  14. The relation between extracurricular activities with academic and social competencies in school age children: a meta-analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Charla P.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /drama, student government, and Future Farmers of America. For the purposes of this study, extracurricular activities directly related to school curricula (i.e. Spanish club, tutoring, honor societies) were excluded. Academic Achievement The completion...

  15. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  16. Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

  17. Formed Core Sampler Hydraulic Conductivity Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. H.; Reigel, M. M.

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-scale formed core sampler was designed and functionally tested for use in the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to compare properties of the formed core samples and core drilled samples taken from adjacent areas in the full-scale sampler. While several physical properties were evaluated, the primary property of interest was hydraulic conductivity. Differences in hydraulic conductivity between the samples from the formed core sampler and those representing the bulk material were noted with respect to the initial handling and storage of the samples. Due to testing conditions, the site port samples were exposed to uncontrolled temperature and humidity conditions prior to testing whereas the formed core samples were kept in sealed containers with minimal exposure to an uncontrolled environment prior to testing. Based on the results of the testing, no significant differences in porosity or density were found between the formed core samples and those representing the bulk material in the test stand.

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

    1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

  19. Activated Boron Nitride Derived from Activated Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    combination of chemical, thermal, and electrical properties. The utility of activated carbon suggests is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and surface area analysis. The activated BN microstructure is similar

  20. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Abstract: Non-toxic magnetic...

  1. Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy . Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State...

  2. Smart” Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smart” Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core Gold-Shell Nanoparticle Synthesis. Smart” Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core Gold-Shell...

  3. Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Synthesis of Lutetium PhosphateApoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles...

  4. Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell Evolution of Gold-Platinum Nanoparticles and Their Electrocatalytic Effect Nanoscale Alloying, Phase-Segregation, and Core-Shell...

  5. DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA Cybersecurity Program Manager (CSPM...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - air-suspended solid-core fibers Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solid core subwavelength ber (a) and suspended porous core... December 2011 | 41 TERAHERTZ Suspended Core Subwavelength Plastic ... Source: Skorobogatiy, Maksim -...

  7. Status of axial heterogeneous liquid-metal fast breeder reactor core design studies and research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, H.; Inagaki, T.; Yoshimi, H.; Shirakata, K.; Watari, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Inoue, K.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current status of axial heterogeneous core (AHC) design development in Japan, which consists of an AHC core design in a pool-type demonstration fast breeder reactor (DFBR) and research and development activities supporting AHC core design, is presented. The DFBR core design objectives developed by The Japan Atomic Power Company include (a) favorable core seismic response, (b) core compactness, (c) high availability, and (d) lower fuel cycle cost. The AHC concept was selected as a reference pool-type DFBR core because it met these objectives more suitably than the homogeneous core (HOC). The AHC core layouts were optimized emphasizing the reduction of the burnup reactivity swing, peak fast fluence, and power peaking. The key performance parameters resulting from the AHC, such as flat axial power/flux distribution, lower peak fast fluence, lower burnup reactivity swing, etc., were evaluated in comparison with the HOC. The critical experiments at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute's Fast Critical Assembly facility demonstrate the key AHC performance characteristics. The large AHC engineering benchmark experiments using the zero-power plutonium reactor and the AHC fuel pin irradiation test program using the JOYO reactor are also presented.

  8. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS, IONIZED GAS, AND MOLECULAR HYDROGEN IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES OF COOL-CORE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donahue, Megan; Mark Voit, G.; Hoffer, Aaron [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); De Messieres, Genevieve E.; O'Connell, Robert W. [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); McNamara, Brian R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Nulsen, Paul E. J., E-mail: donahue@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: voit@pa.msu.edu, E-mail: hofferaa@msu.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of 5-25 {mu}m emission features of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with strong optical emission lines in a sample of nine cool-core clusters of galaxies observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. These systems provide a view of dusty molecular gas and star formation, surrounded by dense, X-ray-emitting intracluster gas. Past work has shown that BCGs in cool-core clusters may host powerful radio sources, luminous optical emission-line systems, and excess UV, while BCGs in other clusters never show this activity. In this sample, we detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), extremely luminous, rotationally excited molecular hydrogen line emission, forbidden line emission from ionized gas ([Ne II] and [Ne III]), and infrared continuum emission from warm dust and cool stars. We show here that these BCGs exhibit more luminous forbidden neon and H{sub 2} rotational line emission than star-forming galaxies with similar total infrared luminosities, as well as somewhat higher ratios of 70 {mu}m/24 {mu}m luminosities. Our analysis suggests that while star formation processes dominate the heating of the dust and PAHs, a heating process consistent with suprathermal electron heating from the hot gas, distinct from star formation, is heating the molecular gas and contributing to the heating of the ionized gas in the galaxies. The survival of PAHs and dust suggests that dusty gas is somehow shielded from significant interaction with the X-ray gas.

  9. Proceedings of the 2003 IAVSD conference, Atsugi, Japan, August 2003. Analysis of Active Suspension Systems with Hydraulic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    Suspension Systems with Hydraulic Actuators XIAOMING SHEN1 and HUEI PENG2 SUMMARY Most of the existing active accurately. In reality, due to the interaction between the hydraulic actuator and suspension system. This is especially true for hydraulic actuators, which remain to be one of the most viable choices due to their high

  10. Did biological activity in the Ionian Sea change after the Eastern Mediterranean Transient? Results from the analysis of remote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , characterize and predict the effect of climate changes on the relevant aspects of ecosystem dynamics. Estimates of the supposed climate change. [4] Only two significantly long time series of remote sensing data in the visibleDid biological activity in the Ionian Sea change after the Eastern Mediterranean Transient? Results

  11. Fragment Based Protein Active Site Analysis Using Markov Random Field Combinations of Stereochemical Feature-Based Classifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pai Karkala, Reetal

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of these methods have been able to account successfully for the diversity in the sequence and structural conformations observed in proteins that have the same function. An additional complication is the flexibility in both the protein active site and the ligand...

  12. Neutron activation analysis of the 30Si content of highly enriched 28Si: proof of concept and estimation of the achievable uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Agostino, Giancarlo; Oddone, Massimo; Prata, Michele; Bergamaschi, Luigi; Giordani, Laura

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the use of neutron activation to estimate the 30Si mole fraction of the ultra-pure silicon material highly enriched in 28Si for the measurement of the Avogadro constant. Specifically, we developed a relative method based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and using a natural-Si sample as a standard. To evaluate the achievable uncertainty, we irradiated a 6 g sample of a natural-Si material and modeled experimentally the signal that would be produced by a sample of the 28Si-enriched material of similar mass and subjected to the same measurement conditions. The extrapolation of the expected uncertainty from the experimental data indicates that a measurement of the 30Si mole fraction of the 28Si-enriched material might reach a 4% relative combined standard uncertainty.

  13. Hydroxylation of Methane by Non-Heme Diiron Enzymes: Molecular Orbital Analysis of C-H Bond Activation by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baik, Mu-Hyun

    Hydroxylation of Methane by Non-Heme Diiron Enzymes: Molecular Orbital Analysis of C-H Bond, 2002 Abstract: The electronic structures of key species involved in methane hydroxylation performed by the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), as proposed previously on the basis of high

  14. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and thermal conductivities were measured at a mean temperature of 25C with a line source in either the needle-probe or half-space configuration. Rock thermal conductivities...

  15. Core Analysis For The Development And Constraint Of Physical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture...

  16. Transient analysis of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trant, Jarrod Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project led by U. C. Berkeley for which MIT is to perform the thermal hydraulic and economic analyses. A parametric study has been performed to determine the optimum ...

  17. Core Analysis At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation,

  18. Core Analysis At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation,2009)

  19. Core Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation,2009)the

  20. Core Analysis At Dunes Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, Inc Jump to:

  1. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, Inc Jump to:1983)

  2. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, Inc Jump to:1983)Laney,

  3. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, Inc Jump

  4. Core Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Morgan,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova Electric Coop, Inc JumpTanaka, 1995) | OpenEt

  5. Core Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information NewAdvisors Jump to: Exploration

  6. Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Boitnott, 2003)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information NewAdvisors Jump| Open Energy

  7. Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Laney, 2005) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information NewAdvisors Jump| Open EnergyOpen

  8. Core Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Philippines (Laney, 2005) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information NewAdvisors Jump| Open EnergyOpenOpen

  9. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information NewAdvisors Jump|2003) |Information

  10. Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information NewAdvisors Jump|2003)

  11. Comparative Bacterial Proteomics: Analysis of the Core Genome Concept. |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement and Making aCompactCompany

  12. Neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, John F.; Cherry, John F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Collapse Supernovae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Mechanisms of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Simulation Results

  13. Asteroseismic Diagnostics of Stellar Convective Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwesh Mazumdar; Sarbani Basu; Braxton L. Collier; Pierre Demarque

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the small frequency separations as diagnostics of the mass of the convective core and evolutionary stage of solar-type stars. We demonstrate how the small separations can be combined to provide sensitive tests for the presence of convective overshoot at the edge of the core. These studies are focused on low degree oscillation modes, the only modes expected to be detected in distant stars. Using simulated data with realistic errors, we find that the mass of the convective core can be estimated to within 5% if the total stellar mass is known. Systematic errors arising due to uncertainty in the mass could be up to 20%. The evolutionary stage of the star, determined in terms of the central hydrogen abundance using our proposed technique, however, is much less sensitive to the mass estimate.

  14. A generalized model of active media with a set of interacting pacemakers: Application to the heart beat analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Rybalko; Ekaterina Zhuchkova

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a quite general model of active media by consideration of the interaction between pacemakers via their phase response curves. This model describes a network of pulse oscillators coupled by their response to the internal depolarization of mutual stimulations. First, a macroscopic level corresponding to an arbitrary large number of oscillatory elements coupled globally is considered. As a specific and important case of the proposed model, the bidirectional interaction of two cardiac nodes is described. This case is generalized by means of an additional pacemaker, which can be expounded as an external stimulater. The behavior of such a system is analyzed. Second, the microscopic level corresponding to the representation of cardiac nodes by one-- and two--dimensional lattices of pulse oscillators coupled via the nearest neighbors is described. The model is a universal one in the sense that on its basis one can easily construct discrete distributed media of active elements, which interact via phase response curves.

  15. Characteristics of the WWR-K test core and the LEU LTAS to be placed in the central experimental beryllium device.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arinkin, F.; Chakrov, P.; Chekushina, L.; Gizatulin,, Sh.; Koltochnik, S.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Kazakhstan Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010 life test of three LEU (19.7%) lead test assemblies (LTA) is expected in the existing WWR-K reactor core with regular WWR-C-type fuel assemblies and a smaller core with a beryllium insert. Preliminary analysis of test safety is to be carried out. It implies reconstruction of the reactor core history for last three years, including burnup calculation for each regular fuel assembly (FA), as well as calculation of characteristics of the test core. For the planned configuration of the test core a number of characteristics have been calculated. The obtained data will be used as input for calculations on LTA test core steady-state thermal hydraulics and on transient analysis.

  16. Performance Analysis of Positive-feedback-based Active Anti-islanding Schemes for Inverter-Based Distributed Generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Pengwei; Aponte, Erick E.; Nelson, J. Keith

    2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently proposed positive-feedback-based anti-islanding schemes (AI) are highly effective in preventing islanding without causing any degradation in power quality. This paper aims to analyze the performance of these schemes quantitatively in the context of the dynamic models of inverter-based distributed generators (DG). In this study, the characteristics of these active anti-islanding methods are discussed and design guidelines are derived.

  17. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

  18. Effect of various solvents on core behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irby, Tom L

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Section of Core Holder with Core 12 6. Effect of Dri-Film on Sessile Drop Ratios of Kerosene on Silica Crystals in Brine 7. Bar Graph Showing Results of Water Flood Test 8. Plot of Resistivity vs. Brine Saturation for Tests No. 1, 4, 7, 9 and 14 27 9. Plot... Resistance Measurements at Various Brine Saturations For Displacement of Brine with Kerosene 35 III. Electrical Resistance Measurements at Various Brine Saturations for Displacement of Brine with East Texas Crude-Kerosene Mixture 36 ABSTRACT Recently...

  19. Core Values Postcard | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCoolWhyCopyTheCoreCore

  20. Control rod worth and related nuclear characteristics of an axially heterogeneous liquidmetal fast breeder reactor core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawashima, K.; Inayaki, T.; Inoue, K.; Kaneto, K.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An axially heterogeneous core (AHC) concept is applied to a 1000-MW(electric)-class tank-type liquidmetal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). This AHC is characterized by a disk-shaped internal blanket with a radial thickness adjustment at the core midplane. The nuclear characteristics connected with control rod worth of the AHC are analyzed and compared with those of a homogeneous core (HOC) of the same power rating. The neutronics analysis shows that the reactivity insertion due to the vertical displacement of control rods relative to the core, which is an important safety characteristic of a tank-type LMFBR core, is significantly decreased in the AHC because of the reduced control worth requirement and smaller peakto-average differential worth in the primary control system. This allows the AHC to have a vertical displacement 50% greater than that of the HOC and may offer less rigid design conditions for roof slab stiffness and core support systems in a tank-type LMFBR. A reduction in the number of primary control rods is also possible because of a smaller control worth requirement and a better power peaking factor. The work was sponsored by a federation of Japanese electric power companies and performed under the guidance of the fast breeder reactor project office.

  1. Influence of core size on the upconversion luminescence properties of spherical Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2} particles with core-shell structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Kezhi; Liu, Zhenyu; Liu, Ye; Song, Weiye; Qin, Weiping, E-mail: wpqin@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical SiO{sub 2} particles with different sizes (30, 80, 120, and 180?nm) have been coated with Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} layers by a heterogeneous precipitation method, leading to the formation of core-shell structural Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2} particles. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, upconversion (UC) emission spectra, and fluorescent dynamical analysis. The obtained core-shell particles have perfect spherical shape with narrow size distribution. Under the excitation of 980?nm diode laser, the core-shell samples showed size-dependent upconversion luminescence (UCL) properties. The inner SiO{sub 2} cores in core-shell samples were proved to have limited effect on the total UCL intensities of Er{sup 3+} ions. The UCL intensities of core-shell particles were demonstrated much higher than the values obtained in pure Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} with the same phosphor volume. The dependence of the specific area of a UCL shell on the size of its inner SiO{sub 2} particle was calculated and analyzed for the first time. It was confirmed that the surface effect came from the outer surfaces of emitting shells is dominant in influencing the UCL property in the core-shell samples. Three-photon UC processes for the green emissions were observed in the samples with small sizes of SiO{sub 2} cores. The results of dynamical analysis illustrated that more nonradiative relaxation occurred in the core-shell samples with smaller SiO{sub 2} core sizes.

  2. 510 Plant Disease / Vol. 97 No. 4 Etiology of Moldy Core, Core Browning, and Core Rot of Fuji Apple in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggs, Alan R.

    Province, 712000, P. R. China; and Alan R. Biggs, Kearneysville Tree Fruit Research and Education Center., Zhang, R., Sun, G. Y., Zha, Y. L., and Biggs, A. R. 2013. Etiology of moldy core, core browning

  3. Review of pertinent thermal-hydraulic data for LMFBR core natural circulation analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, A. A.; Coffield, Jr., R. D.; Markley, R. A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review and summary of significant data is presented relative to LMFBR core natural convection cooling analysis. First, a brief review of computer codes and respective input data needs is made, significant data areas are then addressed and data for verifying the code calculations are described. Recommendations and conclusions with regard to the data are included.

  4. TheElectronMicroscopyCore(EMC) UniversityofMissouriColumbia,MO65211

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    TheElectronMicroscopyCore(EMC) UniversityofMissouriColumbia,MO65211 The. The EMC houses two field emission SEM's, a Hitachi cold-field SEM (S-4700) and a FEI thermal FE SEM imaging and chemical analysis from their SEM/EDS systems. AdditionalSupportby: FormoreInformationortoregistergoto:http://www.emc

  5. Heatup of the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) lower head during core relocation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.K.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to current perceptions of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident, corium largely relocated into the reactor vessel lower head at {approximately}224 min into the accident. Defueling examinations have revealed that the corium relocated from the molten core region to the lower head predominantly by way of drainage through the core former region (CFR) located between the vertical baffle plates immediately surrounding the fuel assemblies and the core barrel. An analysis has been carried out to assess the heatup of the reactor vessel lower head during the core relocation event, particularly the potential for a melting attack on the lower head wall and the in-core instrument nozzle penetration weldments. The analysis employed the THIRMAL computer code developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to predict the breakup and quenching or corium jets under film boiling conditions as well as the size distributions and quenching of the resultant molten droplets. The transient heatup and ablation of the vessel wall and penetration weldments due to impinging corium jets was calculated using the MISTI computer code.

  6. Improving the economics of PWR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ober, T.G. [Entergy Operations, Jackson, MS (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic fuel cycles have become of paramount importance to the nuclear power industry due to the increasing impact of deregulation and competition. This paper describes the PWR core design techniques being employed at Entergy in the quest to meet the ever-decreasing fuel cost targets for these units.

  7. Magnetic Fields in Quasar Cores II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. B. Taylor

    1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-frequency polarimetry with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescope has revealed absolute Faraday Rotation Measures (RMs) in excess of 1000 rad/m/m in the central regions of 7 out of 8 strong quasars studied (e.g., 3C 273, 3C 279, 3C 395). Beyond a projected distance of ~20 pc, however, the jets are found to have |RM| < 100 rad/m/m. Such sharp RM gradients cannot be produced by cluster or galactic-scale magnetic fields, but rather must be the result of magnetic fields organized over the central 1-100 pc. The RMs of the sources studied to date and the polarization properties of BL Lacs, quasars and galaxies are shown to be consistent so far with the predictions of unified schemes. The direct detection of high RMs in these quasar cores can explain the low fractional core polarizations usually observed in quasars at centimeter wavelengths as the result of irregularities in the Faraday screen on scales smaller than the telescope beam. Variability in the RM of the core is reported for 3C 279 between observations taken 1.5 years apart, indicating that the Faraday screen changes on that timescale, or that the projected superluminal motion of the inner jet components samples a new location in the screen with time. Either way, these changes in the Faraday screen may explain the dramatic variability in core polarization properties displayed by quasars.

  8. The Core Language of Aldwych Matthew HUNTBACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huntbach, Matthew

    into a tiny core language which captures the essential mechanisms of its programming style. This idea has been with its basis in CSP [4]. More recently, the pi-calculus [19] has received much attention as the suggested basis for a model of interactive computing. Unlike CSP, the pi-calculus is a name-passing calculus

  9. Fabricating the Solid Core Heatpipe Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, Peter J.; Sayre, Edwin D. [Advanced Methods and Materials, Inc., 1190 Mountain View-Alviso Road, Suite P, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Houts, Mike [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid core heatpipe nuclear reactor has the potential to be the most dependable concept for the nuclear space power system. The design of the conversion system employed permits multiple failure modes instead of the single failure mode of other concepts. Regardless of the material used for the reactor, either stainless steel, high-temperature alloys, Nb1Zr, Tantalum Alloys or MoRe Alloys, making the solid core by machining holes in a large diameter billet is not satisfactory. This is because the large diameter billet will have large grains that are detrimental to the performance of the reactor due to grain boundary diffusion. The ideal fabrication method for the solid core is by hot isostatic pressure diffusion bonding (HIPing). By this technique, wrought fine-grained tubes of the alloy chosen are assembled into the final shape with solid cusps and seal welded so that there is a vacuum in between all surfaces to be diffusion bonded. This welded structure is then HIPed for diffusion bonding. A solid core made of Type 321 stainless steel has been satisfactorily produced by Advanced Methods and Materials and is undergoing evaluation by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. Glitches Induced by the Core Superfluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Jahan-Miri

    2001-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term evolution of the relative rotation of the core superfluid in a neutron star with respect to the rest of the star, at different radial distances from the rotation axis, is determined through model calculations. The core superfluid rotates at a different rate (faster, in young pulsars), while spinning down at the same steady-state rate as the rest of the star, because of the assumed pinning between the superfluid vortices and the superconductor fluxoids. We find that the magnitude of this rotational lag changes with time and also depends on the distance from the rotation axis; the core superfluid supports an evolving pattern of differential rotation. We argue that the predicted change of the lag might occur as discrete events which could result in a sudden rise of the spin frequency of the crust of a neutron star, as is observed at glitches in radio pulsars. This new possibility for the triggering cause of glitches in radio pulsars is further supported by an estimate of the total predicted excess angular momentum reservoir of the core superfluid. The model seems to offer also resolutions for some other aspects of the observational data on glitches.

  11. Assessment of Non-traditional Isotopic Ratios by Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Nuclear Activities: Annual Report Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biegalski, S; Buchholz, B

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to identify isotopic ratios suitable for analysis via mass spectrometry that distinguish between commercial nuclear reactor fuel cycles, fuel cycles for weapons grade plutonium, and products from nuclear weapons explosions. Methods will also be determined to distinguish the above from medical and industrial radionuclide sources. Mass spectrometry systems will be identified that are suitable for field measurement of such isotopes in an expedient manner. Significant progress has been made with this project within the past year: (1) Isotope production from commercial nuclear fuel cycles and nuclear weapons fuel cycles have been modeled with the ORIGEN and MCNPX codes. (2) MCNPX has been utilized to calculate isotopic inventories produced in a short burst fast bare sphere reactor (to approximate the signature of a nuclear weapon). (3) Isotopic ratios have been identified that are good for distinguishing between commercial and military fuel cycles as well as between nuclear weapons and commercial nuclear fuel cycles. (4) Mass spectrometry systems have been assessed for analysis of the fission products of interest. (5) A short-list of forensic ratios have been identified that are well suited for use in portable mass spectrometry systems.

  12. DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and Crawford 2009). Leaching experiments were conducted with a section of core sample 3-2. All cores from location 3 were drilled without using water. Core sample 3-2 was drilled from approximately six inches to a depth of approximately 13 inches. Approximately six inches of the core was removed but it broke into two pieces during removal from the bit. At the time of drilling, core material appeared olive green in color (Smith 2008). The fact that the samples were cored as olive green and were received after storage with a gray outer layer is indicative that some oxidation had occurred prior to leaching studies.

  13. Core Overshoot: An Improved Treatment and Constraints from Seismic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian W. Straka; Pierre Demarque; D. B. Guenther

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive set of stellar evolution models for Procyon A in an effort to guide future measurements of both traditional stellar parameters and seismic frequencies towards constraining the amount of core overshoot in Procyon A and possibly other stars. Current observational measurements of Procyon A when combined with traditional stellar modeling only place a large upper limit on overshoot of alphaOV < 1.1. By carrying out a detailed pulsation analysis, we further demonstrate, how p- and g-mode averaged spacings can be used to gain better estimates of the core size. For both p- and g-modes, the frequency spacings for models without overshoot are clearly separated from the models with overshoot. In addition, measurements of the l=0 averaged small p-mode spacings could be used to establish Procyon A's evolutionary stage. For a fixed implementation of overshoot and under favorable circumstances, the g-mode spacings can be used to determine the overshoot extent to an accuracy of +-0.05 Hp. However, we stress that considerable confusion is added due to the unknown treatment of the overshoot region. This ambiguity might be removed by analyzing many different stars. A simple non-local convection theory developed by Kuhfuss is implemented in our stellar evolution code and contrasted with the traditional approaches. We show that this theory supports a moderate increase of the amount of convective overshoot with stellar mass of Delta(alphaOV) = +0.10 between 1.5 Msun and 15 Msun. This theory places an upper limit on Procyon A's core overshoot extent of ~0.4 Hp which matches the limit imposed by Roxburgh's integral criterion.

  14. Systems-level analysis of age-related macular degeneration reveals global biomarkers and phenotype-specific functional networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    derived from Homo sapiens, an IPA Core Analysis was run forin the RPE-choroid interactome, we restricted IPA results tothe highest scoring IPA network for a given Core Analysis.

  15. Development and application of amorphous core-distribution transformers in Quebec

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulz, R.; Alexandrov, N.; Simoneau, R.; Roberge, R. [Hydro-Quebec Research Inst., Varennes, Quebec (Canada). Materials Technology Dept.; Tetreault, J. [Hydro-Quebec, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes research and development activities at Hydro-Quebec over the last ten years for improving the efficiency of distribution transformers in Quebec. A shell-type (wound-core) design making optimum use of the properties of amorphous metals (Metglas TCA formerly known as Metglas 2605s-2, Allied Signal Inc., Morristown, NJ) was adopted. Dry and oil-cooled, amorphous-core transformer prototypes were built. The joint research and development project was initiated with Transformateurs Ferranti-Packard Ltee, a company of Rolls-Royce Industries Canada Inc., to build and test a few units of high performance transformers on the Hydro-Quebec power system.

  16. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, A status report. Volume 17, Main report and Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, D.F.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Cross-Dial, A.E.; Morris, R.H.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dolan, B.W.; Jansen, J.M.; Minarick, J.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lau, W.; Salyer, W.D. [Reliability and Performance Associates (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 {times} 10E-06 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1992 are considered to be precursors to potential core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to rank precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

  17. Comparison of a NuScale SMR conceptual core design using CASMO5/simulate5 and MCNP5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugh, B. [Studsvik Scandpower Inc., 1015 Ashes Drive, Wilmington, NC 28405 (United States); Mohamed, A. [NuScale Power Inc., 1100 NE Circle Blvd, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key issue during the initial start-ups of new Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) is the lack of operational data for reactor model validation. To help better understand the accuracy of the reactor analysis codes CASMO5 and SIMULATE5, higher order comparisons to MCNP5 have been performed. These comparisons are for an initial core conceptual design of the NuScale reactor. The data have been evaluated at Hot Zero Power (HZP) conditions. Comparisons of core reactivity, fuel temperature coefficient (FTC), and moderator temperature coefficients (MTC) have been performed. Comparison results show good agreement between CASMO5/SIMULATE5 and MCNP5 for the conceptual initial core design. (authors)

  18. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

  19. Anisotropic In distribution in InGaN core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leclere, C.; Renevier, H., E-mail: Hubert.Renevier@grenoble-inp.fr [Laboratoire des Matériaux et du Génie Physique, Grenoble INP - Minatec, Grenoble (France); Katcho, N. A. [Liten, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Tourbot, G.; Daudin, B. [CEA-CNRS group Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, Université Joseph Fourier and CEA Grenoble, INAC, SP2M, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Proietti, M. G. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC - Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we investigate the local atomic structure of defect-free homogeneous and self-organized core-shell structure nanowires by means of X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) Spectroscopy at the In L{sub III} and K edges and Multiwavelength Anomalous Diffraction. The results are interpreted by comparison of the experimental data with X-ray absorption calculations carried out with ab initio structural models. Extended-XAFS data analysis at In K-edge shows an anisotropic In distribution in the second nearest neighbors pointing out to a deviation from randomness in In distribution for the core-shell sample.

  20. Portable tester for determining gas content within a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Jr., Fred (Donora, PA); Schatzel, Steven J. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable tester is provided for reading and displaying the pressure of a gas released from a rock core sample stored within a sealed container and for taking a sample of the released pressurized gas for chemical analysis thereof for subsequent use in a modified direct method test which determines the volume of gas and specific type of gas contained within the core sample. The portable tester includes a pair of low and high range electrical pressure transducers for detecting a gas pressure; a pair of low and high range display units for displaying the pressure of the detected gas- a selector valve connected to the low and high range pressure transducers, a selector knob for selecting gas flow to one of the flow paths; control valve having an inlet connection to the sealed container, and outlets connected to: a sample gas canister, a second outlet port connected to the selector valve means for reading the pressure of the gas from the sealed container to either the low range or high range pressure transducers, and a connection for venting gas contained within the sealed container to the atmosphere. A battery is electrically connected to and supplies the power for operating the unit. The pressure transducers, display units, selector and control valve means and the battery is mounted to and housed within a protective casing for portable transport and use.

  1. Coupled simulation of the reactor core using CUPID/MASTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. R.; Cho, H. K.; Yoon, H. Y.; Jeong, J. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institue, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CUPID is a component-scale thermal hydraulics code which is aimed for the analysis of transient two-phase flows in nuclear reactor components such as the reactor vessel, steam generator, containment. This code adopts a three-dimensional, transient, two-phase and three-field model, and includes physical models and correlations of the interfacial mass, momentum, and energy transfer for the closure. In the present paper, a multi-physics simulation was performed by coupling CUPID with a three dimensional neutron kinetics code, MASTER. MASTER is merged into CUPID as a dynamic link library (DLL). The APR1400 reactor core during a control rod drop/ejection accident was simulated as an example by adopting a porous media approach to employ a fuel assembly. The following sections present the numerical modeling for the reactor core, coupling of the kinetics code, and the simulation results. And also, a preliminary study for multi-scale simulation between CUPID and system-scaled thermal hydraulics code, MARS will be introduced as well. (authors)

  2. Postburn core-drilling results from Hoe Creek 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Ganow, H.C.; Wilder, D.G.

    1981-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents interpretations derived from the analysis of the postburn drilling results from the Hoe Creek 3 experiment. Sixteen partially cored boreholes were drilled using an HQ triple-tube core barrel. The general objectives of this work were to establish the characteristics of the burn cavity and of the materials within and surrounding the cavity. The lateral extent of the burn and the characteristics of the collapsed region overlying the burn cavity were also to be investigated. Important conclusions derived from this study include the following: (1) The horizontally drilled link borehole strongly controlled burn cavity shape and location; no significant combustion occurred below the link; (2) the slag may have acted as an insulation blanket, protecting the coal below the horizontal link borehole; (3) significant roof collapse occurred during the course of the experiment, probably inducing substantial heat losses; (4) the lateral extent of the burn was greatest along the Felix 2 seam; the cavity outline in plan view is shaped like a teardrop; a vertical transverse cross section through the cavity shows a mushroom-shaped outline; (5) roof collapse after the end of the experiment filled much of the space within and above the cavity, producing a mechanically disturbed zone full of voids and weak materials. A zone of fractures or loosened material exists in the remaining (uncollapsed) roof and wall materials, surrounding and paralleling the upper margins of the collapsed region. A void zone was found near the bottom of the collapsed region.

  3. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  4. Activation Analysis for Two Molten Salt Dual-Coolant Blanket Concepts for the U.S. Demo Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z. [University of California-Los Angeles (United States); Sawan, M.E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The US has considered, among other options, two blanket concepts for Demo reactor in which helium is primarily used to cool the first wall (FW) and structure whereas molten salt (MS) is used as both coolant and breeder. Conventional reduced activation ferritic steel (RAFS, F82H) is used as the structural material in both blanket concepts. The low melting point Flibe ({approx}380 deg. C) is used in the first option while the Flinabe ({approx}305 deg. C) is used in the second option. In this paper, we present the results for assessing the radioactivity and decay heat. This assessment is performed separately for the structural material, the Be multiplier and the breeder (Flibe/Flinabe). The Class C waste disposal rating (WDR) was estimated for each material. For Flibe, Flinabe and Be the WDR is much lower than unity. However, the WDR for F82H is {approx}0.6-1.3. They are attributed to reactions with Mo and Nb present in F82H with levels of 70 wppm and 4 wppm, respectively. To ensure that F82H qualifies for shallow land burial, it is suggested to reduce these two impurities to {approx}50 and {approx}3 wppm, respectively.

  5. Collective Memory Transfers for Multi-Core Chips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelogiannakis, George; Williams, Alexander; Shalf, John

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Future performance improvements for microprocessors have shifted from clock frequency scaling towards increases in on-chip parallelism. Performance improvements for a wide variety of parallel applications require domain-decomposition of data arrays from a contiguous arrangement in memory to a tiled layout for on-chip L1 data caches and scratchpads. How- ever, DRAM performance suffers under the non-streaming access patterns generated by many independent cores. We propose collective memory scheduling (CMS) that actively takes control of collective memory transfers such that requests arrive in a sequential and predictable fashion to the memory controller. CMS uses the hierarchically tiled arrays formal- ism to compactly express collective operations, which greatly improves programmability over conventional prefetch or list- DMA approaches. CMS reduces application execution time by up to 32% and DRAM read power by 2.2×, compared to a baseline DMA architecture such as STI Cell.

  6. Towards a Synthesis of Core-Collapse Supernova Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Burrows

    1996-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    New insights into the mechanism and character of core--collapse supernova explosions are transforming the approach of theorists to their subject. The universal realization that the direct hydrodynamic mechanism does not work and that a variety of hydrodynamic instabilities can influence the viability of theoretical explosions has ushered in a new era in supernova modeling. In this paper, I discuss the important physical and technical issues that remain. I review the neutrino--driven mechanism, the possible roles of Rayleigh--Taylor instabilities, questions in neutrino transport, and the various observational constraints within which theorists must operate. However, a consensus has yet to be achieved among active workers concerning many important details and some essential phenomenology. This synopsis is meant to accomplish two things: 1) to focus attention on the interesting problems whose resolution will bring needed progress, and 2) to assess the current status of the theoretical art.

  7. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

  8. Improvements in EBR-2 core depletion calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finck, P.J.; Hill, R.N.; Sakamoto, S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for accurate core depletion calculations in Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-2) is discussed. Because of the unique physics characteristics of EBR-2, it is difficult to obtain accurate and computationally efficient multigroup flux predictions. This paper describes the effect of various conventional and higher order schemes for group constant generation and for flux computations; results indicate that higher-order methods are required, particularly in the outer regions (i.e. the radial blanket). A methodology based on Nodal Equivalence Theory (N.E.T.) is developed which allows retention of the accuracy of a higher order solution with the computational efficiency of a few group nodal diffusion solution. The application of this methodology to three-dimensional EBR-2 flux predictions is demonstrated; this improved methodology allows accurate core depletion calculations at reasonable cost. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  10. Mox fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion. characteristics of the assembly.

  11. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, M.L.; Rosenstein, R.G.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly. 38 figs.

  12. MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

  13. Photon activation analysis of the scraper in a 200-MeV electron accelerator using gamma-spectrometry depth profiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He Lijuan; Li Yuxiong; Yu Guobing; Ren Guangyi; Duan Zongjin

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    For a high energy electron facility, the estimates of induced radioactivity in materials are of major importance to keep exposure to personnel and to the environment as low as reasonably achievable. In addition, an accurate prediction of induced radioactivity is also essential for the design, operation and decommissioning of a high energy electron linear accelerator. The research of induced radioactivity focuses on the photonuclear reaction, whose giant resonance response in the copper is ranging from 10 MeV to 28 MeV. The 200 MeV electron linac of NSRL is one of the earliest high-energy electron linear accelerators in P. R. China. The electrons are accelerated to 200 MeV by five acceleration tubes and collimated by the scrapers made of copper. At present, it is the first retired high-energy electron linear accelerator in domestic. Its decommissioning provides an efficient way for the induced radioactivity research of such accelerators, and is a matter of great significance to the accumulation of the induced radioactivity experience. When the copper target is impacted by an 158 MeV electron beam, the number of photons generated whose energy are in the range of giant resonance response is the largest. Thus, this paper focuses on the induced radioactivity for a copper target impacted by the 158 MeV electron beam. The slicing method is applied in the research. The specific activity of each slice was measured at cooling times of ten months and the results were compared with the prediction from the Monte-Carlo program FLUKA. The simulation results are in good agreement with the measurement results. The method by Monte Carlo simulation in this paper gives a reasonable prediction of the induced radioactivity problem for the high-energy electron linear accelerators, laying a foundation for the accumulation of the induced radioactivity experience.

  14. The Oxygen core inside the Magnesium isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhuyan, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the ground state bulk properties of magnesium isotopes using axially symmetric relativistic mean field formalism. The BCS pairing approach is employed to take care of the pairing correlation for the open shell nuclei. The contour plot of the nucleons distribution are analyzed at various parts of the nucleus, where clusters are located. The presence of an $^{16}$O core along bubble like $\\alpha$-particle(s) and few {\\it nucleons} are found in the Mg isotopes.

  15. Thomson scattering for core plasma on DEMO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhin, E. E.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Bukreev, I. M.; Chernakov, P. V.; Kochergin, M. M.; Koval, A. N.; Litvinov, A. E.; Masyukevich, S. V.; Razdobarin, A. G.; Semenov, V. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya St., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kukushkin, A. B.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A. [NRC Kurchatov Institute, 1, Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Andrew, P. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the challenges of Thomson scattering implementation for core plasma on DEMO and evaluates the capability to measure extremely high electron temperature range 0.5-40keV. A number of solutions to be developed for ITER diagnostics are suggested in consideration of their realization for DEMO. New approaches suggested for DEMO may also be of interest to ITER and currently operating magnetic confinement devices.

  16. Thermoelectric characteristic of the rough InN/GaN core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chao-Wei; Wu, Yuh-Renn, E-mail: yrwu@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis to model the thermoelectric (TE) effects of the rough InN/GaN core-shell nanowires (NWs) with wire diameter ranging from 25?nm to 100?nm is proposed. The elastic continuum model is employed to calculate the phonon dispersion relation curves and the related phonon group velocity. Within the framework of Boltzmann transport equations and relaxation time approximation, the electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, electronic thermal conductivity, and the lattice thermal conductivity is obtained. Simulation results indicate that TE properties of the rough InN/GaN core-shell NWs are strongly affected by the surface roughness and the diameter of NWs. The optimized condition of the proposed rough InN/GaN core-shell TE NWs is studied in this paper and the highest ZT obtained in the calculation is 0.8598 at 300?K and 1.713 at 1000?K.

  17. Neutronic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Grigoriadis, D. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For a five-year transitional period the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) was operating with a mixed core, containing both Low Enrichment (LEU) and High Enrichment (HEU) Uranium MTR- type fuel assemblies. The neutronic study of the GRR-1 conversion to LEU has been performed using a code system comprising the core-analysis code CITATION-LDI2 and the cell-calculation modules XSDRNPM and NITAWL-II of the SCALE code. A conceptual LEU core configuration was defined and analyzed with respect to the three dimensional multi-group neutron fluxes, the power distribution, the control-rod worth and the compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. Perturbation calculations and reactivity feedback computations were also carried out to provide input to a subsequent thermal-hydraulic study. (author)

  18. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States)] [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Baird, Mark [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States)] [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States) [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6173 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Blondin, John [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)] [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  19. STRUCTURE OF THE SUN'S CORE: EVOLUTIONAL AND SEISMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­generating core where the thermonuclear reactions are significant; there is definitely variable hydrogen approximate, of course. We set the core's upper boundary at 10 million K assuming that thermonuclear reactions

  20. Armored spring-core superconducting cable and method of construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter M. (611 Montclair, College Station, TX 77840); Soika, Rainer H. (1 Hensel, #X4C, College Station, TX 77840)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) is provided. The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may include a spring-core (20), at least one superconducting strand (24) wound onto the spring-core (20), and an armored shell (22) that encases the superconducting strands (24). The spring-core (20) is generally a perforated tube that allows purge gases and cryogenic liquids to be circulated through the armored superconducting cable (12), as well as managing the internal stresses within the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12). The armored shell (22) manages the external stresses of the armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) to protect the fragile superconducting strands (24). The armored spring-core superconducting cable (12) may also include a conductive jacket (34) formed outwardly of the armored shell (22).

  1. aml1 core site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    but also helps improve the QoS of the core network and saves the carriers' OPEX and CAPEX on their core networks. Ouyang, Ye; 10.5121ijngn.2010.2105 2010-01-01 6...

  2. Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    v3102014 Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR/1/2013 Page 1 of 5 #12;Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR

  3. A vectorized heat transfer model for solid reactor cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.; Liles, D.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new generation of nuclear reactors includes designs that are significantly different from light water reactors. Among these new reactor designs is the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). In addition, nuclear thermal rockets share a number of similarities with terrestrial HTGRs and would be amenable to similar types of analyses. In these reactors, the heat transfer in the solid core mass is of primary interest in design and safety assessment. One significant safety feature of these reactors is the capability to withstand a loss of pressure and forced cooling in the primary system and still maintain peak fuel temperatures below the safe threshold for retaining the fission products. To accurately assess the performance of gas-cooled reactors during these types of transients, a Helium/Hydrogen Cooled Reactor Analysis (HERA) computer code has been developed. HERA has the ability to model arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, which allows the user to easily analyze reactor cores constructed of prismatic graphite elements. The code accounts for heat generation in the fuel, control rods and other structures; conduction and radiation across gaps; convection to the coolant; and a variety of boundary conditions. The numerical solution scheme has been optimized for vector computers, making long transient analyses economical. Time integration is either explicit or implicit, which allows the use of the model to accurately calculate both short- or long-term transients with an efficient use of computer time. Both the basic spatial and temporal integration schemes have been benchmarked against analytical solutions. Also, HERA has been used to analyze a depressurized loss of forced cooling transient in a HTGR with a very detailed three-dimensional input model. The results compare favorably with other means of analysis and provide further validation of the models and methods. 18 refs., 11 figs.

  4. The nature of the dense core population in the pipe nebula: core and cloud kinematics from C18O observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August A. Muench; Charles J. Lada; Jill M. Rathborne; João F. Alves; M. Lombardi

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present molecular-line observations of 94 dark cloud cores identified in the Pipe nebula through near-IR extinction mapping. Using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12m telescope, we obtained spectra of these cores in the J=1-0 transition of C18O. We use the measured core parameters, i.e., antenna temperature, linewidth, radial velocity, radius and mass, to explore the internal kinematics of these cores as well as their radial motions through the larger molecular cloud. We find that the vast majority of the dark extinction cores are true cloud cores rather than the superposition of unrelated filaments. While we identify no significant correlations between the core's internal gas motions and the cores' other physical parameters, we identify spatially correlated radial velocity variations that outline two main kinematic components of the cloud. The largest is a 15pc long filament that is surprisingly narrow both in spatial dimensions and in radial velocity. Beginning in the Stem of the Pipe, this filament displays uniformly small C18O linewidths (dv~0.4kms-1) as well as core to core motions only slightly in excess of the gas sound speed. The second component outlines what appears to be part of a large (2pc; 1000 solar mass) ring-like structure. Cores associated with this component display both larger linewidths and core to core motions than in the main cloud. The Pipe Molecular Ring may represent a primordial structure related to the formation of this cloud.

  5. Core Internal Transport Barriers in Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiore, Catherine L.

    -Mod Group Supported by DoE grant DE-FC02-99ER54512 #12;Alcator C-Mod Introduction Core Internal TransportAlcator C-Mod Core Internal Transport Barriers in Alcator C-Mod Catherine Fiore MIT Plasma Science types of core ITBs in Alcator C-Mod. Off-Axis ICRF generated core ITBs Spontaneous ITBs at H- to L

  6. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF GABLE MOUNTAIN BASALT CORES HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez-Baez, L.F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1974. 7. Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company, Research andGABLE MOUNTAIN BASALT CORES HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION L.

  7. Cores and cusps in warm dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco [IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, E-46071, Valencia (Spain); Dalal, Neal, E-mail: villa@ific.uv.es, E-mail: neal@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON, M5S3H8 (Canada)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparent presence of large core radii in Low Surface Brightness galaxies has been claimed as evidence in favor of warm dark matter. Here we show that WDM halos do not have cores that are large fractions of the halo size: typically, r{sub core}/r{sub 200}?<10{sup ?3}. This suggests an astrophysical origin for the large cores observed in these galaxies, as has been argued by other authors.

  8. Liquid immiscibility and core-shell morphology formation in ternary Al–Bi–Sn alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, R.; Zhang, J.F.; Zhang, S.G., E-mail: sgzhang@sjtu.edu.cn; Li, J.G.

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of composition on liquid immiscibility, macroscopic morphology, microstructure and phase transformation in ternary Al–Bi–Sn alloys were investigated. Three types of morphology, the core-shell type, the stochastic droplet type and uniform dispersion type, of Al–Bi–Sn particles prepared by a jet breakup process were distinguished, and the relationships between which were discussed. The phase transformation behaviors of the Al–Bi–Sn alloys were studied by thermal analysis, in agreement with the microstructural observation and microanalysis. The liquid immiscibility and formation of the core-shell morphology in Al–Bi–Sn alloys are easily achieved when the composition lies in the liquid miscibility gap. The particles exhibit a high melting point Al-rich core with a low melting point Sn–Bi-rich solder shell, showing promise for application as high-density electronic packaging materials. - Highlights: • The liquid demixing, morphology and microstructure in Al–Bi–Sn alloys were studied. • Three types of morphology were classified and discussed. • The conditions for formation of the core-shell morphology were obtained. • The phase transition behaviors agree with the microstructure characterization. • The Al/Sn–Bi core-shell particles show promise for use in electronic packaging.

  9. analysis reveals permanent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index 21 Design and analysis aspects of radial flux air-cored permanent magnet wind generator system for direct battery charging applications. Open Access Theses and...

  10. Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    between core and acoustic borehole imagery. Detailed structural analysis of the fracture population indicates that fractures are grouped in two principal fractures sets...

  11. Environmental Analysis & Policy: Sample Pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Environmental Analysis & Policy: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Sustainable Development OR Spring GE 425 U.S. Environmental Policy (Senior) GE 309 Intermediate Env Analysis (Fall) EAP Elective Summer Environmental Internship Senior Year GE 420 Env Policy Analysis 4 th Semester

  12. Early induction of cytokines/cytokine receptors and Cox2, and activation of NF-?B in 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced murine oral cancer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yu-Ching [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Heng-Chien; Lee, Miau-Rong [Department of Biochemistry, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Biochemistry, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Lai, Kuang-Chi [Department of Surgery, China Medical University Beigang Hospital, Yunlin 651, Taiwan (China) [Department of Surgery, China Medical University Beigang Hospital, Yunlin 651, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chung-Min; Lin, Yueh-Min [Department of Pathology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Pathology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tin-Yun [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China)] [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Hsiang, Chien-Yun, E-mail: cyhsiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Microbiology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chung, Jing-Gung, E-mail: jgchung@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China) [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genes induced early in murine oral carcinogenesis. Murine tongue tumors induced by the carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO), and paired non-tumor tissues were subjected to microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering of upregulated genes in the tumor tissues revealed an association of induced genes with inflammation. Cytokines/cytokine receptors induced early were subsequently identified, clearly indicating their involvement in oral carcinogenesis. Hierarchical clustering also showed that cytokine-mediated inflammation was possibly linked with Mapk6. Cox2 exhibited the greatest extent (9–18 fold) of induction in the microarray data, and its early induction was observed in a 2 h painting experiment by RT-PCR. MetaCore analysis showed that overexpressed Cox2 may interact with p53 and transcriptionally inhibit expression of several downstream genes. A painting experiment in transgenic mice also demonstrated that NF-?B activates early independently of Cox2 induction. MetaCore analysis revealed the most striking metabolic alterations in tumor tissues, especially in lipid metabolism resulting from the reduction of Ppar? and Rxrg. Reduced expression of Mapk12 was noted, and MetaCore analysis established its relationship with decreased efficiency of Ppar? phosphorylation. In conclusion, in addition to cytokines/cytokine receptors, the early induction of Cox2 and NF-?B activation is involved in murine oral carcinogenesis.

  13. Multilevel transport solution of LWR reactor cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jose Ignacio Marquez Damian; Cassiano R.E. de Oliveira; HyeonKae Park

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a multilevel approach for the solution of the transport equation in typical LWR assemblies and core configurations. It is based on the second-order, even-parity formulation of the transport equation, which is solved within the framework provided by the finite element-spherical harmonics code EVENT. The performance of the new solver has been compared with that of the standard conjugate gradient solver for diffusion and transport problems on structured and unstruc-tured grids. Numerical results demonstrate the potential of the multilevel scheme for realistic reactor calculations.

  14. Hunton Group core workshop and field trip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.S. [ed.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Late Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group is a moderately thick sequence of shallow-marine carbonates deposited on the south edge of the North American craton. This rock unit is a major target for petroleum exploration and reservoir development in the southern Midcontinent. The workshop described here was held to display cores, outcrop samples, and other reservoir-characterization studies of the Hunton Group and equivalent strata throughout the region. A field trip was organized to complement the workshop by allowing examination of excellent outcrops of the Hunton Group of the Arbuckle Mountains.

  15. Core File Settings | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. | EMSL Coordinatively-4Core File

  16. Hydrogen issue in Core Collapse Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Elmhamdi; I. J. Danziger; D. Branch; B. Leibundgut

    2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss results of analyzing a time series of selected photospheric-optical spectra of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). This is accomplished by means of the parameterized supernovae synthetic spectrum (SSp) code ``SYNOW''. Special attention is addressed to traces of hydrogen at early phases, especially for the stripped-envelope SNe (i.e. SNe Ib-c). A thin low mass hydrogen layer extending to very high ejection velocities above the helium shell, is found to be the most likely scenario for Type Ib SNe.

  17. PERMEABILITY TESTING OF SIMULATED SALTSTONE CORE AND VAULT 4 CELL E SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.; Dixon, K.

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Engineering Process Development Group (EPD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared simulated saltstone core samples to evaluate the effect of sample collection by coring on the permeability of saltstone. The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the SRNL was given the task of measuring the permeability of cores of simulated saltstone. Saltstone samples collected from Vault 4 Cell E using both dry and wet coring methods were also submitted for permeability analysis. The cores from Vault 4 Cell E were in multiple pieces when they were recovered (Smith, 2008 Cheng et.al, 2009). Permeability testing was only performed on the portions of the core sample that were intact, had no visible fractures or cracks, and met the specifications for 'undisturbed specimens' identified in Method ASTM D5084-03 Standard Test Methods for Measurement of Hydraulic Conductivity of Saturated Porous Materials Using a Flexible Wall Permeameter that was used for the testing. Permeability values for cores of simulated saltstone compared with values from permeability tests conducted on molded saltstone samples by an independent laboratory using the same method. All hydraulic conductivity results for Vault 4 samples exceeded results for both molded and cored saltstone simulant samples. The average hydraulic conductivity result for Vault 4 Cell E samples of 3.9 x 10{sup -7} cm/sec is approximately two orders of magnitude greater than that of the simulated saltstone with an average of 4.1 x 10{sup -9} cm/sec. Numerical flow and transport simulations of moisture movement through saltstone performed for the performance assessment of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) used 2.0 x 10{sup -9} cm/sec for the hydraulic conductivity of saltstone (Flach et al, 2009). The results for simulated versus actual saltstone were further compared using non-parametric statistics. The results from non-parametric statistical analysis of results indicate that there is at least a 98% probability that the hydraulic conductivity of saltstone samples collected from Vault 4 Cell E saltstone is greater than that of the baseline simulant mix.

  18. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. CORCON-MOD1 preliminary evaluation and application to safety analysis of a large LMFBR plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.H.; Ray, K.S.

    1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The CORCON-MOD1 core material-concrete interaction code, developed at the Sandia Laboratories for LWR safety analysis, was adapted for analyzing a postulated LMFBR core melt accident.

  20. Magnetic Fields in Molecular Cloud Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu

    2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of magnetic field strengths imply that molecular cloud fragments are individually close to being in a magnetically critical state, even though both magnetic field and column density measurements range over two orders of magnitude. The turbulent pressure also approximately balances the self-gravitational pressure. These results together mean that the one-dimensional velocity dispersion $\\sigv$ is proportional to the mean \\Alf speed of a cloud $\\va$. Global models of MHD turbulence in a molecular cloud show that this correlation is naturally satisfied for a range of different driving strengths of the turbulence. For example, an increase of turbulent driving causes a cloud expansion which also increases $\\va$. Clouds are in a time averaged balance but exhibit large oscillatory motions, particularly in their outer rarefied regions. We also discuss models of gravitational fragmentation in a sheet-like region in which turbulence has already dissipated, including the effects of magnetic fields and ion-neutral friction. Clouds with near-critical mass-to-flux ratios lead to subsonic infall within cores, consistent with some recent observations of motions in starless cores. Conversely, significantly supercritical clouds are expected to produce extended supersonic infall.