Sample records for activity conceptual model

  1. Conceptual Model At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Faulds & Melosh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Faulds & Melosh, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  2. Conceptual Model At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grigsby & Tester, 1989) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby & Tester,...

  3. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Okaya & Thompson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Okaya & Thompson, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Okaya & Thompson, 1985)...

  4. Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  5. Conceptual Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use ofInformationConceptual Model

  6. toolkit computational mesh conceptual model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baur, David G.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Cochran, William K.; Williams, Alan B.; Sjaardema, Gregory D.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh is a software library intended to support massively parallel multi-physics computations on dynamically changing unstructured meshes. This domain of intended use is inherently complex due to distributed memory parallelism, parallel scalability, heterogeneity of physics, heterogeneous discretization of an unstructured mesh, and runtime adaptation of the mesh. Management of this inherent complexity begins with a conceptual analysis and modeling of this domain of intended use; i.e., development of a domain model. The Sierra Toolkit computational mesh software library is designed and implemented based upon this domain model. Software developers using, maintaining, or extending the Sierra Toolkit computational mesh library must be familiar with the concepts/domain model presented in this report.

  7. CONCEPTUAL MODELLING OF A CONCURRENT ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amor, Robert

    CONCEPTUAL MODELLING OF A CONCURRENT ENGINEERING ENVIRONMENT Z. Turk1 , R. Wasserfuhr2 , P assisted concurrent engineering. Later experiences have shown that product modelling alone modelling framework which decomposes an abstract concurrent engineering environment into several modelling

  8. A Conceptual Model for Partially PremixedLow-Temperature Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Conceptual Model for Partially PremixedLow-Temperature Diesel Combustion Based onIn-Cylinder Laser Diagnostics and Chemical Kinetics Modeling A Conceptual Model for Partially...

  9. Developing a Conceptual Model of Virtual Organizations for Citizen Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Developing a Conceptual Model of Virtual Organizations for Citizen Science Andrea Wiggins Syracuse-oriented conceptual model of scientific knowledge production through citizen science virtual organizations. Citizen: conceptual models, virtual organizations, citizen science, cyberinfrastructure, massive virtual

  10. Category:Conceptual Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual Model Add.png Add a new Conceptual Model

  11. Conceptual Geologic Model and Native State Model of the Roosevelt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Conceptual Geologic Model and Native State Model of the...

  12. Quantum Gravity models - brief conceptual summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerzy Lukierski

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    After short historical overview we describe the difficulties with application of standard QFT methods in quantum gravity (QG). The incompatibility of QG with the use of classical continuous space-time required conceptually new approach. We present briefly three proposals: loop quantum gravity (LQG), the field-theoretic framework on noncommutative space-time and QG models formulated on discretized (triangularized) space-time. We evaluate these models as realizing expected important properties of QG: background independence, consistent quantum diffeomorphisms, noncommutative or discrete structure of space-time at very short distances, finite/renormalizable QG corrections. We only briefly outline an important issue of embedding QG into larger geometric and dynamical frameworks (e.g. supergravity, (super)strings, p-branes, M-theory), with the aim to achieve full unification of all fundamental interactions.

  13. A Preliminary Conceptual Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for the Blue Mountain Geothermal System, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: A Preliminary Conceptual Model...

  14. An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent Geophysical And Drilling Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  15. A Resource Conceptual Model for the Ngatamariki Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conceptual Model for the Ngatamariki Geothermal Field Based on Recent Exploration Well Drilling and 3D MT Resistivity Imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  16. Final Project Report - Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloriethylene Co-Metabolism: Co-Metabolic Enzyme Activity Probes and Modeling Co-Metabolism and Attenuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starr, Robert C; Orr, Brennon R; Lee, M Hope; Delwiche, Mark

    2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Trichloroethene (TCE) (also known as trichloroethylene) is a common contaminant in groundwater. TCE is regulated in drinking water at a concentration of 5 µg/L, and a small mass of TCE has the potential to contaminant large volumes of water. The physical and chemical characteristics of TCE allow it to migrate quickly in most subsurface environments, and thus large plumes of contaminated groundwater can form from a single release. The migration and persistence of TCE in groundwater can be limited by biodegradation. TCE can be biodegraded via different processes under either anaerobic or aerobic conditions. Anaerobic biodegradation is widely recognized, but aerobic degradation is less well recognized. Under aerobic conditions, TCE can be oxidized to non hazardous conditions via cometabolic pathways. This study applied enzyme activity probes to demonstrate that cometabolic degradation of TCE occurs in aerobic groundwater at several locations, used laboratory microcosm studies to determine aerobic degradation rates, and extrapolated lab-measured rates to in situ rates based on concentrations of microorganisms with active enzymes involved in cometabolic TCE degradation. Microcosms were constructed using basalt chips that were inoculated with microorganisms to groundwater at the Idaho National Laboratory Test Area North TCE plume by filling a set of Flow-Through In Situ Reactors (FTISRs) with chips and placing the FTISRs into the open interval of a well for several months. A parametric study was performed to evaluate predicted degradation rates and concentration trends using a competitive inhibition kinetic model, which accounts for competition for enzyme active sites by both a growth substrate and a cometabolic substrate. The competitive inhibition kinetic expression was programmed for use in the RT3D reactive transport package. Simulations of TCE plume evolution using both competitive inhibition kinetics and first order decay were performed.

  17. Conceptual aircraft dynamics from inverse aircraft modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Gregory E

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a method of construe' ting a nonlinear dynamics model of a theoretical aircraft from the nonlinear batch simulation of an existing aircrew This method provides control law designers with a method of fabricating nonlinear models...

  18. Conceptual modelling for domain specific document description and retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and are applied in the tasks of describing and retrieving documents, within cooperative document management settings, where the users themselves have to perform the document management tasks they need in orderConceptual modelling for domain specific document description and retrieval - An approach

  19. Conceptual stochastic climate models Peter Imkeller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monahan, Adam Hugh

    to be thoroughly inve- stigated but too simple to be treated as quantitatively accurate, through Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) which represent some clima- te subsystems (e.g. the ocean

  20. Combined Estimation of Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model and Parameter Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Ye, Ming; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research described in this report is the development and application of a methodology for comprehensively assessing the hydrogeologic uncertainties involved in dose assessment, including uncertainties associated with conceptual models, parameters, and scenarios. This report describes and applies a statistical method to quantitatively estimate the combined uncertainty in model predictions arising from conceptual model and parameter uncertainties. The method relies on model averaging to combine the predictions of a set of alternative models. Implementation is driven by the available data. When there is minimal site-specific data the method can be carried out with prior parameter estimates based on generic data and subjective prior model probabilities. For sites with observations of system behavior (and optionally data characterizing model parameters), the method uses model calibration to update the prior parameter estimates and model probabilities based on the correspondence between model predictions and site observations. The set of model alternatives can contain both simplified and complex models, with the requirement that all models be based on the same set of data. The method was applied to the geostatistical modeling of air permeability at a fractured rock site. Seven alternative variogram models of log air permeability were considered to represent data from single-hole pneumatic injection tests in six boreholes at the site. Unbiased maximum likelihood estimates of variogram and drift parameters were obtained for each model. Standard information criteria provided an ambiguous ranking of the models, which would not justify selecting one of them and discarding all others as is commonly done in practice. Instead, some of the models were eliminated based on their negligibly small updated probabilities and the rest were used to project the measured log permeabilities by kriging onto a rock volume containing the six boreholes. These four projections, and associated kriging variances, were averaged using the posterior model probabilities as weights. Finally, cross-validation was conducted by eliminating from consideration all data from one borehole at a time, repeating the above process, and comparing the predictive capability of the model-averaged result with that of each individual model. Using two quantitative measures of comparison, the model-averaged result was superior to any individual geostatistical model of log permeability considered.

  1. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Benoit, 1999) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJersey Zip:Open EnergyEnergy

  2. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Waibel, 1987) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJerseyOpen EnergyEnergy

  3. Conceptual Model At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Even, 2012) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJerseyOpen2003) |

  4. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1988) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJerseyOpen2003)

  5. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy

  6. Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Gardner,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformation Faulds, Et Al., 2011)

  7. Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformation Faulds, Et Al., 2011)1988)

  8. Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformation Faulds, Et Al.,

  9. Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Goff,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformation Faulds, Et Al.,Et Al., 1988)

  10. Conceptual Models of Geothermal Systems - Introduction | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformation Faulds, Et Al.,Et Al.,

  11. Conceptual Models of the Dixie Valley, Nevada Geothermal Field | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformation Faulds, Et Al.,Et Al.,Energy

  12. Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

  13. KJRR-FAI Status Report of Conceptual Design Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; B.P. Nielson; D.B. Chapman; J.W. Nielsen; P.E. Murray; D.S. Crawford; S.D. Snow

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has initiated the Ki-Jang Research Reactor (KJRR) project to construct a new dedicated radio-isotope production facility in the KiJang province of South Korea. The KJRR will employ a uranium-molybdenum dispersion plate-type fuel clad in aluminum. The KJRR fuel assembly design will undergo irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as part of the regulatory qualification of the fuel. The Idaho National Laboratory performed a multi-disciplined conceptual design effort and found that one full-size KJRR fuel assembly can be irradiated in the ATR’s north east flux trap. The analyses accomplished during the conceptual design phase are sufficient to prove viability of the overall design and irradiation campaign. Requirements for fission power can be met. The desired burnup can be achieved well within 15% depending on reactor operating availability. Mechanical design and structural analysis show that structural integrity of the irradiation test is maintained. It is recommended that future detailed design efforts be based on the concept described in this report.

  14. DDE-MURR Status Report of Conceptual Design Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; R.B. Nielson; M.H. Sprenger; G.K. Housley

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Design Demonstration Experiment for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (DDE-MURR) is intended to facilitate Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) conversion of the MURR by demonstrating the performance and fabrication of the LEU fuel element design through an irradiation test in a 200mm channel at the Belgium Reactor 2 (BR2). Revision 0 of this report was prepared at the end of government fiscal year 2012 when most of the resources for furthering DDE design work were expected to be postponed. Hence, the conceptual design efforts were summarized to provide the status of key objectives, notable results, and provisions for future design work. Revision 1 of this report was prepared at the end of fiscal year 2013 in order to include results from a neutronic study performed by BR2, to incorporate further details that had been achieved in the engineering sketches of the irradiation devices, and to provide an update of the DDE-MURR campaign in relation to program objectives and opportunities for its eventual irradiation. These updates were purposed to bring the DDE-MURR conceptual design to level of maturity similar to that of the other two DDE efforts (DDE-MITR and DDE-NBSR). This report demonstrates that the DDE-MURR design effort is well on the path to producing a suitable irradiation experiment, but also puts forth several recommendations in order to facilitate success of the irradiation campaign.

  15. DDE-MITR Status Report of Conceptual Design Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; R.B. Nielson; J.D. Wiest; J.W. Nielsen; G.A. Roth; S.D. Snow

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Design Demonstration Experiment for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (DDE-MITR) is intended to facilitate Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) conversion of the MITR by demonstrating the performance and fabrication of the LEU fuel element design through an irradiation test in the Advanced Test Reactor center flux trap. At the time this report was prepared the resources for furthering DDE design work were expected to be postponed. As such, the conceptual design effort to date is summarized herein in order to provide the status of key objectives, notable results, and provisions for future design work. These demonstrate that the DDE-MITR design effort is well on the path to producing a suitable irradiation experiment, but also exhibits several challenges for which timely resolution is recommend in order to facilitate success of the irradiation campaign and ultimate conversion of the MITR.

  16. DDE-NBSR Status Report of Conceptual Design Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; R.B. Nielson; B.P. Durtschi; C.R. Glass; G.A. Roth; D.T. Clark

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Design Demonstration Experiment for the National Bureau of Standard Reactor (DDE-NBSR) is intended to facilitate Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) conversion of the NBSR by demonstrating the performance and fabrication of the LEU fuel element design through an irradiation test in the Advanced Test Reactor center flux trap. At the time this report was prepared the resources for furthering DDE design work were expected to be postponed. As such, the conceptual design effort to date is summarized herein in order to provide the status of key objectives, notable results, and provisions for future design work. These demonstrate that the DDE-NBSR design effort is well on the path to producing a suitable irradiation experiment, but also exhibits several challenges for which timely resolution is recommend in order to facilitate success of the irradiation campaign and ultimate conversion of the NBSR.

  17. DDE-MURR Status Report of Conceptual Design Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; R.B. Nielson; M.H. Sprenger; G.K. Housley

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Design Demonstration Experiment for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (DDE-MURR) is intended to facilitate Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) conversion of the MURR by demonstrating the performance and fabrication of the LEU fuel element design through an irradiation test in a 200mm channel at the Belgium Reactor 2. At the time this report was prepared the resources for furthering DDE design work were expected to be postponed. As such, the conceptual design effort to date is summarized herein in order to provide the status of key objectives, notable results, and provisions for future design work. These demonstrate that the DDE-MURR design effort is well on the path to producing a suitable irradiation experiment, but also exhibits several challenges for which timely resolution is recommend in order to facilitate success of the irradiation campaign and ultimate conversion of the MURR.

  18. Conceptual design statement of work for the immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, T.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-activity waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This statement of work describes the work scope (encompassing definition of new installations and retrofit modifications to four existing grout vaults), to be performed by the Architect-Engineer, in preparation of a conceptual design for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage Facility.

  19. Industrial motivation for interactive shape modeling: a case study in conceptual automotive design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Industrial motivation for interactive shape modeling: a case study in conceptual automotive design illus- trated within the space of conceptual automotive design. Automo- tive design provides a unique but automotive designers almost exclusively work with sketches, clay and other traditional media. Design

  20. Conceptual model for regional radionuclide transport from a salt dome repository: a technical memorandum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kier, R.S.; Showalter, P.A.; Dettinger, M.D.

    1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposal of high-level radioactive wastes is a major environmental problem influencing further development of nuclear energy in this country. Salt domes in the Gulf Coast Basin are being investigated as repository sites. A major concern is geologic and hydrologic stability of candidate domes and potential transport of radionuclides by groundwater to the biosphere prior to their degradation to harmless levels of activity. This report conceptualizes a regional geohydrologic model for transport of radionuclides from a salt dome repository. The model considers transport pathways and the physical and chemical changes that would occur through time prior to the radionuclides reaching the biosphere. Necessary, but unknown inputs to the regional model involve entry and movement of fluids through the repository dome and across the dome-country rock interface and the effect on the dome and surrounding strata of heat generated by the radioactive wastes.

  1. A conceptual model for determining yield loss due to drought stress in sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Paul Robert

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR DETERMINING YIELD LOSS DUE TO DROUGHT STRESS IN SORGHUM A Thesis by PAUL ROBERT KOCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR DETERMINING YIELD LOSS DUE TO DROUGHT STRESS IN SORGHUM A thesis by PAUL ROBERT KOCH Approved as to style and content by: Marshall J. McFarland (Chair of Committee...

  2. Raft River Geothermal Area Data Models - Conceptual, Logical and Fact Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cuyler, David

    Conceptual and Logical Data Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses at Raft River a. Logical Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 b. Fact Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 Derived from Tables, Figures and other Content in Reports from the Raft River Geothermal Project: "Technical Report on the Raft River Geothermal Resource, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., August 2002. "Results from the Short-Term Well Testing Program at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., October 2004.

  3. Three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1994 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.; Vermeul, V.R.; Macdonald, Q.C.; Schubert, S.E.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work conducted during the fiscal year 1994 to development an improved three-dimensional conceptual model of ground-water flow in the unconfined aquifer system across the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, which is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The main objective of the ongoing effort to develop an improved conceptual model of ground-water flow is to provide the basis for improved numerical report models that will be capable of accurately predicting the movement of radioactive and chemical contaminant plumes in the aquifer beneath Hanford. More accurate ground-water flow models will also be useful in assessing the impacts of changes in facilities and operations. For example, decreasing volumes of operational waste-water discharge are resulting in a declining water table in parts of the unconfined aquifer. In addition to supporting numerical modeling, the conceptual model also provides a qualitative understanding of the movement of ground water and contaminants in the aquifer.

  4. Preliminary conceptual model for mineral evolution in Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, C.J.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is presented for mineral alteration in Yucca Mountain, Nevada, that suggests that the mineral transformations observed there are primarily controlled by the activity of aqueous silica. The rate of these reactions is related to the rate of evolution of the metastable silica polymorphs opal-CT and cristobalite assuming that a{sub SiO{sub 2(aq)}} is fixed at the equilibrium solubility of the most soluble silica polymorph present. The rate equations accurately predict the present depths of disappearance of opal-CT and cristobalite. The rate equations have also been used to predict the extent of future mineral alteration that may result from emplacement of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain. Relatively small changes in mineralogy are predicted, but these predictions are based on the assumption that emplacement of a repository would not increase the pH of water in Yucca Mountain nor increase its carbonate content. Such changes may significantly increase mineral alteration. Some of the reactions currently occurring in Yucca Mountain consume H{sup +} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}. Combining reaction rate models for these reactions with water chemistry data may make it possible to estimate water flux through the basal vitrophyre of the Topopah Spring Member and to help confirm the direction and rate of flow of groundwater in Yucca Mountain.

  5. Development of a Conceptual Chum Salmon Emergence Model for Ives Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Bott, Yi-Ju; Nabelek, Marc A.

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the study described herein was to develop a conceptual model of chum salmon emergence that was based on empirical water temperature of the riverbed and river in specific locations where chum salmon spawn in the Ives Island area. The conceptual model was developed using water temperature data that have been collected in the past and are currently being collected in the Ives Island area. The model will be useful to system operators who need to estimate the complete distribution of chum salmon emergence (first emergence through final emergence) in order to balance chum salmon redd protection and power system operation.

  6. Conceptual design of an integrated technology model for carbon policy assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Dimotakes, Paul E. (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the conceptual design of a technology choice model for understanding strategies to reduce carbon intensity in the electricity sector. The report considers the major modeling issues affecting technology policy assessment and defines an implementable model construct. Further, the report delineates the basis causal structure of such a model and attempts to establish the technical/algorithmic viability of pursuing model development along with the associated analyses.

  7. Conceptual Geologic Model and Native State Model of the Roosevelt Hot

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJersey Zip: NJSprings

  8. Conceptual Model of Offshore Wind Environmental Risk Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Hamilton, Erin L.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of offshore wind energy generation projects. The development of ERES for offshore wind is closely allied to a concurrent process undertaken to examine environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy generation, although specific risk-relevant attributes will differ between the MHK and offshore wind domains. During FY10, a conceptual design of ERES for offshore wind will be developed. The offshore wind ERES mockup described in this report will provide a preview of the functionality of a fully developed risk evaluation system that will use risk assessment techniques to determine priority stressors on aquatic organisms and environments from specific technology aspects, identify key uncertainties underlying high-risk issues, compile a wide-range of data types in an innovative and flexible data organizing scheme, and inform planning and decision processes with a transparent and technically robust decision-support tool. A fully functional version of ERES for offshore wind will be developed in a subsequent phase of the project.

  9. Automatically Grounding Semantically-enriched Conceptual Models to Concrete Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gal, Avigdor

    Automatically Grounding Semantically-enriched Conceptual Models to Concrete Web Services Eran Toch semantic Web services. We envision a world in which a designer defines a "virtual" Web service as part of a business process, while requiring the system to seek actual Web services that match the specifi- cations

  10. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  11. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iovenitti, Joe

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodlogy calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal systems in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. This Baseline Conceptual Model report summarizes the results of the first three project tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data, (2) design and populate a GIS database, and (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km. It presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  12. Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model Dietmar on the surface energy balance by very simple repre- sentations of solar and thermal radiation, the atmospheric and cold regions to warm more than other regions. Keywords Climate dynamics Á Climate change Á Climate

  13. Jan 16 Conceptual models of ecological systems Why is Integration Needed in Ecology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Jan 16 Conceptual models of ecological systems #12;Why is Integration Needed in Ecology? Great advances have been made by dividing ecology into subdisciplines. But too much focus on subdisciplines has also hindered ecology · too little study of the interface between disciplines · tended to narrow focus

  14. Continental Shelf Research 24 (2004) 20292043 A conceptual model for river water and sediment dispersal in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washburn, Libe

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continental Shelf Research 24 (2004) 2029­2043 A conceptual model for river water and sediment and Beardsley, 1995; Geyer et al., 1996), while its sediment is dispersed primarily by bottom bound- ary layer dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel, California Jonathan A. Warricka,Ã, Leal A.K. Mertesb , Libe

  15. An independent verification and validation of the Future Theater Level Model conceptual model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, D.S. III; Kruse, K.L.; Martellaro, A.J.; Packard, S.L.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Turley, V.K.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology and results of independent verification and validation performed on a combat model in its design stage. The combat model is the Future Theater Level Model (FTLM), under development by The Joint Staff/J-8. J-8 has undertaken its development to provide an analysis tool that addresses the uncertainties of combat more directly than previous models and yields more rapid study results. The methodology adopted for this verification and validation consisted of document analyses. Included were detailed examination of the FTLM design documents (at all stages of development), the FTLM Mission Needs Statement, and selected documentation for other theater level combat models. These documents were compared to assess the FTLM as to its design stage, its purpose as an analytical combat model, and its capabilities as specified in the Mission Needs Statement. The conceptual design passed those tests. The recommendations included specific modifications as well as a recommendation for continued development. The methodology is significant because independent verification and validation have not been previously reported as being performed on a combat model in its design stage. The results are significant because The Joint Staff/J-8 will be using the recommendations from this study in determining whether to proceed with develop of the model.

  16. Three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system, FY 1993 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.; Spane, F.A. Jr.; Vermeul, V.R.; Webber, W.D.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ground water underlying parts of the Hanford Site (Figure 1.1) contains radioactive and chemical contaminants at concentrations exceeding regulatory standards (Dresel et al. 1993). The Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is responsible for monitoring the movement of these contaminants to ensure that public health and the environment are protected. To support the monitoring effort, a sitewide three-dimensional ground-water flow model is being developed. This report provides an update on the status of the conceptual model that will form the basis for constructing a numerical three-dimensional flow model for, the site. Thorne and Chamness (1992) provide additional information on the initial development of the three-dimensional conceptual model.

  17. Final Report - Advanced Conceptual Models for Unsaturated and Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholl, Michael J.

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Environmental Management Program is faced with two major issues involving two-phase flow in fractured rock; specifically, transport of dissolved contaminants in the Vadose Zone, and the fate of Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) below the water table. Conceptual models currently used to address these problems do not correctly include the influence of the fractures, thus leading to erroneous predictions. Recent work has shown that it is crucial to understand the topology, or ''structure'' of the fluid phases (air/water or water/DNAPL) within the subsurface. It has also been shown that even under steady boundary conditions, the influence of fractures can lead to complex and dynamic phase structure that controls system behavior, with or without the presence of a porous rock matrix. Complicated phase structures within the fracture network can facilitate rapid transport, and lead to a sparsely populated and widespread distribution of concentrated contaminants; these qualities are highly difficult to describe with current conceptual models. The focus of our work is to improve predictive modeling through the development of advanced conceptual models for two-phase flow in fractured rock.

  18. Mercury Issues and Complexities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Redefining the Conceptual Model - 12277

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Mark; Southworth, George; Watson, David [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Looney, Brian; Eddy-Dilek, Carol [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States); Ketelle, Richard [Restoration Services Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Releases of mercury from an industrial facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee in the 1950's and early 1960's resulted in contamination of soil and groundwater within the facility, as well as downstream surface waters. Remediation efforts, which began in the 1980's, have decreased waterborne mercury concentrations near the facility, but elevated levels of mercury remain in the soil, sediment, water, and biota. Widespread distribution of mercury sources and complex mercury transport pathways are some of many challenges at the site. For effective environmental management and closure decision making relative to mercury contamination at the facilities, an up-to-date conceptual model of mercury source areas, processes, likely flow paths, and flux was deemed necessary. Recent facility and reconfiguration efforts, site characterizations, remedial actions, and research are facilitating the collection of new mercury data in Oak Ridge. To develop the current model, a multi-organizational team reviewed existing conceptual models from a variety of sources, consolidated historical data and source information, gathered input from local experts with extensive site knowledge, and used recently collected mercury data from a variety of sampling programs. The developed site conceptual model indicates that the nature and extent of mercury concentration and contaminant flux has significantly changed in the ten years since flux-based conceptual models were used for previous remedial action decisions. A new water treatment system has effectively reduced mercury inputs to the creek and is removing substantially greater quantities of mercury from groundwater than was expected. However, fish concentrations in downstream waters have not responded to decreased water concentrations in the stream. Flux from one large out-fall at the creek's headwaters appears to be a greater percentage of the overall flux leaving the site than previous years, albeit year to year variation in flux is large, and the many small sources of mercury identified in the model may also be important if the goal is to reach very low mercury levels in stream water and fish. The conceptual model is a key reference in helping to prioritize future remedial actions, defining future monitoring, conducting numerical modeling efforts, and evaluating research needs. (authors)

  19. Industrial motivations: Conceptual Automotive Styling Tools (CAST)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Industrial motivations: Conceptual Automotive Styling Tools (CAST) Karan Singh #12;Conceptual. · What makes automotive design unique. · Existing modeling trends. · A proposed workflow for conceptual automotive design. #12;Conceptual design desirables · Abstraction from underlying surface math. · Invite

  20. IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rennich, M.J. [comp.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

  1. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Iovenitti, Joe

    FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  2. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, R.M. [Holt Hydrogeology, Placitas, NM (United States)] [Holt Hydrogeology, Placitas, NM (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

  3. CONCEPTUAL DATA MODELING OF THE INTEGRATED DATABASE FOR THE RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H.S; Shon, J.S; Kim, K.J; Park, J.H; Hong, K.P; Park, S.H

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of a database system that can manage radioactive waste collectively on a network has been carried out. A conceptual data modeling that is based on the theory of information engineering (IE), which is the first step of the whole database development, has been studied to manage effectively information and data related to radioactive waste. In order to establish the scope of the database, user requirements and system configuration for radioactive waste management were analyzed. The major information extracted from user requirements are solid waste, liquid waste, gaseous waste, and waste related to spent fuel. The radioactive waste management system is planning to share information with associated companies.

  4. A conceptual model to estimate cost effectiveness of the indoor environment improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Macroeconomic analyses indicate a high cost to society of a deteriorated indoor climate. The few example calculations performed to date indicate that measures taken to improve IEQ are highly cost-effective when health and productivity benefits are considered. We believe that cost-benefit analyses of building designs and operations should routinely incorporate health and productivity impacts. As an initial step, we developed a conceptual model that shows the links between improvements in IEQ and the financial gains from reductions in medical care and sick leave, improved work performance, lower employee turn over, and reduced maintenance due to fewer complaints.

  5. Conceptual Model At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Casteel, Et Al., 2010) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJersey Zip: NJSpringsOpen

  6. Conceptual Model At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Faulds & Melosh, 2008) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJersey Zip:

  7. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Bell, Et Al., 1980) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJersey Zip:Open Energy

  8. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti, Et Al., 2012)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJersey Zip:Open

  9. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Okaya & Thompson, 1985) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJersey Zip:OpenOpen Energy

  10. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Parchman, Et Al., 1981) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJersey Zip:OpenOpen

  11. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Reed, 2007) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJersey

  12. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1967) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJerseyOpen Energy

  13. Conceptual Model At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1988) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJerseyOpen EnergyEnergyOpen

  14. Conceptual Model At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Grigsby & Tester,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJerseyOpen

  15. Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJerseyOpen2003) | Open

  16. Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open Energy InformationJerseyOpen2003) | Open1991)

  17. Conceptual Model At Salt Wells Area (Faulds, Et Al., 2011) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformation Faulds, Et Al., 2011) Jump

  18. Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformation Faulds, Et Al., 2011)1988) |

  19. Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

  20. Dixie Valley Engineered Geothermal System Exploration Methodology Project, Baseline Conceptual Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iovenitti, Joe

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) Exploration Methodology Project is developing an exploration approach for EGS through the integration of geoscientific data. The Project chose the Dixie Valley Geothermal System in Nevada as a field laboratory site for methodology calibration purposes because, in the public domain, it is a highly characterized geothermal system in the Basin and Range with a considerable amount of geoscience and most importantly, well data. The overall project area is 2500km2 with the Calibration Area (Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield) being about 170km2. The project was subdivided into five tasks (1) collect and assess the existing public domain geoscience data; (2) design and populate a GIS database; (3) develop a baseline (existing data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate geostatistical relationships, and generate baseline, coupled EGS favorability/trust maps from +1km above sea level (asl) to -4km asl for the Calibration Area at 0.5km intervals to identify EGS drilling targets at a scale of 5km x 5km; (4) collect new geophysical and geochemical data, and (5) repeat Task 3 for the enhanced (baseline + new ) data. Favorability maps were based on the integrated assessment of the three critical EGS exploration parameters of interest: rock type, temperature and stress. A complimentary trust map was generated to compliment the favorability maps to graphically illustrate the cumulative confidence in the data used in the favorability mapping. The Final Scientific Report (FSR) is submitted in two parts with Part I describing the results of project Tasks 1 through 3 and Part II covering the results of project Tasks 4 through 5 plus answering nine questions posed in the proposal for the overall project. FSR Part I presents (1) an assessment of the readily available public domain data and some proprietary data provided by Terra-Gen Power, LLC, (2) a re-interpretation of these data as required, (3) an exploratory geostatistical data analysis, (4) the baseline geothermal conceptual model, and (5) the EGS favorability/trust mapping. The conceptual model presented applies to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region. FSR Part II presents (1) 278 new gravity stations; (2) enhanced gravity-magnetic modeling; (3) 42 new ambient seismic noise survey stations; (4) an integration of the new seismic noise data with a regional seismic network; (5) a new methodology and approach to interpret this data; (5) a novel method to predict rock type and temperature based on the newly interpreted data; (6) 70 new magnetotelluric (MT) stations; (7) an integrated interpretation of the enhanced MT data set; (8) the results of a 308 station soil CO2 gas survey; (9) new conductive thermal modeling in the project area; (10) new convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (11) pseudo-convective modeling in the Calibration Area; (12) enhanced data implications and qualitative geoscience correlations at three scales (a) Regional, (b) Project, and (c) Calibration Area; (13) quantitative geostatistical exploratory data analysis; and (14) responses to nine questions posed in the proposal for this investigation. Enhanced favorability/trust maps were not generated because there was not a sufficient amount of new, fully-vetted (see below) rock type, temperature, and stress data. The enhanced seismic data did generate a new method to infer rock type and temperature. However, in the opinion of the Principal Investigator for this project, this new methodology needs to be tested and evaluated at other sites in the Basin and Range before it is used to generate the referenced maps. As in the baseline conceptual model, the enhanced findings can be applied to both the hydrothermal system and EGS in the Dixie Valley region.

  1. Offshore Wind Guidance Document: Oceanography and Sediment Stability (Version 1) Development of a Conceptual Site Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidance document provide s the reader with an overview of the key environmental considerations for a typical offshore wind coastal location and the tools to help guide the reader through a thoro ugh planning process. It will enable readers to identify the key coastal processes relevant to their offshore wind site and perform pertinent analysis to guide siting and layout design, with the goal of minimizing costs associated with planning, permitting , and long - ter m maintenance. The document highlight s site characterization and assessment techniques for evaluating spatial patterns of sediment dynamics in the vicinity of a wind farm under typical, extreme, and storm conditions. Finally, the document des cribe s the assimilation of all of this information into the conceptual site model (CSM) to aid the decision - making processes.

  2. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report; Volume 1 - Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences Governing Subsurface Contaminant Transport in the INEEL Subregion of the Eastern Snake River Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichlacz, Paul Louis; Orr, Brennan

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Research Council has defined a conceptual model as ''an evolving hypothesis identifying the important features, processes, and events controlling fluid flow and contaminant transport of consequence at a specific field site in the context of a recognized problem''. Presently, several subregional conceptual models are under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Additionally, facility-specific conceptual models have been described as part of INEEL environmental restoration activities. Compilation of these models is required to develop a comprehensive conceptual model that can be used to strategically plan for future groundwater research activities at the INEEL. Conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL include the description of the geologic framework, matrix hydraulic properties, and inflows and outflows. They also include definitions of the contaminant source term and contaminant transport mechanisms. The geologic framework of the INEEL subregion is described by the geometry of the system, stratigraphic units within the system, and structural features that affect groundwater flow and contaminant transport. These elements define geohydrologic units that make up the Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA). The United States Geological Survey (USGS) conceptual model encompasses approximately 1,920 mi2 of the eastern Snake River Plain. The Waste Area Group (WAG)-10 model includes the USGS area and additional areas to the northeast and southeast. Both conceptual models are bounded to the northwest by the Pioneer Mountains, Lost River Range, and Lemhi Mountains. They are bounded to the southeast by groundwater flow paths determined from aquifer water-level contours. The upgradient extent of the USGS model is a water-level contour that includes the northeastern boundary of the INEEL. The WAG-10 model includes more of the Mud Lake area to utilize previous estimates of underflow into the subregion. Both conceptual models extend approximately 25 miles to the southwest of the INEEL, a distance sufficient to include known concentrations of contaminant tracers. Several hypotheses have been developed concerning the effective thickness of the SRPA at the INEEL. The USGS model has defined the effective thickness from electrical resistivity and borehole data to be as much as 2,500 ft in the eastern part of the subregion and as much as 4,000 ft in the southwestern part. The WAG-10 model has developed two alternatives using aquifer-temperature and electrical resistivity data. The ''thick'' aquifer interpretation utilizes colder temperature data and includes a northtrending zone in which the thickness exceeds 1,300 ft and with a maximum thickness of 1,700 ft. The ''thin'' aquifer interpretation minimizes aquifer thickness, with thickness ranging from 328 to 1,300 ft. Facility-specific models generally have focused efforts on the upper 250 ft of saturation. Conceptual models have utilized a stratigraphic data set to define geohydrologic units within the INEEL subregion. This data set, compiled from geophysical logs and cores from boreholes, correlates the thick, complex stack of basalt flows across the subregion. Conceptual models generally concur that the upper geohydrologic unit consists of a section of highly fractured, multiple, thin basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds. Beneath this unit is an areally extensive, thick, unfractured basalt flow that rises above the water table southwest of the INEEL. The bottom unit consists of a thick section of slightly- to moderately-altered basalt. A key objective of the DOE water-integration project at the INEEL is to coordinate development of a subregional conceptual model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport that is based on the best available understanding of geologic and hydrologic features. The first step in this process is to compile and summarize the current conceptual models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport at the INEEL that have been developed from extensive geohydrologic studies con

  3. Conceptual design statement of work for the immobilized low-activity waste disposal facility, project W-520

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickett, W.W.

    1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Statement of Work outlines the deliverables and schedule for preparation of the Project W-520 Conceptual Design Report, including, work plans, site development plan, preliminary safety evaluation, and conceptual design.

  4. On the Importance of Surface Forcing in Conceptual Models of the Deep Ocean ANDREW L. STEWART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interior (Lumpkin and Speer 2007). The purpose of this note is to highlight that, while the NV11 conceptual Southern Ocean (Lumpkin and Speer 2007). This circulation is of inte

  5. Status report on the development of a three-dimensional conceptual model for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, P.D.; Chamness, M.A.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the status of development of a three-dimensional conceptual model for the unconfined aquifer system at Hanford. A conceptual model is needed to support development of a realistic three-dimensional numerical model for predicting ground-water flow and the transport of contaminants. The report focuses on developing a hydrogeologic framework, assessing available hydraulic property data, describing flow-system boundaries, and evaluating areal recharge and leakage. Geologic descriptions of samples obtained during well drilling were used to prepare cross sections that correlate relatively continuous layers. The layers were defined based on textural differences that are expected to reflect differences in hydraulic properties. Assigning hydraulic properties to the layers is a critical part of the conceptual model. Available hydraulic property data for the study area were compiled and were correlated with the geologic layers where possible. Flow-system boundaries are present within the study area at basalt outcrops and at the Columbia River. Boundary conditions have been evaluated for these areas. Available estimates of areal recharge from precipitation were compiled.

  6. Constitutive modeling of active polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Therkelsen, Scott V. (Scott Vincent), 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a three-dimensional constitutive model of active polymeric materials, including changes in material volume and properties due to actuation. Active polymers reversibly change shape, volume and/or material ...

  7. APT Blanket System Model Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Integrated 1D TRAC System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the approaches taken in establishing a 1-dimensional integrated blanket system model using the TRAC code, developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  8. Conceptual design of a regional water quality screening model. [RFF; Reach; HANFORD; ARQUAL; SEAS; NASQUAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M J

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water quality assessment methodology is intended to predict concentrations at future times and to estimate the impacts on water quality of energy-related activities (including industrial boilers). Estimates of impacts on water quality at future times are based on incremental changes in pollutant inputs to the body water. Important features of the model are: use of measured concentrations to account for existing conditions; consideration of incremental changes in pollutant loads; emphasis on the energy sector and industrial boilers; analysis restricted to streams only; no attempt to fully account for pollutant behavior; and flexible design, so that future improvements can be incorporated. The basic approach is very similar to the one used by Argonne's ARQUAL model but will allow more complex pollutant behavior and more flexibility in use. (PSB)

  9. Refined conceptual model for the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration and 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rohay, V.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a refined geohydrologic and geochemical conceptual model of the host site (Hanford Reservation) for the Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID) and 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) Expedited Response Action (ERA), based on the results from fiscal year 1992 site characterization activities. The ERA was initiated in December 1990 to minimize or stabilize CCl{sub 4} migration within the unsaturated (vadose) zone in the vicinity of three CCl{sub 4} disposal sites in the 200 West Area (216-Z-1A tile field, 216-Z-9 trench, and 216-Z-18 crib). Implementation of this ERA was based on concerns that CCl{sub 4} residing in the soils was continuing to spread to the groundwater and, if left unchecked, would significantly increase the area of groundwater contamination. A soil-vapor-extraction system began operating at the site in February 1992.

  10. Conceptual Model of Uranium in the Vadose Zone for Acidic and Alkaline Wastes Discharged at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, uranium was disposed in waste solutions of varying waste chemistry at the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The character of how uranium was distributed in the vadose zone during disposal, how it has continued to migrate through the vadose zone, and the magnitude of potential impacts on groundwater are strongly influenced by geochemical reactions in the vadose zone. These geochemical reactions can be significantly influenced by the disposed-waste chemistry near the disposal location. This report provides conceptual models and supporting information to describe uranium fate and transport in the vadose zone for both acidic and alkaline wastes discharged at a substantial number of waste sites in the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The conceptual models include consideration of how co-disposed acidic or alkaline fluids influence uranium mobility in terms of induced dissolution/precipitation reactions and changes in uranium sorption with a focus on the conditions near the disposal site. This information, when combined with the extensive information describing uranium fate and transport at near background pH conditions, enables focused characterization to support effective fate and transport estimates for uranium in the subsurface.

  11. Integrating intrusive and nonintrusive characterization methods to achieve a conceptual site model for the SLDA FUSRAP site - 8265.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L. A.; Peterson, J. M.; Frothingham, D. G.; Frederick, W. T.; Lenart, W.; Environmental Science Division; U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Pittsburg District; U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is addressing radiological contamination following Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements at the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) site, which is a radiologically contaminated property that is part of the Formerly utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The SLDA is an 18-hectare (44-acre) site in Parks township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, about 37 kilometers (23 miles) east-northeast of Pittsburgh. According to historical record, radioactive wastes were disposed of at the SLDA in a series of trenches by the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Company (NUMEC) in the 1960s. The wastes originated from the nearby Apollo nuclear fuel fabrication facility, which began operations under NUMEC in the late 1950s and fabricated enriched uranium into naval reactor fuel elements. It is believed that the waste materials were buried in a series of pits constructed adjacent to one another in accordance with an Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) regulation that has since been rescinded. A CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process was completed for the SLDA site, and the results of the human health risk assessment indicated that the radiologically contaminated wastes could pose a risk to human health in the future. There are no historical records that provide the exact location of these pits. However, based on geophysical survey results conducted in the 1980s, these pits were defined by geophysical anomalies and were depicted on historical site drawings as trenches. At the SLDA site, a combination of investigative methods and tools was used in the RI/FS and site characterization activities. The SLDA site provides an excellent example of how historical documents and data, historical aerial photo analysis, physical sampling, and nonintrusive geophysical and gamma walkover surveys were used in combination to reduce the uncertainty in the location of the trenches. The data and information from these sources were used to refine the conceptual site model, complete the RI/FS, and support the ongoing remedial design and action, which will achieve site closure acceptable to all stakeholders.

  12. Integrating Intrusive and Non-intrusive Characterization Methods To Achieve A Conceptual Site Model For The SLDA FUSRAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A.; Peterson, J.M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Frothingham, D.G.; Frederick, W.T. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY (United States); Lenart, W. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Pittsburgh District, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is addressing radiological contamination following Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements at the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) site, which is a radiologically contaminated property that is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The SLDA is an 18-hectare (44- acre) site in Parks Township, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, about 37 kilometers (23 miles) east-northeast of Pittsburgh. According to historical record, radioactive wastes were disposed of at the SLDA in a series of trenches by the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Company (NUMEC) in the 1960's. The wastes originated from the nearby Apollo nuclear fuel fabrication facility, which began operations under NUMEC in the late 1950's and fabricated enriched uranium into naval reactor fuel elements. It is believed that the waste materials were buried in a series of pits constructed adjacent to one another in accordance with an Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) regulation that has since been rescinded. A CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process was completed for the SLDA site, and the results of the human health risk assessment indicated that the radiologically contaminated wastes could pose a risk to human health in the future. There are no historical records that provide the exact location of these pits. However, based on geophysical survey results conducted in the 1980's, these pits were defined by geophysical anomalies and were depicted on historical site drawings as trenches. At the SLDA site, a combination of investigative methods and tools was used in the RI/FS and site characterization activities. The SLDA site provides an excellent example of how historical documents and data, historical aerial photo analysis, physical sampling, and non-intrusive geophysical and gamma walkover surveys were used in combination to reduce the uncertainty in the location of the trenches. The data and information from these sources were used to refine the conceptual site model, complete the RI/FS, and support the ongoing remedial design and action, which will achieve site closure acceptable to all stakeholders. (authors)

  13. Reactor physics methods, models, and applications used to support the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehin, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Renier, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wemple, C.A.; Jahshan, S.N.; Ryskammp, J.M. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the neutronics analysis performed during 1991 and 1992 in support of characterization of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The methods used in the analysis, parametric studies, and key results supporting the design and safety evaluations of the conceptual design are presented. The analysis approach used during the conceptual design phase followed the same approach used in early ANS evaluations: (1) a strong reliance on Monte Carlo theory for beginning-of-cycle reactor performance calculations and (2) a reliance on few-group diffusion theory for reactor fuel cycle analysis and for evaluation of reactor performance at specific time steps over the fuel cycle. The Monte Carlo analysis was carried out using the MCNP continuous-energy code, and the few- group diffusion theory calculations were performed using the VENTURE and PDQ code systems. The MCNP code was used primarily for its capability to model the reflector components in realistic geometries as well as the inherent circumvention of cross-section processing requirements and use of energy-collapsed cross sections. The MCNP code was used for evaluations of reflector component reactivity effects and of heat loads in these components. The code was also used as a benchmark comparison against the diffusion-theory estimates of key reactor parameters such as region fluxes, control rod worths, reactivity coefficients, and material worths. The VENTURE and PDQ codes were used to provide independent evaluations of burnup effects, power distributions, and small perturbation worths. The performance and safety calculations performed over the subject time period are summarized, and key results are provided. The key results include flux and power distributions over the fuel cycle, silicon production rates, fuel burnup rates, component reactivities, control rod worths, component heat loads, shutdown reactivity margins, reactivity coefficients, and isotope production rates.

  14. Conceptualization and image understanding by neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudipalley, Chandu

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptualization and Fuzzy Semantics 2. Conceptual Associations 3. Pattern-Concept Association 4. Concept-Pattern Association 5. Concept-Concept Association 6. Conceptual Analysis 7. Conceptualization Depth vs Resolution Depth . 8. Focusing of Attention 9.... Comparison Between Gravity Algorithm and Spread- ing Activation 3. Segmentation . 4. Pattern Classification Stage . 5. Invariances by the Fourier-Mellin Transform B. Knowledge Base . 16 19 19 21 22 23 23 25 26 27 29 30 32 32 32 35 37 48...

  15. Conceptual Design of a CERMET NTR Fission Core Using Multiphysics Modeling Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan A. Webb; Brian J. Gross; William T. Taitano

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An initial pre-conceptual CERMET Nuclear Thermal Propulsion reactor system is investigated within this paper. Reactor configurations are investigated where the fuel consists of 60 vol.% UO2 and 40 vol.% W where the UO2 consists of Gd2O3 concentrations of 5 and 10 mol.%.Gd2O3. The fuel configuration consisting of 5 mol.% UO2 was found to have a total mass of 2761 kg and a thrust to weight ratio of 4.10 and required a coolant channel surface area to fueled volume ratio of approximately 15.0 in order to keep the centerline temperature below 3000 K. The configuration consisting of 10 mol.% Gd2O3 required a surface area to volume ratio of approximately 12.2 to cool the reactor to a peak temperature of 3000 K and had a total mass of 3200 kg and a thrust to weight ratio of 3.54. It is not known yet what concentration of Gd2O3 is required to maintain fuel stability at 3000 K; however, both reactors offer the potential for operations at 25,000 lb, and at a specific impulse which may range from 900 to 950 seconds.

  16. Modelling and Control of Activated Sludge Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Modelling and Control of Activated Sludge Processes Michela Mulas Dottorato di Ricerca of Activated Sludge Processes Michela Mulas Supervisors: Prof. Roberto Baratti Ing. Stefania Tronci Dottorato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 ASP Models and Simulations 7 2.1 The Activated Sludge Process

  17. Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

  18. U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics; and Conceptual model of fluid infiltration in fractured media. Project summary, July 28, 1997--July 27, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The title describes the two tasks summarized in this report. The remainder of the report contains information on meetings held or to be held on the subjects. The US National Committee for Rock Mechanics (USNC/RM) provides for US participation in international activities in rock mechanics, principally through adherence to the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM). It also keeps the US rock mechanics community informed about new programs directed toward major areas of national concern in which rock mechanics problems represent critical or limiting factors, such as energy resources, excavation, underground storage and waste disposal, and reactor siting. The committee also guides or produces advisory studies and reports on problem areas in rock mechanics. A new panel under the auspices of the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics has been appointed to conduct a study on Conceptual Models of Fluid Infiltration in Fractured Media. The study has health and environmental applications related to the underground flow of pollutants through fractured rock in and around mines and waste repositories. Support of the study has been received from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project Office. The new study builds on the success of a recent USNC/RM report entitled Rock Fractures and Fluid Flow: Contemporary Understanding and Applications (National Academy Press, 1996, 551 pp.). A summary of the new study is provided.

  19. A Conceptual Approach to Two-Scale Constitutive Modelling For Hydro-Mechanical Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giang D. Nguyen; Abbas El-Zein; Terry Bennett

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Large scale modelling of fluid flow coupled with solid failure in geothermal reservoirs or hydrocarbon extraction from reservoir rocks usually involves behaviours at two scales: lower scale of the inelastic localization zone, and larger scale of the bulk continuum where elastic behaviour can be reasonably assumed. The hydraulic conductivities corresponding to the mechanical properties at these two scales are different. In the bulk elastic host rock, the hydraulic conductivity does not vary much with the deformation, while it significantly changes in the lower scale of the localization zone due to inelastic deformation. Increase of permeability due to fracture and/or dilation, or reduction of permeability due to material compaction can take place inside this zone. The challenge is to predict the evolution of hydraulic conductivities coupled with the mechanical behaviour of the material in all stages of the deformation process. In the early stage of diffuse deformation, the permeability of the material can be reasonably assumed to be homogenous over the whole Representative Volume Element (RVE) However, localized failure results in distinctly different conductivities in different parts of the RVE. This paper establishes a general framework and corresponding field equations to describe the hydro-mechanical coupling in both diffuse and localized stages of deformation in rocks. In particular, embedding the lower scale hydro-mechanical behaviour of the localization zone inside an elastic bulk, together with their corresponding effective sizes, helps effectively deal with scaling issues in large-scale modelling. Preliminary results are presented which demonstrate the promising features of this new approach.

  20. Refinement of the Kansas City Plant site conceptual model with respect to dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korte, N.E.; Hall, S.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, J.L. [AlliedSignal Corp., Kansas City, MO (United States). Dept. of Environmental Protection

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a refinement of the site conceptual model with respect to dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) at the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant (KCP). This refinement was prompted by a review of the literature and the results of a limited study that was conducted to evaluate whether pools of DNAPL were present in contaminated locations at the KCP. The field study relied on the micropurge method of sample collection. This method has been demonstrated as a successful approach for obtaining discrete samples within a limited aquifer zone. Samples were collected at five locations across 5-ft well screens located at the base of the alluvial aquifer at the KCP. The hypothesis was that if pools of DNAPL were present, the dissolved concentration would increase with depth. Four wells with highly contaminated groundwater were selected for the test. Three of the wells were located in areas where DNAPL was suspected, and one where no DNAPL was believed to be present. The results demonstrated no discernible pattern with depth for the four wells tested. A review of the data in light of the available technical literature suggests that the fine-grained nature of the aquifer materials precludes the formation of pools. Instead, DNAPL is trapped as discontinuous ganglia that are probably widespread throughout the aquifer. The discontinuous nature of the DNAPL distribution prevents the collection of groundwater samples with concentrations approaching saturation. Furthermore, the results indicate that attempts to remediate the aquifer with conventional approaches will not result in restoration to pristine conditions because the tortuous groundwater flow paths will inhibit the efficiency of fluid-flow-based treatments.

  1. Using the Conceptual Site Model to Remediate Two Sites in New England and Reach License Termination and Site Reuse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glucksberg, Nadia; Peters, Jay [MACTEC Engineering and Consulting, Inc., Portland, Maine, 04112 and Wakefield, Massachusetts, 01880 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Conceptual Site Model (CSM) is a powerful tool for understanding the link between contamination sources, cleanup objectives, and ultimate site reuse. The CSM describes the site setting, geology, hydrogeology, potential sources, release mechanisms and migration pathways of contaminants. The CSM is needed to understand the extent of contamination and how receptors may be exposed to both radiological and chemical constituents. A key component of the CSM that is often overlooked concerns how the regulatory requirements drive remediation and how each has to be integrated into the CSM to ensure that all stakeholder requirements are understood and addressed. This paper describes how the use of the CSM helped reach closure and reuse at two facilities in Connecticut that are pursuing termination of their Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. The two facilities are the Combustion Engineering Site, located in Windsor, Connecticut, (CE Windsor Site) and the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, located in Haddam Neck, Connecticut (CYAPCO). The closure of each of these facilities is regulated by four agencies: - Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - which requires cleanup levels for radionuclides to be protective of public health; - US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) - which requires cleanup levels for chemicals to be protective of public health and the environment; - Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) Bureau of Air Management, Radiation Division - which requires cleanup levels for radionuclides to be protective of public health; and - Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) Bureau of Water Protection and Land Reuse - which requires cleanup levels for chemicals to be protective of public health and the environment. Some of the radionuclides at the CE Windsor Site are also regulated under the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) under the Army Corps of Engineers. The remainder of this paper presents the similarities and differences between the CSMs for these two sites and how each site used the CSM to reach closure. Although each of these site have unique histories and physical features, the CSM approach was used to understand the geology, hydrogeology, migration and exposure pathways, and regulatory requirements to successfully characterize and plan closure of the sites. A summary of how these attributes affected site closure is provided.

  2. Active Appearance Models for Face Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhulai, Sandjai

    the performance and the computational speed of Active Appearance Models. #12;4 #12;5 Acknowledgements This paper to recognize faces, there are some difficulties to overcome. Faces are highly variable, deformable objects Appearance Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.4 The Active Appearance Search Algorithm

  3. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched. The documents that appeared to be the most pertinent were selected from further review. These documents are tabulated in the citation list. This report summarizes existing geochemical conceptual models, but does not attempt to generate a new conceptual model or select the ''right'' model. This document is organized as follows. Geochemical models are described in general in Section 2. Geochemical processes that control the transport and fate of contaminants introduced into groundwater are described in Section 3. The natural geochemistry of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) is described in Section 4. The effect of waste disposal on the INEEL subsurface is described in Section 5. The geochemical behavior of the major contaminants is described in Section 6. Section 7 describes the site-specific geochemical models developed for various INEEL facilities.

  4. Summary of Conceptual Models and Data Needs to Support the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter; Arthur S. Rood

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the technical approach and data required to support development of the performance assessment, and composite analysis are presented for the remote handled low-level waste disposal facility on-site alternative being considered at Idaho National Laboratory. Previous analyses and available data that meet requirements are identified and discussed. Outstanding data and analysis needs are also identified and summarized. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of facility performance and of the composite performance are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE Order 435.1, 2001) which stipulate that operation and closure of the disposal facility will be managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. The corresponding established procedures to ensure these protections are contained in DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1 2001). Requirements include assessment of (1) all-exposure pathways, (2) air pathway, (3) radon, and (4) groundwater pathway doses. Doses are computed from radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The performance assessment and composite analysis are being prepared to assess compliance with performance objectives and to establish limits on concentrations and inventories of radionuclides at the facility and to support specification of design, construction, operation and closure requirements. Technical objectives of the PA and CA are primarily accomplished through the development of an establish inventory, and through the use of predictive environmental transport models implementing an overarching conceptual framework. This document reviews the conceptual model, inherent assumptions, and data required to implement the conceptual model in a numerical framework. Available site-specific data and data sources are then addressed. Differences in required analyses and data are captured as outstanding data needs.

  5. Ground-water flow and recharge in the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer, east-central Illinois: A conceptual model based on hydrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panno, S.V.; Hackley, K.C.; Cartwright, K.; Liu, C.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major-ion and isotopic analyses of ground water have been used to develop a conceptual model of flow and recharge to the Mahomet Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MVA). The MVA is composed of clean, permeable sands and gravels and forms a basal'' fill up to 60 m thick in a buried, west-trending bedrock valley. A thick succession of glacial tills, some containing interbedded lenses of sand and gravel, covers the MVA. Three regions within the MVA have hydrochemically distinct ground-water types. A fourth ground-water type was found at the confluence of the MVA and the Mackinaw Bedrock Valley Aquifer (MAK) to the west.

  6. Modeling Resources for Activity Coordination and Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Modeling Resources for Activity Coordination and Scheduling Rodion M. Podorozhny , Barbara Staudt describes experience in applying a resource man- agement system to problems in two areas of agent and activity coordi- nation. In the paper we argue that precise speci cation of resources is important

  7. Modeling Resources for Activity Coordination and Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Modeling Resources for Activity Coordination and Scheduling Rodion M. Podorozhny , Barbara Staudt describes experience in applying a resource man­ agement system to problems in two areas of agent and activity coordi­ nation. In the paper we argue that precise specification of resources is important

  8. Conceptual Models for Migration of Key Groundwater Contaminants Through the Vadose Zone and Into the Upper Unconfined Aquifer Below the B-Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Keller, Jason M.; Thorne, Paul D.; Lanigan, David C.; Christensen, J. N.; Thomas, Gregory S.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The B-Complex contains 3 major crib and trench disposal sites and 3 SST farms that have released nearly 346 mega-liters of waste liquids containing the following high groundwater risk drivers: ~14,000 kg of CN, 29,000 kg of Cr, 12,000 kg of U and 145 Ci of Tc-99. After a thorough review of available vadose zone sediment and pore water, groundwater plume, field gamma logging, field electrical resistivity studies, we developed conceptual models for which facilities have been the significant sources of the contaminants in the groundwater and estimated the masses of these contaminants remaining in the vadose zone and currently present in the groundwater in comparison to the totals released. This allowed us to make mass balance calculations on how consistent our knowledge is on the current deep vadose zone and groundwater distribution of contaminants. Strengths and weaknesses of the conceptual models are discussed as well as implications on future groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation alternatives. Our hypothesized conceptual models attribute the source of all of the cyanide and most of the Tc-99 currently in the groundwater to the BY cribs. The source of the uranium is the BX-102 tank overfill event and the source of most of the chromium is the B-7-A&B and B-8 cribs. Our mass balance estimates suggest that there are much larger masses of U, CN, and Tc remaining in the deep vadose zone within ~20 ft of the water table than is currently in the groundwater plumes below the B-Complex. This hypothesis needs to be carefully considered before future remediation efforts are chosen. The masses of these groundwater risk drivers in the the groundwater plumes have been increasing over the last decade and the groundwater plumes are migrating to the northwest towards the Gable Gap. The groundwater flow rate appears to flucuate in response to seasonal changes in hydraulic gradient. The flux of contaminants out of the deep vadose zone from the three proposed sources also appears to be transient such that the evolution of the contaminant plumes is transient.

  9. A Framework of Primitives for Model-Driven SOA Conceptual, Tools, Methodological and Operational support of SOA development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lano, Kevin Charles

    Service Service Component 1..* consistsOf consistsOf 2..* ServiceContract #12;© British Telecommunications engaged in the contract activities. #12;© British Telecommunications plc Service description ServiceContract

  10. Preliminary geohydrologic conceptual model of the Los Medanos region near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for the purpose of performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinster, K.F. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a geohydrologic conceptual model of the northern Delaware Basin to be used in modeling three-dimensional, regional ground-water flow for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the Los Medanos region near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Geochemical and hydrological evidence indicates that flow is transient in the Rustler Formation and the Capitan aquifer in response to changing geologic, hydrologic, and climatic conditions. Before the Pleistocene, ground-water flow in the Rustler Formation was generally eastward, but uneven tilting of the Delaware Basin lowered the regional base level and formed fractures in the evaporitic sequence of rocks approximately parallel to the basin axis. Dissolution along the fractures, coupled with erosion, formed Nash Draw. Also, the drop in base level resulted in an increase in the carrying power of the Pecos River, which began incising the Capitan/aquifer near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Erosion and downcutting released hydraulic pressure that caused a reversal in Rustler ground-water flow direction near the WIPP. Flow in the Rustler west of the WIPP is toward Nash Draw and eventually toward Malaga Bend; flow south of the WIPP is toward Malaga Bend. 126 refs., 70 figs., 18 tabs.

  11. Temperature Modeling in Activated Sludge Systems: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    Temperature Modeling in Activated Sludge Systems: A Case Study Jacek Makinia, Scott A. Wells, Piotr Zima ABSTRACT: A model of temperature dynamics was developed as part of a general model of activated-sludge biochemical-energy inputs and other activated-sludge, heat-balance terms. All the models were tested under

  12. Simulating Conceptually-Guided Perceptual Learning Alexander Gerganov (agerganov@cogs.nbu.bg)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstone, Robert

    Simulating Conceptually-Guided Perceptual Learning Alexander Gerganov (agerganov for conceptual influences on perceptual learning. Computational modeling is often used to simulate perceptual are often derived from simulations. Models of perceptual learning, however, rarely try to account

  13. User readiness to interact with information systems - a human activity perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    human activity between a user and a system with the motive of transforming raw information into useful outcome. Using Activity Theory as a paradigm, this study conceptualizes a user-system interaction model that specifies the mediating relationships...

  14. A conceptual model and preliminary estimate of potential tritium migration from the Benham (U-20c) site, Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brikowski, T.; Mahin, G. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U-20c is the site of a large below-water-table nuclear test near the Nevada Test Site boundary. A conceptual model of potential groundwater migration of tritium from U-20c is constructed and quantitatively evaluated in this report. The lower portion of the collapse chimney at Benham is expected to intersect 200 m of permeable rhyolite lava, overlain by similar thicknesses of low-permeability zeolitized bedded tuff, then permeable welded tuff. Vertical groundwater flow through the chimney is predicted to be minimal, horizontal transport should be controlled by the regional groundwater flow. Analytic solutions treating only advective transport indicate 1 to 2 km of tritium movement (95% confidence interval 0.7--2.5 km) within 5 years after test-related pressure-temperature transients have dissipated. This point lies at the axis of a potentiometric surface trough along the west edge of Area 20, Nevada Test Site. Within 25 years, movement is predicted to extend to 3 km (95% confidence interval 2--5 km) approximately to the intersection of the trough and the Nevada Test Site boundary. Considering the effects of radioactive decay, but not dispersion, plume concentration would fall below Safe Drinking Water Act standards by 204 years, at a predicted distance of 11 km (95% confidence interval 7--31 km). This point is located in the eastern portion of the Timber Mountain Caldera moat within the Nellis Air Force Range (military bombing range).

  15. Emotion Regulation CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    CHAPTER 1 Emotion Regulation CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS JAMES J. GROSS ROSS A. THOMPSON Standing, paper or plastic are made. Quotidian acts of emotion regulation such as this constitute one important- changes that require us to regulate how emotions are experienced and expressed. But what do people do

  16. active region model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model (Wheatland and Glukhov 1998; Wheatland 2008; Wheatland 2009). The magnetic free energy of the model active region varies in time due to a prescribed (deterministic)...

  17. IMPROVEMENTS IN MODELLING DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    1 IMPROVEMENTS IN MODELLING DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS Jacek Makinia*, Scott A in a full-scale activated sludge reactor. The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 was used to describe for dissolved oxygen. KEYWORDS Activated sludge; dispersion; dissolved oxygen dynamics; mass transfer

  18. Theory and modeling of active brazing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James Edward; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Givler, Richard C.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active brazes have been used for many years to produce bonds between metal and ceramic objects. By including a relatively small of a reactive additive to the braze one seeks to improve the wetting and spreading behavior of the braze. The additive modifies the substrate, either by a chemical surface reaction or possibly by alloying. By its nature, the joining process with active brazes is a complex nonequilibrium non-steady state process that couples chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion to the rheology and wetting behavior of the braze. Most of the these subprocesses are taking place in the interfacial region, most are difficult to access by experiment. To improve the control over the brazing process, one requires a better understanding of the melting of the active braze, rate of the chemical reaction, reactant and product diffusion rates, nonequilibrium composition-dependent surface tension as well as the viscosity. This report identifies ways in which modeling and theory can assist in improving our understanding.

  19. Conceptual design of first toroidal electron cyclotron resonance ion source and modeling of ion extraction from it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caliri, C; Volpe, F A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) progressed to higher and higher ion currents and charge states by adopting stronger magnetic fields (beneficial for confinement) and proportionally higher ECR frequencies. Further improvements would require the attainment of "triple products" of density, temperature and confinement time comparable with major fusion experiments. For this, we propose a new, toroidal rather than linear, ECRIS geometry, which would at the same time improve confinement and make better use of the magnetic field. Ion extraction is more complicated than from a linear device, but feasible, as our modelling suggests: single-particle tracings showed successful extraction by at least two techniques, making use respectively of a magnetic extractor and of ExB drifts. Additional techniques are briefly discussed.

  20. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 3: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Natural and Anthropogenic Influences on the Release of Contaminants to the Subsurface Environment from Waste Source Terms at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul L. Wichlacz

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This source-term summary document is intended to describe the current understanding of contaminant source terms and the conceptual model for potential source-term release to the environment at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), as presented in published INEEL reports. The document presents a generalized conceptual model of the sources of contamination and describes the general categories of source terms, primary waste forms, and factors that affect the release of contaminants from the waste form into the vadose zone and Snake River Plain Aquifer. Where the information has previously been published and is readily available, summaries of the inventory of contaminants are also included. Uncertainties that affect the estimation of the source term release are also discussed where they have been identified by the Source Term Technical Advisory Group. Areas in which additional information are needed (i.e., research needs) are also identified.

  1. Activities and Accomplishments in Model Year 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Document summarizes the compliance activity of EPAct-covered state and alternative fuel provider fleets.

  2. Models and Technologies Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    of PPAR-b/d caused a decrease in cell proliferation in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells compared with controls, whereas ligand activation of PPAR-b/d further inhibited proliferation of MCF7 but not MDA-MB-231 cells. Overexpression and/or ligand activation of PPAR-b/d in MDA-MB-231 or MCF7 cells had no effect on experimental

  3. Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model Antonio Araujo, Simone sensitivity analysis of optimal operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test.[7] applied a systematic procedure for control structure design of an activated sludge process

  4. Active manipulation of fields modeled by the Helmholtz Daniel Onofrei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onofrei, Daniel

    Active manipulation of fields modeled by the Helmholtz equation Daniel Onofrei May 27, 2014, now exterior active sources, modeled with the help of the above boundary controls (which can represent of active control in the context of scalar Helmholtz equation. Given a source region Da and {v0, v1, ..., vn

  5. Active manipulation of fields modeled by the Helmholtz Daniel Onofrei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onofrei, Daniel

    Active manipulation of fields modeled by the Helmholtz equation Daniel Onofrei October 27, 2014 exterior active sources, modeled with the help of the above boundary controls (which can represent velocity]) uses a discrete number of active sources located in the exterior of the control region to manipulate

  6. Modeling and Optimizing Ergonomic Activities in Automobile Product Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    Modeling and Optimizing Ergonomic Activities in Automobile Product Development João Ferreira Anna.silva@acm.org Abstract We collect ergonomic rules and normative rules considerations for automobile business and modeled these activities with a special UML language created for automobile business, VDML (Vehicle Development Modeling

  7. Measuring and modeling activity and travel well-being

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abou Zeid, Maya, 1979-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops methods for the measurement of activity and travel well-being and models for linking well-being and behavior. The hypotheses underlying this research are that (1) activities are planned to maintain or ...

  8. Engineering online and in-person social networks to sustain physical activity: application of a conceptual model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and towns within the Harrisburg- Carlisle metropolitanneighborhoods in the city of Harrisburg (pop 49,528); cohortselected towns in the Harrisburg-West Shore region (combined

  9. IT CONCEPTUALIZATION: RESPECTIVE CONTRIBUTIONS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Technology Impacts 5, 1 (2005) 39-58" #12;2 IT CONCEPTUALIZATION: RESPECTIVE CONTRIBUTIONS OF SOCIOLOGY1 IT CONCEPTUALIZATION: RESPECTIVE CONTRIBUTIONS OF SOCIOLOGY AND INFORMATION SYSTEM François contributions. Lastly, it seems that if sociology and IS sometimes diverge in the way they study sociotechnical

  10. Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

  11. High performance APCS conceptual design and evaluation scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, N.; Liekhus, K.; Chambers, A.; Anderson, G.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Air Pollution Control System (APCS) Conceptual Design and Evaluation study was conducted to evaluate a high-performance (APC) system for minimizing air emissions from mixed waste thermal treatment systems. Seven variations of high-performance APCS designs were conceptualized using several design objectives. One of the system designs was selected for detailed process simulation using ASPEN PLUS to determine material and energy balances and evaluate performance. Installed system capital costs were also estimated. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate the incremental cost and benefit of added carbon adsorber beds for mercury control, specific catalytic reduction for NO{sub x} control, and offgas retention tanks for holding the offgas until sample analysis is conducted to verify that the offgas meets emission limits. Results show that the high-performance dry-wet APCS can easily meet all expected emission limits except for possibly mercury. The capability to achieve high levels of mercury control (potentially necessary for thermally treating some DOE mixed streams) could not be validated using current performance data for mercury control technologies. The engineering approach and ASPEN PLUS modeling tool developed and used in this study identified APC equipment and system performance, size, cost, and other issues that are not yet resolved. These issues need to be addressed in feasibility studies and conceptual designs for new facilities or for determining how to modify existing facilities to meet expected emission limits. The ASPEN PLUS process simulation with current and refined input assumptions and calculations can be used to provide system performance information for decision-making, identifying best options, estimating costs, reducing the potential for emission violations, providing information needed for waste flow analysis, incorporating new APCS technologies in existing designs, or performing facility design and permitting activities.

  12. Conceptual combination: does similarity predict emergence?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkenfeld, Merryl Joy

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about emergence. 24 EXPERIMENT ONE: CONCEPTUAL COMBINATION This phase was the actual conceptual combination task. In it, the subjects performed conceptual combination on all 16 pairs of words. The subjects gave two definitions for each pmr...

  13. Modeling Oscillatory Activity of Endocrine Richard Bertram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertram, Richard

    Characteristic Patterns of Electrical Activity #12;Fast Bursting Oscillations Simultaneous fast Ca2+ and voltage Bursting Oscillations Slow oscillations of Ca2+ and voltage from an islet... Zhang et al., Biophys. J., 84 exhibits oscillations, suggesting that insulin is secreted in a pulsatile manner. Porksen et al., AJP, 273

  14. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROBINSON,K.

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has prepared a conceptual design for a world class user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. This facility, called the ''National Synchrotron Light Source II'' (NSLS-II), will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. The overall objective of the NSLS-II project is to deliver a research facility to advance fundamental science and have the capability to characterize and understand physical properties at the nanoscale, the processes by which nanomaterials can be manipulated and assembled into more complex hierarchical structures, and the new phenomena resulting from such assemblages. It will also be a user facility made available to researchers engaged in a broad spectrum of disciplines from universities, industries, and other laboratories.

  15. Simplified Modeling of Active Magnetic Regenerators Thomas Burdyny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    , this technology uses the magnetization and demagnetization of environmentally neutral solid refrigerants ...............................................................................................................1 1.2 Magnetic RefrigerationSimplified Modeling of Active Magnetic Regenerators by Thomas Burdyny BEng., University of Victoria

  16. Fractions: conceptual and didactic aspects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    Fractions: conceptual and didactic aspects Martha Isabel Fandiño Pinilla NRD Department of transforming "Knowledge" into "knowledge to teach" is called didactic transposition and constitutes a moment

  17. How intimacy affects resource conceptualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Allison L

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous research regarding Foa and Foa's Resource Theory does not address whether the level of intimacy shared between the actors affects their resource conceptualization. Furthermore, siblings have not been utilized as a separate intimacy group...

  18. How intimacy affects resource conceptualization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Allison L

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous research regarding Foa and Foa's Resource Theory does not address whether the level of intimacy shared between the actors affects their resource conceptualization. Furthermore, siblings have not been utilized as a separate intimacy group...

  19. A multiobjective, multidisciplinary design optimization methodology for the conceptual design of distributed satellite systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jilla, Cyrus D., 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiobjective, multidisciplinary design optimization methodology for mathematically modeling the distributed satellite system (DSS) conceptual design problem as an optimization problem has been developed to advance the ...

  20. Modeling Temporal Activity Patterns in Dynamic Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Vasanthan; Galstyan, Aram; Tartakovsky, Alexander G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this work is on developing probabilistic models for user activity in social networks by incorporating the social network influence as perceived by the user. For this, we propose a coupled Hidden Markov Model, where each user's activity evolves according to a Markov chain with a hidden state that is influenced by the collective activity of the friends of the user. We develop generalized Baum-Welch and Viterbi algorithms for model parameter learning and state estimation for the proposed framework. We then validate the proposed model using a significant corpus of user activity on Twitter. Our numerical studies show that with sufficient observations to ensure accurate model learning, the proposed framework explains the observed data better than either a renewal process-based model or a conventional uncoupled Hidden Markov Model. We also demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach in predicting the time to the next tweet. Finally, clustering in the model parameter space is shown to result in dist...

  1. Modelling the polarization dichotomy of Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rene W. Goosmann

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    I present polarization modelling of Active Galactic Nuclei in the optical/UV range. The modelling is conducted using the Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code Stokes, which self-consistently models the polarization signature of a complex model arrangement for an active nucleus. In this work I include three different scattering regions around the central source: an equatorial electron scattering disk, an equatorial obscuring dusty torus, and polar electron scattering cones. I investigate the resulting dependencies of the V-band polarization for different optical depths of the scattering cones, different dust compositions inside the torus, and various half-opening angles of the torus/polar cones. The observed polarization dichotomy can be successfully reproduced by the model.

  2. Emotion Regulation as Situated Conceptualizations 1 RUNNING HEAD: EMOTION REGULATION AS SITUATED CONCEPTUALIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barsalou, Lawrence W.

    Emotion Regulation as Situated Conceptualizations 1 RUNNING HEAD: EMOTION REGULATION AS SITUATED CONCEPTUALIZATIONS TITLE: A psychological construction account of emotion regulation and dysregulation: The role of situated conceptualizations Lisa Feldman Barrett Northeastern University; Massachusetts General Hospital

  3. Conceptual Spawning Habitat Model to Aid in ESA Recovery Plans for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop a spawning habitat model that can be used to determine the physical habitat factors that are necessary to define the production potential for fall chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Columbia River's Hanford Reach and Snake River. This project addresses RPA 155 in the NMFS 2000 Biological Opinion: Action 155: BPA, working with BOR, the Corps, EPA, and USGS, shall develop a program to: (1) Identify mainstem habitat sampling reaches, survey conditions, describe cause-and-effect relationships, and identify research needs; (2) Develop improvement plans for all mainstem reaches; and (3) Initiate improvements in three mainstem reaches. During FY 2003 we continued to collect and analyze information on fall chinook salmon spawning habitat characteristics in the Hanford Reach that will be used to address RPA 155, i.e., items 1-3 above. For example, in FY 2003: (1) We continued to survey spawning habitat in the Hanford Reach and develop a 2-dimensional hydraulic and habitat model that will be capable of predicting suitability of fall chinook salmon habitat in the Hanford Reach; (2) Monitor how hydro operations altered the physical and chemical characteristics of the river and the hyporheic zone within fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach; (3) Published a paper on the impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon (Dauble et al. 2003). This paper was made possible with data collected on this project; (4) Continued to analyze data collected in previous years that will ultimately be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships and identify research needs that will assist managers in the improvement of fall chinook habitat quality in main-stem reaches. During FY 2004 we plan to: (1) Complete preliminary reporting and submit papers based on the results of the project through FY 2004. Although we have proposed additional analysis of data be conducted in FY 2005, we anticipate a significant number of key papers being prepared and submitted in FY 2004 which will go toward identifying the data gaps this RPA is intended to address; (2) Make available data from this project for use on Project 2003-038-00 ('Evaluate restoration potential of Snake River fall chinook salmon') which is a BPA-funded project that will start in FY 2004; and (3) Present results of our work at regional and national meetings in order to facilitate technology transfer and information sharing. The objective of this project is to define the production potential of fall chinook salmon that spawn in the Hanford Reach. We will provide fisheries and resource managers with the information they need to determine if the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is indeed healthy, and whether this population will be capable of seeding other satellite populations in the future. We will accomplish this purpose by continuing our on-going research at determining the carrying capacity of the Hanford Reach for producing fall chinook salmon under current operational scenarios, and then begin an assessment of whether the Reach is functioning as a model of a normative river as is widely believed. The product of our research will be a better understanding of the key habitat features for mainstem populations of anadromous salmonids, as well as a better understanding of the measures that must be taken to ensure long-term protection of the Hanford Reach fall chinook population. Although the project was originally funded in FY 1994, it was significantly redefined in FY 2000. At that time five tasks were proposed to accomplish the project objective. The purpose of this progress report is to briefly describe the activities that have been completed on each of the five tasks from FY 2000 through FY 2003.

  4. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate. (MOW)

  5. Learning Active Basis Models by EM-Type Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ying Nian

    Learning Active Basis Models by EM-Type Algorithms Zhangzhang Si1, Haifeng Gong1,2, Song-Chun Zhu1, and scales as latent variables into the image generation process, and learn the template by EM-type scheme for learning image templates of object categories where the learning is not fully supervised. We

  6. Modeling active electrolocation in weakly electric fish Habib Ammari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    Modeling active electrolocation in weakly electric fish Habib Ammari Thomas Boulier Josselin in weakly electric fishes. We first investigate the forward complex conductivity problem and derive the approx- imate boundary conditions on the skin of the fish. Then we provide a dipole approximation

  7. Detecting Termination of Active Database Rules Using Symbolic Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Indrakshi

    Detecting Termination of Active Database Rules Using Symbolic Model Checking Indrakshi Ray is the non-termination of rules. Although algorithms have been proposed to detect non-termination, al- most all provide a conservative estimate; that is, the algorithms detect all the potential cases of non-termination

  8. Effective viscosity of active suspensions: Three-dimensional numerical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levan Jibuti; Walter Zimmermann; Salima Rafaï; Philippe Peyla

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional model is proposed for Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii swimming with a breaststroke-like beating of its two flagella. The model reveals unusual angular orbits of the active swimmer under a linear shear flow. Namely, the swimmer sustains orientation transiently across the flow when flagella plane is perpendicular to the shear plane, and amplify the shear-induced rotation along the flow. Such behavior is a result of the interplay between shear-induced deformation and swimmer's periodic beating motion that exerts internal torques on the torque-free swimmer. This particular behavior has some significant consequences on the rheological properties of the suspension that tends to confirm previous experimental results [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 098102 (2010)]. We calculated the intrinsic viscosity of the suspension with such isolated modeled microswimmers (dilute case) in shear flow using numerical simulations based on Rotne-Prager approximation. The results show an increased intrinsic viscosity for active swimmer suspensions in comparison to non-active ones in accordance with previous experimental measurements. A major enhancement of the active swimmer viscosity occurs due to the effectively extended shape of the deformable swimming cells. We also recover the experimentally observed shear thinning behavior.

  9. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP CONCEPTUAL DESIGN CONTROL DECISION REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRO CA

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This control decision addresses the Knock-Out Pot (KOP) Disposition KOP Processing System (KPS) conceptual design. The KPS functions to (1) retrieve KOP material from canisters, (2) remove particles less than 600 {micro}m in size and low density materials from the KOP material, (3) load the KOP material into Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) baskets, and (4) stage the MCO baskets for subsequent loading into MCOs. Hazard and accident analyses of the KPS conceptual design have been performed to incorporate safety into the design process. The hazard analysis is documented in PRC-STP-00098, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Project Conceptual Design Hazard Analysis. The accident analysis is documented in PRC-STP-CN-N-00167, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Sub-Project Canister Over Lift Accident Analysis. Based on the results of these analyses, and analyses performed in support of MCO transportation and MCO processing and storage activities at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and Canister Storage Building (CSB), control decision meetings were held to determine the controls required to protect onsite and offsite receptors and facility workers. At the conceptual design stage, these controls are primarily defined by their safety functions. Safety significant structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that could provide the identified safety functions have been selected for the conceptual design. It is anticipated that some safety SSCs identified herein will be reclassified based on hazard and accident analyses performed in support of preliminary and detailed design.

  10. Conceptual designs for a long term {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} storage vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, D.M.; Replogle, W.C.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on conceptual designs for a long term, 250 years, storage container for plutonium oxide ([sup 238]PuO[sub 2]). These conceptual designs are based on the use of a quartz filter to release the helium generated during the plutonium decay. In this report a review of filter material selection, design concepts, thermal modeling, and filter performance are discussed.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic Controlled Variable Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test-bed benchmark simulation model no. 1 (BSM1) and the activated sludge model no. 1 (ASM1). The objective is to search for a control

  12. Active Brownian Motion Models and Applications to Ratchets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Fiasconaro; Werner Ebeling; Ewa Gudowska-Nowak

    2008-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an overview over recent studies on the model of Active Brownian Motion (ABM) coupled to reservoirs providing free energy which may be converted into kinetic energy of motion. First, we present an introduction to a general concept of active Brownian particles which are capable to take up energy from the source and transform part of it in order to perform various activities. In the second part of our presentation we consider applications of ABM to ratchet systems with different forms of differentiable potentials. Both analytical and numerical evaluations are discussed for three cases of sinusoidal, staircase-like and Mateos ratchet potentials, also with the additional loads modeled by tilted potential structure. In addition, stochastic character of the kinetics is investigated by considering perturbation by Gaussian white noise which is shown to be responsible for driving the directionality of the asymptotic flux in the ratchet. This \\textit{stochastically driven directionality} effect is visualized as a strong nonmonotonic dependence of the statistics of the right versus left trajectories of motion leading to a net current of particles. Possible applications of the ratchet systems to molecular motors are also briefly discussed

  13. CARD No. 23 Models and Computer Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARD No. 23 Models and Computer Codes 23.A BACKGROUND Section 194.23 addresses the compliance criteria requirements for conceptual models and computer codes. Conceptual models capture a general (PA). The design of computer codes begins with the development of conceptual models. Conceptual models

  14. Activity Diagrams for DEVS Models: A Case Study Modeling Health Care Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozmen, Ozgur [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete Event Systems Specification (DEVS) is a widely used formalism for modeling and simulation of discrete and continuous systems. While DEVS provides a sound mathematical representation of discrete systems, its practical use can suffer when models become complex. Five main functions, which construct the core of atomic modules in DEVS, can realize the behaviors that modelers want to represent. The integration of these functions is handled by the simulation routine, however modelers can implement each function in various ways. Therefore, there is a need for graphical representations of complex models to simplify their implementation and facilitate their reproduction. In this work, we illustrate the use of activity diagrams for this purpose in the context of a health care behavior model, which is developed with an agent-based modeling paradigm.

  15. Modeling Anti-HIV Activity of HEPT Derivatives Revisited. Multiregression Models Are Not Inferior Ones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basic, Ivan [GBS-IT Ltd., CSS Life Science, Prilaz baruna Filipovica 25, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Nadramija, Damir [Zagreb Institute of Public Health, Mirogojska 16, Zagreb 10000 (Croatia); Flajslik, Mario [Univesity of Zagreb, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing (Croatia); Amic, Dragan [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University, P. O. Box 719, 31001 Osijek (Croatia); Lucic, Bono [Ruder Boskovic Institute, P. O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2007-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Several quantitative structure-activity studies for this data set containing 107 HEPT derivatives have been performed since 1997, using the same set of molecules by (more or less) different classes of molecular descriptors. Multivariate Regression (MR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models were developed and in each study the authors concluded that ANN models are superior to MR ones. We re-calculated multivariate regression models for this set of molecules using the same set of descriptors, and compared our results with the previous ones. Two main reasons for overestimation of the quality of the ANN models in previous studies comparing with MR models are: (1) wrong calculation of leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validated (CV) correlation coefficient for MR models in Luco et al., J. Chem. Inf. Comput. Sci. 37 392-401 (1997), and (2) incorrect estimation/interpretation of leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validated and predictive performance and power of ANN models. More precise and fairer comparison of fit and LOO CV statistical parameters shows that MR models are more stable. In addition, MR models are much simpler than ANN ones. For real testing the predictive performance of both classes of models we need more HEPT derivatives, because all ANN models that presented results for external set of molecules used experimental values in optimization of modeling procedure and model parameters.

  16. Conceptual design report for site drainage control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, M.R.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mound Plant (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc. (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety & Health (ES&H) Upgrades Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by facility activities. The first project of this multiphase program is now in the final stages of construction, and the second project is currently under design. Four additional projects, one of which is presented in this report, are in the conceptual design stage. At Mound, 22 soil zones have become contaminated with radioactive material. These zones cover approximately 20 percent of the total area of developed property at the site. During a storm event, the rainwater washes contaminated soil from these zones into the storm sewer system. These radioactive contaminants may then be discharged along with the stormwater into the Great Miami River via the Miami Erie Canal. This conceptual design report (CDR), Site Drainage Control, the fourth project in the ES&H program, describes a project that will provide improvements and much needed repairs to inadequate and deteriorating portions of the storm drainage system on the developed property. The project also will provide a stormwater retention facility capable of storing the stormwater runoff, from the developed property, resulting from a 100-year storm event. These improvements will permit the effective control and monitoring of stormwater to prevent the spread of radioactive contaminants from contaminated soil zones and will provide a means to collect and contain accidental spills of hazardous substances.

  17. A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards...

  18. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Conceptual Site Treatment Plan. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conceptual Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: general discussion of the plan, including the purpose and scope; technical aspects of preparing plans, including the rationale behind the treatability groupings and a discussion of characterization issues; treatment technology needs and treatment options for specific waste streams; low-level mixed waste options; TRU waste options; and future waste generation from restoration activities.

  19. Theoretical Modeling Issue in Active Noise Control for a One-Dimensional Acoustic Duct System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenyu

    Theoretical Modeling Issue in Active Noise Control for a One-Dimensional Acoustic Duct System-6700 Esbjerg, Denmark Email: yang,sp@aaue.dk Abstract--The theoretical modeling of active noise control for the entire one-dimensional active duct noise control system is obtained and validated. The developed model

  20. Waste Handeling Building Conceptual Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.W. Rowe

    2000-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the ''Waste Handling Building Conceptual Study'' is to develop proposed design requirements for the repository Waste Handling System in sufficient detail to allow the surface facility design to proceed to the License Application effort if the proposed requirements are approved by DOE. Proposed requirements were developed to further refine waste handling facility performance characteristics and design constraints with an emphasis on supporting modular construction, minimizing fuel inventory, and optimizing facility maintainability and dry handling operations. To meet this objective, this study attempts to provide an alternative design to the Site Recommendation design that is flexible, simple, reliable, and can be constructed in phases. The design concept will be input to the ''Modular Design/Construction and Operation Options Report'', which will address the overall program objectives and direction, including options and issues associated with transportation, the subsurface facility, and Total System Life Cycle Cost. This study (herein) is limited to the Waste Handling System and associated fuel staging system.

  1. A conceptual model for particle systems animation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flaherty, Eric Wayne

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle systems represent a technique for creating a special class of computer generated images. This class of imagery would be difficult or impossible to create using traditional surface based representations found in current computer animation...

  2. Boron-10 ABUNCL Prototype Models And Initial Active Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from MCNPX model simulations and initial testing of the active mode variation of the Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) design built by General Electric Reuter-Stokes. Initial experimental testing of the as-delivered passive ABUNCL was previously reported.

  3. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Preprint 34851.pdf More Documents &...

  4. Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2014) Conceptual Framework for Developing...

  5. Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

  6. A modified Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) with two-step nitrificationedenitrification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A modified Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) with two-step nitrificationedenitrification Ilenia of the Activated Sludge Models (ASM) [Henze, M., Gujer, W., Mino, T., van Loosdrecht, M.C.M., 2000. Ac- tivated Sludge Models ASM1, ASM2, ASM2d, and ASM3. IWA Scientific and Technical Report No. 9. IWA Publishing

  7. Current Challenges for Modeling Enzyme Active Sites by Biomimetic Synthetic Diiron Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedle, Simone

    This tutorial review describes recent progress in modeling the active sites of carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron enzymes that activate dioxygen to carry out several key reactions in Nature. The chemistry of soluble methane ...

  8. Conceptual design. Final report: TFE Verification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the TFE Conceptual Design, which provided the design guidance for the TFE Verification program. The primary goals of this design effort were: (1) establish the conceptual design of an in-core thermionic reactor for a 2 Mw(e) space nuclear power system with a 7-year operating lifetime; (2) demonstrate scalability of the above concept over the output power range of 500 kW(e) to 5 MW(e); and (3) define the TFE which is the basis for the 2 MW (e) reactor design. This TFE specification provided the basis for the test program. These primary goals were achieved. The technical approach taking in the conceptual design effort is discussed in Section 2, and the results are discussed in Section 3. The remainder of this introduction draws a perspective on the role that this conceptual design task played in the TFE Verification Program.

  9. Conceptual Thermal Treatment Technologies Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suer, A.

    1996-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a conceptual Thermal Treatment Technologies Feasibility Study (FS) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) focusing exclusively on thermal treatment technologies for contaminated soil, sediment, or sludge remediation projects.

  10. Modeling preferential water flow and solute transport in unsaturated soil using the active region model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, F.; Wang, K.; Zhang, R.; Liu, H.H.

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Preferential flow and solute transport are common processes in the unsaturated soil, in which distributions of soil water content and solute concentrations are often characterized as fractal patterns. An active region model (ARM) was recently proposed to describe the preferential flow and transport patterns. In this study, ARM governing equations were derived to model the preferential soil water flow and solute transport processes. To evaluate the ARM equations, dye infiltration experiments were conducted, in which distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration were measured. Predicted results using the ARM and the mobile-immobile region model (MIM) were compared with the measured distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration. Although both the ARM and the MIM are two-region models, they are fundamental different in terms of treatments of the flow region. The models were evaluated based on the modeling efficiency (ME). The MIM provided relatively poor prediction results of the preferential flow and transport with negative ME values or positive ME values less than 0.4. On the contrary, predicted distributions of soil water content and Cl- concentration using the ARM agreed reasonably well with the experimental data with ME values higher than 0.8. The results indicated that the ARM successfully captured the macroscopic behavior of preferential flow and solute transport in the unsaturated soil.

  11. Explorations of iron-iron hydrogenase active site models by experiment and theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, Jesse Wayne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes computational and experimental studies of synthetic complexes that model the active site of the iron-iron hydrogenase [FeFe]H2ase enzyme. Simple dinuclear iron dithiolate complexes act as functional models of the ironiron...

  12. Explorations of iron-iron hydrogenase active site models by experiment and theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, Jesse Wayne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes computational and experimental studies of synthetic complexes that model the active site of the iron-iron hydrogenase [FeFe]H2ase enzyme. Simple dinuclear iron dithiolate complexes act as functional models of the ironiron...

  13. active appearance models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and James L. Crowley Olivier.Chomat@inrialpes.fr To be published Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR'99) Fort Collins recognition of activities from local...

  14. Integral Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1985, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the Clinch River site as its preferred site for the construction and operation of the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility (USDOE, 1985). In support of the DOE MRS conceptual design activity, available data describing the site have been gathered and analyzed. A composite geotechnical description of the Clinch River site has been developed and is presented herein. This report presents Clinch River site description data in the following sections: general site description, surface hydrologic characteristics, groundwater characteristics, geologic characteristics, vibratory ground motion, surface faulting, stability of subsurface materials, slope stability, and references. 48 refs., 35 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Model of Thalamocortical Slow-Wave Sleep Oscillations and Transitions to Activated States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazhenov, Maxim

    ) in nonanesthetized cats, silent (down) states alternate with active (up) states; the down states are absent during of SWS oscillation activated the persistent sodium current and depolarized the membrane of cortical py- ramidal (PY) cells sufficiently for spike generation. In the model, this triggered the active phase, which

  16. Modeling of a Nickel-Hydrogen Cell Phase Reactions in the Nickel Active Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling of a Nickel-Hydrogen Cell Phase Reactions in the Nickel Active Material B. Wu and R. E of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA A nonisothermal model of a nickel-hydrogen cell has been developed with the consideration of multiple phases in the nickel active material. Important

  17. Modeling - Scale-Bridging Simulations Active Materials in Li...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling Overview of the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program Electrochemistry Diagnostics...

  18. activities including modelling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nonpoint source models associate pollutant loads almost exclusively agricultural sources: manure, fertilizers, soilplant complexes, and impervious surfaces and those associated...

  19. Asymptotic Approximations to the Distributed Activation Energy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    applicability in situations, such as computational fluid dynamics modelling of coal-fired boilers, where- plex chemical systems such as coal pyrolysis. MRM assumes that the process can be represented Energy Model (DAEM) or multiple reaction model (MRM) for coal pyrolysis [4] may be applied to either

  20. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Paradox Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Paradox Basin located in the southeastern part of Utah. Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Permian Basin in Texas and Gulf Interior Region salt domes in Louisiana and Mississippi) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in situ testing of the salt. The in-situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homogeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptual design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  1. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Permian Basin locatd in the western part of Texas. Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Paradox Basin in Utah and Gulf Interior Region salt domes in Louisiana and Mississippi) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in situ testing of the salt. The in situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homogeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptual design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  2. Integrated modeling for design of lightweight, active mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohan, Lucy E.

    Lightweight, active, silicon carbide mirrors have the potential to enable larger primary aperture, space-based optical systems, hence improving the resolution and sensitivity of such systems. However, due to the lack of ...

  3. Modeling and characterization of potato quality by active thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Chih-Chen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on characterizing a potato with extra sugar content and identifying the location and depth of the extra sugar content using the active thermography imaging technique. The extra sugar content of the potato is an important...

  4. Modeling and characterization of potato quality by active thermography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Chih-Chen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on characterizing a potato with extra sugar content and identifying the location and depth of the extra sugar content using the active thermography imaging technique. The extra sugar content of the ...

  5. MINIMARS conceptual design: Report I. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains separate articles of seven aspects of the MINIMARS programs. The areas discussed are Fusion Engineering Design Center, Halo Model and Computer Code, safety design, the University of Wisconsin blankets, activation product transport in a FLiBe-VANADIUM alloy HT-9 system, a halo scraper/direct converter system, and heat transport power conversion. The individual articles are cataloged separately. (WRF)

  6. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3--4, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J. [and others

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report.

  7. active fracture model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    porosity of naturally fractured reservoirs with no matrix porosity using stochastic fractal models Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Determining fracture characteristics...

  8. active shape modelling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including ecology, palaeoecology and forensic science. The model we build represents life cycle and natural variation of both shape and texture over multiple diatom species,...

  9. active shape models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including ecology, palaeoecology and forensic science. The model we build represents life cycle and natural variation of both shape and texture over multiple diatom species,...

  10. active shape model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including ecology, palaeoecology and forensic science. The model we build represents life cycle and natural variation of both shape and texture over multiple diatom species,...

  11. activity model validation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Panama Canal System Operations Engineering Websites Summary: and modeled in LTSA. Safety and progress requirements are formally expressed as processes that can. It is...

  12. activated sludge model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattern, although some minor discrepancies were observed in the morphology of the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Keywords: Bidomain theory, hybrid model, anisotropy, ventricles,...

  13. active site models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattern, although some minor discrepancies were observed in the morphology of the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Keywords: Bidomain theory, hybrid model, anisotropy, ventricles,...

  14. activity combined models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattern, although some minor discrepancies were observed in the morphology of the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Keywords: Bidomain theory, hybrid model, anisotropy, ventricles,...

  15. active site model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattern, although some minor discrepancies were observed in the morphology of the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Keywords: Bidomain theory, hybrid model, anisotropy, ventricles,...

  16. active aging model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattern, although some minor discrepancies were observed in the morphology of the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Keywords: Bidomain theory, hybrid model, anisotropy, ventricles,...

  17. activated sludge models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattern, although some minor discrepancies were observed in the morphology of the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Keywords: Bidomain theory, hybrid model, anisotropy, ventricles,...

  18. activity indicator model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattern, although some minor discrepancies were observed in the morphology of the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Keywords: Bidomain theory, hybrid model, anisotropy, ventricles,...

  19. active cochlear model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pattern, although some minor discrepancies were observed in the morphology of the 12-lead electrocardiogram. Keywords: Bidomain theory, hybrid model, anisotropy, ventricles,...

  20. activation energy model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy model First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Time-dependent Stochastic Modeling of...

  1. Reliable Computation of Binary Parameters in Activity Coefficient Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadtherr, Mark A.

    phase equilibria. The technique is demonstrated with examples using the NRTL and electrolyte-NRTL (eNRTL) models. In two of the NRTL examples, results are found that contradict previous work. In the eNRTL time that a method for parameter estimation in the eNRTL model from binary LLE data (mutual solubility

  2. APPLYING ACTIVITY PATTERNS FOR DEVELOPING AN INTELLIGENT PROCESS MODELING TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    attracting the interest of both BPM researchers and BPM tool vendors. Frequently, process models can Process Management (BPM) tools as well as emerging patterns for process modeling and change. BPM processes of an enterprise. Moreover, through Web service technology, the benefits of BPM can be created

  3. Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy1987)issues and

  4. Conceptualization And Implementation Of A Tectonic Geomorphology Study For

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| Open EnergyInformation Faulds, Et Al.,Et

  5. Chapter 9: Control Systems 9-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and Scope The control system for NSLS-II is designed to convey all monitor, control, model and provide data for all control aspects. It must support 1 Hz model-based control, 110 kHz power supplyChapter 9: Control Systems 9-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report 9 CONTROL SYSTEM 9.1 Introduction

  6. Semi-distributed lumped model of a karst system under active1 management2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    system27 28 Keywords29 Impulse response30 Groundwater flow modeling31 Groundwater level fluctuations32 Pumping33 Introduction34 Numerical models for karst aquifers usually fall within two main categories1 Semi-distributed lumped model of a karst system under active1 management2 Bernard LADOUCHE1

  7. A Theory of Travel Decision-Making with Applications for Modeling Active Travel Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    A Theory of Travel Decision-Making with Applications for Modeling Active Travel Demand by Patrick methods, the research upon which modeling tools are based has yet to settle on a comprehensive theory, and environmental factors. While modeling tools have explained travel primarily through economic theories

  8. activity coefficient model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coefficient and viscosity of popular rigid water models: Two non polarizable ones (SPCE with 3 sites, and TIP4P2005 with 4 sites) and a polarizable one (Dang-Chang, 4...

  9. activity coefficient models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coefficient and viscosity of popular rigid water models: Two non polarizable ones (SPCE with 3 sites, and TIP4P2005 with 4 sites) and a polarizable one (Dang-Chang, 4...

  10. Modeling - Scale-Bridging Simulations Active Materials in Li...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Society, v. 154 (10), pp. A978-A986. 3. Wang, C.-W. and Sastry, A.M., 2007, "Mesoscale Modeling of a Li-Ion Poly Cell," Journal of the Electrochemical Society, v. 154...

  11. The Conceptual Foundations of Web Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Nick

    The Conceptual Foundations of Web Development HTML Tutorial 1 #12;Important Links­ CISC:492://schoolacademy.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/ http://rizki.staff.ub.ac.id/category/web-programming/ 2 #12;Ice Breaker How many of these terms are you / Protocols / WWW #12;What is the World Wide Web? 6 WWW is a set of HTML pages accessible using the HTTP

  12. High Power Hg Target Conceptual Design Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Conceptual Design Review 7-8 Feb 05 System Overview Solenoid Proton Alternative Hg Delivery System Hydraulic Fluid Cylinder (3000 psi) Hg Cylinder (1000 psi) Hg Discharge Hg concept & issues · Proposed new baseline delivery system · Hg flow analysis in new baseline system

  13. The Conceptual Origin of Majorana Fermion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    The Conceptual Origin of Majorana Fermion Cao Zexian 2014.11.01 Salon of Science #12;Outline QM and Relativistic QM for Electron Antiparticle & Antimatter Complex Field vs. Real Field Majorana Fermion Searching =+ == F-D statistics? A proper choice for , is 4 by 4 matrices. #12;Pauli Matrices, Dirac Matrices 0 1 0

  14. High Power Hg Target Conceptual Design Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Monitor $12000Total $5500 LabView control system (software & hardware) $500 Control box (power supplies in Solidworks $4800AL Base Support Secondary Containment Primary Containment Sump Subsystem $13000Total $5700SS U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Conceptual Design Review 7-8 Feb 05 Outline · Procured systems - Syringe

  15. PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY Functional and Conceptual Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Thomas J.

    PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY Functional and Conceptual Approaches Edited by Thomas J. DeWitt Samuel M. A great breadth of ideas fall under the rubric of phenotypic plasticity, and this book is designed these diverse ideas under an intentionally broad definition of plasticity: environment-dependent phenotype

  16. Reduced Activity of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Protects against Genetic Models of Motor Neuron Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, M. A.

    A growing body of research indicates that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and mouse models of ALS exhibit metabolic dysfunction. A subpopulation of ALS patients possesses higher levels of resting energy ...

  17. Active Shape Models & Segmentation of the Left Ventricle in Echocardiography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paragios, Nikos

    NATIONALE DES PONTS ET CHAUSSEES, Champs sur Marne, France 2 Imaging and Visualization Department, SIEMENS transformation that projects this model to the desired image fea- tures. During the second step, a linear segmentation Research was carried out during the affiliation of the author with Siemens Corporate Research from

  18. Using Active Deformable Models in Robotic Visual Servoing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Minnesota 4-192 EE/CS Building 200 Union Street SE Minneapolis, MN 55455 September 9, 1997 Submitted to the book \\Event-Based Sensing, Planning and Control of a Robotic System: An Integrated Approach" #12 are updated at frame rates by minimizing an energy function involving the relative position of model points

  19. Graphical Models for Wide-Area Activity Analysis in Continuous Videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayak, Nandita Miyar

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Multi-person Activity Recognition in Wide-area Videos 2.1Context Modeling in Continuous Videos Using Graphical Modelsmethod. Given a continuous video with computed tracklets, a

  20. An Ontological Schema for Sharing Conceptual Engineering Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    An Ontological Schema for Sharing Conceptual Engineering Knowledge Yoshinobu Kitamura and Riichiro have been suffering the difficulty in sharing conceptual engineering knowledge about functionality. Introduction In the engineering design community, the importance of knowledge sharing among designers has been

  1. A mathematical model for countercurrent moving-bed activated carbon adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Douglas Harold

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the column. There was insufficient data taken to verify this model. The testing procedure was limited by the approximate uniformity of the influent concentrations in the pilot plant and the effect of the activated carbon concentration and initial solute...A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR COUNTERCURRENT MOVING-BED ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION A Thesis by DOUGLAS HAROLD ANDERSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  2. Structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors predictive modeling and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors ­ predictive modeling of the state of the art in structural health monitoring with piezoelectric wafer active sensors and follows with conclusions and suggestions for further work Key Words: structural health monitoring, SHM, nondestructive

  3. Organometallic Complexes that Model the Active Sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-Hydrogenases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tianbiao

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    My research primarily focuses on biomimetics of the active sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-hydrogenases (H2ase) and is classified into three parts. Part A: The one-electron oxidation of asymmetrically disubstituted FeIFeI models of the active site...

  4. A Model of OASIS Role-Based Access Control and its Support for Active Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    A Model of OASIS Role-Based Access Control and its Support for Active Security Walt Yao University.bacon@cl.cam.ac.uk ABSTRACT OASIS is a role-based access control architecture for achiev- ing secure interoperation rule associated with its activation becomes false. OASIS does not use role delegation but instead

  5. A Model of OASIS RoleBased Access Control and its Support for Active Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    A Model of OASIS Role­Based Access Control and its Support for Active Security Walt Yao University.bacon@cl.cam.ac.uk ABSTRACT OASIS is a role-based access control architecture for achiev- ing secure interoperation rule associated with its activation becomes false. OASIS does not use role delegation but instead de#12

  6. Modeling of Power and Energy Transduction of Embedded Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    chart show the trends in the power and energy flow behavior with remarkable peaks and valleys that can1 Modeling of Power and Energy Transduction of Embedded Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors a systematic investigation of power and energy transduction in piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS

  7. An Active Oscillator Model Describes the Statistics of Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juelicher, Frank

    Article An Active Oscillator Model Describes the Statistics of Spontaneous Otoacoustic Emissions, sounds that are known as spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. They are a signature of the active amplification mechanism in the cochlea. Emissions occur at frequencies that are unique for an individual

  8. Organometallic Complexes that Model the Active Sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-Hydrogenases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tianbiao

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    My research primarily focuses on biomimetics of the active sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-hydrogenases (H2ase) and is classified into three parts. Part A: The one-electron oxidation of asymmetrically disubstituted FeIFeI models of the active site...

  9. Engineering report (conceptual design) PFP solution stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, J.B.

    1997-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Engineering Report (Conceptual Design) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage.

  10. Conceptual design for PSP mounting bracket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ransom, G.; Stein, R. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Protective structural packages (PSP`s or overpacks) used to ship 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} product cylinders are bolted to truck trailers. All bolts penetrate two longitudinal rows of wooden planks. Removal and replacement is required at various intervals for maintenance and routine testing. A conceptual design is presented for mounting brackets which would securely attach PSP`s to trailer frames, reduce removal and replacement time, and minimize risk of personnel injury.

  11. MUSCLE ACTIVITY DETECTION FROM MYOELECTRIC SIGNALS BASED ON THE AR-GARCH MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouaynaya, Nidhal

    MUSCLE ACTIVITY DETECTION FROM MYOELECTRIC SIGNALS BASED ON THE AR-GARCH MODEL Ghulam Rasool Heteroscedastic (AR-GARCH) process, which captures the heteroscedasticity of the signal. The Akaike information cri- terion test confirms that the AR-GARCH model better fits the EMG signal than the stationary AR

  12. Modeling and Visualization of Human Activities for Multi-Camera Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankaranarayanan, Aswin C.

    of the scene. These are used to render the scene with virtual 3D human models that mimic the observed instant are then presented to a rendering engine that animates a set of virtual actors synthesizing1 Modeling and Visualization of Human Activities for Multi-Camera Networks Aswin C

  13. Grid Cells: The Position Code, Neural Network Models of Activity, and the Problem of Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiete, Ila

    COMMENTARY Grid Cells: The Position Code, Neural Network Models of Activity, and the Problem on the modeling and theoretical fronts in the quest to unravel the computational properties of the grid cell code and to explain the mechanisms underlying grid cell dynamics. The goals of the review are to outline a coherent

  14. Modeling Activities in the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Sciences Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program (ASP) conducts research pertinent to radiative forcing of climate change by atmospheric aerosols. The program consists of approximately 40 highly interactive peer-reviewed research projects that examine aerosol properties and processes and the evolution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Principal components of the program are instrument development, laboratory experiments, field studies, theoretical investigations, and modeling. The objectives of the Program are to 1) improve the understanding of aerosol processes associated with light scattering and absorption properties and interactions with clouds that affect Earth's radiative balance and to 2) develop model-based representations of these processes that enable the effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system to be properly represented in global-scale numerical climate models. Although only a few of the research projects within ASP are explicitly identified as primarily modeling activities, modeling actually comprises a substantial component of a large fraction of ASP research projects. This document describes the modeling activities within the Program as a whole, the objectives and intended outcomes of these activities, and the linkages among the several modeling components and with global-scale modeling activities conducted under the support of the Department of Energy's Climate Sciences Program and other aerosol and climate research programs.

  15. Technosocial Modeling for Determining the Status and Nature of a State’s Nuclear Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Harvey, Julia B.

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Atomic Energy Agency State Evaluation Process: The Role of Information Analysis in Reaching Safeguards Conclusions (Mathews et al. 2008), several examples of nonproliferation models using analytical software were developed that may assist the IAEA with collecting, visualizing, analyzing, and reporting information in support of the State Evaluation Process. This paper focuses on one of the examples a set of models developed in the Proactive Scenario Production, Evidence Collection, and Testing (ProSPECT) software that evaluates the status and nature of a state’s nuclear activities. The models use three distinct subject areas to perform this assessment: the presence of nuclear activities, the consistency of those nuclear activities with national nuclear energy goals, and the geopolitical context in which those nuclear activities are taking place. As a proof-of-concept for the models, a crude case study was performed. The study, which attempted to evaluate the nuclear activities taking place in Syria prior to September 2007, yielded illustrative, yet inconclusive, results. Due to the inconclusive nature of the case study results, changes that may improve the model’s efficiency and accuracy are proposed.

  16. Active patterning and asymmetric transport in a model actomyosin network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenshen Wang; Peter G. Wolynes

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Cytoskeletal networks, which are essentially motor-filament assemblies, play a major role in many developmental processes involving structural remodeling and shape changes. These are achieved by nonequilibrium self-organization processes that generate functional patterns and drive intracellular transport. We construct a minimal physical model that incorporates the coupling between nonlinear elastic responses of individual filaments and force-dependent motor action. By performing stochastic simulations we show that the interplay of motor processes, described as driving anti-correlated motion of the network vertices, and the network connectivity, which determines the percolation character of the structure, can indeed capture the dynamical and structural cooperativity which gives rise to diverse patterns observed experimentally. The buckling instability of individual filaments is found to play a key role in localizing collapse events due to local force imbalance. Motor-driven buckling-induced node aggregation provides a dynamic mechanism that stabilizes the two dimensional patterns below the apparent static percolation limit. Coordinated motor action is also shown to suppress random thermal noise on large time scales, the two dimensional configuration that the system starts with thus remaining planar during the structural development. By carrying out similar simulations on a three dimensional anchored network, we find that the myosin-driven isotropic contraction of a well-connected actin network, when combined with mechanical anchoring that confers directionality to the collective motion, may represent a novel mechanism of intracellular transport, as revealed by chromosome translocation in the starfish oocyte.

  17. Friends or Foes? A Conceptual Analysis of Self-Adaptation and IT Change Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    the current practice in ITIL Change Management as initial reference point. We define the required responsibilities and a generic conceptual object model and map them to the ITIL Change Management roles to evaluate the current practice in ITIL Change Management as initial reference point. We define the required

  18. Scaling studies and conceptual experiment designs for NGNP CFD assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to document scaling studies and conceptual designs for flow and heat transfer experiments intended to assess CFD codes and their turbulence models proposed for application to prismatic NGNP concepts. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses have been applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant turbulent forced convection with slight transverse property variation. In a pressurized cooldown (LOFA) simulation, the flow quickly becomes laminar with some possible buoyancy influences. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple hot jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentumdominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two types of heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second type will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of CFD solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing and turbulence models for typical NGNP plenum geometries in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. As indicated by the scaling studies, in normal full power operation of a typical NGNP conceptual design, buoyancy influences should be negligible in the lower plenum. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets as they mix in flowing through the array of posts in a lower plenum en route to the single exit duct. Conceptual designs for such experiments are described.

  19. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  20. ATA diagnostic beam dump conceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A diagnostic beam dump, able to withstand 72,000 pulses (10 kA, 50 MeV/pulse) per shift was designed and analyzed. The analysis shows that the conceptual beam dump design consisting of 80 vitreous carbon plate-foam elements is able to withstand the thermal and mechanical stresses generated. X-rays produced by bremsstrahlung are absorbed by a three element copper plate-foam x-ray absorber. Cooling between bursts of electron pulses is provided by pressurized helium.

  1. Controlled air incinerator conceptual design study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a conceptual design study for a controlled air incinerator facility for incineration of low level combustible waste at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The facility design is based on the use of a Helix Process Systems controlled air incinerator. Cost estimates and associated engineering, procurement, and construction schedules are also provided. The cost estimates and schedules are presented for two incinerator facility designs, one with provisions for waste ash solidification, the other with provisions for packaging the waste ash for transport to an undefined location.

  2. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Jia, Dongwei, E-mail: jiadongwei@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  3. An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, James T [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons of the CLM3 offline results against observational datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). CLM version 4 has been evaluated using C-LAMP, showing improvement in many of the metrics. Efforts are now underway to initiate a Nitrogen-Land Model Intercomparison Project (N-LAMP) to better constrain the effects of the nitrogen cycle in biosphere models. Presented will be new results from C-LAMP for CLM4, initial N-LAMP developments, and the proposed land-biosphere model benchmarking activity.

  4. Modeling the active sites of non-heme diiron metalloproteins with sterically hindered carboxylates and syn N-Donor ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedle, Simone, 1976-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. Different Synthetic Approaches to Modeling the Active Sites of Carboxylate-Bridged Non-Heme Diiron Enzymes Carboxylate-bridged non-heme diiron enzymes activate dioxygen to perform a variety of biological functions. ...

  5. Conceptual design report for Project W-420, stack monitoring upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, D.T., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Conceptual Design for the upgrade of seven designated Tank Farm stacks to meet NESHAP Title 40, CFR, Part 61, Sub-part H requirements.

  6. Hands-On and Minds-On Modeling Activities to Improve Students' Conceptions of Microscopic Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    Hands-On and Minds-On Modeling Activities to Improve Students' Conceptions of Microscopic Friction of microscopic friction. We will also present our investigation on the relative effectiveness of the use, it is possible to facilitate the refinement of students' ideas of microscopic friction. Keywords: friction

  7. On the Modeling of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensor Impedance Analysis for Structural Health Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    damage assessment, and are considered as a new non-destructive evaluation method. The in-situ impedance of experimental results obtained from previous work. The real part of the measured PWAS impedance presents twoOn the Modeling of Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensor Impedance Analysis for Structural Health

  8. MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

    MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE. J. The essential role of water-ice clouds in shaping the thermal structure of the martian atmosphere has been long presumed [1] but neglected in GCMs because of the lack of observations and difficulty to predict

  9. A Model for the Interfacial Kinetics of Phospholipase D Activity on Long-Chain Lipids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Michael

    -water interfaces and is an example of heterogeneous catalysis in biology. Recently we showed that planar lipid for inter- facial catalysis that includes product activation and substrate depletion. This model describes on the structure and properties of these interfaces (1). The underlying variables that govern catalysis

  10. Antiremodeling Agents Influence Osteoblast Activity Differently in Modeling and Remodeling Sites of Canine Rib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    effects on osteo- blast activity in the canine rib and (2) this effect depends on whether modeling reduce bone loss in part through direct actions on osteoclasts. Their effects on osteoblasts and bone treatments (+108 to +175%, P effect on MAR at either the en- docortical

  11. Undefined 21-4 (2010) 1 1 Towards Automated Models of Activities of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beetz , Moritz Tenorth, Dominik Jain, and Jan Bandouch Intelligent Autonomous Systems Group, Technische in- formative models of human activities enables ma- *Corresponding Author: Michael Beetz Intelligent-85748 Garching. E-mail: beetz@cs.tum.edu *Corresponding Author: Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous

  12. CONTROL OF AN IDEAL ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT VIA AN ODE-PDE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diehl, Stefan

    CONTROL OF AN IDEAL ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS IN WASTEWATER TREATMENT VIA AN ODE-PDE MODEL STEFAN treatment plants, consists basically of a biological reactor followed by a sedi- mentation tank, which has. 1. Introduction The need for efficient wastewater treatment plants in terms of low effluent con

  13. Conceptual designs of NDA instruments for the NRTA system at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, T.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Menlove, H.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Safeguards Science and Technology Group] [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors are studying conceptual designs of selected nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments for the near-real-time accounting system at the rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) of Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL). The JNFL RRP is a large-scale commercial reprocessing facility for spent fuel from boiling-water and pressurized-water reactors. The facility comprises two major components: the main process area to separate and produce purified plutonium nitrate and uranyl nitrate from irradiated reactor spent fuels, and the co-denitration process area to combine and convert the plutonium nitrate and uranyl nitrate into mixed oxide (MOX). The selected NDA instruments for conceptual design studies are the MOX-product canister counter, holdup measurement systems for calcination and reduction furnaces and for blenders in the co-denitration process, the isotope dilution gamma-ray spectrometer for the spent fuel dissolver solution, and unattended verification systems. For more effective and practical safeguards and material control and accounting at RRP, the authors are also studying the conceptual design for the UO{sub 3} large-barrel counter. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art NDA conceptual design and research and development activities for the above instruments.

  14. Kinesthetic activities in physics instruction: Image schematic justification and design based on didactic situations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruun, Jesper

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major difficulties in learning physics is for students to develop a conceptual understanding of the core concepts of physics. Many authors have argued that student conceptions of basic physical phenomena are rooted in basic schemas, originating in fundamental kinesthetic experiences of being. If central schemas have a bodily basis, this idea should be utilized in physics instruction. Thus, we argue that kinesthetic activities, including careful experiential and conceptual analysis will provide useful entry point for student acquisition of the basic conceptions of physics, and can overcome the phenomenological gap between the experiential and the conceptual understanding. We discuss the nature of image schemas and focus particularly on one: effort-resistance-flow. We argue that this schema is fundamental not only in our everyday experience, but also in most of school physics. We provide an example of a kinesthetic model and describe how an instructional strategy of these exercises can support studen...

  15. Frost Growth CFD Model of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A frost growth model is incorporated into a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of a heat pump by means of a user-defined function in FLUENT, a commercial CFD code. The transient model is applied to the outdoor section of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop (IADR) unit in heating mode. IADR is a hybrid vapor compression and active desiccant unit capable of handling 100% outdoor air (dedicated outdoor air system) or as a total conditioning system, handling both outdoor air and space cooling or heating loads. The predicted increase in flow resistance and loss in heat transfer capacity due to frost build-up are compared to experimental pressure drop readings and thermal imaging. The purpose of this work is to develop a CFD model that is capable of predicting frost growth, an invaluable tool in evaluating the effectiveness of defrost-on-demand cycles.

  16. High-Resolution Modeling to Assess Tropical Cyclone Activity in Future Climate Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackmann, Gary

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Applied research is proposed with the following objectives: (i) to determine the most likely level of tropical cyclone intensity and frequency in future climate regimes, (ii) to provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty in these predictions, and (iii) to improve understanding of the linkage between tropical cyclones and the planetary-scale circulation. Current mesoscale weather forecasting models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are capable of simulating the full intensity of tropical cyclones (TC) with realistic structures. However, in order to accurately represent both the primary and secondary circulations in these systems, model simulations must be configured with sufficient resolution to explicitly represent convection (omitting the convective parameterization scheme). Most previous numerical studies of TC activity at seasonal and longer time scales have not utilized such explicit convection (EC) model runs. Here, we propose to employ the moving nest capability of WRF to optimally represent TC activity on a seasonal scale using a downscaling approach. The statistical results of a suite of these high-resolution TC simulations will yield a realistic representation of TC intensity on a seasonal basis, while at the same time allowing analysis of the feedback that TCs exert on the larger-scale climate system. Experiments will be driven with analyzed lateral boundary conditions for several recent Atlantic seasons, spanning a range of activity levels and TC track patterns. Results of the ensemble of WRF simulations will then be compared to analyzed TC data in order to determine the extent to which this modeling setup can reproduce recent levels of TC activity. Next, the boundary conditions (sea-surface temperature, tropopause height, and thermal/moisture profiles) from the recent seasons will be altered in a manner consistent with various future GCM/RCM scenarios, but that preserves the large-scale shear and incipient disturbance activity. This will allow (i) a direct comparison of future TC activity that could be expected for an active or inactive season in an altered climate regime, and (ii) a measure of the level of uncertainty and variability in TC activity resulting from different carbon emission scenarios.

  17. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  18. EVAPORATIVE COOLING - CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR ATLAS SCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niinikoski, T O

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of an evaporative two-phase flow cooling system for the ATLAS SCT detector is described, using perfluorinated propane (C3F8) as a coolant. Comparison with perfluorinated butane (C4F10) is made, although the detailed design is presented only for C3F8. The two-phase pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient are calculated in order to determine the dimensions of the cooling pipes and module contacts for the Barrel SCT. The region in which the flow is homogeneous is determined. The cooling cycle, pipework, compressor, heat exchangers and other main elements of the system are calculated in order to be able to discuss the system control, safety and reliability. Evaporative cooling appears to be substantially better than the binary ice system from the point of view of safety, reliability, detector thickness, heat transfer coefficient, cost and simplicity.

  19. SOLAR MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES, CORONAL POTENTIAL FIELD MODELS AND ERUPTION RATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of the observed photospheric magnetic field and the modeled global coronal magnetic field during the past 3 1/2 solar activity cycles observed since the mid-1970s. We use synoptic magnetograms and extrapolated potential-field models based on longitudinal full-disk photospheric magnetograms from the National Solar Observatory's three magnetographs at Kitt Peak, the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun vector spectro-magnetograph, the spectro-magnetograph and the 512-channel magnetograph instruments, and from Stanford University's Wilcox Solar Observatory. The associated multipole field components are used to study the dominant length scales and symmetries of the coronal field. Polar field changes are found to be well correlated with active fields over most of the period studied, except between 2003 and 2006 when the active fields did not produce significant polar field changes. Of the axisymmetric multipoles, only the dipole and octupole follow the poles whereas the higher orders follow the activity cycle. All non-axisymmetric multipole strengths are well correlated with the activity cycle. The tilt of the solar dipole is therefore almost entirely due to active-region fields. The axial dipole and octupole are the largest contributors to the global field except while the polar fields are reversing. This influence of the polar fields extends to modulating eruption rates. According to the Computer Aided CME Tracking, Solar Eruptive Event Detection System, and Nobeyama radioheliograph prominence eruption catalogs, the rate of solar eruptions is found to be systematically higher for active years between 2003 and 2012 than for those between 1997 and 2002. This behavior appears to be connected with the weakness of the late-cycle 23 polar fields as suggested by Luhmann. We see evidence that the process of cycle 24 field reversal is well advanced at both poles.

  20. Figure 9. Conceptual model for regionally divergent responses of the air-land fluxes to CO2 fertilization, which increases the water-use efficiency of photosynthesis. In dry regions where

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    parameterizations of these processes in models of Mediterranean- climate lands and obtaining a baseline for assessing changes. Acknowledgments NYK is supported by a NOAA Climate and Global Change postdoctoral.1 (2006). I. Y. Fung, S. C. Doney, K. Lindsay, J. John, Evolution of carbon sinks in a changing climate

  1. Non-equilibrium structure and dynamics in a microscopic model of thin film active gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Head; W. J. Briels; G. Gompper

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the presence of ATP, molecular motors generate active force dipoles that drive suspensions of protein filaments far from thermodynamic equilibrium, leading to exotic dynamics and pattern formation. Microscopic modelling can help to quantify the relationship between individual motors plus filaments to organisation and dynamics on molecular and supra-molecular length scales. Here we present results of extensive numerical simulations of active gels where the motors and filaments are confined between two infinite parallel plates. Thermal fluctuations and excluded-volume interactions between filaments are included. A systematic variation of rates for motor motion, attachment and detachment, including a differential detachment rate from filament ends, reveals a range of non-equilibrium behaviour. Strong motor binding produces structured filament aggregates that we refer to as asters, bundles or layers, whose stability depends on motor speed and differential end-detachment. The gross features of the dependence of the observed structures on the motor rate and the filament concentration can be captured by a simple one-filament model. Loosely bound aggregates exhibit super-diffusive mass transport, where filament translocation scales with lag time with non-unique exponents that depend on motor kinetics. An empirical data collapse of filament speed as a function of motor speed and end-detachment is found, suggesting a dimensional reduction of the relevant parameter space. We conclude by discussing the perspectives of microscopic modelling in the field of active gels.

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saurwein, John

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

  3. ITER TCWS Conceptual Design Chit Resolution Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Jan [ORNL

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design Chits resulted from the External Conceptual Design Review (CDR) held at Cadarache on July 21-23, 2009 (Reference [5.1.3]). Those Chits were categorized into 3 categories in accordance with the following rules: Category 1 - Chits to be resolved before proceeding with preliminary design; Category 2 - Chits to be resolved during preliminary design; and Category 3 - Chits already resolved or covered by higher category Chits such that no further action is required. Prior to the preliminary design, all the category 1 chits were resolved and the category chit 1 resolution report was approved (Reference [5.1.4]). However, as the design has been evolving, one of the category 1 chits needs to be re-addressed. The purpose of this report is to present the resolutions to one CDR Category 1 Chit (Cat 1 Chit No.5) and twenty-three CDR Category 2 Chits. The Category 2 Chit resolutions presented are listed in order from item number one to item number twenty-three.

  4. Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate in different experimental rat models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeed, Noha M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Egyptian Russian University, Cairo (Egypt)] [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Egyptian Russian University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Demerdash, Ebtehal [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)] [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Rahman, Hanaa M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Egyptian Russian University, Cairo (Egypt)] [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Egyptian Russian University, Cairo (Egypt); Algandaby, Mardi M. [Department of Biology (Botany), Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Biology (Botany), Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Al-Abbasi, Fahad A. [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B., E-mail: abnaim@pharma.asu.edu.eg [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl palmitate (MP) and ethyl palmitate (EP) are naturally occurring fatty acid esters reported as inflammatory cell inhibitors. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of MP and EP was evaluated in different experimental rat models. Results showed that MP and EP caused reduction of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia in rats, MP and EP reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). MP and EP decreased NF-?B expression in liver and lung tissues and ameliorated histopathological changes caused by LPS. Topical application of MP and EP reduced ear edema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, MP and EP reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of MP and EP in combating inflammation in several experimental models. -- Highlights: ? Efficacy of MP and EP in combating inflammation was displayed in several models. ? MP and EP reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and prostaglandin E2 level. ? MP and EP decreased TNF-? and IL-6 levels in experimental endotoxemia. ? MP and EP reduced NF-?B expression and histological changes in rat liver and lung. ? MP and EP reduced croton oil-induced ear edema and neutrophil infiltration.

  6. Cold vacuum drying system conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the activities involved in the removal of the SNF from the leaking basins and to place it in stable dry storage.

  7. Model-driven multi-omic data analysis elucidates metabolic immunomodulators of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordbar, Aarash; Mo, Monica L.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Metz, Thomas O.; Jones, Marcus B.; Frank, Bryan C.; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Macrophages are central players in the immune response, manifesting divergent phenotypes to control inflammation and innate immunity through the release of cytokines and other regulatory factor-dependent signaling pathways. In recent years, the focus on metabolism has been reemphasized as critical signaling and regulatory pathways of human pathophysiology, ranging from cancer to aging, often converge on metabolic responses. Here, we used genome-scale modeling and multi-omics (transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) analysis to assess metabolic features critical for macrophage functions. We constructed a genome-scale metabolic network for the RAW 264.7 cell line to determine metabolic modulators of macrophage activation. Metabolites well-known to be associated with immunoactivation (e.g., glucose and arginine) and immunosuppression (e.g., tryptophan and vitamin D3) were amongst the most critical effectors. Intracellular metabolic mechanisms linked to critical suppressive effectors were then assessed, identifying a suppressive role for de novo nucleotide synthesis. Finally, the underlying metabolic mechanisms of macrophage activation are identified by analyzing multi-omic data obtained from LPS-stimulated RAW cells in the context of our flux-based predictions. Our study demonstrates metabolism's role in regulating activation may be greater than previously anticipated and elucidates underlying metabolic connections between activation and metabolic effectors.

  8. Managing uncertainty in space systems conceptual design using portfolio theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Myles Alexander, 1975-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most significant challenges in conceptual design is managing the tradespace of potential architectures-choosing which design to pursue aggressively, which to keep on the table and which to leave behind. This ...

  9. Conceptual Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) terminal design for Kuwait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aljeeran, Fares

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study investigated a new conceptual design for a modular structural configuration incorporating storage for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) within the base of the platform structure. The structure, referred to as a modified gravity base...

  10. A Semi-Passive Containment Cooling System Conceptual Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.

    The objective of this project was to investigate a passive containment cooling system (PCCS) for the double concrete containment of the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). Two conceptual PCCS designs: the thermosyphon ...

  11. Metallurgical Process Design A tribute to Douglas' conceptual design approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linninger, Andreas A.

    and systematic flowsheet generation1-2. . Although perfected for continuous petrochemical processes, this work1 Metallurgical Process Design ­ A tribute to Douglas' conceptual design approach Andreas A. Linninger Laboratory for Product and Process Design Department of Chemical Engineering, University

  12. Conceptual Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) terminal design for Kuwait 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aljeeran, Fares

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study investigated a new conceptual design for a modular structural configuration incorporating storage for Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) within the base of the platform structure. The structure, referred to ...

  13. Comparison of a NuScale SMR conceptual core design using CASMO5/simulate5 and MCNP5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugh, B. [Studsvik Scandpower Inc., 1015 Ashes Drive, Wilmington, NC 28405 (United States); Mohamed, A. [NuScale Power Inc., 1100 NE Circle Blvd, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key issue during the initial start-ups of new Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) is the lack of operational data for reactor model validation. To help better understand the accuracy of the reactor analysis codes CASMO5 and SIMULATE5, higher order comparisons to MCNP5 have been performed. These comparisons are for an initial core conceptual design of the NuScale reactor. The data have been evaluated at Hot Zero Power (HZP) conditions. Comparisons of core reactivity, fuel temperature coefficient (FTC), and moderator temperature coefficients (MTC) have been performed. Comparison results show good agreement between CASMO5/SIMULATE5 and MCNP5 for the conceptual initial core design. (authors)

  14. Conceptual design for the ZEPHYR neutral-beam injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, W.S.; Elischer, V.P.; Goldberg, D.A.; Hopkins, D.B.; Jacobson, V.L.; Lou, K.H.; Tanabe, J.T.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1980, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory began a conceptual design study for a neutral beam injection system for the ZEPHYR ignition tokamak proposed by the Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany. The ZEPHYR project was cancelled, and the LBL design effort concluded prematurely in January 1981. This report describes the conceptual design as it existed at that time, and gives brief consideration to a schedule, but does not deal with costs.

  15. Tank SY-102 remediation project: Flowsheet and conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbro, S.L.; Punjak, W.A.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Pope, N.G.; Agnew, S.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Thomas, K.W.; Ortic, E.A.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. A major program in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal. Pretreatment is needed to resolve tank safety issues and to separate wastes into high-level and low-level fractions for subsequent immobilization and disposal. There is a fixed inventory of actinides and fission products in the tank which must be prepared for disposal. By segregating the actinides and fission products from the bulk of the waste, the tank`s contents can be effectively managed. Due to the high public visibility and environmental sensitivity of this problem, real progress and demonstrated efforts toward addressing it must begin as soon as possible. As a part of this program, personnel at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flowsheet to remediate tank SY-102 which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of the flowsheet demonstrations performed with simulated, but radioactive, wastes using an existing glovebox line at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The tank waste was characterized using both a tank history approach and an exhaustive evaluation of the available core sample analyses. This report also presents a conceptual design complete with a working material flow model, a major equipment list, and cost estimates.

  16. Oxidation of substrates tethered to N-donor ligands for modeling non-heme diiron enzyme active sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, Emily Carrig, 1978-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. Modeling Carboxylate-Rich Diiron Sites of Dioxygen-Dependent Non-Heme Enzymes Carboxylate-bridged diiron centers are employed in a variety of biological systems to activate dioxygen for substrate oxidation, and ...

  17. Magnetic properties of a diferrous-water complex and ligands for modeling the active site of MMOH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Amy E. (Amy Elizabeth), 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1: The Importance of Modeling Diiron Sites in Nature.There are a variety of metalloenzymes that have nearly identical carboxylate-bridged diiron active sites. An example is sMMOH, an enzyme that catalyzes the ...

  18. Design and Synthesis of a Novel Triptycene-Based Ligand for Modeling Carboxylate-Bridged Diiron Enzyme Active Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yang

    A novel triptycene-based ligand with a preorganized framework was designed to model carboxylate-bridged diiron active sites in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) hydroxylase enzymes. The synthesis of the ...

  19. Towards Automated Models of Activities of Daily Life Michael Beetz, Jan Bandouch, Dominik Jain and Moritz Tenorth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Towards Automated Models of Activities of Daily Life Michael Beetz, Jan Bandouch, Dominik Jain and Moritz Tenorth Intelligent Autonomous Systems, Technische Universit¨at M¨unchen {beetz, bandouch, jain

  20. Articulated Motion Modeling for Activity Analysis Jiang Gao, Robert T. Collins, Alexander G. Hauptmann and Howard D. Wactlar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wactlar, Howard D.

    on blobs and trajectories output from this tracking system. In Zelnik-Manor and Irani (2001), dynamicArticulated Motion Modeling for Activity Analysis Jiang Gao, Robert T. Collins, Alexander G at a nursing home. 1. Introduction Much recent research has been focused on activity analysis in videos

  1. Modelling the effects of solar activity onto the Greek national electric grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zois, Ioannis P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study both the short term and long term effects of solar activity on the large transformers (150kV and 400kV) of the Greek national electric grid. We use data analysis and various analytic and statistical methods and models. Contrary to the common belief in PPC Greece, we see that there are considerable both short term (immediate) and long term effects of solar activity onto large transformers in a mid-latitude country like Greece. Our results can be summarized as follows: For the short term effects: During 1989-2010 there were 43 stormy days (namely days with for example Ap larger or equal to 100) and we had 19 failures occurring during a stormy day plus or minus 3 days and 51 failures occurring during a stormy day plus or minus 7 days. All these failures can be directly related to Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GICs). Explicit cases are presented. For the long term effects we have two main results: The maximum number of transformer failures occur 3-4 years after the maximum of solar activity. There is...

  2. Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Frank, 1995) Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Water Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Areas...

  3. Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fault surface reflectors dipping away from therange front. Interpreted faults at Blue Mt., where severalwells have been drilled, correlated with well entries.Subsequent well...

  4. Testing the weighted salience model of conceptual combination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Merryl Joy

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    features in final combinations. Additionally, similar pairs were defined with property interpretations more frequently than were dissimilar pairs, and dissimilar pairs were defined with relation interpretations more frequently than were similar pairs...

  5. Geology And A Working Conceptual Model Of The Obsidian Butte...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    concentrations of veinlets and dilational breccias mineralized with pos t-calc-silicate specular hematite & anhydrite. The foregoing observations and deductions are...

  6. Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    studies, and seem to prove useful in most cases (Flexser, 1991; Goff et al., 1991; Smith and Suemnicht, 1991). Results from these studies are also summarized in Sorey et al....

  7. Supply chain design: a conceptual model and tactical simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brann, Jeremy Matthew

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In current research literature, supply chain management (SCM) is a hot topic breaching the boundaries of many academic disciplines. SCM-related work can be found in the relevant literature for many disciplines. Supply chain ...

  8. An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Both reservoirs seem to be separated by a vitreous tuff lithological unit, but hydraulic connectivity occurs through faults and fractures of the system, allowing deep steam...

  9. A Conceptual Model Approach to the Geophysical Exploration of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    approach is particularly effective in geothermal exploration because it promotes the interpretation of geophysics in the context of this wider range of geoscience information....

  10. Spatio-Temporal Conceptual Models: Data Structures + Space + Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    facilities. Responses to such requirements may be found in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), in some DBMS are needed. Major DBMS tools are incorporating facilities for spatial or temporal data management (e and of durability of the design specifications. It is thus foreseeable that a similar evolution will lead spatio

  11. A General Approach to the Generation of Conceptual Model Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBrien, Peter

    and Peter Mc.Brien Dept. Computing, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ email: nr600@doc.ic.ac.uk, pjm

  12. A General Approach to the Generation of Conceptual Model Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBrien, Peter

    .ic.ac.uk, pjm@doc.ic.ac.uk http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/automed Abstract. From Proc. CAiSE05 LNCS 3520, Pages 326

  13. Conceptual Model At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date - 1988 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The study reports well log data from five wells completed during the UOC and CSDP drilling programs in order...

  14. A Conceptual Model Approach to the Geophysical Exploration of Permeable

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe CommissionEnergyEnergySeismicGeothermal Reservoirs

  15. A Preliminary Conceptual Model for the Blue Mountain Geothermal System,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergy InformationOf TheLtd APWR Jump to:AHumboldt

  16. Seismic Reflection Data and Conceptual Models for Geothermal Development in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAir Jump to:ScottsSearchSt.

  17. Geothermal Resource Conceptual Models Using Surface Exploration Data | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)Energy Information )Et Al.,Energy||ImageryEnergy

  18. Geothermal resource conceptual models using surface exploration data | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlan GeothermalEnergy Information

  19. Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpods Inc Jump

  20. An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan BlanchAmiteIn TheContinental Scientific(Mexico) |

  1. Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of Solar Resource DataEstimate

  2. Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of Solar Resource DataEstimate

  3. Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of Solar Resource DataEstimateCoso

  4. Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of Solar Resourceboiling zones and

  5. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of Solar Resourceboiling zones

  6. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of Solar Resourceboiling

  7. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of Solar

  8. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of SolarInformation relevant

  9. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of SolarInformation

  10. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of

  11. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1987) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use ofInformation kinematics of

  12. Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use ofInformation kinematics

  13. Conceptual Model At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use ofInformation

  14. Raft River Geothermal Area Data Models - Conceptual, Logical and Fact

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformationeNevadaRadioactiveRadiometrics

  15. A nanoflare model for active region radiance: application of artificial neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazarghan; H. Safari; D. E. Innes; E. Karami; S. K. Solanki

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Nanoflares are small impulsive bursts of energy that blend with and possibly make up much of the solar background emission. Determining their frequency and energy input is central to understanding the heating of the solar corona. One method is to extrapolate the energy frequency distribution of larger individually observed flares to lower energies. Only if the power law exponent is greater than 2, is it considered possible that nanoflares contribute significantly to the energy input. Aims. Time sequences of ultraviolet line radiances observed in the corona of an active region are modelled with the aim of determining the power law exponent of the nanoflare energy distribution. Methods. A simple nanoflare model based on three key parameters (the flare rate, the flare duration time, and the power law exponent of the flare energy frequency distribution) is used to simulate emission line radiances from the ions Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii, observed by SUMER in the corona of an active region as it rotates around the east limb of the Sun. Light curve pattern recognition by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) scheme is used to determine the values. Results. The power law exponents, alpha 2.8, 2.8, and 2.6 for Fe XIX, Ca XIII, and Si iii respectively. Conclusions. The light curve simulations imply a power law exponent greater than the critical value of 2 for all ion species. This implies that if the energy of flare-like events is extrapolated to low energies, nanoflares could provide a significant contribution to the heating of active region coronae.

  16. I2S2 Idealised Scientific Research Activity Lifecycle Model The model represents the processes and phases of a typical physical science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    I2S2 Idealised Scientific Research Activity Lifecycle Model The model represents the processes include: development of the research proposal; its peer-review; carrying out of the experiment; equipment configuration and calibration data; processing software and associated control parameters; wikis

  17. Modeling green fluorescent protein transcription, translation and modification as a method to obtain NF-kappaB activation profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laible, Allyson Marie

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    that fluorescence increases up to 24 hours after an initial delay of approximately four hours. The fluorescence data was also used to develop a model describing significant events leading to NF-?B activation and GFP expression. In addition, a model describing...

  18. Applications of Artificial Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models in High Throughput Screening: Classifying the activities of various compounds towards Cobalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Applications of Artificial Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models in High Throughput Screening to the existing HTS method, via Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) using Artificial Neural in solving non-linear pattern classification problems, we propose several different models of neural networks

  19. Nonlinear force-free models for the solar corona I. Two active regions with very different structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Regnier; E. R. Priest

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    With the development of new instrumentation providing measurements of solar photospheric vector magnetic fields, we need to develop our understanding of the effects of current density on coronal magnetic field configurations. The object is to understand the diverse and complex nature of coronal magnetic fields in active regions using a nonlinear force-free model. From the observed photospheric magnetic field we derive the photospheric current density for two active regions: one is a decaying active region with strong currents (AR8151), and the other is a newly emerged active region with weak currents (AR8210). We compare the three-dimensional structure of the magnetic fields for both active region when they are assumed to be either potential or nonlinear force-free. The latter is computed using a Grad-Rubin vector-potential-like numerical scheme. A quantitative comparison is performed in terms of the geometry, the connectivity of field lines, the magnetic energy and the magnetic helicity content. For the old decaying active region the connectivity and geometry of the nonlinear force-free model include strong twist and strong shear and are very different from the potential model. The twisted flux bundles store magnetic energy and magnetic helicity high in the corona (about 50 Mm). The newly emerged active region has a complex topology and the departure from a potential field is small, but the excess magnetic energy is stored in the low corona and is enough to trigger powerful flares.

  20. WRAP 2A advanced conceptual design report comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamberd, D.L.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the compilation of the 393 comments that were submitted during the review of the Advanced Conceptual Design Report for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A. The report was prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc. of Englewood, Colorado for the United States Department of Energy. The review was performed by a variety of organizations identified in the report. The comments were addressed first by the Westinghouse cognizant engineers and then by the Raytheon cognizant engineers, and incorporated into the final issue of the Advanced Conceptual Design Report.

  1. MODELING SUPER-FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES OBSERVED BY SDO IN ACTIVE REGION FUNNELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Liu, W.; Title, A.; Aschwanden, M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, quasi-periodic, rapidly propagating waves have been observed in extreme ultraviolet by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in about 10 flare/coronal mass ejection (CME) events thus far. A typical example is the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/CME event that exhibited arc-shaped wave trains propagating in an active region (AR) magnetic funnel with {approx}5% intensity variations at speeds in the range of 1000-2000 km s{sup -1}. The fast temporal cadence and high sensitivity of AIA enabled the detection of these waves. We identify them as fast magnetosonic waves driven quasi-periodically at the base of the flaring region and develop a three-dimensional MHD model of the event. For the initial state we utilize the dipole magnetic field to model the AR and include gravitationally stratified density at coronal temperature. At the coronal base of the AR, we excite the fast magnetosonic wave by periodic velocity pulsations in the photospheric plane confined to a funnel of magnetic field lines. The excited fast magnetosonic waves have similar amplitude, wavelength, and propagation speeds as the observed wave trains. Based on the simulation results, we discuss the possible excitation mechanism of the waves, their dynamical properties, and the use of the observations for coronal MHD seismology.

  2. A direct comparison of X-ray spectral models for tori in active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yuan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several X-ray spectral models for tori in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are available to constrain the properties of tori; however, the accuracy of these models has not been verified. We recently construct a code for the torus using Geant4, which can easily handle different geometries (Liu & Li 2014). Thus, we adopt the same assumptions as Murphy & Yaqoob (2009, hereafter MY09) and Brightman & Nandra (2011, hereafter BN11) and try to reproduce their spectra. As a result, we can reproduce well the reflection spectra and the strength of the Fe K$\\alpha$ line of MY09, for both $\\NH=10^{24}$ and $10^{25}$ cm$^{-2}$. However, we cannot produce the strong reflection component of BN11 in the low-energy band. The origin of this component is the reflection from the visible inner wall of the torus, and it should be very weak in the edge-on directions under the geometry of BN11. Therefore, the behaviour of the reflection spectra in BN11 is not consistent with their geometry. The strength of the Fe K$\\alpha$ ...

  3. Conceptual design of the Mu2e production solenoid cold mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Lamm, M.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nicol, T.H.; Page, T.M.; Pronskikh, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The required magnetic field is produced by a series of superconducting solenoids of various apertures and lengths. This paper describes the conceptual design of the 5 T, 4 m long solenoid cold mass with 1.67 m bore with the emphasis on the magnetic, radiation and thermal analyses.

  4. Economics of a Conceptual 75 MW Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Electric

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: EnergyEastport,de Nantes Jump to:EcomedTransition

  5. A model of calcium-mediated coupling between membrane activity and clock gene expression in neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casado, J M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhythms in electrical activity in the membrane of cells in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are crucial for the function of the circadian timing system, which is characterized by the expression of the so-called clock genes. Intracellular Ca$^{2+}$ ions seem to connect, at least in part, the electrical activity of SCN neurons with the expression of clock genes. In this paper, we introduce a simple mathematical model describing the linking of membrane activity to the transcription of one gene by means of a feedback mechanism based on the dynamics of intracellular calcium ions.

  6. Concept Formation, Remembering, and Understanding: Dynamic Conceptual Semantics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amsterdam, University of

    Recherche du Temps Perdu Renate Bartsch ILLC University of Amsterdam #12;i Preface This study presents Conceptual Semantics and of the Unconscious and Conscious, which has been developed in Bartsch 1998 Dynamic and in Bartsch 2002, Consciousness Emerging: The Dynamics of Perception, Imagination, Action, Memory, Thought

  7. iFISH -Conceptually What is iFISH?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Jon

    iFISH - Conceptually What is iFISH? iFISH is an underlying technology that can form the basis and effective manner. It provides users with a unique exploration experience. iFISH offers a playful environment that encourages a further quick and deeper investigation. iFISH provides all of the above. It employs sliders

  8. A Simple Approach to Abductive Inference using Conceptual Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagnucco, Maurice

    A Simple Approach to Abductive Inference using Conceptual Graphs Maurice Pagnucco Knowledge Systems, Australia. email: morri@cs.su.oz.au fax : +61­2­692­3838 Abstract Abductive reasoning (or simply abduction) is a form of logical in­ ference that aims to derive plausible explanations for data. The term ``abduction

  9. Emotion Regulation Choice: A Conceptual Framework and Supporting Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    Emotion Regulation Choice: A Conceptual Framework and Supporting Evidence Gal Sheppes Tel Aviv that remains virtually unexplored is that of emotion regulation. This is surprising given that healthy adaptation requires flexibly choosing between regulation strategies in a manner that is responsive

  10. Cross-Language High Similarity Search Using a Conceptual Thesaurus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Paolo

    Cross-Language High Similarity Search Using a Conceptual Thesaurus Parth Gupta, Alberto Barr Universitat Polit`ecnica de Val`encia, Spain {pgupta,lbarron,prosso}@dsic.upv.es http://www.dsic.upv.es/grupos/nle Abstract. This work addresses the issue of cross-language high similarity and near-duplicates search, where

  11. CREATIVE CONCEPTUAL DESIGN: EXTENDING THE SCOPE BY INFUSED DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shai, Offer

    1 CREATIVE CONCEPTUAL DESIGN: EXTENDING THE SCOPE BY INFUSED DESIGN Offer Shai School of Mechanical infused design that guarantees generating design solutions by transforming systems and methods from remote. This process is partially supported by a computer tool. We describe the method of infused design and illustrate

  12. The Conceptual Design of Robotic Architectures using Complexity Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    The Conceptual Design of Robotic Architectures using Complexity Rules Waseem A. Khan and J. Angeles To develop a concept-evaluation framework for robot design Requirements Should be quantitative Should lead Benefits Could provide tools to complement the robot designer's judgement; and support the contemporary

  13. A generalized model of active media with a set of interacting pacemakers: Application to the heart beat analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Rybalko; Ekaterina Zhuchkova

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a quite general model of active media by consideration of the interaction between pacemakers via their phase response curves. This model describes a network of pulse oscillators coupled by their response to the internal depolarization of mutual stimulations. First, a macroscopic level corresponding to an arbitrary large number of oscillatory elements coupled globally is considered. As a specific and important case of the proposed model, the bidirectional interaction of two cardiac nodes is described. This case is generalized by means of an additional pacemaker, which can be expounded as an external stimulater. The behavior of such a system is analyzed. Second, the microscopic level corresponding to the representation of cardiac nodes by one-- and two--dimensional lattices of pulse oscillators coupled via the nearest neighbors is described. The model is a universal one in the sense that on its basis one can easily construct discrete distributed media of active elements, which interact via phase response curves.

  14. Model-based Analysis of HER Activation in Cells Co-Expressing EGFR, HER2 and HER3.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankaran, Harish; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Yunbing; Resat, Haluk

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The HER/ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases drive critical responses in normal physiology and cancer, and the expression levels of the various HER receptors are critical determinants of clinical outcomes. HER activation is driven by the formation of various dimer complexes between members of this receptor family. The HER dimer types can have differential effects on downstream signaling and phenotypic outcomes. We constructed an integrated mathematical model of HER activation and trafficking to quantitatively link receptor expression levels to dimerization and activation. We parameterized the model with a comprehensive set of HER phosphorylation and abundance data collected in a panel of human mammary epithelial cells expressing varying levels of EGFR, HER2 and HER3. Although parameter estimation yielded multiple solutions, predictions for dimer phosphorylation were in agreement with each other. We validated the model using experiments where pertuzumab was used to block HER2 dimerization. We used the model to predict HER dimerization and activation patterns in a panel of epithelial cells lines with known HER expression levels. Simulations over the range of expression levels seen in various cell lines indicate that: i) EGFR phosphorylation is driven by HER1/1 and HER1/2 dimers, and not HER1/3 dimers, ii) HER1/2 and HER2/3 dimers both contribute significantly to HER2 activation with the EGFR expression level determining the relative importance of these species, and iii) the HER2/3 dimer is largely responsible for HER3 activation. The model can be used to predict phosphorylated dimer levels for any given HER expression profile. This information in turn can be used to quantify the potencies of the various HER dimers, and can potentially inform personalized therapeutic approaches.

  15. Commons-oriented information syntheses : a model for user-driven design and creation activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukkasi, Sittha

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of user-driven creation activities has recently emerged and is quickly expanding, especially on the Web. A growing number of people participate in online activities, where they generate content by themselves, ...

  16. 1. Fractions: conceptual and didactic aspects....................................................3 2. Le frazioni, aspetti concettuali e didattici....................................................37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    1 CONTENTS 1. Fractions: conceptual and didactic aspects...........................................................................263 #12;2 #12;3 Fractions: conceptual and didactic aspects Martha Isabel Fandiño Pinilla NRD Bologna

  17. Distributed & conceptual CAD (DC-CAD) : a new software solution for product design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egan, Mark D. (Mark Douglas), 1985-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many computer aided design (CAD) software packages focus on detailed design and not on early stage, conceptual design. The ability to conceptualize and sketch early versions of a product solution is currently limited to ...

  18. Programmed path : the conceptual re-enactment of a Charlestown warehouse and dock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Sarah Rundquist

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptually re-defining the role of a 100-year-old waterfront brick and timber warehouse structure, it is turned inside-out : interior becomes path. Programmatic functions imitate the physical characteristics of a conceptual ...

  19. This is a 1D model of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) that was developed in MATLAB. The model uses cycle inputs such as the fluid mass flow and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    This is a 1D model of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) that was developed of an Active Magnetic Regenerator Refrigerator 1. Governing Equations Figure 1 shows a schematic of an active in MATLAB. The model uses cycle inputs such as the fluid mass flow and magnetic field profiles, fluid

  20. On a one-dimensional shape-memory alloy model in its fast-temperature-activation limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    On a one-dimensional shape-memory alloy model in its fast-temperature-activation limit Toyohiko describing the motion of a shape-memory alloy spring at a small characteristic time scale, called here fast for shape memory alloys that can capture oscillations and then damp out these oscillations numerically

  1. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, E.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Xia, L.; Weerts, H. (High Energy Physics); (Many)

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but considered feasible following a realistic future R&D program.

  2. Conceptual design study for the HCRF direct contact heat exchanger modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, E. F.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of sieve trays for modifying the HCRF direct contact heat exchanger was developed as follows. The models of the prior work, EG&G subcontract No. K-7752, were extended and modified so the predicted heat transfer coincided with the experimental data of the 60 KW Raft River tests conducted by EG&G. Using these models, a hole diameter of 0.25 inches and a hole velocity of 1.3 ft/sec or greater was selected to accomplish the required heat transfer while minimizing mass transferred to the geothermal fluid. Using the above information, a conceptual design for a sieve tray column was developed. It was determined that the column should operate as a working fluid filled, working fluid dispersed column. This is accomplished by level control of the geothermal fluid below the bottom tray. The dimensions and configuration of the trays and downcomers, and the number of holes and their diameters is summarized in Wahl Company drawings 84144001 and 84144003 submitted with this report. The performance of this design is expected to be 12,000 lbs/hr of geothermal fluid for single component fluids and 11,800 to 12,000 lbs/hr for mixed fluids at a working fluid flow rate of 71% of the geothermal fluid flow rate. The flow rate limit of the geothermal fluid will vary from 9800 to 13,000 lbs/hr as the ratio varies from 83% to 62%.

  3. USING A DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE AND DENSITY MEASUREMENTS IN AN ACTIVE REGION CORE TO TEST A STEADY HEATING MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Schmelz, Joan T. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Saar, Steve H.; Kashyap, Vinay L., E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The frequency of heating events in the corona is an important constraint on the coronal heating mechanisms. Observations indicate that the intensities and velocities measured in active region cores are effectively steady, suggesting that heating events occur rapidly enough to keep high-temperature active region loops close to equilibrium. In this paper, we couple observations of active region (AR) 10955 made with the X-Ray Telescope and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode to test a simple steady heating model. First we calculate the differential emission measure (DEM) of the apex region of the loops in the active region core. We find the DEM to be broad and peaked around 3 MK. We then determine the densities in the corresponding footpoint regions. Using potential field extrapolations to approximate the loop lengths and the density-sensitive line ratios to infer the magnitude of the heating, we build a steady heating model for the active region core and find that we can match the general properties of the observed DEM for the temperature range of 6.3 < log T < 6.7. This model, for the first time, accounts for the base pressure, loop length, and distribution of apex temperatures of the core loops. We find that the density-sensitive spectral line intensities and the bulk of the hot emission in the active region core are consistent with steady heating. We also find, however, that the steady heating model cannot address the emission observed at lower temperatures. This emission may be due to foreground or background structures, or may indicate that the heating in the core is more complicated. Different heating scenarios must be tested to determine if they have the same level of agreement.

  4. Longitudinal study of student conceptual understanding in electricity and magnetism S. J. Pollock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Longitudinal study of student conceptual understanding in electricity and magnetism S. J. Pollock at the freshman level on juniors' performance on a conceptual survey of Electricity and Magnetism E&M . We measured student performance on a research-based conceptual instrument--the Brief Electricity & Magnetism

  5. Conceptual Ideas for New Nondestructive UF6 Cylinder Assay Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of uranium cylinders play an important role in helping the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguard uranium enrichment plants. Traditionally, these measurements have consisted of a scale or load cell to determine the mass of UF{sub 6} in the cylinder combined with a gamma-ray measurement of the 186 keV peak from {sup 235}U to determine enrichment. More recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed systems that exploit the passive neutron signal from UF{sub 6} to determine uranium mass and/or enrichment. These include the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM), and the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The purpose of this report is to provide the IAEA with new ideas on technologies that may or may not be under active development but could be useful for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay. To begin, we have included two feasibility studies of active interrogation techniques. There is a long history of active interrogation in the field of nuclear safeguards, especially for uranium assay. Both of the active techniques provide a direct measure of {sup 235}U content. The first is an active neutron method based on the existing PNEM design that uses a correlated {sup 252}Cf interrogation source. This technique shows great promise for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay and is based on advanced technology that could be implemented in the field in the near term. The second active technique is nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF). In the NRF technique, a bremsstrahlung photon beam could be used to illuminate the cylinder, and high-resolution gamma-ray detectors would detect the characteristic de-excitation photons. The results of the feasibility study show that under certain measurement geometries, NRF is impractical for UF6 cylinder assay, but the 'grazing transmission' and 'secant transmission' geometries have more potential for this application and should be assessed quantitatively. The next set of techniques leverage scintillator detectors that are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. The first is the BC-523A capture-gated organic liquid scintillator. The detector response from several different neutron energies has been characterized and is included in the study. The BC-523A has not yet been tested with UF{sub 6} cylinders, but the application appears to be well suited for this technology. The second detector type is a relatively new inorganic scintillator called CLYC. CLYC provides a complementary detection approach to the HEVA and PNEM systems that could be used to determine uranium enrichment in UF{sub 6} cylinders. In this section, the conceptual idea for an integrated CLYC-HEVA/PNEM system is explored that could yield more precision and robustness against systemic uncertainties than any one of the systems by itself. This is followed by a feasibility study on using alpha-particle-induced reaction gamma-rays as a way to estimate {sup 234}U abundance in UF{sub 6}. Until now, there has been no readily available estimate of the strength of these reaction gamma-rays. Thick target yields of the chief reaction gammas are computed and show that they are too weak for practical safeguards applications. In special circumstances where long count times are permissible, the 1,275 keV F({alpha},x{gamma}) is observable. Its strength could help verify an operator declaration provided other knowledge is available (especially the age). The other F({alpha},x{gamma}) lines are concealed by the dominant uranium line spectrum and associated continuum. Finally, the last section provides several ideas for electromagnetic and acoustic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. These can be used to measure cylinder wall thickness, which is a source of systematic uncertainty for gamma-ray-based NDA techniques; characterize the UF{sub 6} filling profile inside the cylinder, which is a source of systematic uncertainty for neutron-based NDA techniques; locate hidden objects inside the cylinder; a

  6. Molecular Analysis of Microglial Activation and Macrophage Recruitment in Murine Models of Neuroinflammation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puntambekar, Shweta

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nitric oxide synthase ITAM: immunoreceptor tyrosine basedbased activation motif (ITAM). The TLTs, have longermotif (ITIM). S S S S (DAP-12) ITAM ITIM Charged amino acid

  7. Advanced Turbine Systems Program: Conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective is to provide the conceptual design and product development plant for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000 (secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS). This report addresses the remaining 7 of the 9 subtasks in Task 8, Design and Test of Critical Components: catalytic combustion, recuperator, high- temperature turbine disc, advanced control system, and ceramic materials.

  8. A Three-layered Conceptual Framework of Data Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Yiyu

    A Three-layered Conceptual Framework of Data Mining Y.Y. Yao1 , N. Zhong2 and Y. Zhao1 1 Department-Cho, Maebashi 371, Japan E-mail: zhong@maebashi-it.ac.jp Summary. The study of the foundations of data mining may be viewed as a scien- tific inquiry into the nature of data mining and the scope of data mining

  9. Conceptual design for the NSTX Central Instrumentation and Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashore, D.; Oliaro, G. Roney, P.; Sichta, P.; Tindall, K.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and construction phase for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is under way at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Operation is scheduled to begin on April 30, 1999. This paper describes the conceptual design for the NSTX Central Instrumentation and Control (I and C) System. Major elements of the Central I and C System include the Process Control System, Plasma Control System, Network System, Data Acquisition System, and Synchronization System to support the NSTX experimental device.

  10. Empirical Study of MacroBIM and Conceptual Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajbhiye, Anand Dhanraj

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    of _________ This thesis follows the style of Journal of Construction Engineering and Management. 2 construction. For this reason, conceptual estimation has been of real importance for the three main actors of the construction industry, i.e. designer, owner... the historical cost database provided by ENR for the multistory steel framed office buildings. According to him, since the costs books provides the cost based on just the gross floor area of the building, it results into the variabilities in the estimated...

  11. Modeling of Power and Energy Transduction of Embedded Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Transmitter INPUT Transmitter PWAS A'A Electrical response (7-mm transmitter) ­ Active power ­ Reactive power ­ Reactive power is dominant · capacitive behavior 0 200 400 600 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 Electrical Reactive Power frequency (kHz) Power(mW) 21 ^ 2 active RP Y V 21 ^ 2 reactive IP Y V Piezoelectric transduction

  12. Motion Pattern Analysis for Modeling and Recognition of Complex Human Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Amit K. Roy

    , research in activity recognition is moving towards more complex scenes involving multiple objects-mail: amitrc@ee.ucr.edu 1 This work has been partially supported by the DARPA VIRAT program and NSF award IIS to several kinds of activity recognition systems. For example, in a surveillance system, the interest could

  13. Conceptual design of retrieval systems for emplaced transuranic waste containers in a salt bed depository. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogleman, S.F.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have jurisdiction over the nuclear waste management program. Design studies were previously made of proposed repository site configurations for the receiving, processing, and storage of nuclear wastes. However, these studies did not provide operational designs that were suitable for highly reliable TRU retrieval in the deep geologic salt environment for the required 60-year period. The purpose of this report is to develop a conceptual design of a baseline retrieval system for emplaced transuranic waste containers in a salt bed depository. The conceptual design is to serve as a working model for the analysis of the performance available from the current state-of-the-art equipment and systems. Suggested regulations would be based upon the results of the performance analyses.

  14. Forward Modeling of Active Region Coronal Emissions. II. Implications for Coronal Heating This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McTiernan, James M.

    Forward Modeling of Active Region Coronal Emissions. II. Implications for Coronal Heating of Contents and more related content is available Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience #12;FORWARD MODELING OF ACTIVE REGION CORONAL EMISSIONS. II. IMPLICATIONS FOR CORONAL HEATING L. L

  15. Advanced Turbine Systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, February--April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Task 8.5 (active clearance control) was replaced with a test of the 2600F prototype turbine (Task 8.1T). Test 8.1B (Build/Teardown of prototype turbine) was added. Tasks 4 (conversion of gas-fired turbine to coal-fired turbine) and 5 (market study) were kicked off in February. Task 6 (conceptual design) was also initiated. Task 8.1 (advanced cooling technology) now has an approved test plan. Task 8.4 (ultra low NOx combustion technology) has completed the code development and background gathering phase. Task 8.6 (two-phase cooling of turbine vanes) is proceeding well; initial estimates indicate that nearly 2/3 of required cooling flow can be eliminated.

  16. Conceptual design report for environmental, safety and health phase III FY-91 line item

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mound Facility (Mound), located in Miamisburg, Ohio, is a Department of Energy (DOE) development and production facility performing support work for DOE`s weapons and energy-related programs. EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (EG&G) is the Operating Contractor (OC) for this Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facility. The work performed at Mound emphasizes nuclear energy and explosives technology. Mound is currently implementing an Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program designed to protect its employees, the public, and the environment from adverse effects caused by the facility`s activities. Design has been completed, and construction is in progress for Phase I of this multiphase program. Phase II has been submitted for fiscal year (FY) 89 funding and Phase IV is being submitted as an FY 92 line item. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) addresses Phase III of the ES&H program.

  17. Advanced conceptual design report: T Plant secondary containment and leak detection upgrades. Project W-259

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hookfin, J.D.

    1995-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The T Plant facilities in the 200-West Area of the Hanford site were constructed in the early 1940s to produce nuclear materials in support of national defense activities. T Plant includes the 271-T facility, the 221-T facility, and several support facilities (eg, 2706-T), utilities, and tanks/piping systems. T Plant has been recommended as the primary interim decontamination facility for the Hanford site. Project W-259 will provide capital upgrades to the T Plant facilities to comply with Federal and State of Washington environmental regulations for secondary containment and leak detection. This document provides an advanced conceptual design concept that complies with functional requirements for the T Plant Secondary Containment and Leak Detection upgrades.

  18. Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

  19. Model Based Identification of Transcription Factor Regulatory Activity via Markov Chain Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Simon

    ,Khanin,Girolami (Glasgow) MCMC for TFA MASAMB 2006 2 / 43 #12;Outline 1 Motivation Regulatory Networks Regulation 2 Model,Khanin,Girolami (Glasgow) MCMC for TFA MASAMB 2006 4 / 43 #12;Modeling Regulatory Networks Considerable effort has gone linear Rogers,Khanin,Girolami (Glasgow) MCMC for TFA MASAMB 2006 4 / 43 #12;Modeling Regulatory Networks

  20. Conceptual Design Report: Nevada Test Site Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental cleanup of contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and test sites generates radioactive waste that must be disposed. Site cleanup activities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex are projected to continue through 2050. Some of this waste is mixed waste (MW), containing both hazardous and radioactive components. In addition, there is a need for MW disposal from other mission activities. The Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision designates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as a regional MW disposal site. The NTS has a facility that is permitted to dispose of onsite- and offsite-generated MW until November 30, 2010. There is not a DOE waste management facility that is currently permitted to dispose of offsite-generated MW after 2010, jeopardizing the DOE environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. A mission needs document (CD-0) has been prepared for a newly permitted MW disposal facility at the NTS that would provide the needed capability to support DOE's environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. This report presents a conceptual engineering design for a MW facility that is fully compliant with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The facility, which will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the NTS, will provide an approximately 20,000-cubic yard waste disposal capacity. The facility will be licensed by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP).

  1. Simultaneous activation of multiple memory systems during learning : insights from electrophysiology and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorn, Catherine A. (Catherine Ann), 1980-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallel cortico-basal ganglia loops are thought to give rise to a diverse set of limbic, associative and motor functions, but little is known about how these loops operate and how their neural activities evolve during ...

  2. A model for cerebral cortical neuron group electric activity and its implications for cerebral function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karameh, Fadi Nabih

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electroencephalogram, or EEG, is a recording of the field potential generated by the electric activity of neuronal populations of the brain. Its utility has long been recognized as a monitor which reflects the vigilance ...

  3. Understanding, Modeling and Predicting Hidden Solder Joint Shape Using Active Thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giron Palomares, Jose

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing hidden solder joint shapes is essential for electronics reliability. Active thermography is a methodology to identify hidden defects inside an object by means of surface abnormal thermal response after applying a heat flux...

  4. activity-based interaction models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Szilagyi a is modeled with a spatially and temporally discretized version of the linear kinematic wave equation written-aquifer interactions; Baseflow separation; Flow routing;...

  5. Review of Regional Locomotive Emission Modeling and the Constraints Posed by Activity Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Gregory; Niemeier, Debbie A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accessed July 21, 2008. Booz Allen Hamilton Inc. LocomotiveBoard, Sacramento, 1991. Booz Allen Hamilton Inc. Report onemission model. Booz Allen Hamilton was hired to develop the

  6. Critical Simulation Based Evaluation of Thermally Activated Building Systems (TABS) Design Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Chandrayee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of discomfort. Full- factorial design, defined later in thedesign model. Full-factorial design The design scenariosformulated into a full factorial design. In statistics, a

  7. Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Perry; R. Youngs

    2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is threefold: (1) Present a conceptual framework of igneous activity in the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) consistent with the volcanic and tectonic history of this region and the assessment of this history by experts who participated in the probabilistic volcanic hazard analysis (PVHA) (CRWMS M&O 1996 [DIRS 100116]). Conceptual models presented in the PVHA are summarized and applied in areas in which new information has been presented. Alternative conceptual models are discussed, as well as their impact on probability models. The relationship between volcanic source zones defined in the PVHA and structural features of the YMR are described based on discussions in the PVHA and studies presented since the PVHA. (2) Present revised probability calculations based on PVHA outputs for a repository footprint proposed in 2003 (BSC 2003 [DIRS 162289]), rather than the footprint used at the time of the PVHA. This analysis report also calculates the probability of an eruptive center(s) forming within the repository footprint using information developed in the PVHA. Probability distributions are presented for the length and orientation of volcanic dikes located within the repository footprint and for the number of eruptive centers (conditional on a dike intersecting the repository) located within the repository footprint. (3) Document sensitivity studies that analyze how the presence of potentially buried basaltic volcanoes may affect the computed frequency of intersection of the repository footprint by a basaltic dike. These sensitivity studies are prompted by aeromagnetic data collected in 1999, indicating the possible presence of previously unrecognized buried volcanoes in the YMR (Blakely et al. 2000 [DIRS 151881]; O'Leary et al. 2002 [DIRS 158468]). The results of the sensitivity studies are for informational purposes only and are not to be used for purposes of assessing repository performance.

  8. PEP-II: An asymmetric B factory. Conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the authors have described an updated conceptual design for the high-luminosity Asymmetric B Factory (PEP-II) to be built in the PEP tunnel culmination of more than four years of effort aimed at the design and construction of an asymmetric e{sub +}e{sub {minus}} collider capable of achieving a luminosity of L = 3 {times} 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. All aspects of the conceptual design were scrutinized in March 1991 by a DOE technical review committee chaired by Dr. L. Edward Temple. The design was deemed feasible and capable of achieving its physics goals. Furthermore, the cost estimate, schedule, and management plan for the project were fully endorsed by the committee. This updated conceptual design report captures the technical progress since the March 1991 review and reflects the lower cost estimate corresponding to the improved design. Although the PEP-II design has continued to evolve, no technical scope changes have been made that invalidate the conclusion of the DOE review. The configuration adopted utilizes two storage rings, an electron ring operating at 9 GeV and a positron ring at 3.1 GeV, each with a circumference of 2200 m. The high-energy ring is an upgrade of the PEP storage ring at SLAC; all PEP magnets and most power supplies will be reused. The upgrade consists primarily of replacing the PEP vacuum chamber and RF system with newly designed versions optimized for the high-current environment of PEP-II. The low-energy ring will be newly constructed and will be situated atop the high-energy ring in the PEP tunnel. Utilities already installed in the PEP tunnel are largely sufficient to operate the two PEP-II storage rings.

  9. A density functional theory model of mechanically activated silyl ester hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pill, Michael F.; Schmidt, Sebastian W. [Department of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstr. 34, 80335 Munich (Germany) [Department of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstr. 34, 80335 Munich (Germany); Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Olshausenstraße 40, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 Munich (Germany); Beyer, Martin K. [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Olshausenstraße 40, 24098 Kiel (Germany) [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Olshausenstraße 40, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke [Department of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstr. 34, 80335 Munich (Germany) [Department of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstr. 34, 80335 Munich (Germany); Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 Munich (Germany); Kersch, Alfred, E-mail: akersch@hm.edu [Department of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstr. 34, 80335 Munich (Germany)] [Department of Applied Sciences and Mechatronics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstr. 34, 80335 Munich (Germany)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    To elucidate the mechanism of the mechanically activated dissociation of chemical bonds between carboxymethylated amylose (CMA) and silane functionalized silicon dioxide, we have investigated the dissociation kinetics of the bonds connecting CMA to silicon oxide surfaces with density functional calculations including the effects of force, solvent polarizability, and pH. We have determined the activation energies, the pre-exponential factors, and the reaction rate constants of candidate reactions. The weakest bond was found to be the silyl ester bond between the silicon and the alkoxy oxygen atom. Under acidic conditions, spontaneous proton addition occurs close to the silyl ester such that neutral reactions become insignificant. Upon proton addition at the most favored position, the activation energy for bond hydrolysis becomes 31 kJ?mol{sup ?1}, which agrees very well with experimental observation. Heterolytic bond scission in the protonated molecule has a much higher activation energy. The experimentally observed bi-exponential rupture kinetics can be explained by different side groups attached to the silicon atom of the silyl ester. The fact that different side groups lead to different dissociation kinetics provides an opportunity to deliberately modify and tune the kinetic parameters of mechanically activated bond dissociation of silyl esters.

  10. LINKING MICROBES TO CLIMATE: INCORPORATING MICROBIAL ACTIVITY INTO CLIMATE MODELS COLLOQUIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLong, Edward; Harwood, Caroline; Reid, Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report explains the connection between microbes and climate, discusses in general terms what modeling is and how it applied to climate, and discusses the need for knowledge in microbial physiology, evolution, and ecology to contribute to the determination of fluxes and rates in climate models. It recommends with a multi-pronged approach to address the gaps.

  11. Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro, Thomas; Forget, François; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

  12. Solar-parabolic dish-Stirling-engine-system module. Task 1: Topical report, market assessment/conceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The major activities reported are: a market study to identify an early market for a dish-Stirling module and assess its commercial potential; preparation of a conceptual system and subsystem design to address this market; and preparation of an early sales implementation plan. A study of the reliability of protection from the effects of walk-off, wherein the sun's image leaves the receiver if the dish is not tracking, is appended, along with an optical analysis and structural analysis. Also appended are the relationship between PURPA and solar thermal energy development and electric utility pricing rationale. (LEW)

  13. Conceptual design of a divertor Thomson scattering diagnostic for NSTX-U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLean, A. G., E-mail: mclean@fusion.gat.com; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Allen, S. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Carlstrom, T. N. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); LeBlanc, B. P.; Ono, M.; Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design for a divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) diagnostic has been developed for the NSTX-U device to operate in parallel with the existing multipoint Thomson scattering system. Higher projected peak heat flux in NSTX-U will necessitate application of advanced magnetics geometries and divertor detachment. Interpretation and modeling of these divertor scenarios will depend heavily on local measurement of electron temperature, T{sub e}, and density, n{sub e}, which DTS provides in a passive manner. The DTS design for NSTX-U adopts major elements from the successful DIII-D DTS system including 7-channel polychromators measuring T{sub e} to 0.5 eV. If implemented on NSTX-U, the divertor TS system would provide an invaluable diagnostic for the boundary program to characterize the edge plasma.

  14. Influence of active sites organisation on calcium carbonate formation at model biomolecular interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hell, Stefan W.

    aqueous CaCO3 was observed in situ by Brewster angle microscopy, where CaCO3 domains appear bright. Striking differences in kinetics and extent of CaCO3 formation are observed between monolayers containing-carrageenan in the subphase as a further active component resulted in partial inhibition of CaCO3 formation. # 2004 Elsevier B

  15. Submited to Trans. on CAD Revised Version Probabilistic Modeling of Dependencies During Switching Activity Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    synthesis have become primary concerns for the CAD community. To calculate average power consumption lag-one Markov Chains and conditional probabilities to manage complex spatiotemporal correlations. Two on these notions, it is shown that the relative error in calculating the switching activity of a logic gate using

  16. Learning Setting-Generalized Activity Models for Smart Spaces Diane J. Cook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    found in smart homes offer unprecedented opportunities for providing context-aware services, including the recognition of activities is an important step toward monitoring the functional health of a smart home datasets from the CASAS Smart Home project [2]. #12;Figure 1. Sensor layout for the seven CASAS smart

  17. REVIEW AND ANALYSIS Research Activities at U.S. Government Agencies in Subsurface Reactive Transport Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    All T. Cygan; Caroline T. Stevens; Robert W. Puls; Steven B. Yabusaki; Robert D; David R. Turner

    Subsurface reactive transport modeling may be defi ned as the use of mathematical models to simulate the fate and transport of dissolved species and particulates in groundwater as these species are transported through porous media and react with each other, with mineral surfaces, and with microbes associated with the porous media matrix. This type of modeling has evolved over the last 30 yr from a specialized research topic involving a dozen or so practitioners (with often large stacks of computer punch cards) to a common offi ce tool found today on the personal computer (and occasional supercomputer) of many environmental chemists, geochemists, and soil scientists. The devel-

  18. Conceptual design of pressure relief systems for cryogenic application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grohmann, S. [Institute for Technical Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Engler-Bunte-Ring 21, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany and Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 E (Germany); Süßer, M. [Institute for Technical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of pressure relief systems is an important aspect in the early phase of any cryogenic system design, because a prudent and responsible evaluation of relief systems involves much more than just relief devices. The conceptual design consists of various steps: At first, hazard scenarios must be considered and the worst-case scenario identified. Next, a staged interaction against pressure increase is to be defined. This is followed by the selection of the general type of pressure relief device for each stage, such as safety valve and rupture disc, respectively. Then, a decision concerning their locations, their capacities and specific features must be taken. Furthermore, it is mandatory to consider the inlet pressure drop and the back pressure in the exhaust line for sizing the safety devices. And last but not least, economic and environmental considerations must be made in case of releasing the medium to the atmosphere. The development of the system's safety concept calls for a risk management strategy based on identification and analysis of hazards, and consequent risk mitigation using a system-based approach in compliance with the standards.

  19. A conceptual design for the STAR endcap electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bielick, E.; Fornek, T.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1993-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to make measurements of the gluon spin or helicity distribution in the proton or the gluon spin average distribution in nuclei, both a barrel and an endcap electromagnetic calorimeter must be added to the STAR baseline detector. Information on the gluon will be obtained in inclusive direct-{gamma} + jet and jet + jet production. In order to be sensitive to the proper gluon kinematic regions, either the direct-{gamma} or the jet must be in the endcap electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC). However, the endcap EMC is not large enough to completely contain the jets, so that the barrel EMC is also needed. This note describes a conceptual design for the STAR endcap EMC. Constraints are imposed by the space available between the end of the time projection chamber (TPC) and the inside of the magnet pole tip iron. Severe constraints also occur near {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} = 1, where the barrel and endcap EMC`s meet. Cables from detectors inside the EMC, including those from the TPC, will exit from STAR near {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} = 1. The constraints in this region have not yet been seriously studied since no decision on the detailed routing of these cables was available at the time this work was being done. This report includes details of the conceptual design, analytical and finite element calculations of stresses in various structural members for the endcap EMC, and a preliminary cost estimate.

  20. Research recommendations to the EPA in support of earth system modeling activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosiano, J.J.; Dannevik, W.P.; Kercher, J.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Rotman, D.

    1994-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A theme which emerges from our simple considerations is that some well-planned early parametric and sensitivity studies, using current-generation coupled Earth system model components, along with simplistic proxy models of terrestrial biospheric and biogeochemical processes, could furnish valuable information to help guide the development of a longer-term plan for research supporting ESM development. This theme is rooted in the premise that the importance of various ESM component processes can be fully assessed only from the perspective of a complete coupling of that process into the ESM context. That is, the question, ``How well must a given process be modelled``? Cannot be answered in isolation, but rather requires a careful blend of process research and coupled model studies.

  1. Model reduction for active control design using multiple-point Arnoldi methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lassaux, G.

    A multiple-point Arnoldi method is derived for model reduction of computational fluid dynamic systems. By choosing the number of frequency interpolation points and the number of Arnoldi vectors at each frequency point, the ...

  2. How-Models of Human Reaching Movements in the Context of Everyday Manipulation Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Nyga, Moritz Tenorth and Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous Systems, Technische Universit¨at M¨unchen {nyga, tenorth, beetz}@cs.tum.edu Abstract-- We present a system for learning models of human reaching

  3. Real-time detection of malicious network activity using stochastic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Jaeyeon, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation develops approaches to rapidly detect malicious network traffic including packets sent by portscanners and network worms. The main hypothesis is that stochastic models capturing a host's particular ...

  4. Mathematical transport modeling for determination of effectiveness of Kepone clean up activities in the James River estuary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Y.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of 1966-1975, a highly chlorinated pesticide, Kepone, was discharged to the environment around Hopewell, Virginia. Much of the Kepone that reached the James River estuary was adsorbed by river sediment, becoming a long-term source of pollution. In order to identify an optimal location to remove Kepone from the river bed and to assess the effectiveness of the clean up activities to reduce the Kepone level in the river, the mathematical simulation of sediment and Kepone transport in the James River estuary was performed by applying the sediment-containment transport model, FETRA, to an 86-km river reach between Bailey and Burwell Bays. The FETRA code is an unsteady, two-dimensional, finite element interactions. The submodels are: (1) a sediment transport submodel, (2) a dissolved contaminant transport submodel, and (3) a particulate contaminant (contaminant adsorbed by sediment) transport submodel. FETRA also predicts changes in river bed conditions of sediment and contaminant. The value of applying models to dredging activity goes beyond this specific example. Through the sensitivity analysis, one can employ models to predict the most cost effective strategy for dredging. Properly constructed strategies will take advantage of river and coastal water dynamics to reduce the total volume of sediments to be dredged. Results of the simulation can also be used to predict subsequent environmental impacts.

  5. Modeling and analysis of a semi-active permanent magnet damper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Wayne Chinn-Tzu

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. Robin C, Redfield A method for employing a linear electromagnetic motor as a semi-active damper is proposed. This strategy is based on two physical principles: Faraday's law and Lenz's law. Unlike a hydraulic damper, which has fluid... compressibility and inertia problems at high input frequencies, the magnetic damper, because of its low inductance, presents minimal complications due to compliance. Furthermore, the linear motor's damping levels can be adjusted electronically, either through a...

  6. The relevance of didactic categories for analysing obstacles in conceptual change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prediger, Susanne

    1 The relevance of didactic categories for analysing obstacles in conceptual change Revisiting research like `Grundvorstellungen' and epistemological obstacles. These didactic categories help to make

  7. MODELING MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION CORONA USING NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELDS IN SPHERICAL GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Y.; Sun, X. D. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); DeRosa, M. L. [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Wiegelmann, T., E-mail: guoyang@nju.edu.cn [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We test a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) optimization code in spherical geometry using an analytical solution from Low and Lou. Several tests are run, ranging from idealized cases where exact vector field data are provided on all boundaries, to cases where noisy vector data are provided on only the lower boundary (approximating the solar problem). Analytical tests also show that the NLFFF code in the spherical geometry performs better than that in the Cartesian one when the field of view of the bottom boundary is large, say, 20 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 20 Degree-Sign . Additionally, we apply the NLFFF model to an active region observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) both before and after an M8.7 flare. For each observation time, we initialize the models using potential field source surface (PFSS) extrapolations based on either a synoptic chart or a flux-dispersal model, and compare the resulting NLFFF models. The results show that NLFFF extrapolations using the flux-dispersal model as the boundary condition have slightly lower, therefore better, force-free, and divergence-free metrics, and contain larger free magnetic energy. By comparing the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we find that the NLFFF performs better than the PFSS not only for the core field of the flare productive region, but also for large EUV loops higher than 50 Mm.

  8. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colwell, Frederick; Radtke, Corey; Newby, Deborah; Delwiche, Mark; Crawf, Ronald L.; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Strap, Janice; Conrad, Mark; Brodic, Eoin; Starr, Robert; Lee, Hope

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires 'lines of evidence' indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. Our research will study the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism in contaminated aquifers first at the Idaho National Laboratory and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site, where natural attenuation of TCE is occurring. We will use flow-through in situ reactors to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. We will use new approaches (e.g., stable isotope probing, enzyme activity probes, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, proteomics) to assay the TCE co-metabolic rates, and interpret these rates in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different methane concentrations and groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites that are contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  9. Analysis of the conceptual shielding design for the upflow Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, C.O.; Reed, D.A.; Cramer, S.N.; Emmett, M.B.; Tomlinson, E.T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptual Shielding Configuration III for the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) was analyzed by performing global calculations of neutron and gamma-ray fluences and correcting the results as appropriate with bias factors from localized calculations. Included among the localized calculations were the radial and axial cell streaming calculations, plus extensive preliminary calculations and three final confirmation calculations of the plenum flow-through shields. The global calculations were performed on the GCFR mid-level and the lower and upper plenum regions. Calculated activities were examined with respect to the design constraint, if any, imposed on the particular activity. The spatial distributions of several activities of interest were examined with the aid of isoplots (i.e., symbols are used to describe a surface on which the activity level is everywhere the same). In general the results showed that most activities were below the respective design constraints. Only the total neutron fluence in the core barrel appeared to be marginal with the present reactor design. Since similar results were obtained for an earlier design, it has been proposed that the core barrel be cooled with inlet plenum gas to maintain it at a temperature low enough that it can withstand a higher fluence limit. Radiation levels in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) and liner appeared to be sufficiently below the design constraint that expected results from the Radial Shield Heterogeneity Experiment should not force any levels above the design constraint. A list was also made of a number of issues which should be examined before completion of the final shielding design.

  10. Combining Semi-analytic Models with Simulations of Galaxy Clusters: the Need for Heating from Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Short; P. A. Thomas

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present hydrodynamical N-body simulations of clusters of galaxies with feedback taken from semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. The advantage of this technique is that the source of feedback in our simulations is a population of galaxies that closely resembles that found in the real universe. We demonstrate that, to achieve the high entropy levels found in clusters, active galactic nuclei must inject a large fraction of their energy into the intergalactic/intracluster media throughout the growth period of the central black hole. These simulations reinforce the argument of Bower et al., who arrived at the same conclusion on the basis of purely semi-analytic reasoning.

  11. Thermal Modeling Studies for Active Storage Modules in the Calvert Cliffs ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.; Fort, James A.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.

    2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature measurements obtained for two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE) were used to perform validation and sensitivity studies on detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the concrete storage modules, including the dry storage canister within the modules. The storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s ISFSI are a site-specific version of the standard NUHOMS® HSM. The two modules inspected each contained a 24P DSC loaded with 24 CE 14x14 spent fuel assemblies. The thermal analysis was performed using the STAR-CCM+ package, and the models developed for the specific ISFSI modules yielded temperature predictions in actual storage conditions for the concrete structure, the DSC and its contents, including preliminary estimates of fuel cladding temperatures for the used nuclear fuel. The results of this work demonstrate that existing CFD modeling tools can be used to obtain reasonable and accurate detailed representations of spent fuel storage systems with realistic decay heat loadings when the model omits specific conservatisms and bounding assumptions normally used in design-basis and safety-basis calculations. This paper presents sensitivity studies on modeling detail (for the storage module and the DSC), boundary conditions, and decay heat load, to evaluate the effect of the modeling approach on predicted temperatures and temperature distributions. Because nearly all degradation mechanisms for materials and structures comprising dry storage and transportation systems are dependent on temperature, accurate characterization of local temperatures and temperature gradients that the various components of these systems will experience over the entire storage period has been identified as a primary requirement for evaluation of very long term storage of used nuclear fuel.

  12. Hierarchical Modeling of Activation Mechanisms in the ABL and EGFR Kinase Domains: Thermodynamic and Mechanistic Catalysts of Kinase Activation by Cancer Mutations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixit, Anshuman; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural and functional studies of the ABL and EGFR kinase domains have recently suggested a common mechanism of activation by cancer-causing mutations. However, dynamics and mechanistic aspects of kinase activation by ...

  13. Towards Accurate and Practical Predictive Models of Active-Vision-Based Visual Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornof, Anthony

    which permit increasingly realistic and accurate predictions for visual human-computer interaction tasks not practical. For as long as human-computer interaction has been studied, researchers have been working@cs.uoregon.edu ABSTRACT Being able to predict the performance of interface designs using models of human cognition

  14. Integrated Modeling and Design of Lightweight, Active Mirrors for Launch Survival and On-Orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Orbit Performance Lucy E. Cohan and David W. Miller June 2010 SSL# 2-10 #12;#12;Integrated Modeling and Design June 2010 SSL# 2-10 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis by Lucy Cohan submitted

  15. REGION-BASED ACTIVE SURFACE MODELLING AND ALPHA MATTING FOR UNSUPERVISED TUMOUR SEGMENTATION IN PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jue

    hierarchical segmentation scheme consists of three steps, as shown in the system flow-chart in Fig. 2 the Poisson Gradient Vector Flow (PGVF) of Hsu et al. [2] for edge-based seg- mentation and the Markov Random segmentation model [6, 7] are used to obtain an energy function that can be minimized by convex optimization

  16. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purcell, James W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the lessmodels, except BT474 and MDA-MB-468 which were established50 for ispinesib of 45nM) and MDA-MB-468, a basal A triple

  17. High Dimensional Sparse Econometric Models: An Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belloni, Alexandre

    2011-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this chapter we discuss conceptually high dimensional sparse econometric models as well as estimation of these models using ?1-penalization and post-?1-penalization methods. Focusing on linear and nonparametric regression ...

  18. Modeling the Earth System, volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojima, D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The topics covered fall under the following headings: critical gaps in the Earth system conceptual framework; development needs for simplified models; and validating Earth system models and their subcomponents.

  19. Nonequilibrium equation of state in suspensions of active colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Félix Ginot; Isaac Theurkauff; Demian Levis; Christophe Ybert; Lydéric Bocquet; Ludovic Berthier; Cécile Cottin-Bizonne

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Active colloids constitute a novel class of materials composed of colloidal-scale particles locally converting chemical energy into motility, mimicking micro-organisms. Evolving far from equilibrium, these systems display structural organizations and dynamical properties distinct from thermalized colloidal assemblies. Harvesting the potential of this new class of systems requires the development of a conceptual framework to describe these intrinsically nonequilibrium systems. We use sedimentation experiments to probe the nonequilibrium equation of state of a bidimensional assembly of active Janus microspheres, and conduct computer simulations of a model of self-propelled hard disks. Self-propulsion profoundly affects the equation of state, but these changes can be rationalized using equilibrium concepts. We show that active colloids behave, in the dilute limit, as an ideal gas with an activity-dependent effective temperature. At finite density, increasing the activity is similar to increasing adhesion between equilibrium particles. We quantify this effective adhesion and obtain a unique scaling law relating activity and effective adhesion in both experiments and simulations. Our results provide a new and efficient way to understand the emergence of novel phases of matter in active colloidal suspensions.

  20. Mu2e production solenoid cryostat conceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.M.; Peterson, T.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mu2e is a muon-to-electron conversion experiment being designed by an international collaboration of more than 65 scientists and engineers from more than 20 research institutions for installation at Fermilab. The experiment is comprised of three large superconducting solenoid magnet systems, production solenoid (PS), transport solenoid (TS) and detector solenoid (DS). A 25 kW, 8 GeV proton beam strikes a target located in the PS creating muons from the decay of secondary particles. These muons are then focused in the PS and the resultant muon beam is transported through the TS towards the DS. The production solenoid presents a unique set of design challenges as the result of high radiation doses, stringent magnetic field requirements, and large structural forces. This paper describes the conceptual design of the PS cryostat and will include discussions of the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation, cooling system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system.

  1. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  2. Conceptual Design Report for the Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Barnes; J. Beller; K. Caldwell; K. Croft; R. Cherry; W. Landman

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design supports the creation of Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers, which will replicate deep subsurface and subocean environments characterized by high pressure (2,000 psi) and subfreezing to high temperature (-4 to 300 degrees F) with differing chemical and saturation conditions. The design provides a system to support research and development that includes heat transfer, phase change issues in porous media, microbiology in extreme environments, and carbon sequestration and extraction. The initial system design is based on the research needs to support the commercial production of methane hydrates from subsurface sediments. The design provides for three pressure vessels: a Down Hole Test Vessel, a Vertical Multi-phase Test Vessel, and a Horizontal Multi-phase Test Vessel.

  3. Conceptual designs for modular OTEC SKSS. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume presents the results of the first phase of the Station Keeping Subsystem (SKSS) design study for 40 MW/sub e/ capacity Modular Experiment OTEC Platforms. The objectives of the study were: (1) establishment of basic design requirements; (2) verification of technical feasibility of SKSS designs; (3) identification of merits and demerits; (4) estimates of sizes for major components; (5) estimates of life cycle costs; (6) deployment scenarios and time/cost/risk assessments; (7) maintenance/repair and replacement scenarios; (8) identifications of interface with other OTEC subsystems; (9) recommendations for and major problems in preliminary design; and (10) applicability of concepts to commercial plant SKSS designs. A brief site suitability study was performed with the objective of determining the best possible location at the Punta Tuna (Puerto Rico) site from the standpoint of anchoring. This involved studying the vicinity of the initial location in relation to the prevailing bottom slopes and distances from shore. All subsequent studies were performed for the final selected site. The two baseline OTEC platforms were the APL BARGE and the G and C SPAR. The results of the study are presented in detail. The overall objective of developing two conceptual designs for each of the two baseline OTEC platforms has been accomplished. Specifically: (1) a methodology was developed for conceptual designs and followed to the extent possible. At this stage, a full reliability/performance/optimization analysis based on a probabilistic approach was not used due to the numerous SKSS candidates to be evaluated. A deterministic approach was used. (2) For both of the two baseline platforms, the APL BARGE and the G and C SPAR, all possible SKSS candidate concepts were considered and matrices of SKSS concepts were developed.

  4. Ultra-Supercritical Pressure CFB Boiler Conceptual Design Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhen Fan; Steve Goidich; Archie Robertson; Song Wu

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric utility interest in supercritical pressure steam cycles has revived in the United States after waning in the 1980s. Since supercritical cycles yield higher plant efficiencies than subcritical plants along with a proportional reduction in traditional stack gas pollutants and CO{sub 2} release rates, the interest is to pursue even more advanced steam conditions. The advantages of supercritical (SC) and ultra supercritical (USC) pressure steam conditions have been demonstrated in the high gas temperature, high heat flux environment of large pulverized coal-fired (PC) boilers. Interest in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion, as an alternative to PC combustion, has been steadily increasing. Although CFB boilers as large as 300 MWe are now in operation, they are drum type, subcritical pressure units. With their sizes being much smaller than and their combustion temperatures much lower than those of PC boilers (300 MWe versus 1,000 MWe and 1600 F versus 3500 F), a conceptual design study was conducted herein to investigate the technical feasibility and economics of USC CFB boilers. The conceptual study was conducted at 400 MWe and 800 MWe nominal plant sizes with high sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal used as the fuel. The USC CFB plants had higher heating value efficiencies of 40.6 and 41.3 percent respectively and their CFB boilers, which reflect conventional design practices, can be built without the need for an R&D effort. Assuming construction at a generic Ohio River Valley site with union labor, total plant costs in January 2006 dollars were estimated to be $1,551/kW and $1,244/kW with costs of electricity of $52.21/MWhr and $44.08/MWhr, respectively. Based on the above, this study has shown that large USC CFB boilers are feasible and that they can operate with performance and costs that are competitive with comparable USC PC boilers.

  5. Design of Predictive Control Strategies for Active BITIES Systems Using Frequency Domain Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y.; Athienitis, A. K.; Gala, K. E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Source Layer Temperature and Thermal Energy Injection Using discrete frequency response modeling for an assembly consisting of ? layers of material (Figure 3), the oscillatory responses of heat flux ???? ?,? and temperature ???? ?,? at surface 0... top surface 1 2 N 0 l Layer index for the assembly Surface index for each layer 0 l 0 l boundary (e.g. the concrete underneath the source layer). The responses ???? ? and ???? ? at time interval ? at source layer can be calculated...

  6. Simulated 3D Ultrasound LV Cardiac Images for Active Shape Model Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frangi, Alejandro

    information: (Send correspondence to A.F.F.) C.B.: E-mail: constantine.butakoff@upf.edu, Telephone: +34 935 42 1364 S.B.: E-mail: simone.balocco@upf.edu S.O.: E-mail: sebastian.ordas@upf.edu A.F.F.: E-mail: alejandro.frangi@upf.edu, Telephone: +34 935 42 1451 #12;authors opted for a statistical shape model based

  7. Using GIS and Spatial Modeling to Examine Active Travel Potential in a University Town

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rybarczyk, Greg

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    at the trip start ? Required tools: ? Survey instrument ? GIS ? Spatially explicit model Greg Rybarczyk, Ph.D. 8 ? Gender, university classification, home address ? Distance from UM-Flint ? Mode Share to & on UM-Flint campus ? Auto ? Bicycle ? Bus... to nearest transit stop Destination accessibility by transit* Working-age population within a 45-minute transit commute Destination accessibility by car Jobs within a 45-minute drive Demographics Percentage of households with no car, 1 car, or 2 or more...

  8. Conceptual Content Management for Pattern-based Software Design: An E-Learning Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This intrinsically dualistic nature of patterns makes them good candidates for conceptual content management (CCM). In this paper we report on the use of the CCM approach for the realization of a CCM system for teaching experience. In previous projects we have used our Conceptual Content Management (CCM) approach to provide

  9. Modeling of UF{sub 6} enrichment with gas centrifuges for nuclear safeguards activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercurio, G.; Peerani, P.; Richir, P.; Janssens, W.; Eklund, G. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements Via Fermi, 2749-TP181,20127 Ispra (Italy)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical modeling of uranium isotopes ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U) separation process by centrifugation of is a key aspect for predicting the nuclear fuel enrichment plant performances under surveillance by the Nuclear Safeguards Authorities. In this paper are illustrated some aspects of the modeling of fast centrifuges for UF{sub 6} gas enrichment and of a typical cascade enrichment plant with the Theoretical Centrifuge and Cascade Simulator (TCCS). The background theory for reproducing the flow field characteristics of a centrifuge is derived from the work of Cohen where the separation parameters are calculated using the solution of a differential enrichment equation. In our case we chose to solve the hydrodynamic equations for the motion of a compressible fluid in a centrifugal field using the Berman - Olander vertical velocity radial distribution and the solution was obtained using the Matlab software tool. The importance of a correct estimation of the centrifuge separation parameters at different flow regimes, lies in the possibility to estimate in a reliable way the U enrichment plant performances, once the separation external parameters are set (feed flow rate and feed, product and tails assays). Using the separation parameters of a single centrifuge allow to determine the performances of an entire cascade and, for this purpose; the software Simulink was used. The outputs of the calculation are the concentrations (assays) and the flow rates of the enriched (product) and depleted (tails) gas mixture. These models represent a valid additional tool, in order to verify the compliance of the U enrichment plant operator declarations with the 'on site' inspectors' measurements.

  10. Ocular Dominance and Activation Dynamics in a Unified Self-Organizing Model . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neural network model for the self-organization of lateral connections and ocular dominance columns from uncorrelated binocular input is pre- sented. The self-organizing process results in a network where (1) afferent weights of each neuron organize into smooth hill-shaped receptive fields primarily on one of the retinas, (2) neurons with common eye preference form connected, intertwined patches, and (3) lateral connections primarily link regions of the same eye preference. Similar self-organization of cortical structures has been observed experimentally in strabismic kittens. The lateral

  11. Testing a model of variability of X-ray reprocessing features in Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. T. Zycki; A. Rozanska

    2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of recent results from X-ray observations of Active Galactic Nuclei involving the Fe K alpha line (reduction of line variability compared to the X-ray continuum variability, the X-ray ``Baldwin effect'') were attributed to a presence of a hot, ionized skin of an accretion disc, suppressing emission of the line. The ionized skin appears as a result of the thermal instability of X-ray irradiated plasma. We test this hypothesis by computing the Thomson thickness of the hot skin on top of the 'alpha P_tot' Shakura-Sunyaev disc, by simultaneously solving the vertical structure of both the hot skin and the disc. We then compute a number of relations between observable quantities, e.g. the hard X-ray flux, amplitude of the observed reprocessed component, relativistic smearing of the K alpha line, the r.m.s. variability of the hard X-rays. These relations can be compared to present and future observations. We point out that this mechanism is unlikely to explain the behaviour of the X-ray source in MCG-6-30-15, where there is a number of arguments against the existence of a thick hot skin, but it can work for some other Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  12. Coupled Biogeochemical Process Evaluation for Conceptualizing Trichloroethylene Co-Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Colwell; Corey Radtke; Mark Delwiche; Deborah Newby; Lynn Petzke; Mark Conrad; Eoin Brodie; Hope Lee; Bob Starr; Dana Dettmers; Ron Crawford; Andrzej Paszczynski; Nick Bernardini; Ravi Paidisetti; Tonia Green

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorinated solvent wastes (e.g., trichloroethene or TCE) often occur as diffuse subsurface plumes in complex geological environments where coupled processes must be understood in order to implement remediation strategies. Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) warrants study as a remediation technology because it minimizes worker and environment exposure to the wastes and because it costs less than other technologies. However, to be accepted MNA requires different ?lines of evidence? indicating that the wastes are effectively destroyed. We are studying the coupled biogeochemical processes that dictate the rate of TCE co-metabolism first in the medial zone (TCE concentration: 1,000 to 20,000 ?g/L) of a plume at the Idaho National Laboratory?s Test Area North (TAN) site and then at Paducah or the Savannah River Site. We will use flow-through in situ reactors (FTISR) to investigate the rate of methanotrophic co-metabolism of TCE and the coupling of the responsible biological processes with the dissolved methane flux and groundwater flow velocity. TCE co-metabolic rates at TAN are being assessed and interpreted in the context of enzyme activity, gene expression, and cellular inactivation related to intermediates of TCE co-metabolism. By determining the rate of TCE co-metabolism at different groundwater flow velocities, we will derive key modeling parameters for the computational simulations that describe the attenuation, and thereby refine such models while assessing the contribution of microbial co-metabolism relative to other natural attenuation processes. This research will strengthen our ability to forecast the viability of MNA at DOE and other sites contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  13. Conceptual Design of the International Axion Observatory (IAXO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armengaud, E; Betz, M; Brax, P; Brun, P; Cantatore, G; Carmona, J M; Carosi, G P; Caspers, F; Caspi, S; Cetin, S A; Chelouche, D; Christensen, F E; Dael, A; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Derbin, A V; Desch, K; Diago, A; Döbrich, B; Dratchnev, I; Dudarev, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Fanourakis, G; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Galán, J; García, J A; Garza, J G; Geralis, T; Gimeno, B; Giomataris, I; Gninenko, S; Gómez, H; González-Díaz, D; Guendelman, E; Hailey, C J; Hiramatsu, T; Hoffmann, D H H; Horns, D; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Isern, J; Imai, K; Jakobsen, A C; Jaeckel, J; Jakov?i?, K; Kaminski, J; Kawasaki, M; Karuza, M; Kr?mar, M; Kousouris, K; Krieger, C; Laki?, B; Limousin, O; Lindner, A; Liolios, A; Luzón, G; Matsuki, S; Muratova, V N; Nones, C; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovaroff, M J; Raffelt, G; Redondo, J; Ringwald, A; Russenschuck, S; Ruz, J; Saikawa, K; Savvidis, I; Sekiguchi, T; Semertzidis, Y K; Shilon, I; Sikivie, P; Silva, H; Kate, H ten; Tomas, A; Troitsky, S; Vafeiadis, T; Bibber, K van; Vedrine, P; Villar, J A; Vogel, J K; Walckiers, L; Weltman, A; Wester, W; Yildiz, S C; Zioutas, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) will be a forth generation axion helioscope. As its primary physics goal, IAXO will look for axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) originating in the Sun via the Primakoff conversion of the solar plasma photons. In terms of signal-to-noise ratio, IAXO will be about 4-5 orders of magnitude more sensitive than CAST, currently the most powerful axion helioscope, reaching sensitivity to axion-photon couplings down to a few $\\times 10^{-12}$ GeV$^{-1}$ and thus probing a large fraction of the currently unexplored axion and ALP parameter space. IAXO will also be sensitive to solar axions produced by mechanisms mediated by the axion-electron coupling $g_{ae}$ with sensitivity $-$for the first time$-$ to values of $g_{ae}$ not previously excluded by astrophysics. With several other possible physics cases, IAXO has the potential to serve as a multi-purpose facility for generic axion and ALP research in the next decade. In this paper we present the conceptual design of IAXO, w...

  14. Conceptual design for the STAR barrel electromagnetic calorimeter support rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bielick, E.; Fornek, T.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will be used to measure the energy of photons and electrons from collisions of beams of particles in the RHIC accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The present design is documented in the EMC Conceptual Design Report, and consists of a cylindrical barrel and two flat endcap calorimeter sections. The barrel EMC will consist of 120 modules, each subtending 6{degrees} in azimuthal angle about the beam ({phi}), and half the barrel length. Each module will be subdivided into ``towers`` of alternating scintillator and lead, which project to the nominal interaction point. There is a strong coupling between the designs for the EMC and for the conventional solenoidal magnet, which will be located immediately outside the barrel EMC. For example, the inner radius of the magnet must be minimized to lower costs and to reduce the STAR detector`s outer diameter to fit within constraints of the existing detector building. This condition requires the calorimeter modules to be just thick enough to accomplish physics goals and to support their weight with small deflections. This note describes progress in the design of the EMC support rings. Several ring designs and methods of construction have been considered. In addition, installation and alignment problems for both the rings and the rails have been considered in more depth. Finally, revised stress calculations for the recommended ring designs have been performed. Most of this work has been done in close collaboration with the STAR magnet subgroup.

  15. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  16. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  17. Force-free field modeling of twist and braiding-induced magnetic energy in an active-region corona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thalmann, J. K. [Institute of Physics/IGAM, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Tiwari, S. K.; Wiegelmann, T., E-mail: julia.thalmann@uni-graz.at [Max Plank Institute for Solar System Research, Max-Planck-Str. 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical concept that braided magnetic field lines in the solar corona may dissipate a sufficient amount of energy to account for the brightening observed in the active-region (AR) corona has only recently been substantiated by high-resolution observations. From the analysis of coronal images obtained with the High Resolution Coronal Imager, first observational evidence of the braiding of magnetic field lines was reported by Cirtain et al. (hereafter CG13). We present nonlinear force-free reconstructions of the associated coronal magnetic field based on Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms. We deliver estimates of the free magnetic energy associated with a braided coronal structure. Our model results suggest (?100 times) more free energy at the braiding site than analytically estimated by CG13, strengthening the possibility of the AR corona being heated by field line braiding. We were able to appropriately assess the coronal free energy by using vector field measurements and we attribute the lower energy estimate of CG13 to the underestimated (by a factor of 10) azimuthal field strength. We also quantify the increase in the overall twist of a flare-related flux rope that was noted by CG13. From our models we find that the overall twist of the flux rope increased by about half a turn within 12 minutes. Unlike another method to which we compare our results, we evaluate the winding of the flux rope's constituent field lines around each other purely based on their modeled coronal three-dimensional field line geometry. To our knowledge, this is done for the first time here.

  18. Microsoft Word - NGNP Conceptual Design Baseline Document Indirect...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TBD MWth Circulator TBD MWe Heat Exchanger Tube-type (He to Water) Reactor Cavity Cooling System Type - Operational Conditions - Accident Conditions Water Based Active...

  19. Conceptual Study on Air Ingress Mitigation for VHTRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air-ingress accident followed by a pipe break is considered as a critical event for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) safety. Following helium depressurization, it is anticipated that unless countermeasures are taken, air will enter the core through the break leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure. Thus, without mitigation features, this accident might lead to severe exothermic chemical reactions of graphite and oxygen depending on the accident scenario and the design. Under extreme circumstances, a loss of core structural integrity may occur and lead to a detrimental situation for the VHTR safety. This paper discusses various air-ingress mitigation concepts applicable for the VHTRs. The study begins with identifying important factors (or phenomena) associated with the air-ingress accident using a root-cause analysis. By preventing main causes of the important events identified in the root-cause diagram, the basic air-ingress mitigation ideas were conceptually developed. Among them, two concepts were finally evaluated as effective candidates. One concept is to inject helium into the lower plenum which is a direct in-vessel helium injection. The other concept is to enclose the reactor with a non-pressure boundary consisting of an opening at the bottom, which is an ex-vessel enclosure boundary. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods were used to validate these concepts. As a result, it was shown that both concepts can effectively mitigate the air-ingress process. In the first concept, the injected helium replaces the air in the core and the lower plenum upper part by buoyancy force because of its low density. It prevented air from moving into the reactor core showing great potential for mitigating graphite oxidation in the core. In the second concept, the air-ingress rate is controlled by molecular diffusion through the opening at the enclosure bottom after depressurization. Some modified reactor cavity design is expected to play this role in the VHTRs.

  20. Conceptual design report, TWRS Privatization Phase I, Liquideffluent transfer systems, subproject W-506

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, G.

    1997-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document includes Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for providing liquid effluent lines for routing waste from two Private Contractor (PC) facilities to existing storage, treatment, and disposal facilities in the 200-East Area.

  1. Conceptual Design Phase of Project on Design and Development of Airships for Transportation of Goods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramu, Palaniappan

    Conceptual Design Phase of Project on Design and Development of Airships for Transportation Team 2 Literature Review 3 Requirements Capture 4 Discussions with Airship Manufacturers 5 Identification of Vendors and Resource Agencies 6 Regulations related to airship design, manufacture

  2. Conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor (ASBWR) is outlined. The proposed design, ASBWR, combines the boiler and superheater regions into one fuel assembly. This ensures good neutron ...

  3. DOE Makes Available $8 Million for Pre-Conceptual Design of Next...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    studies and develop a pre-conceptual design to guide research on the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The INL will issue a contract later this week to Westinghouse...

  4. Measuring Flexicurity at the Macro Level - Conceptual and Data Availability Challenges. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Fabio; Bonoli, Giuliano

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This working paper provides a critical discussion of attempts that have been made in recent years to measure the concept of flexicurity. It begins by addressing some conceptual aspects, looking in particular at different ...

  5. Conceptual design report for tank farm restoration and safe operations, project W-314

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, S.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) presents the conceptual level design approach that satisfies the established technical requirements for Project W-314, `Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations.` The CDR also addresses the initial cost and schedule baselines for performing the proposed Tank Farm infrastructure upgrades. The scope of this project includes capital improvements to Hanford`s existing tank farm facilities(primarily focused on Double- Shell Tank Farms) in the areas of instrumentation/control, tank ventilation, waste transfer, and electrical systems.

  6. Facilitating conceptual change through instructional strategies: an experimental study using the Karplus Learning Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Rebecca Janet

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facilitating Conceptual Change Through Instructional Strategies: An Experimental Study Using the Karplus Learning Cycle A Thesis by REBECCA JANET POLLARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... by REBECCA JANET POLLARD Approved as to style and content by: Carol L Stuessy (Chair of Committee) Stephanie L. Kmg t (Member) William H. Peters (Department Head) Donald Barker (Member) August 1990 ABSTRACT Facilitating Conceptual Change Through...

  7. The Communist revolution in Republican China: the conceptual development of the second united front.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hope, Brian Lannes

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE COMMUNIS( RE'JOLUT ION IN REPUBL ICAN CHINA: THE CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE SECOND UNITED FRONT A Thesis by BRIAN LANNES HOPE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree oi MASTER OF ARTS December, 1974 Major Subject: Political Science THE COMMUNIST REVOLUTION IN REPUBLICAN CHINA: THE CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE SECOND UNITED FRONT A Thesis by BRIAN LANNES HOPE Approved as to style and content by: +~9...

  8. Advanced conceptual design report. Phase II. Liquid effluent treatment and disposal Project W-252

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Advanced Conceptual Design Report (ACDR) provides a documented review and analysis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), WHC-SD-W252-CDR-001, June 30, 1993. The ACDR provides further design evaluation of the major design approaches and uncertainties identified in the original CDR. The ACDR will provide a firmer basis for the both the design approach and the associated planning for the performance of the Definitive Design phase of the project.

  9. Initial Scaling Studies and Conceptual Thermal Fluids Experiments for the Prismatic NGNP Point Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to document the initial high temperature gas reactor scaling studies and conceptual experiment design for gas flow and heat transfer. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/ATHENA/RELAP5-3D calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses are being applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant forced convection with slight transverse property variation. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple buoyant jets into a confined density-stratified crossflow -- with obstructions. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second experiment will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets as they mix in flowing through the array of posts in a lower plenum en route to the single exit duct. Initial conceptual designs for such experiments are described.

  10. An explication of the reactance processing model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quick, Brian Lee

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model (RPM). Specifically, the RPM conceptualizes reactance as a motivational state, investigates the degree of reactance arousal elicited by threat-tochoice, vivid, and explicit language (along with an additive effect of the aforementioned message...

  11. LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments:Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, J.; Boutet, S.; Castagna, J-C.; Chapman, H.; Feng, Y.; Foyt, W.; Fritz, D.M.; Gaffney, K.J.; Gr|bel, G.; Hajdu, J.; Hastings, J.B.; Kurita, N.; Larsson, J.; Ludwig, K.; Messerschmidt, M.; Miao, J.; Reis, D.A.; Robert, A.; Stephenson, G.B.; Tschentscher, Th.; van Bakel, N.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /DESY /Lund Inst. Tech. /Boston U. /UCLA /Michigan U. /Argonne

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), along with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility, which will operate in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This FEL, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC linac and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac will be used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons will be transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which will house a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons will be bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength will be tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS will include two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing three X-ray instruments in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of this new LCLS facility. The technical objective of the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) project is to design, build, and install at the LCLS three hard X-ray instruments that will complement the initial instrument included in the LCLS construction. As the science programs advance and new technological challenges appear, instrumentation needs to be developed and ready to conquer these new opportunities. The LCLS instrument concepts have been developed in close consultation with the scientific community through a series of workshops team meetings and focused reviews. In particular, the LUSI project instruments have been identified as meeting the most urgent needs of the scientific community based on the advice of the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in response to an open call for letters of intent (LOI) from the breadth of the scientific community.

  12. Modeling of a Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor: II. Model Parametric Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Modeling of a Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor: II. Model Parametric Sensitivity Eunsung Kan: The sensitivity of a conceptual model of a foam emulsion bioreactor (FEBR) used for the control of toluene vapors mass transfer and kinetic limitations can coexist in the bioreactor system. These results will help

  13. Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Seltzer; Zhen Fan

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal is presently the world's primary fuel for generating electrical power and, being more abundant and less expensive than oil or natural gas, is expected to continue its dominance into the future. Coal, however, is more carbon intensive than natural gas and oil and consequently coal-fired power plants are large point source emitters of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Since CO{sub 2} is a greenhouse gas, which may have an adverse impact on the world's climate/weather patterns, studies have been conducted to determine the feasibility and economic impact of capturing power plant CO{sub 2} emissions for pipeline transport to a sequestration/storage site. The stack gas that exhausts from a modern coal-fired power plant typically contains about 15% CO{sub 2} on a dry volume basis. Although there are numerous processes available for removing CO{sub 2} from gas streams, gas scrubbing with amine solvent is best suited for this application because of the large gas volumes and low CO{sub 2} concentrations involved. Unfortunately the energy required to regenerate the solvent for continued use as a capturing agent is large and imposes a severe energy penalty on the plant. In addition this ''back end'' or post combustion cleanup requires the addition of large vessels, which, in retrofit applications, are difficult to accommodate. As an alternative to post combustion scrubbing, Foster Wheeler (FW) has proposed that the combustion process be accomplished with oxygen rather than air. With all air nitrogen eliminated, a CO{sub 2}-water vapor rich flue gas will be generated. After condensation of the water vapor, a portion of the flue gas will be recirculated back to the boiler to control the combustion temperature and the balance of the CO{sub 2} will be processed for pipeline transport. This proposed oxygen-carbon dioxide (O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}) combustion process eliminates the need for CO{sub 2} removal/separation and reduces the cost of supplying a CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration. FW has developed a conceptual design of an O{sub 2} fired boiler to determine overall plant performance and economics. Five subtasks were conducted: (1) a literature review, (2) a system design and analysis, (3) a low NOx burner design and analysis, (4) a furnace and heat recovery area design analysis, and (5) an economic analysis. The objective of the literature search is to locate any data/information relevant to the Oxygen-Based PC Boiler conceptual design. The objective of the system design and analysis task is to optimize the PC boiler plant by maximizing system efficiency within practical considerations. Simulations of the oxygen-fired plant with CO{sub 2} sequestration were conducted using Aspen Plus and were compared to a reference air-fired 460 MW plant. Flue gas recycle is used in the O{sub 2}-fired PC to control the flame temperature. Parametric runs were made to determine the effect of flame temperature on system efficiency and required waterwall material and thickness. The degree of improvement on system efficiency of various modifications including hot gas recycle, purge gas recycle, flue gas feedwater recuperation, and recycle purge gas expansion were investigated. The selected O{sub 2}-fired design case has a system efficiency of 30.6% compared to the air-fired system efficiency of 36.7%. The design O{sub 2}-fired case requires T91 waterwall material and has a waterwall surface area of only 65% of the air-fired reference case. The objective of the low NOx burner design and analysis task is to optimize the burner design to ensure stable ignition, to provide safe operation, and to minimize pollutant formation. The burners were designed and analyzed using the Fluent CFD computer program. Four burner designs were developed: (1) with no OFG and 65% flue gas recycle, (2) with 20% OFG and 65% flue gas recycle, (3) with no OFG and 56% flue gas recycle and (4) with 20% OFG and 56% flue gas recycle. A 3-D Fluent simulation was made of a single wall-fired burner and horizontal portion of the furnace from the wall to the center. Without primary gas sw

  14. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Jolley; R. Jarek; P. Mariner

    2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  15. The Revised WIPP Passive Institutional Controls Program - A Conceptual Plan - 13145

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Russ [Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Klein, Thomas [URS-Professional Solutions, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [URS-Professional Solutions, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States); Van Luik, Abraham [Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)] [Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 National Parks Highway Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy/Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO) is responsible for managing all activities related to the disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed waste in the geologic repository, 650 m below the land surface, at WIPP, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The main function of the Passive Institutional Controls (PIC's) program is to inform future generations of the long-lived radioactive wastes buried beneath their feet in the desert. For the first 100 years after cessation of disposal operations, the rooms are closed and the shafts leading underground sealed, WIPP is mandated by law to institute Active Institutional Controls (AIC's) with fences, gates, and armed guards on patrol. At this same time a plan must be in place of how to warn/inform the future, after the AIC's are gone, of the consequences of intrusion into the geologic repository disposal area. A plan was put into place during the 1990's with records management and storage, awareness triggers, permanent marker design concepts and testing schedules. This work included the thoughts of expert panels and individuals. The plan held up under peer review and met the requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Today the NEA is coordinating a study called the 'Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) Across Generations' to provide the international nuclear waste repository community with a guide on how a nuclear record archive programs should be approached and developed. CBFO is cooperating and participating in this project and will take what knowledge is gained and apply that to the WIPP program. At the same time CBFO is well aware that the EPA and others are expecting DOE to move forward with planning for the future WIPP PIC's program; so a plan will be in place in time for WIPP's closure slated for the early 2030's. The DOE/CBFO WIPP PIC's program in place today meets the regulatory criteria, but complete feasibility of implementation is questionable, and may not be in conformance with the international guidance being developed. International guidance currently under development may suggest that the inter-generational equity principle strives to warn the future, however, in doing so not to unduly burden present generations. Building markers and monuments that are out of proportion to the risk being presented to the future is not in keeping with generational equity. With this in mind the DOE/CBFO is developing conceptual plans for re-evaluating and revising the current WIPP PIC's program. These conceptual plans will suggest scientific and technical work that must be completed to develop a 'new' PICs program that takes the best ideas of the present plan, blended with new ideas from the RK and M project, and proposed alternative permanent markers designs and materials in consideration. (authors)

  16. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1993--July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Yearly Technical Progress Report covers the period August 3, 1993 through July 31, 1994 for Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program by Solar Turbines Incorporated under DOE Contract No. DE-AC421-93MC30246. As allowed by the Contract (Part 3, Section J, Attachment B) this report is also intended to fulfill the requirements for a fourth quarterly report. The objective of Phase 2 of the ATS Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost-competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized in the year 2000. During the period covered by this report, Solar has completed three of eight program tasks and has submitted topical reports. These three tasks included a Project Plan submission of information required by NEPA, and the selection of a Gas-Fueled Advanced Turbine System (GFATS). In the latest of the three tasks, Solar`s Engineering team identified an intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine as the eventual outcome of DOE`s ATS program coupled with Solar`s internal New Product Introduction (NPI) program. This machine, designated ``ATS50`` will operate at a thermal efficiency (turbine shaft power/fuel LHV) of 50 percent, will emit less than 10 parts per million of NOx and will reduce the cost of electricity by 10 percent. It will also demonstrate levels of reliability, availability, maintainability, and durability (RAMD) equal to or better than those of today`s gas turbine systems. Current activity is concentrated in three of the remaining five tasks a Market Study, GFATS System Definition and Analysis, and the Design and Test of Critical Components.

  17. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.E. Rogers

    1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

  18. Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: An interpretive synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bender, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and quality. Implications for nursing management Managersmanagement Clinical nurse leader-integrated care delivery systems highlight the benefits of nurse-led models of care for transforming healthcare quality.

  19. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)Conceptual Design ReportThe LBNE Water Cherenkov DetectorApril 13 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettell S. H.; Bishai, M.; Brown, R.; Chen, H.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J., Geronimo, G.; Gill, R.; Hackenburg, R.; Hahn, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D.; Junnarkar, S.; Kettell, S.H.; Lanni,F.; Li, Y.; Ling, J.; Littenberg, L.; Makowiecki, D.; Marciano, W.; Morse, W.; Parsa, Z.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Samios, N.; Sharma, R.; Simos, N.; Sondericker, J.; Stewart, J.; Tanaka, H.; Themann, H.; Thorn, C.; Viren, B., White, S.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Yu, B.; Zhang, C.

    2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptual Design Report (CDR) developed for the Water Cherekov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  20. Conceptual approach to radioactive waste management in Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marek, J. [Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The need, initiation and commencing of work on the creation of the Czech national policy and strategy of radioactive waste management is presented in this paper. The main steps of the national concept are defined in agreement with the worldwide approved approach, keeping the goal to reach all international standards in radioactive waste management. The description of the financial expenses of radwaste activities is also briefly discussed.

  1. Performance and Fabrication Status of TREAT LEU Conversion Conceptual Design Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IJ van Rooyen; SR Morrell; AE Wright; E. P Luther; K Jamison; AL Crawford; HT III Hartman

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resumption of transient testing at the TREAT facility was approved in February 2014 to meet U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) objectives. The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program is evaluating conversion of TREAT from its existing highly enriched uranium (HEU) core to a new core containing low enriched uranium (LEU). This paper describes briefly the initial pre-conceptual designs screening decisions with more detailed discussions on current feasibility, qualification and fabrication approaches. Feasible fabrication will be shown for a LEU fuel element assembly that can meet TREAT design, performance, and safety requirements. The statement of feasibility recognizes that further development, analysis, and testing must be completed to refine the conceptual design. Engineering challenges such as cladding oxidation, high temperature material properties, and fuel block fabrication along with neutronics performance, will be highlighted. Preliminary engineering and supply chain evaluation provided confidence that the conceptual designs can be achieved.

  2. 3D-Face Model Tracking Based on a Multi-Resolution Active Search Chaumont M. and Puech W.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and the illustration, trough a complete implementation, that our face tracking solution is near real cylindrical model. Our model's deformations are proceeded directly during the tracking which gives additional

  3. The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myint, P C; Firoozabadi, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO$_2$) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi, and the CO$_2$ activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO$_2$, pure water, and both CO$_2$-rich and aqueous (H$_2$O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spy...

  4. Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument - Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyce, R.F.; Boyce, R.M.; Haller, G.; Hastings, J.B.; Hays, G.; Lee, H.J.; /SLAC; Lee, R.W.; /LLNL, Livermore; Nagler, B.; /Rutherford; Scharfenstein, M.; Marsh, D.; White, W.E.; /SLAC; ,

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) research facility. The FEL has already met its performance goals in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This facility, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC 2-Mile Linear Accelerator (linac) and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac is used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons are transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which houses a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons are bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength is tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS includes two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing an X-ray instrument in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of LCLS by creating extreme conditions and study the behavior of plasma under those controlled conditions. This instrument will address the Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences, mission objective related to study of Plasma and Warm Dense Matter as described in the report titled LCLS, the First Experiments, prepared by the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in September 2000. The technical objective of the LCLS Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) Instrument project is to design, build, and install at the LCLS an X-ray instrument that will complement the initial instrument suite included in the LCLS construction and the LUSI Major Item of Equipment (MIE) Instruments. As the science programs advance and new technological challenges appear, instrumentation must be developed and ready to conquer these new opportunities. The MEC concept has been developed in close consultation with the scientific community through a series of workshops team meetings and focused reviews. In particular, the MEC instrument has been identified as meeting one of the most urgent needs of the scientific community based on the advice of the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in response to an open call for letters of intent (LOI) from the breadth of the scientific community. The primary purpose of the MEC instrument is to create High Energy Density (HED) matter and measure its physical properties. There are three primary elements of the MEC instrument: (A) Optical laser drivers that will create HED states by irradiation in several ways and provide diagnostics capability; (B) The LCLS x-ray free electron laser, which will provide the unique capability to create, probe and selectively pump HED states; and, (C) A suite of diagnostic devices required to observe the evolution of the HED state. These elements when combined in the MEC instrument meet the 'Mission Need' as defined in CD-0. For the purposes of the description we separate the types of experiments to be performed into three categories: (1) High pressure: Here we are interested in the generation of high pressure using the optical lasers to irradiate a surface that ablates and drives a pressure wave into a sample, similar to a piston. The pressures that can be reached exceed 1 Mbar and the properties of interest are for example, the reflectivity, conductivity, opacity as well as the changes driven by the pressure wave on, e.g., condensed matter structure. These phenomena will be studied by means of diffraction measurements, measurements of the pressure wave characteristics, in situ probing by

  5. Modeling the time and energy behavior of the GCR intensity in the periods of low activity around the last three solar minima

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krainev, M B; Kalinin, M S; Svirzhevskaya, A K; Svirzhevsky, N S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the simple model for the description of the GCR modulation in the heliosphere and the sets of parameters discussed in the accompanying paper we model some features of the time and energy behavior of the GCR intensity near the Earth observed during periods of low solar activity around three last solar minima. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying these features in the GCR behavior, we use the suggested earlier decomposition of the calculated intensity into the partial intensities corresponding to the main processes (diffusion, adiabatic losses, convection and drifts).

  6. Conceptual design report, plutonium stabilization and handling,project W-460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, E.V.

    1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, encompasses procurement and installation of a Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) to oxidize and package for long term storage remaining plutonium-bearing special nuclear materials currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), and modification of vault equipment to allow storage of resulting packages of stabilized SNM for up to fifty years. This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) provides conceptual design details for the vault modification, site preparation and site interface with the purchased SPS. Two concepts are described for vault configuration; acceleration of this phase of the project did not allow completion of analysis which would clearly identify a preferred approach.

  7. Functional role of tropomyosin on thin filament activation and cross bridge kinetics in transgenic cardiac muscle: a model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamoorthy, Gayathri

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulation of contractile activity in cardiac muscle is a cooperative interaction between thick and thin filament sarcomeric proteins. Tropomyosin (Tm), an essential thin filament protein, interacts with troponin (Tn) and regulates muscle...

  8. MATHEMATICS AND E-LEARNING: A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    @diima.unisa.it Abstract This paper starts from the study of the epistemological statute of the didactics on how the triangle teacher-pupil-knowledge changes are presented. Then the model of a-didactic-teacher-knowledge" in didactics During last twenty years the research in didactics of mathematics has analysed in various modes

  9. A conceptual national plan for outdoor recreation in Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saaidi-Ashtiani, Hossein

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the construction of Amir Kab1r (Karaj), Shahbanou Farah (Sef1d Rud) Mohammad Reza Shah (Dez) and Faranhnaz (Latian) dams have resulted in the creation of four large artificial lakes. Th1s in turn has led to the activities of water skiing and boating in Iran... is humid and subtrop1cal in character, while the interior deserts have hot dry summers and cold dry winters. TABLE 2 IRANIAN DANS AND CAPACITIES Name of Dam Reservoir ca acit million cu. m. A) 8) Dams already built Mohammad Reza Shah Empress Farah...

  10. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albrecht H. Mayer

    2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) has completed its technology based program. The results developed under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 8, concentrated on technology development and demonstration have been partially implemented in newer turbine designs. A significant improvement in heat rate and power output has been demonstrated. ABB will use the knowledge gained to further improve the efficiency of its Advanced Cycle System, which has been developed and introduced into the marked out side ABB's Advanced Turbine System (ATS) activities. The technology will lead to a power plant design that meets the ATS performance goals of over 60% plant efficiency, decreased electricity costs to consumers and lowest emissions.

  11. Conceptual Steps towards Exploring the Fundamental Nature of our Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Grandpierre

    2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the basic questions of solar research is the nature of the Sun. We show here how the plasma nature of the Sun leads to the self-generation of solar activity. The release of magnetic, rotational, gravitational, nuclear energies and that of the gravity mode oscillations deviate from uniformity and spherical symmetry. Through instabilities they lead to the emergence of sporadic and localized regions like flux tubes, electric filaments, magnetic elements and high temperature regions. A systematic approach exploring the solar collective degrees of freedom, extending to ordering phenomena of the magnetic features related to Higgs fields, is presented. Handling solar activity as transformations of energies from one form to another one presents a picture on the network of the energy levels of the Sun, showing that the Sun is neither a mere "ball of gas" nor a "quiescent steady-state fusion-reactor machine", but a complex self-organizing system. Since complex self-organizing systems are similar to living systems (and, by some opinion, identical with them), we also consider what arguments indicate the living nature of the Sun. Thermodynamic characteristics of the inequilibrium Sun are found important in this respect and numerical estimations of free energy rate densities and specific exergies are derived. KEY WORDS solar physics, degrees of freedom, self-organizing complex systems, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, astrobiology CLASSIFICATION PACS: 01.70.+w, 96.60.Rd

  12. The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. Myint; Y. Hao; A. Firoozabadi

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO$_2$) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi, and the CO$_2$ activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO$_2$, pure water, and both CO$_2$-rich and aqueous (H$_2$O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spycher and Pruess model. In aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) mixtures, we show that Duan and Sun's model yields accurate results for the partial molar enthalpy of CO$_2$. It can be combined with another model for the brine enthalpy to calculate the molar enthalpy of H$_2$O-CO$_2$-NaCl mixtures. We conclude by explaining how the CPA equation of state may be modified to further improve agreement with experiments. This generalized CPA is the basis of our future work on this topic.

  13. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

  14. U. S. conceptual design contribution to the INTOR phase 1 workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Schmidt, J.A.; Shannon, T.E.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design of a first-generation tokamak engineering test reactor is presented. The objectives, testing mission, and role in the fusion program of such a device are discussed. The physics, nuclear, and engineering design are described, and the projected operational schedule is outlined. An estimate of the cost and design/construction schedule is presented.

  15. U. S. conceptual design contribution to the Inter Phase I workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Schmidt, J.A.; Shannon, T.E.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design of a first-generation tokamak engineering test reactor is presented. The objectives, testing mission, and role in the fusion program of such a device are discussed. The physics, nuclear, and engineering design are described, and the projected operational schedule is outlined. An estimate of the cost and design/construction schedule is presented. 6 refs.

  16. Comparing student learning with multiple research-based conceptual surveys: CSEM and BEMA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    research-based assessment tools: the Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment (BEMA) and the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism(CSEM). To deepen our understanding of student learning in our course in introductory physics. In the domain of Electricity and Magnetism (E&M) several such instruments are widely used

  17. by raising CO2 levels around the leaf3 manner conceptually similar to adding a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    by raising CO2 levels around the leaf3 in a manner conceptually similar to adding a CCM photo- synthetic CO2 fixation. CCMs have evolved independently in cyanobacteria, microalgae and some a series of membrane- based pumps for CO2 and bicarbonate (HCO3 - ), and special microcompartments called

  18. A Case-Based Conceptual Design Information Server for Concurrent Engineering1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    1 A Case-Based Conceptual Design Information Server for Concurrent Engineering1 William H. Wood III been focused on the functionality of an artifact to be provided to a customer. Concurrent engineering i n concurrent engineering are indexed to provide access through multiple interfaces, allowing

  19. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  20. Conceptual design report for immobilized high-level waste interim storage facility (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgard, K.C.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Canister Storage Building (CSB Bldg. 212H) will be utilized to interim store Phase 1 HLW products. Project W-464, Immobilized High-Level Waste Interim Storage, will procure an onsite transportation system and retrofit the CSB to accommodate the Phase 1 HLW products. The Conceptual Design Report establishes the Project W-464 technical and cost basis.

  1. Seed dispersal by wind: towards a conceptual framework of seed abscission and its contribution to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    above some threshold wind speed and (ii) depends on the drag force generated by the wind. 2. We revisitSeed dispersal by wind: towards a conceptual framework of seed abscission and its contribution determines many aspects of seed dispersal by wind. While there is yet no complete mechanistic framework

  2. Conceptual design report, TWRS Privatization Phase I, site development and roads, subproject W-505

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, G.

    1997-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document includes Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the site development, construction of new roads and improvements at existing road intersections, habitat mitigation, roadway lighting, and construction power needed for the construction of two Private Contractor (PC) Facilities. Approximately 50 hectare (124 acres) land parcel, east of the Grout Facility, is planned for the PC facilities.

  3. Population Dynamics and Tropical Deforestation: State of the Debate and Conceptual Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Population Dynamics and Tropical Deforestation: State of the Debate and Conceptual Challenges David is the role of population in driving deforestation? This question was put forth as a discussion topic diverse backgrounds weighed in on the discussion, citing key factors in the population-deforestation nexus

  4. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Gulf Interior Region salt domes. [Richton, Vacherie, Cypress domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Gulf Interior Region of the United States (Louisiana and Mississippi). Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Paradox Basin in Utah and Permian Basin in Texas) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in-situ testing of the salt. The in-situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homoqeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptural design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  5. From Growth to Poverty Reduction: A New Conceptual Framework in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    From Growth to Poverty Reduction: A New Conceptual Framework in Development Economics Alice: sindzingre@wanadoo.fr. International Conference "Poverty and Misery in the History of Economic Thought-4Dec2011 Author manuscript, published in ""Poverty and Misery in the History of Economic Thought

  6. A conceptual framework to understand retailers' logistics1 and transport organization illustrated for groceries' goods2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A conceptual framework to understand retailers' logistics1 and transport organization ­ illustrated38 * Corresponding author9 10 11 1 IFSTTAR,12 Production Systems, logistics, Transport Organisation as retailers, through in-house or51 outsourced logistics deliveries to points of sale, have a high share

  7. Chapter 14: ESH&QA 14-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Chapter 14: ESH&QA 14-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report 14 ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, & HEALTH-II Environmental Safety and Health Manager is responsible for ensuring that an ES&H system is established, implemented, and maintained in accordance with requirements. The ES&H Manager will provide oversight

  8. Newman Unit 1 advanced solar repowering advanced conceptual design. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Newman Unit 1 solar repowering design is a water/steam central receiver concept supplying superheated steam. The work reported is to develop a refined baseline conceptual design that has potential for construction and operation by 1986, makes use of existing solar thermal technology, and provides the best economics for this application. Trade studies performed in the design effort are described, both for the conceptual design of the overall system and for the subsystem conceptual design. System-level functional requirements, design, operation, performance, cost, safety, environmental, institutional, and regulatory considerations are described. Subsystems described include the collector, receiver, fossil energy, electrical power generating, and master control subsystems, site and site facilities. The conceptual design, cost, and performance of each subsystem is discussed at length. A detailed economic analysis of the repowered unit is made to realistically assess the economics of the first repowered unit using present cost data for a limited production level for solar hardware. Finally, a development plan is given, including the design, procurement, construction, checkout, startup, performance validation, and commercial operation. (LEW)

  9. Models of signalling networks - what cell biologists can gain from them and give to them

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janes, Kevin A.

    Computational models of cell signalling are perceived by many biologists to be prohibitively complicated. Why do math when you can simply do another experiment? Here, we explain how conceptual models, which have been ...

  10. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Engineering Program, Project 7: Development of Field Exposure Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracken, T.D.; Rankin, R.F.; Wiley, J.A.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to develop a conceptual model for estimating magnetic field (EMF) personal exposure (PE) of individuals or groups and construct a working model using existing data.

  11. Automatic segmentation of head and neck CT images for radiotherapy treatment planning using multiple atlases, statistical appearance models, and geodesic active contours

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritscher, Karl D., E-mail: Karl.Fritscher@umit.at; Sharp, Gregory [Department for Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Department for Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Peroni, Marta [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland)] [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Zaffino, Paolo; Spadea, Maria Francesca [Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro 88100 (Italy)] [Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro 88100 (Italy); Schubert, Rainer [Institute for Biomedical Image Analysis, Private University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall in Tirol 6060 (Austria)] [Institute for Biomedical Image Analysis, Private University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall in Tirol 6060 (Austria)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) is a precondition for intensity modulated radiation therapy. However, manual delineation of OARs is time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability. Because of image artifacts and low image contrast between different structures, however, the number of available approaches for autosegmentation of structures in the head-neck area is still rather low. In this project, a new approach for automated segmentation of head-neck CT images that combine the robustness of multiatlas-based segmentation with the flexibility of geodesic active contours and the prior knowledge provided by statistical appearance models is presented. Methods: The presented approach is using an atlas-based segmentation approach in combination with label fusion in order to initialize a segmentation pipeline that is based on using statistical appearance models and geodesic active contours. An anatomically correct approximation of the segmentation result provided by atlas-based segmentation acts as a starting point for an iterative refinement of this approximation. The final segmentation result is based on using model to image registration and geodesic active contours, which are mutually influencing each other. Results: 18 CT images in combination with manually segmented labels of parotid glands and brainstem were used in a leave-one-out cross validation scheme in order to evaluate the presented approach. For this purpose, 50 different statistical appearance models have been created and used for segmentation. Dice coefficient (DC), mean absolute distance and max. Hausdorff distance between the autosegmentation results and expert segmentations were calculated. An average Dice coefficient of DC = 0.81 (right parotid gland), DC = 0.84 (left parotid gland), and DC = 0.86 (brainstem) could be achieved. Conclusions: The presented framework provides accurate segmentation results for three important structures in the head neck area. Compared to a segmentation approach based on using multiple atlases in combination with label fusion, the proposed hybrid approach provided more accurate results within a clinically acceptable amount of time.

  12. A quasi-static model of drop impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    We develop a conceptually simple theoretical model of non-wetting drop impact on a rigid surface at small Weber numbers. Flat and curved impactor surfaces are considered, and the influence of surface curvature is elucidated. ...

  13. 3D Temperature distribution and numerical modeling of heat transfers in an active fault zone: Eugene Island 330, Offshore Louisiana.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerin, Gilles

    productive reservoirs of the EI330 oil field. #12;126 4.2 Introduction The Eugene Island 330 (EI330) oil sensitive to the movement of strong seismic events such as oil/water and gas/oil contacts on the scale for the dynamics of active oil fields. Here, Plio- Pleistocene sandstone reservoirs are supplied with mature

  14. Solid breeder blanket option for the ITER conceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.; Attaya, H.; Billone, M.C.; Finn, P.; Majumdar, S.; Turner, L.R.; Baker, C.C.; Nelson, B.E.; Raffray, R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid-breeder water-cooled blanket option was developed for ITER based on a multilayer configuration. The blanket uses beryllium for neutron multiplication and lithium oxide for tritium breeding. The material forms are sintered products for both material with 0.8 density factor. The lithium-6 enrichment is 90%. This blanket has the capability to accommodate a factor of two change in the neutron wall loading without violating the different design guidelines. The design philosophy adopted for the blanket is to produce the necessary tritium required for the ITER operation and to operate at power reactor conditions as much as possible. At the same time, the reliability and the safety aspects of the blanket are enhanced by the use of a low-pressure coolant and the separation of the tritium purge lines from the coolant system. The blanket modules are made by hot vacuum forming and diffusion bonding a double wall structure with integral cooling channels. The different aspects of the blanket design including tritium breeding, nuclear heat deposition, activation analyses, thermal-hydraulics, tritium inventory, structural analyses, and water coolant conditions are summarized in this paper. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Conceptual design report: Neutrino physics after the Main Injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, R.; Beverly, L.; Browning, F.; Childress, S.; Freeman, W.; Jacobsen, V.; Koizumi, G.; Krider, J.; Kula, L.; Malensek, A.; Pordes, Stephen H.; /Fermilab /Ohio State U.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Main Injector will provide an unprecedented opportunity for challenging the Standard Model. The increased fluxes available from this essential upgrade make possible neutrino experiments of great power both at the Tevatron and at intermediate energies. With a factor of six increase in flux, experiments at higher energies probe with great sensitivity the electroweak sector, test QCD, and search for rare processes which could point the way to new physics. Such experiments can make simultaneous measurements of the Standard Model {rho} parameter and sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} to 0.25% and 0.6%, respectively. Measurements of the radiative corrections in electroweak physics will reveal physics at the TeV mass scale. {rho} probes the Higgs sector, and deviations from its expected value would be unambiguous signals of new phenomena and possibly our first clear window into physics beyond the Standard Model. Another way to quantify these corrections is through measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} in different processes; comparisons among an ensemble of precise electroweak measurements can then distinguish among alternatives and pin down the sources of new phenomena. Four processes likely to be important in the coming decade are the direct boson mass measurements, Z polarization asymmetries, atomic parity violation, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. Each of these processes has a different dependence on the various sources of new physics: such phenomena as multiple Z's, supersymmetry, or technicolor are just three of many possibilities. Neutral current measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} and {rho} have already provided constraints on m{sub t}; improved measurements will extend their reach and help us interpret the information from the colliders. QCD tests, especially those involving the structure function xF{sub 3}, can check two fundamental predictions of the theory: the dependence of the strong-coupling constant {alpha}{sub S}(Q{sup 2}) on Q{sup 2}, and the value (and Q{sup 2} dependence) of R{sub QCD} = {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub T}. A Main Injector experiment will check the scaling violation of the theory and provide solid measurements of the gluon distributions.

  16. Advances in non-heme diiron modeling chemistry : developing functional protein mimics through ligand design and understanding dioxygen activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Loi Hung

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1 A comprehensive review of diiron modeling in the Lippard group over the past thirty years is presented. This account describes the different strategies employed to prepare biomimetic complexes of non-heme diiron ...

  17. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Achieving the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) goals of 60% efficiency, single-digit NO{sub x}, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NO{sub x} emission. Improved coatings and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. GE`s view of the market, in conjunction with the industrial and utility objectives, requires the development of Advanced Gas Turbine Systems which encompass two potential products: a new aeroderivative combined-cycle system for the industrial market, and a combined-cycle system for the utility sector that is based on an advanced frame machine. The GE Advanced Gas Turbine Development program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology; (2) a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced Ge heavy-duty machine utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. Both of these activities required the identification and resolution of technical issues critical to achieving ATS goals. The emphasis for the industrial ATS was placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS was placed on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling, while utilizing demonstrated and planned improvements in low emission combustion. Significant overlap in the development programs will allow common technologies to be applied to both products. GE Power Systems is solely responsible for offering GE products for the industrial and utility markets.

  18. Biosphere Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.W. Wu; A.J. Smith

    2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), TSPA-LA. The ERMYN provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs) (Section 6.2), the reference biosphere (Section 6.1.1), the human receptor (Section 6.1.2), and approximations (Sections 6.3.1.4 and 6.3.2.4); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model (Section 6.3) and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); (8) Validating the ERMYN by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).

  19. Effect of Secondary Interactions on the Fundamental Properties of Small Molecule Models of the Diiron Hydrogenase Active Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singleton, Michael Lee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    mixed-valent FeIFeII complexes. An X-ray crystal structure of one of these complexes, (?-SCH2 C(CH3)2CH2S-)[Fe(CO)2PMe3]2PF6 shows both a semi-bridging carbonyl and an open site similar to the 2-Fe subsite in the Hox state of the enzyme active site...

  20. Frontiers of Reverse Engineering: a Conceptual Model Gerardo Canfora and Massimiliano Di Penta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Penta, Massimiliano

    is not available--the sys- tem binaries. The IEEE-1219 [32] standard recommends reverse engineering as a key Software reverse engineering is a crucial task to recon- struct high-level views of a software system--with the pur- pose of understanding and/or maintaining it--when the only reliable source of information

  1. A Conceptual Model for Floodplains in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opperman, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology Moyle PB, Baxter RD, Sommer TR, Foin TC, Matern SA.Society. p 83–138. Feyrer F, Sommer T, Harrell W. 2006a.2):115–126. Feyrer F, Sommer T, Harrell W. 2006b. Managing

  2. Risk Management in Product Design: Current State, Conceptual Model and Future Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehmen, Josef

    Risk management is an important element of product design. It helps to minimize the project- and product-related risks such as project budget and schedule overrun, or missing product cost and quality targets. Risk management ...

  3. Towards a Conceptual Model of a Bio-Robotic AUV: Pectoral Fin Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rajat

    of these technological problems whereas the FY03 ONR MURI program (Integrated Artificial Mus- cle, High-Lift Bio of marine mammals systems (MMS), specifically dolphins. The key technological advances required in order to reach this goal are: 1) An engineered sonar system that matches the perfor- mance of MMS. 2) An AUV

  4. A Conceptual Model of Sedimentation in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoellhamer, David H.; Wright, Scott A.; Drexler, Judy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    which sometimes require dredging to maintain navigation. Theimportant than open water. Dredging, filling, and armoringlocation (i.e. restoration, dredging, fill, vegeta- tion)

  5. Conceptual Design and Physical Model Tests of a Levee-in-Dune Hurricane Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Nicholas Allan

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    expensive and is presently not under consideration. Like height, side slope specifications require careful consideration. Shallower slopes add stability while also serving to better dissipate wave energy and mitigate wave runup (flood-side), as well... the area behind it. Some of the sacrificial material will settle just offshore, changing the submerged beach profile, which will act to 13 dissipate wave energy from directly hitting the dune. The larger waves will break farther offshore while passing over...

  6. Borehole Completion and Conceptual Hydrogeologic Model for the IFRC Well Field, 300 Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horner, Jacob A.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Lanigan, David C.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A tight cluster of 35 new wells was installed over a former waste site, the South Process Pond (316-1 waste site), in the Hanford Site 300 Area in summer 2008. This report documents the details of the drilling, sampling, and well construction for the new array and presents a summary of the site hydrogeology based on the results of drilling and preliminary geophysical logging.

  7. Conceptual modular description of the high-level waste management system for system studies model development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, R.W.; Young, J.R.; Konzek, G.J.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents modular descriptions of possible alternative components of the federal high-level radioactive waste management system and the procedures for combining these modules to obtain descriptions for alternative configurations of that system. The 20 separate system component modules presented here can be combined to obtain a description of any of the 17 alternative system configurations (i.e., scenarios) that were evaluated in the MRS Systems Studies program (DOE 1989a). First-approximation descriptions of other yet-undefined system configurations could also be developed for system study purposes from this database. The descriptions include, in a modular format, both functional descriptions of the processes in the waste management system, plus physical descriptions of the equipment and facilities necessary for performance of those functions.

  8. Desertification of high latitude ecosystems: conceptual models, time-series analyses and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorsson, Johann

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , representing state 5 where land degradation and erosion has resulted in loss of much of the mineral soil and nutrients, leaving a frost-heaved, gravely, oligotrophic substrate behind... exhibiting signs of frost damage on three dates............................................... 83 4.10 Percentage of birch seedling in control and 25% and 75% defoliation treatments exhibiting signs of frost damage in June of 2001, 2002 and 2003...

  9. Detecting Indirect Forms of Offensive Language using Commonsense Reasoning and Conceptual Modeling of Social Stereotypes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Rei

    , Yammer) as viable everyday business tools now allows employees to engage with customers in new and much more visible ways. In these types of environments, offensive language and slander are not just a matter of personal offense, but rather are a source...

  10. A restated conceptual model for the Humboldt House-Rye Patch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fault system, controls outflow to the south. Specific targets have been identified using seismic profiling and a revised structural interpretation. A prominent imbricate off the...

  11. Fundamental analysis and conceptual model for corporate strategy in global engineering and construction markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheah, Yuen Jen, 1972-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategic management as an academic field of study has spanned over four decades. As an interdisciplinary subject that enjoys concurrent contributions by allied disciplines such as economics and social science, numerous ...

  12. A Resource Conceptual Model for the Ngatamariki Geothermal Field Based on

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergy InformationOf TheLtdJalisco, Mexico |Recent

  13. A restated conceptual model for the Humboldt House-Rye Patch geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergySulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer

  14. An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Travale Geothermal Field Based On Recent

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan BlanchAmiteIn TheContinental Scientific(Mexico)

  15. Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2007) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use of Solar Resource

  16. A Conceptual Model for Partially PremixedLow-Temperature Diesel Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015Gross Gamma-Ray LogAFuels inBased

  17. Geology And A Working Conceptual Model Of The Obsidian Butte (Unit 6)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005) | Open Energy(Blackwell, EtRaft river valley, Idaho

  18. Donaldson Active Regeneration PM System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Modeling - FEA * Failure Mode Analysis & Life Prediction - Reliability Analysis * FMEA, Fault Tree Analysis, Risk Assessment, etc. Active System Durability & Reliability...

  19. Mathematical Formulation Requirements and Specifications for the Process Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steefel, C.; Moulton, D.; Pau, G.; Lipnikov, K.; Meza, J.; Lichtner, P.; Wolery, T.; Bacon, D.; Spycher, N.; Bell, J.; Moridis, G.; Yabusaki, S.; Sonnenthal, E.; Zyvoloski, G.; Andre, B.; Zheng, L.; Davis, J.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) is intended to be a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM program is aimed at addressing critical EM program needs to better understand and quantify flow and contaminant transport behavior in complex geological systems. It will also address the long-term performance of engineered components including cementitious materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities, in order to reduce uncertainties and risks associated with DOE EM's environmental cleanup and closure activities. Building upon national capabilities developed from decades of Research and Development in subsurface geosciences, computational and computer science, modeling and applied mathematics, and environmental remediation, the ASCEM initiative will develop an integrated, open-source, high-performance computer modeling system for multiphase, multicomponent, multiscale subsurface flow and contaminant transport. This integrated modeling system will incorporate capabilities for predicting releases from various waste forms, identifying exposure pathways and performing dose calculations, and conducting systematic uncertainty quantification. The ASCEM approach will be demonstrated on selected sites, and then applied to support the next generation of performance assessments of nuclear waste disposal and facility decommissioning across the EM complex. The Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC) Simulator is one of three thrust areas in ASCEM. The other two are the Platform and Integrated Toolsets (dubbed the Platform) and Site Applications. The primary objective of the HPC Simulator is to provide a flexible and extensible computational engine to simulate the coupled processes and flow scenarios described by the conceptual models developed using the ASCEM Platform. The graded and iterative approach to assessments naturally generates a suite of conceptual models that span a range of process complexity, potentially coupling hydrological, biogeochemical, geomechanical, and thermal processes. The Platform will use ensembles of these simulations to quantify the associated uncertainty, sensitivity, and risk. The Process Models task within the HPC Simulator focuses on the mathematical descriptions of the relevant physical processes.

  20. Game Theoretic Modelling of a Human Driver’s Steering Interaction with Vehicle Active Steering Collision Avoidance System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Na, Xiaoxiang; Cole, David J.

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    -Integral-Derivative (PID) control, Model Predictive Control (MPC) and Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR). Particular attention here is given to the MPC and LQR which serve as the foundation of the distributed MPC and LQ dynamic optimization approaches to be described...