Sample records for activities site operators

  1. Loch Linnhe `94: Test operations description and on-site analysis, US activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantrom, D.D.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field experiment named Loch Linnhe `94 (LL94) is described. This experiment was conducted in upper Loch Linnhe, Scotland, in September 1994, as an exercise involving UK and US investigators, under the Joint UK/US Radar Ocean Imaging Program. This experiment involved a dual-frequency, dual-polarization hillside real aperture radar operated by the UK, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) current meter array (CMA), in-water hydrodynamic sensors, and meteorological measurements. The primary measurements involved imaging ship-generated and ambient internal waves by the radar and the CMA. This report documents test operations from a US perspective and presents on-site analysis results derived by US investigators. The rationale underlying complementary radar and CMA measurements is described. Descriptions of the test site, platforms, and major US instrument systems are given. A summary of test operations and examples of radar, CMA, water column profile, and meteorological data are provided. A description of the rather extensive analysis of these data performed at the LL94 test site is presented. The products of this analysis are presented and some implications for further analysis and future experiments are discussed. All experimental objectives were either fully or partially met. Powerful on-site analysis capabilities generated many useful products and helped improve subsequent data collection. Significant further data analysis is planned.

  2. Proposal for the award of a contract for stores operation and provision of logistics-related activities on the CERN site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for stores operation and provision of logistics-related activities on the CERN site

  3. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2014-02-25 This Independent Activity...

  4. Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site -...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Security Site - December 2012 December 2012 Nevada National Security Site Operational Awareness Visit HIAR NNSS-2012-12-03 This Independent Activity Report documents an...

  5. Federal environmental standards of potential importance to operations and activities at US Department of Energy sites. Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.M.; Bilyard, G.R.; Davidson, S.A.; Jonas, R.J.; Joseph, J.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is now engaged in a program of environmental restoration nationwide across its 45 sites. It is also bringing its facilities into compliance with environmental regulations, decontaminating and decommissioning unwanted facilities, and constructing new waste management facilities. One of the most difficult questions that DOE must face in successfully remediating its inactive waste sites, decontaminating and decommissioning its inactive facilities, and operating its waste management facilities is: ``What criteria and standards should be met?`` Acceptable standards or procedures for determining standards will assist DOE in its conduct of ongoing waste management and pending cleanup activities by helping to ensure that those activities are conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations and are accepted by the regulatory community and the public. This document reports on the second of three baseline activities that are being conducted as prerequisites to either the development of quantitative standards that could be used by DOE, or consistent procedures for developing such standards. The first and third baseline activities are also briefly discussed in conjunction with the second of the three activities.

  6. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Site Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 126 Site Selection Date Last Modified Modified by: 09 References none #12;SOP 126: Site Selection 3 1.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY This standard operating procedure field conditions, and for ease of operation and maintenance. IMPROVE aerosol samplers are generally

  7. Hanford Site air operating permit application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

  8. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Sampler Maintenance by Site Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 201 Sampler Maintenance by Site Operators Date Last.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY This standard operating procedure (SOP) describes the procedures and schedules. The procedural steps for weekly maintenance and repairs performed by the site operator are included in TI 201A

  9. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Annual Site Maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 226 Annual Site Maintenance Date Last Modified Modified This standard operating procedure (SOP) describes the procedures for annual maintenance of equipment Sampler Operation Manual #12;SOP 226: Annual Site Maintenance 3 1.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY

  10. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, R.S.

    1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

  12. Operating Ground Rules - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeedingthis site » Open Government

  13. Trial operation of material protection, control, and accountability systems at two active nuclear material handling sites within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skripka, G.; Vatulin, V.; Yuferev, V. [VNIIEF, Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses Russian Federal Nuclear Center (RFNC)-VNIIEF activities in the area of nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) procedures enhancement. The goal of such activities is the development of an automated systems for MPC and A at two of the active VNIIEF research sites: a research (reactor) site and a nuclear material production facility. The activities for MPC and A system enhancement at both sites are performed in the framework of a VNIIEF-Los Alamos National Laboratory contract with participation from Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and PANTEX Plant in accordance with Russian programs supported by MinAtom. The American specialists took part in searching for possible improvement of technical solutions, ordering equipment, and delivering and testing the equipment that was provided by the Americans.

  14. Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    responsibility on April 1, 2000. BWXT Y-12, LLC, was awarded the contract to manage the Y-12 National Security (ORR), a government-owned, contractor-operated facility, contains three major operating sites: the Y-12 the K-25 Site). The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret

  15. Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional Laboratory Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional Laboratory January 28, 2015 -...

  16. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program; Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.F.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities during the first quarter centered around integrating the new participants into the program. A meeting of the Site Operators, in conjunction with the first meeting of the Electric Vehicle Users Task Force, was held in October. A second meeting of the Task Force was held in December. During these meetings the new contractual requirements were explained to the participants. The Site Operator Data Base was distributed and explained. The Site Operators will begin using the data base in December 1991 and will supply the operating and maintenance data to the INEL on a monthly basis. The Operators requested that they be able to have access to the data of the other Operators and it was agreed that they would be provided this on floppy disk monthly from the INEL. Presentations were made to the DOE sponsored Automotive Technology Development-Contractors Coordination Meeting in October. An overview of the program was given by EG G. Representatives from Arizona Public Service, Texas A M University, and York Technical College provided details of their programs and the results and future goals. Work was begun on commercializing the Versatile Data Acquisition System (VDAS). A Scope of Work has been written for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to be submitted to the USABC. If implemented, the CRADA will provide funds for the development and commercialization of the VDAS. Participants in the Site Operator Program will test prototypes of the system within their fleets, making the data available to the USABC and other interested organizations. The USABC will provide recommendations on the data to be collected. Major activities by the majority of the Operators were involved with the continued operation and demonstration of existing vehicles. In addition, several of the operators were involved in identifying and locating vehicles to be added to their fleets. A list of the vehicles in each Site Operator fleet is included as Appendix A to this report.

  17. Electric and hybrid vehicle program; Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.F.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities during the second quarter included the second meeting of the Site Operators in Phoenix, AZ in late April. The meeting was held in conjunction with the Solar and Electric 500 Race activities. Delivery of vehicles ordered previously has begun, although two of the operators are experiencing some delays in receiving their vehicles. Public demonstration activities continue, with an apparent increasing level of awareness and interest being displayed by the public. Initial problems with the Site Operator Database have been corrected and revised copies of the program have been supplied to the Program participants. Operating and Maintenance data is being supplied and submitted to INEL on a monthly basis. Interest in the Site Operator Program is being reflected in requests for information from several organizations from across the country, representing a wide diversity of interests. These organizations have been referred to existing Site Operators with the explanation that the program will not be adding new participants, but that most of the existing organizations are willing to work with other groups. The exception to this was the addition of Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) to the program. PEPCO has been awarded a subcontract to operate and maintain the DOE owned G-Van and Escort located in Washington, DC. They will provide data on these vehicles, as well as a Solectria Force which PEPCO has purchased. The Task Force intends to be actively involved in the infrastructure development in a wide range of areas. These include, among others, personnel development, safety, charging, and servicing. Work continues in these areas. York Technical College (YORK) has completed the draft outline for the EV Technician course. This is being circulated to organizations around the country for comments. Kansas State University (KSU) is working with a private sector company to develop a energy dispensing meter for opportunity charging in public areas.

  18. Paducah and Portsmouth Sites Advance Operations at DUF6 Plants...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paducah and Portsmouth Sites Advance Operations at DUF6 Plants Paducah and Portsmouth Sites Advance Operations at DUF6 Plants November 1, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis First cylinder...

  19. Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The statute establishes a procedure for the review, approval, monitoring, and enforcement of compliance in the planning, siting, construction, and operation of energy facilities, including...

  20. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, 625 Indiana Ave., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20004-2901 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  1. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program: Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report details activities of the Department of Energy (DOE) Site Operator Program for the months of April, May, and June 1995. The 12 program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are provided.

  2. Field Operations Program Activities Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. Francfort; D. V. O'Hara; L. A. Slezak

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

  3. Electric and hybrid vehicle program site operator program. Quarterly progress report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Operator Program was initially established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to incorporate the electric vehicle activities dictated by the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976. In the ensuing years, the Program has evolved in response to new legislation and interests. The Program currently includes twelve sites located in diverse geographic, metrologic, and metropolitan areas across the United States. Information is shared reciprocally with a thirteenth site, not under Program contract. The vehicles are operator-owned. The Mission Statement of the Site Operator Program includes three major activities: (1) Advancement of electric vehicle technologies; (2) Development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and (3) Increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs) by the public. The current participants in the Site Operator Program are shown. Table 1 indicates the EVs in each of the Site Operator fleets. Table 2 provides baseline information on several EVs currently in use by the Site Operators, or which have evolved to the point that they may be introduced in the near future. The Program is currently managed by personnel of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The current principal management functions include: Coordination of Site Operator efforts in the areas of public awareness and infrastructure development (program-related meetings, and educational presentations).

  4. Beyond the Active Site: The Impact of the Outer Coordination...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Active Site: The Impact of the Outer Coordination Sphere on Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and Oxidation. Beyond the Active Site: The Impact of the Outer Coordination...

  5. Comprehensive Integrated Planning Process for the Oak Ridge Operations Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC; Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation; Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan is intended to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel in implementing a comprehensive integrated planning process consistent with DOE Order 430.1A, "Life Cycle Asset Management," and Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Order 430 on sites under the jurisdiction of DOE-ORO. Those sites are the Oak Ridge Reservation, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, in Paducah, Kentucky; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, in Piketon, Ohio. DOE contractors at these sites are charged with developing and producing this plan, which is referred to as simply the Comprehensive Integrated Plan.

  6. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program; Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.F.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities during the first quarter centered around integrating the new participants into the program. A meeting of the Site Operators, in conjunction with the first meeting of the Electric Vehicle Users Task Force, was held in October. A second meeting of the Task Force was held in December. During these meetings the new contractual requirements were explained to the participants. The Site Operator Data Base was distributed and explained. The Site Operators will begin using the data base in December 1991 and will supply the operating and maintenance data to the INEL on a monthly basis. The Operators requested that they be able to have access to the data of the other Operators and it was agreed that they would be provided this on floppy disk monthly from the INEL. Presentations were made to the DOE sponsored Automotive Technology Development-Contractors Coordination Meeting in October. An overview of the program was given by EG&G. Representatives from Arizona Public Service, Texas A&M University, and York Technical College provided details of their programs and the results and future goals. Work was begun on commercializing the Versatile Data Acquisition System (VDAS). A Scope of Work has been written for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to be submitted to the USABC. If implemented, the CRADA will provide funds for the development and commercialization of the VDAS. Participants in the Site Operator Program will test prototypes of the system within their fleets, making the data available to the USABC and other interested organizations. The USABC will provide recommendations on the data to be collected. Major activities by the majority of the Operators were involved with the continued operation and demonstration of existing vehicles. In addition, several of the operators were involved in identifying and locating vehicles to be added to their fleets. A list of the vehicles in each Site Operator fleet is included as Appendix A to this report.

  7. Site-Wide Optimization Using an Operations Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, D.

    "Most industrial sites consist of more that one individual production unit. Whenever this is the case, there is a natural tendency to treat the operation and performance of each unit as one entity within its own right. However, it is generally...

  8. Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site). The ORR was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret of Energy. In 1999, a new contractor, UT-Battelle, LLC, was awarded the contract to manage the Oak Ridge

  9. Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) for Hanford Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Nichols, William E.; Kincaid, Charles T.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This data package was originally prepared to support a 2004 composite analysis (CA) of low-level waste disposal at the Hanford Site. The Technical Scope and Approach for the 2004 Composite Analysis of Low Level Waste Disposal at the Hanford Site (Kincaid et. al. 2004) identified the requirements for that analysis and served as the basis for initial preparation of this data package. Completion of the 2004 CA was later deferred, with the 2004 Annual Status Report for the Composite Analysis of Low-Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site (DOE 2005) indicating that a comprehensive update to the CA was in preparation and would be submitted in 2006. However, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recently decided to further defer the CA update and will use the cumulative assessment currently under preparation for the environmental impact statement (EIS) being prepared for tank closure and other site decisions as the updated CA. Submittal of the draft EIS is currently planned for FY 2008. This data package describes the facility-specific parameters (e.g. location, operational dates, etc.) used to numerically simulate contaminant flow and transport in large-scale Hanford assessments. Kincaid et al. (2004) indicated that the System Assessment Capability (SAC) (Kincaid et al. 2000; Bryce et al. 2002; Eslinger 2002a, 2002b) would be used to analyze over a thousand different waste sites. A master spreadsheet termed the Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) was assembled to facilitate the generation of keyword input files containing general information on each waste site/facility, its operational/disposal history, and its environmental settings (past, current, and future). This report briefly describes each of the key data fields, including the source(s) of data, and provides the resulting inputs to be used for large-scale Hanford assessments.

  10. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment.

  11. active site zn: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 30 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  12. active site confers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fee Lodging Giles, C. Lee 29 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  13. active site mutant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 39 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  14. active site mutations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In contrast van Aalten, Daan 57 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  15. active site mutants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 39 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  16. active site tryptic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 18 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  17. active site serine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 33 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  18. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The NTS is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. NNSA/NSO is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and NSTec is the Management & Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The U10C Disposal Site is located in the northwest corner of Area 9 at the NTS (Figure 1) and is located in a subsidence crater created by two underground nuclear events, one in October 1962 and another in April 1964. The disposal site opened in 1971 for the disposal of rubbish, refuse, pathological waste, asbestos-containing material, and industrial solid waste. A Notice of Intent form to operate the disposal site as a Class II site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 26, 1994, and was acknowledged in a letter to the DOE on February 8, 1994. It operated as a state of Nevada Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS) until it closed on October 5, 1995, for retrofit as a Class III SWDS. The retrofit consisted of the installation of a minimum four-foot compacted soil layer to segregate the different waste types and function as a liner to inhibit leachate and water flow into the lower waste zone. Five neutron monitoring tubes were installed in this layer to monitor possible leachate production and water activity. Upon acceptance of the installed barrier and approval of an Operating Plan by NDEP/BFF, the site reopened in January 1996 as a Class III SWDS for the disposal of industrial solid waste and other inert waste.

  19. Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Ridge area. The majority lies within the corporate limits of the city of Oak Ridge; 608 acres, west, L. W. McMahon, and L. G. Shipe Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy currently oversees activities. The reservation's role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy

  20. Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site- July 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Nevada National Security Site Device Assembly Facility Justification for Continued Operations for Inoperable HEPA-Filtered Ventilation System [HIAR-NNSS-2011-07-08

  1. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Briasco, S. [Los Angeles City Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goals of the site operator program include field evaluation of electric vehicles (EVs) in real-world applications and environments, advancement of electric vehicle technologies, development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant EV use, and increasing the awareness and acceptance of EVs by the public. The site operator program currently consists of 11 participants under contract and two other organizations with data-sharing agreements with the program. The participants (electric utilities, academic institutions, Federal agencies) are geographically dispersed within US and their vehicles see a broad spectrum of service conditions. Current EV inventories of the site operators exceeds 250 vehicles. Several national organizations have joined DOE to further the introduction and awareness of EVs, including: (1) EVAmerica (a utility program) and DOE conduct performance and evaluation tests to support market development for EVs; (2) DOE, DOT, the Electric Transportation Coalition, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas are conducting a series of workshops to encourage urban groups in Clean Cities (a DOE program) to initiate the policies and infrastructure development necessary to support large-scale demonstrations, and ultimately the mass market use, of EVs. Current focus of the program is collection and dissemination of EV operations and performance data to aid in the evaluation of real- world EV use. This report contains several sections with vehicle evaluation as a focus: EV testing results, energy economics of EVs, and site operators activities.

  2. Oak Ridge Operations Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc. No.GS05:or _^r a2012IC77GLg

  3. Site operator program final report for fiscal years 1992 through 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Birasco, S. [Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Operator Program was an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program`s goals included the field evaluation of electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments; the support of electric vehicle technology advancement; the development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from 1992 to 1996. The Site Operator Program ended in September 1996, when it was superseded by the Field Operations Program. Electric vehicle testing included baseline performance testing, which was performed in conjunction with EV America. The baseline performance parameters included acceleration, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collected fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program`s thirteen partners, comprising electric utilities, universities, and federal agencies. The Program`s partners had over 250 electric vehicles, from vehicle converters and original equipment manufacturers, in their operating fleets. Test results are available via the World Wide Web site at http://ev.inel.gov/sop.

  4. Operating Water Cherenkov Detectors in high altitude sites for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) are efficient detectors for detecting GRBs in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV energy range using the single particle technique, given their sensitivity to low energy secondary photons produced by high energy photons when cascading in the atmosphere. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) operates arrays of WCD in high altitude sites (above 4500 m a.s.l.) in Bolivia, Mexico and Venezuela, with planned extension to Peru. Details on the operation and stability of these WCD in remote sites with high background rates of particles will be detailed, and compared to simulations. Specific issues due to operation at high altitude, atmospheric effects and solar activity, as well as possible hardware enhancements will also be presented.

  5. active site mismatches: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ayman U. (Ayman Umar) 2001-01-01 38 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  6. active site conformational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D 2005 Elsevier B Hong, Mei 56 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  7. active site metal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mainly due to: a) their moderate 49 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  8. active site conformation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D 2005 Elsevier B Hong, Mei 56 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  9. active site entrance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edwards, Fred Huntley 2012-06-07 51 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  10. active site probe: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 61 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  11. active site constrained: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 41 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

  12. active site insights: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disassembly of C-site. Our current results Lee, Keun Woo 2 Theoretic Insight into CO2 Reduction at Active Sites of Molybdenum and Tungsten Enzymes: a pi Interaction between CO2...

  13. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995 (first quarter of fiscal year 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Briasco, S. [Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Site Operator Program quarterly report for USDOE electric and hybrid vehicle research. Its mission now includes the three major activity categories of advancement of electric vehicle (EV) technologies, development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use and increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 11 Site Operator Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified. The EV inventories of the site operators totals about 250 vehicles. The individual fleets are summarized.

  14. Active Sites Additional Information | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartment ofATVM LoanActive Financial Assistance LettersActive

  15. Control of Substrate Access to the Active Site and Catalytic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control of Substrate Access to the Active Site and Catalytic Mechanism of Methane and Toluene Monooxygenases Friday, June 22, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL Main Conference Room 137-322 Prof....

  16. US Department of Energy DOE Nevada Operations Office, Nevada Test Site: Underground safety and health standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Underground Safety and Health Standards Working Group was formed at the direction of John D. Stewart, Director, Nevada Test Site Office in April, 1990. The objective of the Working Group was to compile a safety and health standard from the California Tunnel Safety Orders and OSHA for the underground operations at the NTS, (excluding Yucca Mountain). These standards are called the NTS U/G Safety and Health Standards. The Working Group submits these standards as a RECOMMENDATION to the Director, NTSO. Although the Working Group considers these standards to be the most integrated and comprehensive standards that could be developed for NTS Underground Operations, the intent is not to supersede or replace any relevant DOE orders. Rather the intent is to collate the multiple safety and health references contained in DOE Order 5480.4 that have applicability to NTS Underground Operations into a single safety and heath standard to be used in the underground operations at the NTS. Each portion of the standard was included only after careful consideration by the Working Group and is judged to be both effective and appropriate. The specific methods and rationale used by the Working Group are outlined as follows: The letter from DOE/HQ, dated September 28, 1990 cited OSHA and the CTSO as the safety and health codes applicable to underground operations at the NTS. These mandated codes were each originally developed to be comprehensive, i.e., all underground operations of a particular type (e.g., tunnels in the case of the CTSO) were intended to be adequately regulated by the appropriate code. However, this is not true; the Working Group found extensive and confusing overlap in the codes in numerous areas. Other subjects and activities were addressed by the various codes in cursory fashion or not at all.

  17. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report for July through September 1994 (Fourth quarter of fiscal year 1994)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Operator Program was initially established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to incorporate the electric vehicle activities dictated by the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976. In the ensuing years, the Program has evolved in response to new legislation and interests. The Program currently includes twelve sites located in diverse geographic, metrologic, and metropolitan areas across the US. Information is shared reciprocally with a thirteenth site, not under Program contract. The vehicles are operator-owned, except for two Griffon vans. The Mission Statement of the Site Operator Program includes three major activities: advancement of electric vehicle technologies; development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs) by the public. The current participants in the Site Operator Program are shown. The ultimate thrust of program activities varies among sites, reflecting not only the Operator`s business interests but also geographic and climate-related operating conditions. This fourth quarter report (FY-94) includes a summary of activities from the previous three quarters. The report section sequence has been revised to provide a more easily seen program overview, and specific operator activities are now found in Appendix A.

  18. Preliminary investigation Area 12 fleet operations steam cleaning discharge area Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the characterization activities and findings of a former steam cleaning discharge area at the Nevada Test Site. The former steam cleaning site is located in Area 12 east of Fleet Operations Building 12-16. The characterization project was completed as a required condition of the ``Temporary Water Pollution Control Permit for the Discharge From Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Facility`` issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The project objective was to collect shallow soil samples in eight locations in the former surface discharge area. Based upon field observations, twelve locations were sampled on September 6, 1995 to better define the area of potential impact. Samples were collected from the surface to a depth of approximately 0.3 meters (one foot) below land surface. Discoloration of the surface soil was observed in the area of the discharge pipe and in localized areas in the natural drainage channel. The discoloration appeared to be consistent with the topographically low areas of the site. Hydrocarbon odors were noted in the areas of discoloration only. Samples collected were analyzed for bulk asbestos, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (Semi-VOCs), and gamma scan.

  19. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2003 DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Lee, Majelle

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2003 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing Rocketdyne’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2003 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  20. PIA - Savannah River Site Management and Operating Contractor...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Management and Operating Contractor (HRMS) More Documents & Publications PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management System (HRMS) Integrated Safety...

  1. EM Active Sites (large) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartmentStatement |DepartmentEnergyEnergyActive

  2. Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model Antonio Araujo, Simone sensitivity analysis of optimal operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test.[7] applied a systematic procedure for control structure design of an activated sludge process

  3. Nuclear Operations Application to Environmental Restoration at Corrective Action Unit 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, at the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Cabble (NSO), Mark Krauss and Patrick Matthews (N-I)

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has responsibility for environmental restoration at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly the Nevada Test Site). This includes remediation at locations where past testing activities have resulted in the release of plutonium to the environment. One of the current remediation efforts involves a site where an underground subcritical nuclear safety test was conducted in 1964. The underground test was vented through a steel pipe to the surface in a closed system where gas samples were obtained. The piping downstream of the gas-sampling apparatus was routed belowground to a location where it was allowed to vent into an existing radioactively contaminated borehole. The length of the pipe above the ground surface is approximately 200 meters. This pipe remained in place until remediation efforts began in 2007, at which time internal plutonium contamination was discovered. Following this discovery, an assessment was conducted to determine the quantity of plutonium present in the pipe. This site has been identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites. The quantity of plutonium identified at CAU 547 exceeded the Hazard Category 3 threshold but was below the Hazard Category 2 threshold specified in DOE Standard DOE-STD-1027-92. This CAU, therefore, was initially categorized as a Hazard Category 3 environmental restoration site. A contaminated facility or site that is initially categorized as Hazard Category 3, however, may be downgraded to below Hazard Category 3 if it can be demonstrated through further analysis that the form of the material and the energy available for release support reducing the hazard category. This is an important consideration when performing hazard categorization of environmental restoration sites because energy sources available for release of material are generally fewer at an environmental restoration site than at an operating facility and environmental restoration activities may result in the complete removal of source material.

  4. Environmental restoration and waste management site-specific plan for Richland Operations Office. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was prepared to implement and support the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) national plan. The national plan, entitled Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (DOE 1990b) (hereinafter referred to as the DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan) is the cornerstone of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term strategy in environmental restoration and waste management. The DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan addresses overall philosophy and environmental and waste-related activities under the responsibilities of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The plan also reaffirms DOE-HQ goals to bring its nuclear sites into environmental compliance in cooperation with its regulators and the public, and to clean up and restore the environment by 2019 (the commitment for the Hanford Site is for one year sooner, or 2018). This document is part of the site-specific plan for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is the first revision of the original plan, which was dated December 1989 (DOE-RL 1989a). This document is a companion document to the Overview of the Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989d) and The Hanford Site Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan Activity Data Sheets (DOE-RL 1991). Although there are three documents that make up the complete DOE-RL plan, this detailed information volume was prepared so it could be used as a standalone document. 71 refs., 40 figs., 28 tabs.

  5. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  6. The Hanford Site Richland Operations Office Office of River Protection Office of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Hanford Site Richland Operations Office Office of River Protection Office of Science Plateau Remediation Contractor Tank Operations Contractor Analytical Services Contractor Waste Treatment Plant (WTP;HANFORDSMALLBUSINESSCOUNCIL Richland Operations Office Sally A. Sieracki Small Business Program Manager E-mail: sally

  7. Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States)] [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

  8. Molecular Active Sites in Heterogeneous Ir-La/C Catalyzed Carbonylatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Active Sites in Heterogeneous Ir-LaC Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methanol to Acetates. Molecular Active Sites in Heterogeneous Ir-LaC Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methanol...

  9. Sandia Energy - Test Site Operations & Maintenance Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocumentsInstitute ofSitingStaffSunshineMolten SaltTest

  10. Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3 Through AprilSite

  11. EIS-0380: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the continued operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NNSA identified and assessed three alternatives for continued operation of LANL: (1) No Action, (2) Reduced Operations, and (3) Expanded Operations.

  12. Environmental analysis of the operation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10 site)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.W.; Blumberg, R.; Cotter, S.J.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental analysis of the operation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facilities in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley was conducted to present to the public information concerning the extent to which recognizable effects, or potential effects, on the environment may occur. The analysis addresses current operations of the ORNL X-10 site and completed operations that may continue to have residual effects. Solid wastes from ORNL operations at the Y-12 site which are transported to the X-10 site for burial (e.g., Biology Division animal wastes) are included as part of X-10 site operation. Socioeconomic effects are associated primarily with the communities where employees live and with the Knoxville Bureau of Economic Analysis economic area as a whole. Therefore, ORNL employees at both Y-12 and X-10 sites are included in the ORNL socioeconomic impact analysis. An extensive base of environmental data was accumulated for this report. Over 80 reports related to ORNL facilities and/or operations are cited as well as many open-literature citations. Environmental effects of the operation of ORNL result from operational discharges from the onsite facilities; construction and/or modification of facilities, transportation to and from the site of persons, goods and services; socioeconomic impacts to the local, regional, and general population; and accidental discharges if they should occur. Operational discharges to the environnment are constrained by federal, state, and local regulations and by criteria established by the US Department of Energy to minimize adverse impacts. It is the purpose of this document to evaluate the operation of the ORNL insofar as impacts beyond the site boundary may occur or have the potential for occurrence.

  13. active site architecture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    active site architecture First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Architectural Design...

  14. Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) for the 2004 Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Nichols, William E.; Kincaid, Charles T.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly describes each of the key data fields, including the source(s) of data, and provides the resulting inputs to be used for the 2004 Composite Analysis. A master spreadsheet termed the Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) was assembled to facilitate the generation of keyword input files containing general information on each waste site, its operational/disposal history, and its environmental settings (past, current, and future).

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Anaconda Smelter site, (Operable Unit 11 - Flue Dust), Deer Lodge County, Anaconda, MT. (Second remedial action), September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The 6,000-acre Anaconda Smelter site is a former copper and ore processing facility in Deer Lodge County, Montana. Land use in the area is predominantly residential. The site is bounded on the north and east, respectively, by the Warm Springs Creek and Mill Creek, both of which are potential sources of drinking water. From 1884 until 1980 when activities ceased, the site was used for ore processing and smelting operations. In 1988, EPA conducted an investigation to determine the nature and extent of the flue dust contamination. A 1988 ROD addressed the Mill Creek Operable Unit (OU15) and documented the relocation of residents from the community surrounding the smelter site as the selected remedial action. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the Flue Dust Operable Unit (OU11). The primary contaminants of concern affecting this site from the flue dust materials are metals including arsenic, cadmium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  16. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  17. Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities at the Seperations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  18. Non-Operational Property Evaluation for the Hanford Site River Corridor - 12409

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, John [CH2M HILL, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Aly, Alaa [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and INTERA Incorporated, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site River Corridor consists of the former reactor areas of the 100 Areas and the former industrial (fuel processing) area in the 300 Area. Most of the waste sites are located close to the decommissioned reactors or former industrial facilities along the Columbia River. Most of the surface area of the River Corridor consists of land with little or no subsurface infrastructure or indication of past or present releases of hazardous constituents, and is referred to as non-operational property or non-operational area. Multiple lines of evidence have been developed to assess identified fate and transport mechanisms and to evaluate the potential magnitude and significance of waste site-related contaminants in the non-operational area. Predictive modeling was used for determining the likelihood of locating waste sites and evaluating the distribution of radionuclides in soil based on available soil concentration data and aerial radiological surveys. The results of this evaluation indicated: 1) With the exception of stack emissions, transport pathways associated with waste site contaminants are unlikely to result in dispersion of contaminants in soil away from operational areas, 2) Stack emissions that may have been associated with Hanford Site operations generally emitted short-lived and/or gaseous radionuclides, and (3) the likelihood of detecting elevated radionuclide concentrations or other waste sites in non-operational area soils is very small. The overall conclusions from the NPE evaluation of the River Corridor are: - With the exception of stack emissions to the air, transport pathways associated with waste site contaminants are unlikely to result in dispersion of contaminants in soil away from operational areas. While pathways such as windblown dust, overland transport and biointrusion have the potential for dispersing waste site contaminants, the resulting transport is unlikely to result in substantial contamination in non-operational areas. - Stack emissions that may have been associated with Hanford Site operations generally emitted short-lived and/or gaseous radionuclides; these radionuclides either would have decayed and would be undetectable in soil, or likely would not have deposited onto Hanford Site soils. A small fraction of the total historical emissions consisted of long-lived particulate radionuclides, which could have deposited onto the soil. Soil monitoring studies conducted as part of surveillance and monitoring programs do not indicate a build-up of radionuclide concentrations in soil, which might indicate potential deposition impacts from stack emissions. Aerial radiological surveys of the Hanford Site, while effective in detecting gamma-emitting nuclides, also do not indicate deposition patterns in soil from stack emissions. - The surveillance and monitoring programs also have verified that the limited occurrence of biointrusion observed in the River Corridor has not resulted in a spread of contamination into the non-operational areas. - Monitoring of radionuclides in ambient air conducted as part of the surveillance and monitoring programs generally show a low and declining trend of detected concentrations in air. Monitoring of radionuclides in soil and vegetation correspondingly show declining trends in concentrations, particularly for nuclides with short half lives (Cs-137, Co-60 and Sr-90). - Statistical analysis of the geographical distribution of waste sites based on man -made features and topography describes the likely locations of waste sites in the River Corridor. The results from this analysis reinforce the findings from the Orphan Site Evaluation program, which has systematically identified any remaining waste sites within the River Corridor. - Statistical analysis of the distribution of radionuclide concentrations observable from aerial surveys has confirmed that the likelihood of detecting elevated radionuclide concentrations in non-operational area soils is very small; the occurrences and locations where potentially elevated concentrations may be found are discussed below. In

  19. Characterization ReportOperational Closure Covers for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada Geotechnical Sciences

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The Area 3 RWMS is located in south-central Yucca Flat and the Area 5 RWMS is located about 15 miles south, in north-central Frenchman Flat. Though located in two separate topographically closed basins, they are similar in climate and hydrogeologic setting. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste, while the Area 3 RWMS uses subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons for the disposal of packaged and unpackaged bulk waste. Over the next several decades, most waste disposal units at both the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are anticipated to be closed. Closure of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs will proceed through three phases: operational closure, final closure, and institutional control. Many waste disposal units at the Area 5RWMS are operationally closed and final closure has been placed on one unit at the Area 3 RWMS (U-3ax/bl). Because of the similarities between the two sites (e.g., type of wastes, environmental factors, operational closure cover designs, etc.), many characterization studies and data collected at the Area 3 RWMS are relevant and applicable to the Area 5 RWMS. For this reason, data and closure strategies from the Area 3 RWMS are referred to as applicable. This document is an interim Characterization Report – Operational Closure Covers, for the Area 5 RWMS. The report briefly describes the Area 5 RWMS and the physical environment where it is located, identifies the regulatory requirements, reviews the approach and schedule for closing, summarizes the monitoring programs, summarizes characterization studies and results, and then presents conclusions and recommendations.

  20. Report on audit of the Richland Operations Office Site Characterization Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Secretary of Energy changed the mission of the Richland Operations Office (ROO) from supporting weapons production to environmental restoration and waste management. Through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), ROO was required to survey Hanford for contaminants, analyze samples, and determine the most cost-effective method to clean up the waste identified. The objective of this audit was to determine if the Department of Energy (DOE) and ROO had evaluated alternatives to accomplish certain site characterization activities in a cost-effective manner. This audit showed that neither the DOE nor ROO evaluated alternatives to ensure that two site characterization activities were accomplished in a cost-effective manner. First, DOE accelerated the core sampling program for high-level radioactive waste tanks from 6 to 3 years. DOE made this decision in response to a Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Safety Board) recommendation without first determining if the method chosen (core sampling) was the most efficient and economical method to satisfy the Safety Board`s concerns. This 3-year acceleration would cost over $71 million with little increase in benefits. Second, ROO agreed to a Tri-Party Agreement Amendment to require low-level waste samples be analyzed within 25 miles of Hanford. ROO estimated that the 25-mile restriction will require an additional $46 million over an 8-year period. It is recommended that DOE (1) notify the appropriate parties that characterization of the high-level radioactive waste tanks will be completed in the most cost-effective method to achieve program objectives, and (2) negotiate to remove the requirement to perform 80% of low-level waste sample analyses within 25 miles of Hanford. It is also recommended that management perform economic analyses of alternatives before making decisions as to how program objectives will be accomplished.

  1. Site environmental report for calendar year 2002. DOE operations at the Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2002 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing' s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL)). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development , fabrication , and disassembly of nuclear reactors , reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials . Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and, subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites . Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2002 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL . All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored , including air , soil, surface water, groundwater , direct radiation , transfer of property ( land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive w astes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal . No liquid radioactive wastes are released into the environment, and no structural debris from buildings w as transferred to municipal landfills or recycled in 2002.

  2. Progress report on decommissioning activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), is located about 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. Between 1953 and 1989, the facility, then called the Feed Material Production Center or FMPC, produced uranium metal products used in the eventual production of weapons grade material for use by other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In 1989, FMPC`s production was suspended by the federal government in order to focus resources on environmental restoration versus defense production. In 1992, Fluor Daniel Fernald assumed responsibility for managing all cleanup activities at the FEMP under contract to the DOE. In 1990, as part of the remediation effort, the site was divided into five operable units based on physical proximity of contaminated areas, similar amounts of types of contamination, or the potential for a similar technology to be used in cleanup activities. This report continues the outline of the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities at the FEMP site Operable Unit 3 (OU3) and provides an update on the status of the decommissioning activities. OU3, the Facilities Closure and Demolition Project, involves the remediation of more than 200 uranium processing facilities. The mission of the project is to remove nuclear materials stored in these buildings, then perform the clean out of the buildings and equipment, and decontaminate and dismantle the facilities.

  3. EIS-0018: Continued Operation of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Site, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this statement to assesses the potential cumulative environmental impacts associated with current, known future, and continuing activities at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory site.

  4. Immobilized low-activity waste site borehole 299-E17-21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Reynolds, K.D.; Horton, D.G.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is the group at the Hanford Site responsible for the safe underground storage of liquid waste from previous Hanford Site operations, the storage and disposal of immobilized tank waste, and closure of underground tanks. The current plan is to dispose of immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW) in new facilities in the southcentral part of 200-East Area and in four existing vaults along the east side of 200-East Area. Boreholes 299-E17-21, B8501, and B8502 were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site in support of the Performance Assessment activities for the disposal options. This report summarizes the initial geologic findings, field tests conducted on those boreholes, and ongoing studies. One deep (480 feet) borehole and two shallow (50 feet) boreholes were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site. The primary factor dictating the location of the boreholes was their characterization function with respect to developing the geohydrologic model for the site and satisfying associated Data Quality Objectives. The deep borehole was drilled to characterize subsurface conditions beneath the ILAW site, and two shallow boreholes were drilled to support an ongoing environmental tracer study. The tracer study will supply information to the Performance Assessment. All the boreholes provide data on the vadose zone and saturated zone in a previously uncharacterized area.

  5. Active constraint regions for optimal operation of distillation columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Active constraint regions for optimal operation of distillation columns Magnus G. Jacobsen the control structure of distillation columns, with optimal operation in mind, it is important to know how for distillation columns change with variations in energy cost and feed flow rate. The production of the most

  6. Superfund Docket Operations Manual for rule-making activities. Directive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive discusses the purpose of the SDIC Operations Manual for Rulemaking Activities which is to serve as a procedural guide for SDIC staff when a rulemaking docket is prepared. These procedures are evaluated on a regular basis, and are revised as needed to keep the SDIC operationally efficient and responsive to its users.

  7. Savannah River Site’s H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions- Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation’s only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The Savannah River Site (SRS) is breathing new life into the H Canyon, the only active nuclear chemical separations facility still operating in the U.S.

  8. Overview of Nevada Test Site Radioactive and Mixed Waste Disposal Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.T. Carilli; S.K. Krenzien; R.G. Geisinger; S.J. Gordon; B. Quinn

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is responsible for carrying out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and low-level radioactive mixed waste (MW) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Core elements of this mission are ensuring safe and cost-effective disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the NTS related to LLW and MW. Covered topics include: the first year of direct funding for NTS waste disposal operations; zero tolerance policy for non-compliant packages; the suspension of mixed waste disposal; waste acceptance changes; DOE Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) auditing; the 92-Acre Area closure plan; new eligibility requirements for generators; and operational successes with unusual waste streams.

  9. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by NDEP/BFF. The generator of permissible waste is responsible for preparing documentation related to waste acceptance criteria, waste characterization, and load verification. Waste and Water (WW) personnel are responsible for operating the disposal site and reviewing documentation to determine if the waste is acceptable.

  10. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  11. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan for the Disposal of Low-Level Waste with Regulated Asbestos Waste.'' A requirement of the authorization was that on or before October 9, 1999, a permit was required to be issued. Because of NDEP and NNSA/NSO review cycles, the final permit was issued on April 5, 2000, for the operation of the Area 5 Low-Level Waste Disposal Site, utilizing Pit 7 (P07) as the designated disposal cell. The original permit applied only to Pit 7, with a total design capacity of 5,831 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (157,437 cubic feet [ft{sup 3}]). NNSA/NSO is expanding the SWDS to include the adjacent Upper Cell of Pit 6 (P06), with an additional capacity of 28,037 yd{sup 3} (756,999 ft{sup 3}) (Figure 3). The proposed total capacity of ALLW in Pit 7 and P06 will be approximately 33,870 yd{sup 3} (0.9 million ft{sup 3}). The site will be used for the disposal of regulated ALLW, small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The only waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM). The term asbestiform is used throughout this document to describe this waste. Other TSCA waste (i.e., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]) will not be accepted for disposal at the SWDS. The disposal site will be used as a depository of permissible waste generated both on site and off site. All generators designated by NNSA/NSO will be eligible to dispose regulated ALLW at the Asbestiform Low-Level Waste Disposal Site in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) 325

  12. Baseline risk assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. Cleanup of the site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU), consisting of the Weldon Spring quarry and its surrounding area, is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, DOE is conducting a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the proper response to address various contaminated media that constitute the QROU. Specifically, the operable unit consists of the following areas and media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and the bulk waste; groundwater underlying the quarry and surrounding area; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including surface water and sediment at Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek. An initial evaluation of conditions at the quarry area identified remaining data requirements needed to support the conceptual site exposure and hydrogeological models. These data requirements are discussed in the RI/FS work plan issued in January 1994. Soil contamination located at a property adjacent to the quarry, referred to as Vicinity Property 9 (VP9), was originally part of the scope of the QROU, as discussed in the work plan. However, a decision was subsequently made to remediate this vicinity property as part of cleanup activities for the chemical plant operable unit, as provided for in the Record of Decision (ROD). Remediation of VP9 was completed in early 1996. Hence, this baseline risk assessment (BRA) does not address VP9.

  13. Session: Development and application of guidelines for siting, constructing, operating and monitoring wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manville, Albert; Hueckel, Greg

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The two papers were: 'Development and Application of USFWS Guidance for Site Evaluation, Siting, Construction, Operation and Monitoring of Wind Turbines' by Albert Manville and 'Wind Power in Washington State' by Greg Hueckel. The session provided a comparison of wind project guidelines developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in May 2003 and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife in August 2003. Questions addressed included: is there a need or desire for uniform national or state criteria; can other states learn from Washington State's example, or from the USFWS voluntary guidelines; should there be uniform requirements/guidelines/check-lists for the siting, operation, monitoring, and mitigation to prevent or minimize avian, bat, and other wildlife impacts.

  14. Operational Strategies for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site in Egypt - 13513

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, Yasser T. [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate aims of treatment and conditioning is to prepare waste for disposal by ensuring that the waste will meet the waste acceptance criteria of a disposal facility. Hence the purpose of low-level waste disposal is to isolate the waste from both people and the environment. The radioactive particles in low-level waste emit the same types of radiation that everyone receives from nature. Most low-level waste fades away to natural background levels of radioactivity in months or years. Virtually all of it diminishes to natural levels in less than 300 years. In Egypt, The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center has been established since 1983, as a waste management facility for LLW and ILW and the disposal site licensed for preoperational in 2005. The site accepts the low level waste generated on site and off site and unwanted radioactive sealed sources with half-life less than 30 years for disposal and all types of sources for interim storage prior to the final disposal. Operational requirements at the low-level (LLRW) disposal site are listed in the National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control NCNSRC guidelines. Additional procedures are listed in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Standards Manual. The following describes the current operations at the LLRW disposal site. (authors)

  15. EIS-0302: Transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) operations at the Mound Site near Miamisburg, Ohio, to an alternative DOE site.

  16. Electric and hybrid vehicle program site operator program. Quarterly progress report, October 1994--December 1994 (First quarter of FY-95)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. Its mission now includes three ma or activity categories: (1) Advancement of Electric Vehicle (EV) technologies, (2) Development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use, and (3) Increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 13 Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified in Table ES-1. The EV inventories of each participant are summarized in Table ES-2.

  17. Functional and operational requirements for TA-18 relocation to the NTS/DAF Site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malenfant, R. E. (Richard E.); Bedsun, D. A. (David A.); Paternoster, Richard R.,

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Area 18 (TA-18), or Pajarito Site, of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been operational as a nuclear facility since 1945. The original complement of a dozen part-time researchers with a single mission in one building at the end of a dirt road has evolved to a complex, multimission facility with a staff of 125 occupying 25 major buildings adjacent to a heavily traveled road with public access. In the year 2000, the Secretary of Energy determined that the mission of TA-18 was essential to support national security, but that consideration had to be given to improving safety and physical security. It is presently proposed to relocate most of the TA-18 operations to the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The purpose of this paper is to identify the functional and operational requirements and to demonstrate how they can be met at the DAF.

  18. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program: Site Operation Program. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.; Bassett, R.R.; Briasco, S. [and others

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Operator Program has evolved substantially since its inception in response to the Electric Vehicle Research and Demonstration Act of 1976. In its original form, a commercialization effort was intended but this was not feasible for lack of vehicle suppliers and infrastructure. Nonetheless, with DOE sponsorship and technical participation, a few results (primarily operating experience and data) were forthcoming. The current Program comprises eleven sites and over 200 vehicles, of which about 50 are latest generation vehicles. DOE partially funds the Program participant expenditures and the INEL receives operating and maintenance data for the DOE-owned, and participant-owned or monitored vehicles, as well as Program reports. As noted elsewhere in this report, participants represent several widely differing categories: electric utilities, academic institutions, and federal agencies. While both the utilities and the academic institutions tend to establish beneficial relationships with the industrial community.

  19. EIS-0426: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of proposed alternatives for continued management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site) and other U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)-managed sites in Nevada.

  20. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H CANYON FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, L.; Fuller, Kenneth

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H Canyon Facility is the only large scale, heavily shielded, nuclear chemical separations plant still in operation in the U.S. The facility's operations historically recovered uranium-235 (U-235) and neptunium-237 (Np-237) from aluminum-clad, enriched-uranium fuel tubes from Site nuclear reactors and other domestic and foreign research reactors. Today the facility, in conjunction with HB Line, is working to provide the initial feed material to the Mixed Oxide Facility also located on SRS. Many additional campaigns are also in the planning process. Furthermore, the facility has started to integrate collaborative research and development (R&D) projects into its schedule. H Canyon can serve as the appropriate testing location for many technologies focused on monitoring the back end of the fuel cycle, due to the nature of the facility and continued operation. H Canyon, in collaboration with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), has been working with several groups in the DOE complex to conduct testing demonstrations of novel technologies at the facility. The purpose of conducting these demonstrations at H Canyon will be to demonstrate the capabilities of the emerging technologies in an operational environment. This paper will summarize R&D testing activities currently taking place in H Canyon and discuss the possibilities for future collaborations.

  1. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter.

  2. Feasibility study for remedial action for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis (Figure 1.1). Cleanup of the Weldon Spring site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the following areas and/or media that constitute the QROU: (1) the residual material (soil and sediment) remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the bulk waste (about 11 million L [3 million gal] of uranium-contaminated ponded water was also addressed previous to bulk waste removal); (2) other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough and several creeks; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of Femme Osage Slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of QROU RI/FS evaluations. For remedial action sites, it is DOE policy to integrate values associated with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) into the CERCLA decision-making process. The analyses contained herein address NEPA values as appropriate to the actions being considered for the QROU. A work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing conceptual site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in January 1994. The RI and baseline risk assessment (BRA) reports have been completed. The RI discusses in detail the nature and extent and the fate and transport of contamination at the quarry area.

  3. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  4. Electric and hybrid vehicle program; Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1992 (Second quarter of fiscal year 1992)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.F.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities during the second quarter included the second meeting of the Site Operators in Phoenix, AZ in late April. The meeting was held in conjunction with the Solar and Electric 500 Race activities. Delivery of vehicles ordered previously has begun, although two of the operators are experiencing some delays in receiving their vehicles. Public demonstration activities continue, with an apparent increasing level of awareness and interest being displayed by the public. Initial problems with the Site Operator Database have been corrected and revised copies of the program have been supplied to the Program participants. Operating and Maintenance data is being supplied and submitted to INEL on a monthly basis. Interest in the Site Operator Program is being reflected in requests for information from several organizations from across the country, representing a wide diversity of interests. These organizations have been referred to existing Site Operators with the explanation that the program will not be adding new participants, but that most of the existing organizations are willing to work with other groups. The exception to this was the addition of Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) to the program. PEPCO has been awarded a subcontract to operate and maintain the DOE owned G-Van and Escort located in Washington, DC. They will provide data on these vehicles, as well as a Solectria Force which PEPCO has purchased. The Task Force intends to be actively involved in the infrastructure development in a wide range of areas. These include, among others, personnel development, safety, charging, and servicing. Work continues in these areas. York Technical College (YORK) has completed the draft outline for the EV Technician course. This is being circulated to organizations around the country for comments. Kansas State University (KSU) is working with a private sector company to develop a energy dispensing meter for opportunity charging in public areas.

  5. Regulatory impact analysis of environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title I of the Act pertains to tailings at inactive sites for which the Agency has developed standards as part of a separate rulemaking. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards developed under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the operations standards is very limited.

  6. Waste minimization plan construction and operation of the replacement cross-site transfer system, project W-058

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boucher, T.D.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the research and development of a waste minimization plan for the construction and operation of Project W-058, Replacement of the Cross-Site Transfer System, on the Hanford Site. The plan is based on Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-307, Plans. The waste minimization plan identifies areas where pollution prevention/waste minimization principles can be incorporated into the construction and operation of the cross-site transfer system.

  7. ATLAS off-Grid sites (Tier 3) monitoring. From local fabric monitoring to global overview of the VO computing activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PETROSYAN, A; The ATLAS collaboration; BELOV, S; ANDREEVA, J; KADOCHNIKOV, I

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ATLAS is a particle physics experiment on Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The experiment produces petabytes of data every year. The ATLAS Computing model embraces the Grid paradigm and originally included three levels of computing centres to be able to operate such large volume of data. With the formation of small computing centres, usually based at universities, the model was expanded to include them as Tier3 sites. The experiment supplies all necessary software to operate typical Grid-site, but Tier3 sites do not support Grid services of the experiment or support them partially. Tier3 centres comprise a range of architectures and many do not possess Grid middleware, thus, monitoring of storage and analysis software used on Tier2 sites becomes unavailable for Tier3 site system administrator and, also, Tier3 sites activity becomes unavailable for virtual organization of the experiment. In this paper we present ATLAS off-Grid sites monitoring software suite, which enables monitoring on sites, which are not unde...

  8. Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  9. Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    -St. Louis International Airport, which is now referred to as the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS). In 1966

  10. Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    International Airport, which is now referred to as the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS). In 1966, the SLAPS wastes

  11. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. T. Urbon

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning site is located in the southeast portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site (Figure 1). This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 23, 2001. Because of questionable representativeness and precision of the results, the site was resampled on June 12, 2001. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the December 1997 Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1997). If after six years the rate of degradation appears to be so slow that the greatest concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) present at the site would not decay within 30 years of the site closure, the site will be reevaluated with consideration to enriching the impacted soil at the site to enhance the degradation process. A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report, samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in TPH concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, the data results from 2000 were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2001 consisted of the following: Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2); Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]); Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs; and Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  12. Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on In2O3(110): A DFT Study. Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on...

  13. Modeling of batch operations in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.G.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model is in development to provide a dynamic simulation of batch operations within the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The DWPF will chemically treat high level waste materials from the site tank farm and vitrify the resulting slurry into a borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The DWPF consists of three major processing areas: Salt Processing Cell (SPC), Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and the Melt Cell. Separate models have been developed for each of these process units using the SPEEDUP{trademark} software from Aspen Technology. Except for glass production in the Melt Cell, all of the chemical operations within DWPF are batch processes. Since the SPEEDUP software is designed for dynamic modeling of continuous processes, considerable effort was required to devise batch process algorithms. This effort was successful and the models are able to simulate batch operations and the dynamic behavior of the process. In this paper, we will describe the SPC model in some detail and present preliminary results from a few simulation studies.

  14. Environmental assessment of ground water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an environmental assessment of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. It analyzes the impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action for ground water compliance. The proposed action is to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the UMTRA Project sites (40 CFR Part 192) by meeting supplemental standards based on the limited use ground water at the Spook site. This proposed action would not require site activities, including ground water monitoring, characterization, or institutional controls. Ground water in the uppermost aquifer was contaminated by uranium processing activities at the Spook site, which is in Converse County, approximately 48 miles (mi) (77 kilometers [km]) northeast of Casper, Wyoming. Constituents from the site infiltrated and migrated into the uppermost aquifer, forming a plume that extends approximately 2500 feet (ft) (800 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The principal site-related hazardous constituents in this plume are uranium, selenium, and nitrate. Background ground water in the uppermost aquifer at the site is considered limited use. It is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e)). Background ground water quality also is poor due to first, naturally occurring conditions (natural uranium mineralization associated with an alteration front), and second, the effects of widespread human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). There are no known exposure pathways to humans, animals, or plants from the contaminated ground water in the uppermost aquifer because it does not discharge to lower aquifers, to the surface, or to surface water.

  15. Development and operation of a photovoltaic power system for use at remote Antarctic sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piszczor, M.F.; Kohout, L.L.; Manzo, M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Colozza, A.J. [NYMA, Brook Park, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic power system, designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center, has successfully operated over the past two summer seasons at a remote site in Antarctica, providing utility-type power for a six-person field team. The system was installed at the Lake Hoare site for approximately five weeks during late 1992, put into storage for the Antarctic winter, and then used again during the 1993 season. The photovoltaic power system consists of three silicon photovoltaic sub-arrays delivering a total of 1.5 kWe peak power, three lead-acid gel battery modules supplying 2.4 kWh, and an electrical distribution system which delivers 120 Vac and 12 Vdc to the user. The system worked extremely well in providing quiet, reliable power. The experience gained from early system demonstrations such as this should be beneficial in accelerating the transition toward future PV systems in Antarctica and other similar areas.

  16. Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site- June 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting in Augusta, Ga, Regarding the Savannah River Site [HIAR-SRS-2011-06-16

  17. active site mapping: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Summit for Decision Calyam, Prasad 19 Thursday, May 17, 2007 Contact Us | Site Map | Search PARTICIPATION Engineering Websites Summary: , a library services...

  18. active site prediction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shieber, Stuart 20 FUSION OF CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELD AND SIGNALP FOR PROTEIN CLEAVAGE SITE PREDICTION Engineering Websites Summary: FUSION OF CONDITIONAL RANDOM FIELD AND...

  19. active site characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emphasis on an assessment of the erosion potential of the site, and the potential impacts on any surfacewaters in thecatchment,hydrogeology, meteorological conditions, land...

  20. active site determination: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emphasis on an assessment of the erosion potential of the site, and the potential impacts on any surfacewaters in thecatchment,hydrogeology, meteorological conditions, land...

  1. active sites independently: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emphasis on an assessment of the erosion potential of the site, and the potential impacts on any surfacewaters in thecatchment,hydrogeology, meteorological conditions, land...

  2. Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos Site Office- December 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos Site Office, Office of Quality Assurance Assessment of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project Quality Assurance Plan

  3. active site structure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matrix 76 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

  4. active-site structure binding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Threshold Occupancy and Specific Cation Binding Modes in the Hammerhead Ribozyme Active Site components to facilitate catalysis through electrostatic engineering. In the case of...

  5. Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase Tuesday, March 31, 2015 All living organisms depend on the availability of nitrogen for incorporation into the basic...

  6. Loch Linnhe `94: Current meter array operations and on-site analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, D.H.; Jones, H.E.

    1995-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the operation and on-site data analysis of the LLNL Current Meter Array (CMA) which was fielded at Loch Linnhe `94. The CMA is a large floating array of 10 sensors which measure horizontal current near the water surface. The measurements are used to interpret radar images of the water surface. This experiment was conducted as a part of the Joint UK/US Radar Ocean Imaging (ROI) Program. It was held at Loch Linnhe, Scotland in September 1994. The experiment consisted of measuring natural and ship-generated internal waves (IWs) in Loch Linnhe and imaging them with a land-based, dual frequency, dual-polarization real aperture radar operated by the UK. The goal was to determine the relationship between the amplitude of IWs as measured by instrumentation deployed in the water and the modulation they produce in radar images of the water surface.

  7. Health physics and public health activities at hazardous wastes sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charp, P.A. [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) at several sites contaminated with radioactive materials. The Navajo Brown Vandever (B-V) uranium mine site near Bluewater, New Mexico, and the Austin Avenue Radiation Site (AAR) in Lansdowne, Pennsylvania were the subject of ATSDR health advisories. The sites were contamined with uranium or uranium byproducts but the identification of potential health effects and actions taken to prevent or reduce exposures were approached from different perspectives. At B-V contaminants included uranium and mine tailings, radium, and radon. Contaminants at the site and physical hazards were removed. At AAR, radium and radon were located in residential settings. Residents who might have had annual exposures greater than accepted standards or recommendations were relocated and contaminated building demolished.

  8. Sandia Site Office Assessment of Activity-Levell Work Planning...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Activity-Level Work Planning and Control at Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNL) Dates of Activity : 02142011 - 02182011 Report Preparer: Patricia Williams...

  9. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

    2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in the remedial decision making. The site should redo the risk calculations as the future use scenario has changed for the site. As a result, the existing model is based on very conservative assumptions that result in calculation of unreasonably low cleanup goals. Specifically, the review team proposes that LLNL consider: (1) Revising the industrial worker scenario to a reasonable maximum exposure (RME) for a site worker that performs a weekly walk down of the area for two hours for 25 years (or an alternative RME if the exposure scenario changes); (2) Revising the ESSI of 2 mg U per kg soil for the deer mouse to account for less than 0.05 of the total ingested uranium being adsorbed by the gut; (3) Revising bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for vegetation and invertebrates that are based on 100 mg of soluble uranium per kg of soil, as the uranium concentration in the slope soil does not average 100 mg/kg and it is not all in a soluble form; and (4) Measuring actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates at the site and using the actual values to support risk calculations. The team recommends that the site continue a phased approach during remediation. The activities should focus on elimination of the principal threats to groundwater by excavating (1) source material from the firing table and alluvial deposits, and (2) soil hotspots from the surrounding slopes with concentrations of U-235 and U-238 that pose unacceptable risk. This phased approach allows the remediation path to be driven by the results of each phase. This reduces the possibility of costly 'surprises', such as failure of soil treatment, and reduces the impact of remediation on endangered habitat. Treatment of the excavated material with physical separation equipment may result in a decreased volume of soil for disposal if the DU is concentrated in the fine-grained fraction, which can then be disposed of in an offsite facility at a considerable cost savings. Based on existing data and a decision to implement the recommended phased approach, the cost of characterization, excavation and physical

  10. Report on the oversight assessment of the operational readiness review of the Replacement Tritium Facility at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.T.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an oversight assessment (OA) conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) of operational readiness review (ORR) activities for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) located at Savannah River Site (SRS). The EH OA of this facility took place concurrently with an ORR conducted by the DOE Office of Defense Programs (DP). The DP ORR was conducted from January 19 through February 5, 1993. The EH OA was performed in accordance with the protocol and procedures specified in EH Program for Oversight Assessment of Operational Readiness Evaluations for Startups and Restarts,'' dated September 15, 1992. The EH OA Team evaluated the DP ORR to determine whether it was thorough and demonstrated sufficient inquisitiveness to verify that the implementation of programs and procedures adequately ensures the protection of worker safety and health. The EH OA Team performed its evaluation of the DP ORR in the following technical areas: occupational safety, industrial hygiene, and respiratory protection; fire protection; and chemical safety. In the areas of fire protection and chemical safety, the EH OA Team conducted independent vertical-slice reviews to confirm DP ORR results. Within each technical area, the EH OA Team reviewed the DP ORR Plan, including the Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs); the qualifications of individual DP ORR team members; the performance of planned DP ORR activities; and the results of the DP ORR.

  11. Splice site strength–dependent activity and genetic buffering by poly-G runs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Xinshu

    Pre-mRNA splicing is regulated through the combinatorial activity of RNA motifs, including splice sites and splicing regulatory elements. Here we show that the activity of the G-run (polyguanine sequence) class of splicing ...

  12. Current Challenges for Modeling Enzyme Active Sites by Biomimetic Synthetic Diiron Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedle, Simone

    This tutorial review describes recent progress in modeling the active sites of carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron enzymes that activate dioxygen to carry out several key reactions in Nature. The chemistry of soluble methane ...

  13. Improving Reactivity Against Target Organothiophosphates via Active-Site Directed Mutagenisis of a Bacterial Phosphotriesterase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Githens, Tyler 1986-

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the initial screen and were targets for steady state kinetic characterization of active site mutants. Site directed mutagenesis of binding sites was conducted and the most reactive point mutants, F132G, F132V and S308G, were used as backgrounds for subsequent...

  14. THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

  15. active sites environmental: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: ER 200-1-4 29 August 2014 ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM.C. 20314-1000 CECC-E Regulation No. 200-1-4 29 August 2014...

  16. Organometallic Complexes that Model the Active Sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-Hydrogenases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tianbiao

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    My research primarily focuses on biomimetics of the active sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-hydrogenases (H2ase) and is classified into three parts. Part A: The one-electron oxidation of asymmetrically disubstituted FeIFeI models of the active site...

  17. SI}M!1ARY REPORT ON SITE nnTESTIGATION AND REMOVAL ACTIVITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /QC ·..·.······················.·.···..··········.·.. 12 6.0 CONCLUSIONS AND RECO~~OATIONS .·······....·..········ 12 7. () llE.!'.LTH & SAFETY PLAN ···································· 13 9.01 General Site Activities 13 9 .. 02 Health &- Safety " ~ · ~ .. '" '" '" '" . " ~ ~ 1.4 9 ~ 03 activities at the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute (CSMRI) creekside site in Golden~ Colorado

  18. Organometallic Complexes that Model the Active Sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-Hydrogenases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tianbiao

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    My research primarily focuses on biomimetics of the active sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-hydrogenases (H2ase) and is classified into three parts. Part A: The one-electron oxidation of asymmetrically disubstituted FeIFeI models of the active site...

  19. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-4 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit and three source operable units. The 100-KR-4 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination.

  20. Analytical Electron Microscopy examination of uranium contamination at the DOE Fernald operation site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) has been used to identify uranium-bearing phases present in contaminated soils from the DOE Fernald operation site. A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and AEM was used in isolating and characterizing uranium-rich regions of the contaminated soils. Soil samples were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by ultramicrotomy using an embedding resin previously employed for aquatic colloids and biological samples. This preparation method allowed direct comparison between SEM and TEM images. At the macroscopic level much of the uranium appears to be associated with clays in the soils; however, electron beam analysis revealed that the uranium is present as discrete phases, including iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Only low levels of uranium were actually within the clay minerals. The distribution of uranium phases was inhomogeneous at the submicron level.

  1. active site suffices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    site suffices First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Convergence from below suffices J. F....

  2. BIOTIC INTEGRITY OF STREAMS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNITS, 1996 TO 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M; Susan Dyer, S

    2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been divided into six Integrator Operable Units (IOUs) that correspond to the watersheds of the five major streams on the SRS (Upper Three Runs, Fourmile Branch, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs) and the portions of the Savannah River and Savannah River Swamp associated with the SRS. The streams are the primary integrators within each IOU because they potentially receive, through surface or subsurface drainage, soluble contaminants from all waste sites within their watersheds. If these contaminants reach biologically significant levels, they would be expected to effect the numbers, types, and health of stream organisms. In this study, biological sampling was conducted within each IOU as a measure of the cumulative ecological effects of the waste sites within the IOUs. The use of information from biological sampling to assess environmental quality is often termed bioassessment. The IOU bioassessment program included 38 sites in SRS streams and nine sites in the Savannah River. Sampling was conducted in 1996 to 1998, 2000, and 2003. Four bioassessment methods were used to evaluate ecological conditions in the IOU streams: the Index of Biotic Integrity, the Fish Health Assessment Index, measurement of fish tissue contaminant levels, and two benthic macroinvertebrate indices. The Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is an EPA supported method based on comparison of ecologically important and sensitive fish assemblage variables between potentially disturbed and reference (i.e., undisturbed) sites. It is designed to assess the ability of a stream to support a self-sustaining biological community and ecological processes typical of undisturbed, natural conditions. Since many types of contaminants can bioaccumulate, fish tissue contaminant data were used to determine the types of chemicals fish were exposed to and their relative magnitudes among IOUs. The Fish Health Assessment Index (HAI) is an EPA supported method for assessing the health and condition of individual fish based on dissection and internal examination. It helped to determine whether contaminant concentrations were high enough to adversely affect the health of individual fish. The benthic macroinvertebrate multimetric index (HDMI), used in 1997 to 2000, is a method for assessing stream health based on macroinvertebrate data collected with Hester-Dendy artificial substrates. In 2003 it was replaced with the Multiple Habitat Sampling protocol, a SCDHEC method for collecting and analyzing benthic macroinvertebrate data from natural substrate. These two macroinvertebrate based methods were used in conjunction with the fish based IBI to provide a more comprehensive assessment of ecological conditions. Lastly, habitat data were collected from each stream to assist in determining whether ecological integrity was compromised by physical factors (e.g., erosion) or chemical factors (e.g., discharge of toxic materials). Fish from many SRS streams exhibited evidence of contamination as a result of current or former SRS operations. The most prevalent radiological contaminants were cesium-137 (highest in fish from Lower Three Runs followed by Steel Creek and Fourmile Branch), tritium (highest in fish from Fourmile Branch followed by Pen Branch, and the Savannah River swamp), and strontium (highest in fish from Fourmile Branch followed by Pen Branch). Radiological contaminants were also found in fish collected from the Savannah River near the mouths of contaminated SRS streams; however, contaminant levels were substantially lower than in fish from the streams themselves. Mercury levels were moderately elevated in fish from some streams, particularly Lower Three Runs, and in fish from the Savannah River. Despite the occurrence of contaminants, most SRS streams exhibited comparatively high biotic integrity (based on IBI, HDMI, and MHSP scores) and minimal levels of pathology among individual fish (e.g., presence of tumors or extreme thinness), indicating that contaminant levels were generally insufficient to cause significant ecological de

  3. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report, 1992. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, S.C.; Latham, A.R.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site for 1992. Monitoring and surveillance on and around the NTS by DOE contractors and Site user organizations during 1992 indicated that underground nuclear testing operations were conducted in compliance with regulations, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.15 percent of the guideline for air exposure. All 1992 nuclear events took place during the first three quarters of the calendar year prior to the Congressional testing moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from test operations was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated maximum effective dose equivalent offsite would have been 0.012 mrem. Any person receiving this dose was also exposed to 78 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped to EPA-approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Non-NTS support facilities complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

  4. GROUDWATER REMEDIATION AT THE 100-HR-3 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA - 11507

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMOOT JL; BIEBESHEIMER FH; ELUSKIE JA; SPILIOTOPOULOS A; TONKIN MJ; SIMPKIN T

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site underlies three former plutonium production reactors and the associated infrastructure at the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminant of concern at the site is hexavalent chromium; the secondary contaminants are strontium-90, technetium-99, tritium, uranium, and nitrate. The hexavalent chromium plume is the largest plume of its type in the state of Washington, covering an area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} (2.7 mi{sup 2}) with concentrations greater than 20 {micro}g/L. Concentrations range from 60,000 {micro}g/L near the former dichromate transfer station in the 100-D Area to large areas of 20 to 100 {micro}g/L across much of the plume area. Pump-and-treat operations began in 1997 and continued into 2010 at a limited scale of approximately 200 gal/min. Remediation of groundwater has been fairly successful in reaching remedial action objectives (RAOs) of 20 {micro}g/L over a limited region at the 100-H, but less effective at 100-D. In 2000, an in situ, permeable reactive barrier was installed downgradient of the hotspot in 100-D as a second remedy. The RAOs are still being exceeded over a large portion of the area. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company was awarded the remediation contract for groundwater in 2008 and initiated a remedial process optimization study consisting of modeling and technical studies intended to enhance the remediation. As a result of the study, 1,400 gal/min of expanded treatment capacity are being implemented. These new systems are designed to meet 2012 and 2020 target milestones for protection of the Columbia River and cleanup of the groundwater plumes.

  5. Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.

    2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 °C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 °C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 °C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been observed in any of the pour stream glass samples. Spinel was observed at the bottom of DWPF Melter 1 as a result of K-3 refractory corrosion. Issues have occurred with accumulation of spinel in the pour spout during periods of operation at higher waste loadings. Given that both DWPF melters were or have been in operation for greater than 8 years, the service life of the melters has far exceeded design expectations. It is possible that the DWPF liquidus temperature approach is conservative, in that it may be possible to successfully operate the melter with a small degree of allowable crystallization in the glass. This could be a viable approach to increasing waste loading in the glass assuming that the crystals are suspended in the melt and swept out through the riser and pour spout. Additional study is needed, and development work for WTP might be leveraged to support a different operating limit for the DWPF. Several recommendations are made regarding considerations that need to be included as part of the WTP crystal tolerant strategy based on the DWPF development work and operational data reviewed here. These include: Identify and consider the impacts of potential heat sinks in the WTP melter and glass pouring system; Consider the contributions of refractory corrosion products, which may serve to nucleate additional crystals leading to further accumulation; Consider volatilization of components from the melt (e.g., boron, alkali, halides, etc.) and determine their impacts on glass crystallization behavior; Evaluate the impacts of glass REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) conditions and the distribution of temperature within the WTP melt pool and melter pour chamber on crystal accumulation rate; Consider the impact of precipitated crystals on glass viscosity; Consider the impact of an accumulated crystalline layer on thermal convection currents and bubbler effectiveness within the melt pool; Evaluate the impact of spinel accumulation on Joule heating of the WTP melt pool; and Include noble metals in glass melt experiments because of their potential to act as nucleation site

  6. Active Fault Controls At High-Temperature Geothermal Sites- Prospectin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the level of unrecognized active faults present in these areas. Analysis of low-sun-angle aerial photography acquired over the Needle Rocks, Astor Pass, Empire, and Lee...

  7. Third-party/shared savings initiatives at DOE's government-owned/contractor-operated sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrolati, V.P.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To promote energy conservation at its government owned/contractor operated (GOCO) facilities, DOE implemented the In-house Energy Management (IHEM) Program. In early FY 1984, the IHEM program became interested in the concept of third-party financing as a potential supplement for its appropriated budget. The basic approach to this activity is discussed, including some of the initial concerns of third-party/shared savings financing at DOE facilities. The legal and procurement issues involved are discussed in detail. Planned initiatives are also discussed.

  8. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  9. Electric and hybrid vehicle program: Site operator program. Quarterly progress report, April--June, 1994 (3rd quarter of FY-1994)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. Its mission now includes three major activity categories; advancement of Electric Vehicle (EV) technologies, development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use, and increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 13 Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified. The EV inventories of each participant are summarized. This third quarter report (FY-94) will include a summary of activities from the previous three quarters. The report section sequence has been revised to provide a more easily seen program overview, and specific operator activities are now included.

  10. Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.; Dresel, P EVAN.; Murray, Christopher J.

    2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final. The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers). COC with similar properties were grouped for the screening evaluation. The screening evaluation was conducted in two primary steps. The initial screening step evaluated potential remediation methods based on whether they can be effectively applied within the environmental setting of the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit for the specified contaminants. In the second step, potential remediation methods were screened using scoping calculations to estimate the scale of infrastructure, overall quantities of reagents, and conceptual approach for applying the method for each defined grouping of COC. Based on these estimates, each method was screened with respect to effectiveness, implementability, and relative cost categories of the CERCLA feasibility study screening process defined in EPA guidance.

  11. Superconducting Super Collider site environmental report for calendar year 1991. Pre-operational

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first annual SER prepared for the SSC project. It is a pre-operational report, intended primarily to describe the baseline characterization of the Ellis County, Texas site that has been developed subsequent to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Supplemental Environmental impact Statement (SEIS). As such, the emphasis will be on environmental compliance efforts, including monitoring and mitigation programs. The SER also reports on the measures taken to meet the commitments made in the EIS and SEIS. These measures are detailed in the Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) (Department of Energy (DOE), 1991), which was prepared following the signing of the Record of Decision (ROD) to construct the SSC in Texas. The SER will continue to be preoperational until the first high-energy (20 trillion electron volt or TeV) protons collisions are observed, at which point the SSC will become operational. At that time, the SER will place more emphasis on the radiological monitoring program. This SER will report on actions taken in 1991 or earlier and briefly mention some of those planned for calendar year 1992. AU actions completed in 1992 will be addressed in the SER for calendar year 1992.

  12. Operations of the LR56 radioactive liquid cask transport system at U.S. Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.S. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hornstra, D.J. [Performance Development Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sazawal, V.K. [NUMATEC, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States); Clement, G. [SGN, St. Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LR56 cask system is licensed for use in France under Certificate of Compliance F/309/B(U)F for transport of 4,000-liter volumes of radioactive liquids. Three LR56 cask systems (with modifications for use at Department of Energy (DOE) sites) have been purchased for delivery at the Hanford Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The LR56 cask systems will be used for on-site transfers of Type B quantities of radioactive liquid waste. The ORNL unit will also be used as a Type A packaging for transfers of radioactive liquids between DOE sites. This paper discusses LR56 operating features and the use of the cask system at the three DOE sites.

  13. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented.

  14. Radiation Belt Activity Indices and Solar Proton Event Alarm on the CRATERRE Project Web Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiation Belt Activity Indices and Solar Proton Event Alarm on the CRATERRE Project Web Site D--Two Radiation Belt Activity Indices, based on electron flux measurement >300 keV and >1.6 MeV, and one Solar updated. Index Terms- CRATERRE project, Radiation belts activity, Space environment I. INTRODUCTION

  15. Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit at the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The Weldon Spring site consists of two noncontiguous areas -- the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits, and the quarry. Cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, incorporating the values of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The contents of the documents prepared for the project are not intended to represent a statement regarding the legal applicability of NEPA to remedial actions conducted under CERCLA. In accordance with the integrated CERCLA/NEPA approach, a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment (RI/FS-EA) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU). This operable unit consists of the following areas and/or media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and bulk waste; underlying groundwater; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough. This work plan identifies the activities within the RI/FS-EA process that are being proposed to address contamination remaining at the quarry area.

  16. ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES TO OPERATING AN ON-SITE LABORATORY AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, S.G.; Creech, M.N.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During the excavation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), operations were realized by the presence of URS' (formerly known as United Research Services) On-site Mobile Laboratory (OSML) and the close proximity of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration Chemical Laboratory (ERCL). The laboratory was located adjacent to the landfill in order to provide soil characterization, health and safety support, and waste management data. Although the cost of maintaining and operating an analytical laboratory can be higher than off-site analysis, there are many benefits to providing on site analytical services. This paper describes the synergies between the laboratory, as well as the advantages and disadvantages to having a laboratory on-site during the excavation of SNL/NM CWL.

  17. U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, environmental data report for the Nevada Test Site -- 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.; Kinnison, R.R.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` establishes environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for DOE operations. These mandates require compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection regulations. During calendar year (CY) 1995 environmental protection and monitoring programs were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) managed sites in Nevada and across the United States. A detailed discussion of these environmental protection and monitoring programs, and summary data and assessments for environmental monitoring results at these sites in CY 1995 are provided in the DOE/NV, Annual Site Environmental Report--1995, (ASER) DOE/NV/11718-037. A brief description of the scope of this environmental monitoring is provided below, categorized by ``on-NTS`` and ``off-NTS`` monitoring.

  18. Activity-level Work Planning and Control in the Hanford Site Worker Evaluation Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Ted Giltz, Volpentest HAMMER Federal Training Center. Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool, Verifying Activity-Level Worker Medical Clearance and Training. The Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool (HSWET) provides line management an easy to use tool to determine if workers are medically cleared and trained to perform work safely.

  19. Identification of Highly Active Fe Sites in (Ni,Fe)OOH for Electrocata...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhanced OER activity in Fe-doped -NiOOH, in which Fe sites have near-optimum binding energies for OER intermediates. The conversion of solar energy and water to hydrogen is a...

  20. Explorations of iron-iron hydrogenase active site models by experiment and theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, Jesse Wayne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes computational and experimental studies of synthetic complexes that model the active site of the iron-iron hydrogenase [FeFe]H2ase enzyme. Simple dinuclear iron dithiolate complexes act as functional models of the ironiron...

  1. Roles of key active-site residues in flavocytochrome P450 BM3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Michael A.; Miles, Caroline S.; Chapman, Stephen K.; Lysek, Dominikus A.; MacKay, Angela C.; Reid, Graeme A.; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Munro, Andrew W.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of mutation of key active-site residues (Arg-47, Tyr-51, Phe-42 and Phe-87) in Bacillus megaterium flavocytochrome P450 BM3 were investigated. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of laurate and arachidonate showed ...

  2. Explorations of iron-iron hydrogenase active site models by experiment and theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, Jesse Wayne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes computational and experimental studies of synthetic complexes that model the active site of the iron-iron hydrogenase [FeFe]H2ase enzyme. Simple dinuclear iron dithiolate complexes act as functional models of the ironiron...

  3. Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office- June 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hanford Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Multi-Canister Overpack, Operational Proficiency Demonstration [HIAR-RL-2011-06-22

  4. OPERATIONS REVIEW OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS - 11327

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Poirier, M.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.; Brown, S.; Geeting, M.

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is removing liquid radioactive waste from its Tank Farm. To treat waste streams that are low in Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides, SRS developed the Actinide Removal Process and implemented the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). The Actinide Removal Process contacts salt solution with monosodium titanate to sorb strontium and select actinides. After monosodium titanate contact, the resulting slurry is filtered to remove the monosodium titanate (and sorbed strontium and actinides) and entrained sludge. The filtrate is transferred to the MCU for further treatment to remove cesium. The solid particulates removed by the filter are concentrated to {approx} 5 wt %, washed to reduce the sodium concentration, and transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. The CSSX process extracts the cesium from the radioactive waste using a customized solvent to produce a Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS), and strips and concentrates the cesium from the solvent with dilute nitric acid. The DSS is incorporated in grout while the strip acid solution is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. The facilities began radiological processing in April 2008 and started processing of the third campaign ('MarcoBatch 3') of waste in June 2010. Campaigns to date have processed {approx}1.2 million gallons of dissolved saltcake. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel performed tests using actual radioactive samples for each waste batch prior to processing. Testing included monosodium titanate sorption of strontium and actinides followed by CSSX batch contact tests to verify expected cesium mass transfer. This paper describes the tests conducted and compares results from facility operations. The results include strontium, plutonium, and cesium removal, cesium concentration, and organic entrainment and recovery data. Additionally, the poster describes lessons learned during operation of the facility.

  5. Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Third Quarter Calendar Year 2013

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L O G I

  6. Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Third Quarter Calendar Year 2013

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O L O G IThird

  7. Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic Controlled Variable Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test-bed benchmark simulation model no. 1 (BSM1) and the activated sludge model no. 1 (ASM1). The objective is to search for a control

  8. EMAB Briefing on Capital Assets Projects and Operations Activities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    www.em.doe.gov 5 * Capital asset projects with funding at over 10 M: Richland, Savannah River Site, Portsmouth, Paducah, Oak Ridge, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National...

  9. Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the ''Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory'' (SWEIS) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a proposal for modifying current methods utilized to receive and manage certain offsite unwanted radioactive sealed sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory or if additional documentation under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is needed. The need for a SA to an existing environmental impact statement (EIS) is initiated by subsequent changes in the basis upon which the original EIS was prepared and the need to evaluate whether or not the EIS is adequate in light of those changes. It is submitted according to the requirements for determining the need for supplemental environmental impact statements (10 CFR 1021.314) in the Department of Energy's regulation for implementing NEPA. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of a program evaluated in the SWEIS with those of a proposal that would change the approach of this management. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in earlier NEPA analysis.

  10. Summary of activities to remove the aircraft hydrant system (Panero site) at March Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrian, G.L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the activities to remove the underground storage tank farm (Panero Site, Operable Unit 3, Installation Restoration Program) used for aircraft refueling at March AFB. This summary report is organized into four sections: introduction--gives the scope, information summary, and composition of the report; planned work scope--states the scope of work as provided in the Performance Work Statement for Removal of Aircraft Fuel Hydrant System March Air Force Base, California; demolition results--records the accomplishments for each task defined in the Performance Work Statement; and recycling efforts--record the efforts to reduce generating unnecessary waste.

  11. Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars coordinating the logistics and resupply of far-flung planetary bases. A number of logistics methods have been terrestrial logistics methods were tested in the context of (analog) planetary exploration. A comprehensive

  12. EIS-0147: Continued Operation of the K-,L-, and P- Reactors, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental impact statement (EIS) analyzes the environmental impacts of the proposed action, which is to continue operation of K-, L-, and P-Reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to ensure the capability to produce nuclear materials, and to produce nuclear materials as necessary for United States defense and nondefense programs.

  13. EIS-0063: Waste Management Operations, Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the existing tank design and consider additional specific design and safety feature alternatives for the thirteen tanks being constructed for storage of defense high-level radioactive liquid waste at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This statement supplements ERDA-1538, "Final Environmental Statement on Waste Management Operation."

  14. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by DOE contractors and NTS user organizations during 1993 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable federal and DOE guidelines, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.04 percent of the 10 mrem per year guide for air exposure. No nuclear tests were conducted due to the moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of effluents, or resuspension was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.004 mrem. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 97 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Support facilities at off-NTS locations compiled with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

  15. Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleteduranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime because of the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation, and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Construction at Locations B or C would not result in direct impacts to wetlands. However, the hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. The impacts at Location A may potentially be avoided by an alternative routing of the entrance road, or mitigation may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the State of Ohio. Unavoidable impacts to isolated wetlands may require an Isolated Wetlands Permit from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor for the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found in this part of Ohio, which in many cases involve previously disturbed habitats.

  16. Lessons learned from an installation perspective for chemical demilitarization plant start-up at four operating incineration sites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motz, L.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the lessons learned by chemical storage installations as they prepared for the start of chemical demilitarization plant operations at the four current chemical incinerator sites in Alabama, Arkansas, Oregon, and Utah. The study included interviews with persons associated with the process and collection of available documents prepared at each site. The goal was to provide useful information for the chemical weapons storage sites in Colorado and Kentucky that will be going through plant start-up in the next few years. The study is not a compendium of what to do and what not to do. The information has been categorized into ten lessons learned; each is discussed individually. Documents that may be useful to the Colorado and Kentucky sites are included in the appendices. This study should be used as a basis for planning and training.

  17. Quantum delocalization of protons in the hydrogen bond network of an enzyme active site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lu; Boxer, Steven G; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enzymes utilize protein architectures to create highly specialized structural motifs that can greatly enhance the rates of complex chemical transformations. Here we use experiments, combined with ab initio simulations that exactly include nuclear quantum effects, to show that a triad of strongly hydrogen bonded tyrosine residues within the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) facilitates quantum proton delocalization. This delocalization dramatically stabilizes the deprotonation of an active site tyrosine residue, resulting in a very large isotope effect on its acidity. When an intermediate analog is docked, it is incorporated into the hydrogen bond network, giving rise to extended quantum proton delocalization in the active site. These results shed light on the role of nuclear quantum effects in the hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the reactive intermediate of KSI, and the behavior of protons in biological systems containing strong hydrogen bonds.

  18. A Tale of Two Isomerases: Compact versus Extended Active Sites in Ketosteroid Isomerase and Phosphoglucose Isomerase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somarowthu, Srinivas; Brodkin, Heather R.; D’ Aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Beuning, Penny J. (Brandeis); (NEU)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the catalytic efficiency and specificity of enzymes is a fundamental question of major practical and conceptual importance in biochemistry. Although progress in biochemical and structural studies has enriched our knowledge of enzymes, the role in enzyme catalysis of residues that are not nearest neighbors of the reacting substrate molecule is largely unexplored experimentally. Here computational active site predictors, THEMATICS and POOL, were employed to identify functionally important residues that are not in direct contact with the reacting substrate molecule. These predictions then guided experiments to explore the active sites of two isomerases, Pseudomonas putida ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) and human phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), as prototypes for very different types of predicted active sites. Both KSI and PGI are members of EC 5.3 and catalyze similar reactions, but they represent significantly different degrees of remote residue participation, as predicted by THEMATICS and POOL. For KSI, a compact active site of mostly first-shell residues is predicted, but for PGI, an extended active site in which residues in the first, second, and third layers around the reacting substrate are predicted. Predicted residues that have not been previously tested experimentally were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. In human PGI, single-point mutations of the predicted second- and third-shell residues K362, H100, E495, D511, H396, and Q388 show significant decreases in catalytic activity relative to that of the wild type. The results of these experiments demonstrate that, as predicted, remote residues are very important in PGI catalysis but make only small contributions to catalysis in KSI.

  19. Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - October 2011 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plant Operational Awareness Site Visit HIAR PTX-2011-10-28 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness activity conducted by Office of Health, Safety and...

  20. Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter.

  1. Magnetic properties of a diferrous-water complex and ligands for modeling the active site of MMOH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Amy E. (Amy Elizabeth), 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1: The Importance of Modeling Diiron Sites in Nature.There are a variety of metalloenzymes that have nearly identical carboxylate-bridged diiron active sites. An example is sMMOH, an enzyme that catalyzes the ...

  2. Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, where Management and Operations are performed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS). In 2004, DOE recognized SRS as structure within the Cold War Historic District of national, state and local significance composed of the first generation of facilities constructed and operated from 1950 through 1989 to produce plutonium and tritium for our nation's defense. DOE agreed to manage the SRS 105-C Reactor Facility as a potentially historic property due to its significance in supporting the U.S. Cold War Mission and for potential for future interpretation. This reactor has five primary areas within it, including a Disassembly Basin (DB) that received irradiated materials from the reactor, cooled them and prepared the components for loading and transport to a Separation Canyon for processing. The 6,317 square meter area was divided into numerous work/storage areas. The walls between the individual basin compartments have narrow vertical openings called 'slots' that permit the transfer of material from one section to another. Data indicated there was over 830 curies of radioactivity associated with the basin sediments and approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated water, not including a large quantity of activated reactor equipment, scrap metal, and debris on the basin floor. The need for an action was identified in 2010 to reduce risks to personnel in the facility and to eliminate the possible release of contaminants into the environment. The release of DB water could potentially migrate to the aquifer and contaminate groundwater. DOE, its regulators [U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)] and the SC Historical Preservation Office (SHPO) agreed/concurred to perform a non-time critical removal action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

  3. Hydrogen bond dynamics in the active site of photoactive yellow protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herschlag, Dan

    Hydrogen bond dynamics in the active site of photoactive yellow protein Paul A. Sigala, Mark A for review February 5, 2009) Hydrogen bonds play major roles in biological structure and function. Nonetheless, hydrogen-bonded protons are not typically observed by X-ray crystallography, and most structural

  4. Comparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to test the strengths and limitations of cloud boundary retrievals from radiosonde profiles, 4 yearsComparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains radiosonde-based methods applied to 200 m resolution profiles obtained at the same site. The lidar

  5. Oxygen Activation by the Noncoupled Binuclear Copper Site in Peptidylglycine r-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Peng

    sites in hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase, in O2 activation. 1. Introduction Cu proteinsII centers.4 Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase.2 The two Cu)), which is acti- vated for electrophilic attack on substrates (in tyrosinase).4 Noncoupled binuclear Cu

  6. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF{sub 6} from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (United States Code, Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a Federal Register Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; from the transportation of all ETTP cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF6 [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) to Portsmouth; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). An option of shipping the ETTP cylinders to Paducah is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Portsmouth and ETTP sites. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0359) evaluates potential environmental impacts for the proposed Paducah conversion facility.

  7. List of currently classified documents relative to Hanford Production Facilities Operations originated on the Hanford Site between 1961 and 1972

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has declared that all Hanford plutonium production- and operations-related information generated between 1944 and 1972 is declassified. Any documents found and deemed useful for meeting Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) objectives may be declassified with or without deletions in accordance with DOE guidance by Authorized Derivative Declassifiers. The September 1992, letter report, Declassifications Requested by the Technical Steering Panel of Hanford Documents Produced 1944--1960, (PNWD-2024 HEDR UC-707), provides an important milestone toward achieving a complete listing of documents that may be useful to the HEDR Project. The attached listing of approximately 7,000 currently classified Hanford-originated documents relative to Hanford Production Facilities Operations between 1961 and 1972 fulfills TSP Directive 89-3. This list does not include such titles as the Irradiation Processing Department, Chemical Processing Department, and Hanford Laboratory Operations monthly reports generated after 1960 which have been previously declassified with minor deletions and made publicly available. Also Kaiser Engineers Hanford (KEH) Document Control determined that no KEH documents generated between January 1, 1961 and December 31, 1972 are currently classified. Titles which address work for others have not been included because Hanford Site contractors currently having custodial responsibility for these documents do not have the authority to determine whether other than their own staff have on file an appropriate need-to-know. Furthermore, these documents do not normally contain information relative to Hanford Site operations.

  8. U. S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office - Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSite Map Site Map Home Page DOE-SR News Releases

  9. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). Although not part of the proposed action, an option of shipping all cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF{sub 6} [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Paducah rather than to Portsmouth is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Paducah site. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0360) evaluates the potential environmental impacts for the proposed Portsmouth conversion facility.

  10. Particle Size Distribution Data From Existing Boreholes at the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Martin, Maria B.; Moreno, Jorge R.; Ferri, Rosalie M.; Horton, Duane G.; Reidel, Stephen P.

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides particle size distribution data for samples near the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Site that were archived in the Hanford Geotechnical Sample Library. Seventy-nine sediment samples were analyzed from four boreholes. Samples were collected from every ten feet in the boreholes. Eightly percent of the samples were classified as slightly gravelly sand. Fifteen percent were classified as gravelly sand, gravelly silty sand, or sandy gravels. These data indicate that the particle size of the sediment is consistent across the ILAW site and is dominated by sand in the upper part of the Hanford formation with more gravel rich units in the lower part.

  11. Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, C.A.

    1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level waste, for disposal is a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

  12. Modeling the active sites of non-heme diiron metalloproteins with sterically hindered carboxylates and syn N-Donor ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedle, Simone, 1976-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. Different Synthetic Approaches to Modeling the Active Sites of Carboxylate-Bridged Non-Heme Diiron Enzymes Carboxylate-bridged non-heme diiron enzymes activate dioxygen to perform a variety of biological functions. ...

  13. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

  14. REVISED FINAL REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT SITES, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK – DCN 0496-SR-06-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  15. Drart environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

  16. Summary of field operations Tijeras Arroyo Well TJA-2. Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foutz, W.L. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCord, J.P. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a basic data report for field operations associated with the drilling, logging, completion, and development of Tijeras Arroyo well TJA-2. This test/monitoring well was installed as part of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Environmental Restoration Project.

  17. Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NNSS and National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NNSS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NNSS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NNSS. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NNSS (Figure 1), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. The site will be used for the disposal of regulated Asbestiform Low-Level Waste (ALLW), small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM) and PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water. The term asbestiform is used throughout this document to describe RACM. The disposal site will be used as a depository of permissible waste generated both on site and off site. All generators designated by NNSA/NSO will be eligible to dispose regulated ALLW at the Asbestiform Low-Level Waste Disposal Site in accordance with the DOE/NV-325, Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC, current revision). Approval will be given by NNSA/NSO to generators that have successfully demonstrated through process knowledge (PK) and/or sampling and analysis that the waste is low-level, contains asbestiform material, or contains PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, or small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste and does not contain prohibited waste materials. Each waste stream will be approved through the Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP), which ensures that the waste meets acceptance requirements outlined in the NNSSWAC.

  18. DOE/SC-ARM-14-016 ARM Operations and Engineering Procedure Mobile Facility Site Startup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOffice ofHale Plan24,7,INL is62 The35 ARM6

  19. File:Large Construction Site Notice for Primary Operators.pdf | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdf JumpIntermediatesale

  20. File:Large Construction Site Notice for Secondary Operators.pdf | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,SizeEthiopiametstak.pdf JumpIntermediatesaleEnergy

  1. Internal Site Office Operations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other NewsSpinInteragency1 01/01/2013Internal Site Office

  2. Transient Inverse Calibration of Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts - 1943 to 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Thorne, Paul D.; Orr, Samuel; Mckinley, Mathew I.

    2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of predictions made with the Hanford site-wide groundwater flow and transport model. The focus is on characterizing major uncertainties in the current model. PNNL will develop and implement a calibration approach and methodology that can be used to evaluate alternative conceptual models of the Hanford aquifer system. The calibration process will involve a three-dimensional transient inverse calibration of each numerical model to historical observations of hydraulic and water quality impacts to the unconfined aquifer system from Hanford operations since the mid-1940s.

  3. Measurement of Tc-99 in Savannah River Site High Activity Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiPrete, D.P.

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste cleanup efforts currently underway at the Savannah River Site have created a need to characterize Tc-99 in the various high activity waste matrices currently in Site inventories. The traditional method our laboratory used for analyzing Tc-99 in higher activity matrices was a solvent-solvent extraction method using Aliquat-336 in xylene, which resulted in the problematic generation of mixed waste. In an effort to eliminate the generation of mixed wastes resulting from the Aliquat 336/xylene process, a variety of different separation methodologies have been studied. Eichrom TEVA solid phase extractions using column technology have been employed in a case by case basis over the last several years. More recently, applications using Eichrom TEVA extraction discs and 3M Empore Tc extraction discs have also been explored.

  4. Disposal Activities and the Unique Waste Streams at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This slide show documents waste disposal at the Nevada National Security Site. Topics covered include: radionuclide requirements for waste disposal; approved performance assessment (PA) for depleted uranium disposal; requirements; program approval; the Waste Acceptance Review Panel (WARP); description of the Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP); facility evaluation; recent program accomplishments, nuclear facility safety changes; higher-activity waste stream disposal; and, large volume bulk waste streams.

  5. Fiscal year 1996 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Site summary baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johndro-Collins, A.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical baseline is a hierarchical description of the Hanford Site cleanup mission. This technical baseline does not address the science, technology, or economic transition missions. It begins with a definition of the existing conditions at the Hanford Site, provides a description of the end product or mission accomplishments at completion, presents a statement of the major requirements and constraints that must be observed during the performance of the mission, and provides a statement of the top-level strategic approach to accomplish the mission. Mission-level interfaces are also described. This information is further defined hierarchically in increasing levels of detail. This definition is composed of the following major elements: functions that are key task descriptions; requirements that are the measurable standards to which the functions must be performed; architectures which are specific engineering solutions or systems that perform the functions described earlier; and verification ensuring the system satisfies the requirements and fulfills the functions. The above information is supplemented with the following: interface data; risk analyses and watch lists; assumptions; and required analyses.

  6. Active Constraint Regions for Optimal Operation of Distillation Magnus G. Jacobsen and Sigurd Skogestad*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    , NTNU, N-7491, Trondheim, Norway ABSTRACT: When designing the control structure of distillation columnsActive Constraint Regions for Optimal Operation of Distillation Columns Magnus G. Jacobsen presented in an earlier paper, to find how the active constraints for distillation columns change

  7. Safety analysis--200 Area Savannah River Site: Separations Area operations Building 211-H Outside Facilities. Supplement 11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-Area Outside Facilities are located in the 200-H Separations Area and are comprised of a number of processes, utilities, and services that support the separations function. Included are enriched uranium loadout, bulk chemical storage, water handling, acid recovery, general purpose evaporation, and segregated solvent facilities. In addition, services for water, electricity, and steam are provided. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Area Outside Facilities and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the SR Implementation Plan for DOE order 5481.1A. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the facility can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations, to the environment, and to operating personnel. In this report, risks are defined as the expected frequencies of accidents, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequences in person-rem. Following the summary description of facility and operations is the site evaluation including the unique features of the H-Area Outside Facilities. The facility and process design are described in Chapter 3.0 and a description of operations and their impact is given in Chapter 4.0. The accident analysis in Chapter 5.0 is followed by a list of safety related structures and systems (Chapter 6.0) and a description of the Quality Assurance program (Chapter 7.0). The accident analysis in this report focuses on estimating the risk from accidents as a result of operation of the facilities. The operations were evaluated on the basis of three considerations: potential radiological hazards, potential chemical toxicity hazards, and potential conditions uniquely different from normal industrial practice.

  8. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is comprised of appendices which support monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during 1993. Appendix A contains onsite Pu-238, gross beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides in air. Appendix B contains onsite tritium in air. Appendix C contains onsite Pu-238, Sr-90, gross alpha and beta, gamma-emitting radionuclides, Ra-226, Ra-228 and tritium in water. A summary of 1993 results of offsite radiological monitoring is included in Appendix D. Appendix E contains radioactive noble gases in air onsite. Appendix F contains onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data. Historical trends in onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data are contained in Appendix G. Appendix H summarizes 1993 compliance at the DOE/NV NTS and non-NTS facilities. Appendix I summarizes the 1993 results of non radiological monitoring.

  9. Operational Awareness Oversight of the Nevada National Security Site, August 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y earEnergy T H EaBuildingOperating and MaintainingHSS

  10. Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

  11. Supplement Analysis to the 1999 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Proposed Disposition of Certain Large Containment Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) (DOE 1999a) adequately addresses the environmental effects of introducing a proposed project for the clean-out and decontamination (DECON) of certain large containment vessels into the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA) 3, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. After undergoing the clean-out and DECON steps, the subject containment vessels would be disposed of at LANL's TA-54 low-level waste (LLW) disposal site or, as appropriate, at a DOE or commercial offsite permitted LLW-regulated landfill; after actinides were recovered from the DECON solution within the CMR Building, they would be moved to LANL's TA-55 Plutonium Facility and undergo subsequent processing at that facility for reuse. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9(c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an environmental impact statement (EIS) when an agency makes substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns, or there are changed circumstances or new or changed information relevant to concerns and bearing on the proposed action or its impacts. This SA is prepared in accordance with Section 10 CFR 10211.314(c) of the DOE's regulations for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementation that states: ''When it is unclear whether or not an EIS supplement is required, DOE shall prepare a Supplement Analysis''. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of the proposed project action with the LANL operations capabilities evaluated in the 1999 SWEIS in support DOE's long-term hydrodynamic testing program at LANL, as well as the waste disposal capabilities evaluated in the SWEIS in support of LANL operations. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in the SWEIS analysis. The SWEIS analyzed the impacts of performing plutonium (Pu) and actinide activities, including hydrodynamic testing support activity, at the Plutonium Facility and at the CMR Building.

  12. CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE OPERATING EXPERIENCE AND LESSONS LEARNED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) is the first, production-scale Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction process for cesium separation to be constructed. The process utilizes an engineered solvent to remove cesium from waste alkaline salt solution resulting from nuclear processes. While the application of this solvent extraction process is unique, the process uses commercially available centrifugal contactors for the primary unit operation as well as other common methods of physical separation of immiscible liquids. The fission product, cesium-137, is the primary focus of the process due to the hazards associated with its decay. The cesium is extracted from the waste, concentrated, and stripped out of the solvent resulting in a low-level waste salt solution and a concentrated cesium nitrate stream. The concentrated cesium stream can be vitrified into borosilicate glass with almost no increase in glass volume, and the salt solution can be dispositioned as a low-level grout. The unit is deployed as an interim process to disposition waste prior to start-up of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The Salt Waste Processing Facility utilizes the same cesium removal technology, but will treat more contaminated waste. The MCU is not only fulfilling a critical need, it is the first demonstration of the process at production-scale.

  13. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohori, Makoto [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan); Kinoshita, Takayoshi [Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuencho 1-1, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Yoshimura, Seiji [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan); Warizaya, Masaichi [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan); Nakajima, Hidenori [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan)]. E-mail: hidenori.nakajima@jp.astellas.com; Miyake, Hiroshi [Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokodai 5-2-3, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-2698 (Japan)

    2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGF{beta}-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC{sub 50} values of 0.08 and 0.05 {mu}M. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to S{gamma} of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, N{zeta} of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, N{delta}2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPK{alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}/{delta} which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades.

  14. activity-dependent polyadenylation site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 37 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  15. Evaluation and Screening of Remedial Technologies for Uranium at the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimmons, Michael J.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is presently conducting a re-evaluation of remedies addressing persistent dissolved uranium concentrations in the upper aquifer under the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This work is being conducted as a Phase III feasibility study for the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy. As part of the feasibility study process, a comprehensive inventory of candidate remedial technologies was conducted by PNNL. This report documents the identification and screening of candidate technologies. The screening evaluation was conducted in accordance with guidance and processes specified by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations associated with implementation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act process.

  16. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

  17. Contaminated land and groundwater management at Sellafield, a large operational site with significant legacy and contaminated land challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeve, Phil; Eilbeck, Katherine [British Nuclear Group Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sellafield is a former Royal Ordnance Factory used since the 1940's for the production and reprocessing of fissile materials. Leaks and spills from these plants and their associated waste facilities has led to radioactive contaminated ground legacy of up to 20 million m{sup 3}. Consideration of land contamination at Sellafield began in 1976, following discovery of a major leak from a waste storage silo. Over the past three decades there has been a programme of environmental monitoring and several phases of characterization. The latest phase of characterization is a pounds 10 million contract to develop second generation conceptual and numeric models. The Site Licence Company that operates the site has been subject to structural changes due to reorganizations within the British nuclear industry. There has also been a change in emphasis to place an increased importance on accelerated decommissioning. To address these challenges a new contaminated land team and contaminated land and groundwater management plan have been established. Setting and measuring performance against challenging objectives is important. The management plan has to be cognizant of the long timescales (ca. 80 years) for final remediation. Data review, collation, acquisition, analysis, and storage is critical for success. It is equally important to seize opportunities for early environmental gains. It is possible to accelerate the development and delivery of a contaminated land and groundwater management plan by using international experts. (authors)

  18. Oxidation of substrates tethered to N-donor ligands for modeling non-heme diiron enzyme active sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, Emily Carrig, 1978-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1. Modeling Carboxylate-Rich Diiron Sites of Dioxygen-Dependent Non-Heme Enzymes Carboxylate-bridged diiron centers are employed in a variety of biological systems to activate dioxygen for substrate oxidation, and ...

  19. Site Characterization Activities with a focus on NETL MMV efforts: Southwest Regional Partnership, San Juan Basin Pilot, New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's San Juan Basin pilot site to aid in the deployment and Verification (MMV) associated with geologic sequestration activities. Our efforts are primarily focused sequestration test in the

  20. Design and Synthesis of a Novel Triptycene-Based Ligand for Modeling Carboxylate-Bridged Diiron Enzyme Active Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yang

    A novel triptycene-based ligand with a preorganized framework was designed to model carboxylate-bridged diiron active sites in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) hydroxylase enzymes. The synthesis of the ...

  1. Investigation of Reaction Networks and Active Sites In Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming Over Co-Based Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paper by Umit S. Ozkan, Hua Song, and Lingzhi Zhang (Ohio State University) on the fundamental understanding of reaction networks, active sites of deactivation mechanisms of potential bio-ethanol steam reforming catalysts.

  2. Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE proposes to continue operating the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos County, in north-central New Mexico. DOE has identified and assessed four alternatives for the operation of LANL: (1) No Action, (2) Expanded Operations, (3) Reduced Operations, and (4) Greener. Expanded Operations is DOE's Preferred Alternative, with the exception that DOE would only implement pit manufacturing at a level of 20 pits per year. In the No Action Alternative, DOE would continue the historical mission support activities LANL has conducted at planned operational levels. In the Expanded Operations Alternative, DOE would operate LANL at the highest levels of activity currently foreseeable, including full implementation of the mission assignments from recent programmatic documents. Under the Reduced Operations Alternative, DOE would operate LANL at the minimum levels of activity necessary to maintain the capabilities to support the DOE mission in the near term. Under the Greener Alternative, DOE would operate LANL to maximize operations in support of nonproliferation, basic science, materials science, and other nonweapons areas, while minimizing weapons activities. Under all of the alternatives, the affected environment is primarily within 50 miles (80 kilometers) of LANL. Analyses indicate little difference in the environmental impacts among alternatives. The primary discriminators are: collective worker risk due to radiation exposure, socioeconomic effects due to LANL employment changes, and electrical power demand.

  3. [Aluminum coordination and active sites on aluminas, Y-zeolites and pillared layered silicates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripiat, J.J.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is organized in four sections. In the first the authors will outline structural features which are common to all fine grained alumina, as well as to non-framework alumina in zeolites. This section will be followed by a study of the surface vs. bulk coordination of aluminum. The third section will deal with measurement of the number of acid sites and the scaling of their strength. The fourth and last section will describe three model reactions: the isomerization of 1-butene and of 2 cis-butene; the isomerization and disproportionation of oxtho-xylene; and the transformation of trichloroethane into vinyl chloride followed by the polymerization of the vinyl chloride. The relationship between chemical activity and selectivity and what is known of the local structure of the active catalytic sites will be underlined. Other kinds of zeolites besides Y zeolite have been studied. Instead of the aluminum pillared silicates they found it more interesting to study the substitution of silicon by aluminum in a layered structure containing a permanent porosity (aluminated sepiolite).

  4. Bringing the world home: International activities at the Department of Energy`s environmental management sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slate, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Flage, E. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken the monumental task of environmental cleanup at its many sites and facilities. To accomplish this effort more efficiently, the DOE has embarked on a program to develop new environmental technologies through private industry, its national laboratories, and its contractors. These new technologies will be lower cost, faster, or more effective than technologies currently available. DOE also realizes that many foreign countries have similar problems and possess developed technologies and scientific capabilities which are not available in the United States. The Department has made a wide variety of investments to access these technologies and capabilities and to work with the international community on several common environmental problems. This paper summarizes a set of papers that will be presented at a special session at Spectrum `96. These papers will describe recently completed and current international activities at each of the major DOE sites and at Headquarters, plans for additional activities, and lessons learned. They will also provide recommendations for improving the effectiveness of DOE`s international initiatives.

  5. Operations & Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations and Maintenance Operations OASIS: OATI (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) Contact Information...

  6. Operations & Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates Operations & Maintenance Operations OASIS: WACM (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) wesTTrans Common...

  7. Regulatory impact analysis of final environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards promulgated under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public health and environment after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the standards during mill operations is very limited.

  8. Design criteria applicable to the environmental restoration of sites affected by uranium mining activities in the past

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carboneras, P. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, M. [INITEC, Madrid (Spain)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the authors discuss the basic aspects to be considered while evaluating different alternatives to perform environmental restoration of sites affected by naturally occurring radionuclides, enhanced by human actions, as is the case in some old uranium mining activities. The discussion is confined to sites where radiation hazards had existed forever (sites with uranium deposits) and where the mining activities have introduced several factors modifying the initial situation, leading to the now existing one, requiring intervention as decided by the relevant authorities, in accordance with recommendations of ICRP60.

  9. Environmental restoration and waste management site specific plan for Oak Ridge Operation Office Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) occupies 748 security-fenced acres located on a 3,400-acre tract in McCracken County, Kentucky, which was previously part of the Kentucky Ordnance Works. The principle objective on-site process at PGDP is the separation of uranium isotopes through gaseous diffusion. The process produces enriched uranium, which is used for nuclear fuel in commercial power plants and for military purposes. This document provides an overview of the major environmental and waste management concerns at PGDP, requirements for implementation, organization/management, corrective activities, environmental restoration, waste management options, compliance with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), reporting and data management, quality assurance and federal, state and local interactions. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority regional waste management center at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a landfill and technology center for regionally-generated municipal solid waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The facility would serve the municipal solid waste disposal needs for SRS and at least nine of the surrounding counties who currently comprise the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority (TRSWA). Additional counties could become included in the proposed action at some future date. Current Federal and state requirements do not afford individual counties and municipalities within the region encompassing SRS the ability to efficiently or economically operate modern waste management facilities. In addition, consolidation of regional municipal solid waste at one location would have the benefit of reducing the duplicity of environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of county-level facilities. The option to seek a combined disposal and technology development facility based on a regionally-cooperative effort was selected as a viable alternative to the existing individual SRS or county disposal activities. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR Part 1021). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. Based on the potential for impacts described for impacts described herein, DOE will either publish a Finding of No Significant Impact or prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS).

  11. Oversight Scheduling and Operational Awareness at the Savannah...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on oversight be postponed until contract negotiations with Parsons are completed. 5. As an operational awareness activity, the Site Lead performed a limited-scope review of...

  12. Natural resource management activities at the Savannah River Site. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences of ongoing natural resource management activities on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Appendix A contains the Natural Resources Management Plant (NRMP). While several SRS organizations have primary responsibilities for different elements of the plan, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Savannah River Forest Station (SRFS) is responsible for most elements. Of the river scenarios defined in 1985, the High-Intensity Management alternative established the upper bound of environmental consequences; it represents a more intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative established compliance mechanisms for several natural resource-related requirements and maximum practical timber harvesting. Similarly, the Low-Intensity Management alternative established the lower bound of environmental consequences and represents a less intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative also established compliance mechanisms, but defined a passively managed natural area. The Proposed Action of this EA describes the current level of multiple-natural resource management. This EA reviews the proposed action, and the high and low intensity alternative scenarios.

  13. Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

  14. Proposal for the award of an industrial service contract for stores operations and relatedlogistics, in-house mail distribution and transport services on the CERN site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document concerns the award of an industrial support contract for stores operations and related logistics, in-house mail distribution and transport services on the CERN site. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium ISS (CH) - ISS (ES), for stores operations and related logistics, in-house mail distribution and transport services on the CERN site for a period of three years for a total amount not exceeding 10 312 028 Swiss francs not subject to revision. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period.

  15. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  16. SWEIS Yearbook-2012 Comparison of 2012 Data to Projections of the 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahowald, Hallie B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wright, Marjorie Alys [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) operations data for Calendar Year (CY) 2012 mostly fell within the 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) projections. Operation levels for one LANL facility exceeded the 2008 SWEIS capability projections—Radiochemistry Facility; however, none of the capability increases caused exceedances in radioactive air emissions, waste generation, or National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge. Several facilities exceeded the2008 SWEIS levels for waste generation quantities; however, all were one-time, non-routine events that do not reflect the day-to-day operations of the Laboratory. In addition, total site-wide waste generation quantities were below SWEIS projections for all waste types, reflecting the overall levels of operations at both the Key and Non-Key Facilities. Although gas and electricity consumption have remained within the 2008 SWEIS limits for utilities, water consumption exceeded the 2008 SWEIS projections by 27 million gallons in CY 2012.

  17. EIS-0238-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Albuquerque Operations Office, has prepared a Supplemental Analysis (SA) to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a proposal for modifying current methods utilized to receive and manage certain offsite unwanted radioactive sealed sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory or if additional documentation under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is needed.

  18. EA-1906: Operations, Consolidation, and Upgrades at the Office of Secure Transportation Western Command Site, Albuquerque, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates environmental impacts associated with the siting and construction of several proposed buildings, including a new vehicle maintenance facility and mobile equipment maintenance building (and their support structures) at the Western Command Site, Albuquerque, NM.

  19. Effect of Secondary Interactions on the Fundamental Properties of Small Molecule Models of the Diiron Hydrogenase Active Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singleton, Michael Lee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    mixed-valent FeIFeII complexes. An X-ray crystal structure of one of these complexes, (?-SCH2 C(CH3)2CH2S-)[Fe(CO)2PMe3]2PF6 shows both a semi-bridging carbonyl and an open site similar to the 2-Fe subsite in the Hox state of the enzyme active site...

  20. SUPPLEMENTAL COLUMBIA RIVER PROTECTION ACTIVITIES AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 2008 TECHNICAL REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; Dawn S. Kaback, D; Eugene L. LeBoeuf, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Karen L. Skubal, K; David L. Cocke, D; Paul C. Deutsch, P

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in 2006, the US Department of Energy (DOE) supported nine applied research projects to improve the protection of the Columbia River and mitigate the impacts of Hanford Site groundwater. These projects were funded through a supplemental Congressional budget allocation, and are now in various stages of completion in accordance with the research plans. The DOE Office of Environmental Management Groundwater and Soil Cleanup Technologies (EM-22) sponsored a technical peer review meeting for these projects in Richland WA, July 28-31, 2008. The overall objective of the peer review is to provide information to support DOE decisions about the status and potential future application of the various technologies. The charge for the peer review panel was to develop recommendations for each of the nine 'technologies'. Team members for the July 2008 review were Brian Looney, Gene LeBoeuf, Dawn Kaback, Karen Skubal, Joe Rossabi, Paul Deutsch, and David Cocke. Previous project reviews were held in May 2007 and March-May of 2006. The team used the following four rating categories for projects: (a) Incorporate the technology/strategy in ongoing and future EM activities; (b) Finish existing scope of applied research and determine potential for EM activities when research program is finished; (c) Discontinue current development activities and do not incorporate technology/strategy into ongoing and future EM activities unless a significant and compelling change in potential viability is documented; and (d) Supplement original funded work to obtain the data needed to support a DOE decision to incorporate the technology into ongoing and future EM activities. The supplemental funding portfolio included two projects that addressed strontium, five projects that addressed chromium, one project that addressed uranium and one project that addressed carbon tetrachloride. The projects ranged from in situ treatment methods for immobilizing contaminants using chemical-based methods such as phosphate addition, to innovative surface treatment technologies such as electrocoagulation. Total funding for the nine projects was $9,900,000 in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and $2,000,000 in FY 2007. At the Richland meeting, the peer reviewers provided a generally neutral assessment of the projects and overall progress, and a generally positive assessment with regard to the principal investigators meeting their stated research objectives and performing the planned laboratory research and limited field work. Only one project, the Electrocoagulation Treatability Test, received a rating of 'discontinue' from the team because the project goals had not been met. Because this particular project has already ended, no action with respect to funding withdrawal is necessary. All other projects were recommended to be finished and/or incorporated into field efforts at Hanford. Specific technical comments and recommendations were provided by the team for each project.

  1. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O? bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H?O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH boundmore »structures have the highest calculated activity to date.« less

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF OKLAHOMA ABANDONED DRILLING AND PRODUCTION SITES AND ASSOCIATED PUBLIC EDUCATION/OUTREACH ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Terry

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has participated with the Oklahoma Energy Resource Board (OERB) since 1995 by providing grant funding for on-going work in both environmental assessment of abandoned oilfield exploration and production sites and associated public education/outreach activities. The OERB, a state agency created in 1993 by the Oklahoma legislature, administers programs funded by an assessment of one tenth of one percent on all oil and natural gas produced and sold in the state of Oklahoma. Approximately one half of the funds are used to assess and remediate abandoned oilfield sites and the other half are being used to educate about the importance of the oil and natural gas industry and OERB's environmental efforts. Financial participation through grant funding by the U.S. D.O.E. has been $200,000 annually which represents approximately 3 percent of OERB's private funding. Most of OERB's revenues come from an assessment of 1/10th of 1% on the sale of crude and natural gas in Oklahoma. The assessment is considered voluntary in that any interest owner may ask for a refund annually of their contributions to the fund. On average, 95% of the assessment dollars have remained with OERB, which shows tremendous support by the industry. This Final Report summarizes the progress of the three year grant. The purpose of this three-year project was to continue the progress of the OERB to accomplish its environmental and educational objectives and transfer information learned to other organizations and producing states in the industry.

  3. History of the 185-/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory and its effects on reactor operations at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 185-D deaeration building and the 189-D refrigeration building were constructed at Hanford during 1943 and 1944. Both buildings were constructed as part of the influent water cooling system for D reactor. The CMS studies eliminated the need for 185-D function. Early gains in knowledge ended the original function of the 189-D building mission. In 1951, 185-D and 189-D were converted to a thermal-hydraulic laboratory. The experiments held in the thermal-hydraulic lab lead to historic changes in Hanford reactor operations. In late 1951, the exponential physics experiments were moved to the 189-D building. In 1958, new production reactor experiments were begun in 185/189-D. In 1959, Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor experiments were added to the 185/189-D facility. By 1960, the 185/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory was one of the few full service facilities of its type in the nation. During the years 1961--1963 tests continued in the facility in support of existing reactors, new production reactors, and the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor. In 1969, Fast Flux Test Facility developmental testings began in the facility. Simulations in 185/189-D building aided in the N Reactor repairs in the 1980`s. In 1994 the facility was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, because of its pioneering role over many years in thermal hydraulics, flow studies, heat transfer, and other reactor coolant support work. During 1994 and 1995 it was demolished in the largest decontamination and decommissioning project thus far in Hanford Site history.

  4. Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

  5. U.S. Department of Energy electric and hybrid vehicle Site Operator Program at Platte River Power Authority. Final report, July 3, 1991--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmert, R.A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Platte River Power Authority (Platte River) is a political subdivision of the state of Colorado, owned by the four municipalities of Fort Collins, Loveland, Longmont and Estes Park, Colorado. Platte River is a non-profit, publicly owned, joint-action agency formed to construct, operate and maintain generating plants, transmission systems and related facilities for the purpose of delivering to the four municipalities electric energy for distribution and resale. Platte River, as a participant in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Site Operator Program, worked to accomplish the Site Operator Program goals and objectives to field test and evaluate electric and electric-hybrid vehicles and electric vehicle systems in a real world application/environment. This report presents results of Platte River`s program (Program) during the five-years Platte River participated in the DOE Site Operator Program. Platte River participated in DOE Site Operator Program from July 3, 1991 through August 31, 1996. During its Program, Platte River conducted vehicle tests and evaluations, and electric vehicle demonstrations in the Front Range region of Northern Colorado. Platte River also investigated electric vehicle infrastructure issues and tested infrastructure components. Platte River`s Program objectives were as follows: evaluate the year round performance, operational costs, reliability, and life cycle costs of electric vehicles in the Front Range region of Northern Colorado; evaluate an electric vehicle`s usability and acceptability as a pool vehicle; test any design improvements or technological improvements on a component level that may be made available to PRPA and which can be retrofit into vehicles; and develop, test and evaluate, and demonstrate components to be used in charging electric vehicles.

  6. Computation Of The Residual Radionuclide Activity Within Three Natural Waterways At The Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R. A.; Phifer, M. A.

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010 a Composite Analysis (CA) of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Savannah River Site (SRS) was completed. This investigation evaluated the dose impact of the anticipated SRS End State residual sources of radionuclides to offsite members of the public. Doses were assessed at the locations where SRS site streams discharge into the Savannah River at the perimeter of the SRS. Although the model developed to perform this computation indicated that the dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/yr (30 mrem/yr), associated with CA, was not approached at the Points of Assessment (POAs), a significant contribution to the total computed dose was derived from the radionuclides (primarily Cs-137) bound-up in the soil and sediment of the drainage corridors of several SRS streams. DOE’s Low Level Waste Federal Review Group (LFRG) reviewed the 2010 CA and identified several items to be addressed in the SRS Maintenance Program. One of the items recognized Cs-137 in the Lower Three Runs (LTR) Integrator Operable Unit (IOU), as a significant CA dose driver. The item made the recommendation that SRS update the estimated radionuclide inventory, including Cs-137, in the LTR IOU. That initial work has been completed and its radionuclide inventory refined. There are five additional streams at SRS and the next phase of the response to the LFRG concern was to obtain a more accurate inventory and distribution of radionuclides in three of those streams, Fourmile Branch (FMB), Pen Branch (PB) and Steel Creek (SC). Each of these streams is designated as an IOU, which are defined for the purpose of this investigation as the surface water bodies and associated wetlands, including the channel sediment, floodplain sed/soil, and related biota. If present, radionuclides associated with IOUs are adsorbed to the streambed sediment and soils of the shallow floodplains that lie immediately adjacent to stream channels. The scope of this effort included the evaluation of any previous sampling and analysis data that had been collected for various SRS investigations, as well as the additional streambed and floodplain sampling and analysis data acquired more recently as part of the ongoing SRS IOU program, and associated specifically with the FMB, PB, and SC IOUs. Samples have been acquired along the waterways, within the stream channels themselves and in the adjacent floodplain zones. While Cs-137 is the most significant and abundant radionuclide associated with the SRS waterways, it is not the only radionuclide, hence work was conducted to evaluate all radionuclides present.

  7. Remote Handled TRU Waste Status and Activities and Challenges at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCKENNEY, D.E.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant portion of the Department of Energy's forecast volume of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste will originate from the Hanford Site. The forecasted Hanford RH-TRU waste volume of over 2000 cubic meters may constitute over one-third of the forecast inventory of RH-TRU destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To date, the Hanford TRU waste program has focused on the retrieval, treatment and certification of the contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes. This near-term focus on CH-TRU is consistent with the National TRU Program plans and capabilities. The first shipment of CH-TRU waste from Hanford to the WIPP is scheduled early in Calendar Year 2000. Shipments of RH-TRU from Hanford to the WIPP are scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 2006 per the National TRU Waste Management Plan. This schedule has been incorporated into milestones within the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). These Tri-Party milestones (designated the ''M-91'' series of milestones) relate to development of project management plans, completion of design efforts, construction and contracting schedules, and initiation of process operations. The milestone allows for modification of an existing facility, construction of a new facility, and/or commercial contracting to provide the capabilities for processing and certification of RH-TRU wastes for disposal at the WIPP. The development of a Project Management Plan (PMP) for TRU waste is the first significant step in the development of a program for disposal of Hanford's RH-TRU waste. This PMP will address the path forward for disposition of waste streams that cannot be prepared for disposal in the Hanford Waste Receiving and Processing facility (a contact-handled, small container facility) or other Site facilities. The PMP development effort has been initiated, and the PMP will be provided to the regulators for their approval by June 30, 2000. This plan will detail the path forward for the Hanford RH-TRU program.

  8. An Overview Comparison of Tank Closure Activities at Certain DOE Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUKE, J.J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a summary-level comparison of the similarities and differences of tank closure programs at the four primary radioactive waste tank sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The sites are Hanford, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The depth of our understanding of the closure programs varies with the amount of detailed information each of the four sites has provided to date. This paper was prepared using the best available information, including direct communications with key tank closure personnel at each of the sites. Many of the current schedules are under review for possible acceleration.

  9. Operating Experience and Lessons Learned in the Use of Soft-Sided Packaging for Transportation and Disposal of Low Activity Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapoor, A. [DOE; Gordon, S. [NSTec; Goldston, W. [Energy Solutions

    2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the operating experience and lessons learned at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites as a result of an evaluation of potential trailer contamination and soft-sided packaging integrity issues related to the disposal of low-level and mixed low-level (LLW/MLLW) radioactive waste shipments. Nearly 4.3 million cubic meters of LLW/MLLW will have been generated and disposed of during fiscal year (FY) 2010 to FY 2015—either at commercial disposal sites or disposal sites owned by DOE. The LLW/MLLW is packaged in several different types of regulatory compliant packaging and transported via highway or rail to disposal sites safely and efficiently in accordance with federal, state, and local regulations and DOE orders. In 1999, DOE supported the development of LLW containers that are more volumetrically efficient, more cost effective, and easier to use as compared to metal or wooden containers that existed at that time. The DOE Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), working in conjunction with the plastic industry, tested several types of soft-sided waste packaging systems that meet U.S. Department of Transportation requirements for transport of low specific activity and surface contaminated objects. Since then, soft-sided packaging of various capacities have been used successfully by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects to package, transport, and dispose D&D wastes throughout the DOE complex. The joint team of experts assembled by the Energy Facility Contractors Group from DOE waste generating sites, DOE and commercial waste disposal facilities, and soft-sided packaging suppliers conducted the review of soft-sided packaging operations and transportation of these packages to the disposal sites. As a result of this evaluation, the team developed several recommendations and best practices to prevent or minimize the recurrences of equipment contamination issues and proper use of soft-sided packaging for transport and disposal of waste.

  10. 1994 Site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  11. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009, Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009. Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  12. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  13. Electric and hybrid vehicle program, site operator program quarterly progress report for April through June 1996 (third quarter of fiscal year 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Briasco, S. [Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. The goals of the Site Operator Program include the field evaluation of electric vehicles (EVs) in real-world applications and environments; the advancement of electric vehicle technologies; the development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of EVs by the public. The Site Operator Program currently consists of eleven participants under contract and two other organizations that have data-sharing agreements with the Program (Table ES-1). Several national organizations have joined DOE to further the introduction and awareness of electric vehicles, including: (1) EVAmerica (a utility program) and DOE conduct performance and evaluation tests to support market development for electric vehicles; and (2) DOE, the Department of Transportation, the Electric Transportation Coalition, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas are conducting a series of workshops to encourage urban groups in Clean Cities (a DOE program) to initiate the policies and infrastructure development necessary to support large-scale demonstrations, and ultimately the mass market use, of electric vehicles. The current focus of the Program is the collection and dissemination of EV operations and performance data to aid in the evaluation of real-world EV use. This report contains several sections with vehicle evaluation as a focus.

  14. Fragment Based Protein Active Site Analysis Using Markov Random Field Combinations of Stereochemical Feature-Based Classifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pai Karkala, Reetal

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of these methods have been able to account successfully for the diversity in the sequence and structural conformations observed in proteins that have the same function. An additional complication is the flexibility in both the protein active site and the ligand...

  15. New Mexico Air Operating Permit List of Trivial Activities | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania:Information Operating Permit List of Trivial Activities Jump

  16. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  17. Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, B.

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, single particle composition and size distributions at a high-elevation research site from March 2011 are presented.

  18. Activity-level Work Planning and Control in the Hanford Site...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Worker Evaluation Tool Addthis Description Slide Presentation by Ted Giltz, Volpentest HAMMER Federal Training Center. Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool, Verifying...

  19. The effect of the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid on the activity in catalyzing aldol condensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Xiaofang [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Yu Xiaobo [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wu Shujie; Liu Bo; Liu Heng [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.c [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Kan Qiubin, E-mail: catalysischina@yahoo.com.c [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts containing carboxylic and amine groups, which were immobilized at defined distance from one another on the mesoporous solid were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), elemental analysis, and back titration. Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance was more active than maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. It appears that the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid should be an essential factor for catalysis optimization. -- Graphical abstract: Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance and maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance. {yields} Maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance. {yields} Compared to maximum-C-A-SBA-15, proximal-C-A-SBA-15 was more active toward aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

  20. Corrosion Control during Closure Activities at the Savannah River Site - 13514

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, Bruce J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Subramanian, Karthik H.; Martin, Keisha B. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Site (SRS) separation process are stored in large underground carbon steel tanks. Until the waste is removed from storage, transferred, and processed, the materials and structures of the tanks must maintain a confinement function by providing a barrier to the environment and by maintaining acceptable structural stability during normal service and design basis events (e.g., earthquake conditions). A corrosion control program is in place to ensure that degradation of the steel does not impact the structural and leak integrity functions of these waste tanks. The SRS is currently retrieving waste from older waste tanks and processing the waste through the vitrification for long term stabilization. The retrieval processes prepare the tanks for ultimate closure (i.e., grouting) by removing sludge by mechanical and/or sluicing methods, dissolving salt cake by adding water, and chemical cleaning of the residual sludge with oxalic acid. Each of these retrieval methods will result in waste chemistry that does not meet the requirements of the current corrosion control program. Given the short-term exposure and limited remaining service life for the tanks in which retrievals are being performed, an assessment of the need for corrosion controls in these tanks was performed. The assessment reviewed the corrosion rates in the more aggressive environments and the postulated loads on the structure during the closure activities. The assessment concluded that the current corrosion control program may be suspended for a short period of time while final retrieval of the waste is performed. (authors)

  1. ATLAS off-Grid sites (Tier 3) monitoring. From local fabric monitoring to global overview of the VO computing activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PETROSYAN, A; The ATLAS collaboration; BELOV, S; ANDREEVA, J; KADOCHNIKOV, I

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing activities have so far concentrated in the "central" part of the experiment computing system, namely the first 3 tiers (the CERN Tier0, 10 Tier1 centers and over 60 Tier2 sites). Many ATLAS Institutes and National Communities have deployed (or intend to) deploy Tier-3 facilities. Tier-3 centers consist of non-pledged resources, which are usually dedicated to data analysis tasks by the geographically close or local scientific groups, and which usually comprise a range of architectures without Grid middleware. Therefore a substantial part of the ATLAS monitoring tools which make use of Grid middleware, cannot be used for a large fraction of Tier3 sites. The presentation will describe the T3mon project, which aims to develop a software suite for monitoring the Tier3 sites, both from the perspective of the local site administrator and that of the ATLAS VO, thereby enabling the global view of the contribution from Tier3 sites to the ATLAS computing activities. Special attention in p...

  2. Proposal for the award of a contract for the provision of maintenance and operation services on cooling and ventilation installations on the CERN site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document concerns the award of a contract for maintenance and operation services of the cooling and ventilation installations on the CERN site. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium COFATHEC (UK) â?? SOTEB NATIONAL ELEKTRO (FR), the lowest bidder, for the provision of the maintenance and operation of the cooling and ventilation installations on the CERN site for three years for a total amount of 6 127 250 euros (9 588 819 Swiss francs), not subject to revision until 30 June 2009. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period. 2006/67/5/e

  3. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats Site, operable unit 4, Ruston/North Tacoma Study Area, WA, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Ruston/North Tacoma Study Area, in Ruston and Tacoma, Washington. The EPA has divided the Commencement Bay/Nearshore Tideflats Superfund site into seven operable units (OU's) in order to facilitate the investigation, analysis, and cleanup of this very large site. Four of these OU's are associated with the Asarco smelter: OU 02 - Asarco Tacoma Smelter; OU 04 - Asarco Off-Property (Ruston/North Tacoma Study Area); OU 06 - Asarco Sediments; and OU 07 - Asarco Demolition. The remedy described in this ROD addresses OU 04 and involves the cleanup of arsenic and lead contaminated soils and slag in the Study Area, the residential community surrounding the smelter. This remedy will address the principal threat posed by conditions at the site, which is the ingestion of contaminated soil and dust.

  4. Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  5. A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lentsch, J.W.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  6. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  7. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  8. A review of market monitoring activities at U.S. independent system operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Goldman, Charles; Bartholomew, Emily

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policymakers have increasingly recognized the structural impediments to effective competition in electricity markets, which has resulted in a renewed emphasis on the need for careful market design and market monitoring in wholesale and retail electricity markets. In this study, we review the market monitoring activities of four Independent System Operators in the United States, focusing on such topics as the organization of an independent market monitoring unit (MMU), the role and value of external market monitors, performance metrics and indices to aid in market analysis, issues associated with access to confidential market data, and market mitigation and investigation authority. There is consensus across the four ISOs that market monitoring must be organizationally independent from market participants and that ISOs should have authority to apply some degree of corrective actions on the market, though scope and implementation differ across the ISOs. Likewise, current practices regarding access to confidential market data by state energy regulators varies somewhat by ISO. Drawing on our interviews and research, we present five examples that illustrate the impact and potential contribution of ISO market monitoring activities to enhance functioning of wholesale electricity markets. We also discuss several key policy and implementation issues that Western state policymakers and regulators should consider as market monitoring activities evolve in the West.

  9. active site h103w: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ST. LOUIS DOWNTOWN SITE Engineering Websites Summary: with the Manhattan Engi- neer District and the Atomic Energy Commission in the 1940s and 50's. The USACE encourages...

  10. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

  11. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

  12. DOE/EIS-0238, Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (1999)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE proposes to continue operating the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos County, in north-central New Mexico. DOE has identified and assessed four alternatives for the...

  13. Methanol Synthesis over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3: The Active Site in Industrial Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, Malte

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike homogeneous catalysts, heterogeneous catalysts that have been optimized through decades are typically so complex and hard to characterize that the nature of the catalytically active site is not known. This is one of the main stumbling blocks in developing rational catalyst design strategies in heterogeneous catalysis. We show here how to identify the crucial atomic structure motif for the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} methanol synthesis catalyst. Using a combination of experimental evidence from bulk-, surface-sensitive and imaging methods collected on real high-performance catalytic systems in combination with DFT calculations. We show that the active site consists of Cu steps peppered with Zn atoms, all stabilized by a series of well defined bulk defects and surface species that need jointly to be present for the system to work.

  14. A Conserved Surface Loop in Type I Dehydroquinate Dehydratases Positions an Active Site Arginine and Functions in Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Peterson, Scott N.; Caffrey, Michael; Anderson, Wayne F.; Lavie, Arnon (UC); (UIC)

    2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQD) catalyzes the third step in the biosynthetic shikimate pathway. We present three crystal structures of the Salmonella enterica type I DHQD that address the functionality of a surface loop that is observed to close over the active site following substrate binding. Two wild-type structures with differing loop conformations and kinetic and structural studies of a mutant provide evidence of both direct and indirect mechanisms of involvement of the loop in substrate binding. In addition to allowing amino acid side chains to establish a direct interaction with the substrate, closure of the loop necessitates a conformational change of a key active site arginine, which in turn positions the substrate productively. The absence of DHQD in humans and its essentiality in many pathogenic bacteria make the enzyme a target for the development of nontoxic antimicrobials. The structures and ligand binding insights presented here may inform the design of novel type I DHQD inhibiting molecules.

  15. Environmental assessment for the resiting, construction, and operation of the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This environmental assessment (EA) presents estimated environmental impacts from the resiting, construction, and operation of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), which is proposed to be constructed and operated on land near the south boundary of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The EMSL, if constructed, would be a modern research facility in which experimental, theoretical, and computational techniques can be focused on environmental restoration problems, such as the chemical and transport behavior of complex mixtures of contaminants in the environment. The EMSL design includes approximately 18,500 square meters (200,000 square feet) of floor space on a 12-hectare (30-acre) site. The proposed new site is located within the city limits of Richland in north Richland, at the south end of DOE`s 300 Area, on land to be deeded to the US by the Battelle Memorial Institute. Approximately 200 persons are expected to be employed in the EMSL and approximately 60 visiting scientists may be working in the EMSL at any given time. State-of-the-art equipment is expected to be installed and used in the EMSL. Small amounts of hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) are expected to be used in experimental work in the EMSL.

  16. Site environmental report for 2008 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2008 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2008. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  17. Site environmental report for 2004 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2004 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2004. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  18. Site environmental report for 2006 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2006 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2006. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  19. Site environmental report for 2005 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Site Office (SSO) oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2005 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2005. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  20. Site environmental report for 2003 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2003 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2003. General site and environmental program information is also included.

  1. Preliminary Site Characterization Report, Rulsion Site, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of environmental information gathered during a review of the documents pertaining to Project Rulison and interviews with personnel who worked on the project. Project Rulison was part of Operation Plowshare (a program designed to explore peaceful uses for nuclear devices). The project consisted of detonating a 43-kiloton nuclear device on September 10, 1969, in western Colorado to stimulate natural gas production. Following the detonation, a reentry well was drilled and several gas production tests were conducted. The reentry well was shut-in after the last gas production test and was held in standby condition until the general cleanup was undertaken in 1972. A final cleanup was conducted after the emplacement and testing wells were plugged in 1976. However, some surface radiologic contamination resulted from decontamination of the drilling equipment and fallout from the gas flaring during drilling operations. With the exception of the drilling effluent pond, all surface contamination at the Rulison Site was removed during the cleanup operations. All mudpits and other excavations were backfilled, and both upper and lower drilling pads were leveled and dressed. This report provides information regarding known or suspected areas of contamination, previous cleanup activities, analytical results, a review of the regulatory status, the site`s physical environment, and future recommendations for Project Ruhson. Based on this research, several potential areas of contamination have been identified. These include the drilling effluent pond and mudpits used during drilling operations. In addition, contamination could migrate in the gas horizon.

  2. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

  3. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2008). Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  4. The Role of the Sellafield Ltd Centres of Expertise in Engaging with the Science, Environment and Technology Supply Chain and University Sector to Support Site Operations and Decommissioning in the UK Nuclear Industry - 13018

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, Ed [Uranium and Reactive Metals Centre of Expertise Lead, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [Uranium and Reactive Metals Centre of Expertise Lead, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Connor, Donna [Technical Capability Manager, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [Technical Capability Manager, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Keighley, Debbie [Head of Profession, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [Head of Profession, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and maintenance of the broad range of the highly technical skills required for safe and successful management of nuclear sites is of vital importance during routine operations, decommissioning and waste treatment activities.. In order to maintain a core team of technical experts, across all of the disciplines required for these tasks, the approach which has been taken by the Sellafield Ltd has been the formation of twenty five Centres of Expertise (CoE), each covering key aspects of the technical skills required for nuclear site operations. Links with the Specialist University Departments: The CoE leads are also responsible for establishing formal links with university departments with specialist skills and facilities relevant to their CoE areas. The objective of these links is to allow these very specialist capabilities within the university sector to be more effectively utilized by the nuclear industry, which benefits both sectors. In addition to the utilization of specialist skills, the university links are providing an important introduction to the nuclear industry for students and researchers. This is designed to develop the pipeline of potential staff, who will be required in the future by both the academic and industrial sectors. (authors)

  5. SWEIS annual review - CY2002 : a comparison of CY2002 operations to projections included in the site-wide environmental impact statement for continued operation of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayliss, Linda Sue (Outrider Environmental Planning & Technical Services, Cedar Crest, NM); White, Brenda Bailey (The Plus Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Guerrero, Joseph Vincent; Catechis, Christopher Spyros (Outrider Environmental Planning & Technical Services, Cedar Crest, NM)

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SNL/NM CY2002 SWEIS Annual Review discusses changes in facilities and facility operations that have occurred in selected and notable facilities since source data were collected for the SNL/NM SWEIS (DOE/EIS-0281). The following information is presented: {sm_bullet} An updated overview of SNL/NM selected and notable facilities and infrastructure capabilities. {sm_bullet} An overview of SNL/NM environment, safety, and health programs, including summaries of the purpose, operations, activities, hazards, and hazard controls at relevant facilities and risk management methods for SNL/NM. {sm_bullet} Updated base year activities data, together with related inventories, material consumption, emissions, waste, and resource consumption. {sm_bullet} Appendices summarizing activities and related hazards at SNL/NM individual special, general, and highbay laboratories, and chemical purchases.

  6. Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application Supplemental Information [Sec 1 Thru 5] Vol 1 Thru 3 Appendices A Thru C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CURN, B.L.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61), Subpart H: ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv). which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.S E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE. which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard.

  7. Tertiary contacts distant from the active site prime a ribozyme for catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martick, Monika; Scott, William G

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pH-activity relationships of G8 and G12 variants at thecharged alkoxide anion. (C) The G8-C3 base pair is important

  8. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

  9. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  10. Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  11. SITE OFFICE CONSOLIDATION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paul Golan, Site Office Manager, SLAC/LBNL, will present on the role of the DOE Site Office. We anticipate that Paul will cover the role of the DOE Site Office, operating model, and vision.

  12. Scenarios constructed for basaltic igneous activity at Yucca Mountain and vicinity; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, G.E.; Dunn, E.; Dockery, H.; Barnard, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Valentine, G.; Crowe, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basaltic volcanism has been identified as a possible future event initiating a release of radionuclides from a potential repository at the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository site. The performance assessment method set forth in the Site Characterization Plan (DOE, 1988) requires that a set of scenarios encompassing all significant radionuclide release paths to the accessible environment be described. This report attempts to catalogue the details of the interactions between the features and processes produced by basaltic volcanism in the presence of the presumed groundwater flow system and a repository structure, the engineered barrier system (EBS), and waste. This catalogue is developed in the form of scenarios. We define a scenario as a well-posed problem, starting from an initiating event or process and proceeding through a logically connected and physically possible combination or sequence of features, events, and processes (FEPs) to the release of contaminants.

  13. Proposed plan for remedial action for the Groundwater Operable Unit at the Chemical Plant Area of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Proposed Plan addresses the remediation of groundwater contamination at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring site in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The site is located approximately 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis in St. Charles County . Remedial activities at the site will be conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of the Army (DA), conducted a joint remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to allow for a comprehensive evaluation of groundwater conditions at the Weldon Spring chemical plant area and the Weldon Spring ordnance works area, which is an Army site adjacent to the chemical plant area. Consistent with DOE policy, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) values have been incorporated into the CERCLA process. That is, the analysis conducted and presented in the RVFS reports included an evaluation of environmental impacts that is comparable to that performed under NEPA. This Proposed Plan summarizes information about chemical plant area groundwater that is presented in the following documents: (1) The Remedial Investigation (RI), which presents information on the nature and extent of contamination; (2) The Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA), which evaluates impacts to human health and the environment that could occur if no cleanup action of the groundwater were taken (DOE and DA 1997a); and (3) The Feasibility Study (FS) and the Supplemental FS, which develop and evaluate remedial action alternatives for groundwater remediation.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Savannah River Site (USDOE), Operable Unit 5, Aiken, SC, March 27, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit located at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the results of the remedial investigation, no action is necessary at the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit to ensure the protection of human health and the environment. Since the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit poses no threat to human health or the environment, and no action is needed, the CERCLA Section 121 requirements are not applicable. This action is protective of human health and the environment and is meant to be a permanent solution, final action, for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit. No five-year remedy review is needed or will be performed.

  15. Status of activities on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report on the status of the Office of Environment's program for inactive uranium mill tailings sites is an analysis of the current status and a forecast of future activities of the Office of Environment. The termination date for receipt of information was September 30, 1980. Aerial radiological surveys and detailed ground radiological assessments of properties within the communities in the vicinity of the designated processing sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho led to the designation of an initial group of vicinity properties for remedial action. The potential health effects of the residual radioactive materials on or near these properties were estimated, and the Assistant Secretary for Environment recommended priorities for performing remedial action to the Department's Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. In designating these properties and establishing recommended priorities for performing remedial action, the Office of Environment consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, representatives from the affected State and local governments, and individual property owners. After notifying the Governors of each of the affected States and the Navajo Nation of the Secretary of Energy's designation of processing sites within their areas of jurisdiction and establishment of remedial action priorities, a Sample Cooperative Agreement was developed by the Department in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and provided to the affected States and the Navajo Nation for comments. During September 1980, a Cooperative Agreement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the designated Canonsburg processing site was executed by the Department. It is anticipated that a Cooperative Agreement between the State of Utah and the Department to perform remedial actions at the designated Salt Lake City site will be executed in the near future.

  16. Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

  17. Start | Grid View | Browse by Day OR Group/Topical | Author Index | Keyword Index | Personal Scheduler Active Constraint Regions for Economically Optimal Operation of Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Scheduler Active Constraint Regions for Economically Optimal Operation of Distillation Columns Tuesday and operation of distillation columns has been widely studied, as illustrated by for example Skogestad (1993 operation of distillation columns has been studied relatively little. The issue of active constraints

  18. Control of Substrate Access to the Active Site and Catalytic Mechanism of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi Site Office (FSO) FSO HomeContributed papers

  19. Conformational Lability in Serine Protease Active Sites: Structures of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator (HGFA) Alone and with the Inhibitory Domain from HGFA Inhibitor-1B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shia, Steven; Stamos, Jennifer; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Fan, Bin; Wu, Judy; Corpuz, Raquel T.; Santell, Lydia; Lazarus, Robert A.; Eigenbrot, Charles (Genentech)

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) is a serine protease that converts hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) into its active form. When activated HGF binds its cognate receptor Met, cellular signals lead to cell growth, differentiation, and migration, activities which promote tissue regeneration in liver, kidney and skin. Intervention in the conversion of HGF to its active form has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit where HGF/Met activity is associated with tumorigenesis. To help identify ways to moderate HGF/Met effects, we have determined the molecular structure of the protease domain of HGFA. The structure we determined, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, with no pseudo-substrate or inhibitor bound is characterized by an unconventional conformation of key residues in the enzyme active site. In order to find whether this apparently non-enzymatically competent arrangement would persist in the presence of a strongly-interacting inhibitor, we also have determined, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, the X-ray structure of HGFA complexed with the first Kunitz domain (KD1) from the physiological inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 1B (HAI-1B). In this complex we observe a rearranged substrate binding cleft that closely mirrors the cleft of other serine proteases, suggesting an extreme conformational dynamism. We also characterize the inhibition of 16 serine proteases by KD1, finding that the previously reported enzyme specificity of the intact extracellular region of HAI-1B resides in KD1 alone. We find that HGFA, matriptase, hepsin, plasma kallikrein and trypsin are potently inhibited, and use the complex structure to rationalize the structural basis of these results.

  20. Biological activities of binding site specific monoclonal antibodies to prolactin receptors of rabbit mammary gland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djiane, J.; Dusanter-Fourt, I.; Katoh, M.; Kelly, P.A.

    1985-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The biological activity of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the rabbit mammary prolactin (PRL) receptor (M110, A82, and A917) were investigated using explants of rabbit mammary gland. The three mAbs which were all able to inhibit the binding of SVI-ovine prolactin to its receptor had different biological activities. Two mAbs (M110 and A82) were able to prevent the stimulating effect of PRL on casein synthesis when the molar ratio between the mAb and PRL was 100. One mAb (A917) was able to mimic the action of PRL on both casein and DNA ((TH)thymidine incorporation) synthesis, whereas the other two mAbs were without any stimulatory effect. For this stimulatory effect to be observed, bivalency of the antibody was essential, since monovalent fragments, which were able to inhibit PRL binding, had no agonistic activity. The ability of the mAbs to induce a down-regulation of receptors was also studied. These studies suggest that the binding domain of the receptor might be relatively complex, since only a part of this domain recognized by the antibody with PRL-like activity was able to induce hormonal action. Alternatively, only those antibodies able to microaggregate the receptors may possess PRL-like activity.

  1. The Bioorganometallic Chemistry of Iron and the Diatomic Ligands CO and NO as Related to Hydrogenase Active Sites and Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bethel, Ryan D

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a diiron organometallic active site, found in the [FeFe]-Hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, has led to a revisiting of the classic organometallic chemistry involving the Fe-Fe bond and bridging ligands. This diiron site is connected to a...

  2. The Bioorganometallic Chemistry of Iron and the Diatomic Ligands CO and NO as Related to Hydrogenase Active Sites and Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bethel, Ryan D

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a diiron organometallic active site, found in the [FeFe]-Hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, has led to a revisiting of the classic organometallic chemistry involving the Fe-Fe bond and bridging ligands. This diiron site is connected to a...

  3. Fernald Environmental Management Project 1995 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fernald site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. This 1995 Site Environmental Report provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA.

  4. Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Cultural Resource Activities at Colorado UMTRA Project Sites for October 1993 through September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The UMTRA Project is a cooperative (state and federal) program mandated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, Public Law 95-604 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.). This law requires the timely cleanup of 24 inactive uranium mill tailings sites throughout the United States. Nine of these inactive uranium mill tailings sites are in Colorado at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of agreement (PMOA) (DOE, 1984). This PMOA specifies requirements for the DOE`s fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report fulfills the requirement for the DOE to provide the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all of the UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. This report is organized by UMTRA Project site. For each site, the general remedial action activities and cultural resource activities performed during the period of record are summarized. When known, the DOE`s plans for future cultural resource activities at the site are summarized.

  5. Influence of active sites organisation on calcium carbonate formation at model biomolecular interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hell, Stefan W.

    aqueous CaCO3 was observed in situ by Brewster angle microscopy, where CaCO3 domains appear bright. Striking differences in kinetics and extent of CaCO3 formation are observed between monolayers containing-carrageenan in the subphase as a further active component resulted in partial inhibition of CaCO3 formation. # 2004 Elsevier B

  6. Identification of items and activities important to waste form acceptance by Westinghouse GoCo sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Dempster, J. [West Valley Demonstration Project, NY (United States); Randklev, E.H. [Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (United States)

    1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has established specifications (Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms, or WAPS) for canistered waste forms produced at Hanford, Savannah River, and West Valley. Compliance with these specifications requires that each waste form producer identify the items and activities which must be controlled to ensure compliance. As part of quality assurance oversight activities, reviewers have tried to compare the methodologies used by the waste form producers to identify items and activities important to waste form acceptance. Due to the lack of a documented comparison of the methods used by each producer, confusion has resulted over whether the methods being used are consistent. This confusion has been exacerbated by different systems of nomenclature used by each producer, and the different stages of development of each project. The waste form producers have met three times in the last two years, most recently on June 28, 1993, to exchange information on each producer`s program. These meetings have been sponsored by the Westinghouse GoCo HLW Vitrification Committee. This document is the result of this most recent exchange. It fills the need for a documented comparison of the methodologies used to identify items and activities important to waste form acceptance. In this document, the methodology being used by each waste form producer is summarized, and the degree of consistency among the waste form producers is determined.

  7. Antiremodeling Agents Influence Osteoblast Activity Differently in Modeling and Remodeling Sites of Canine Rib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    effects on osteo- blast activity in the canine rib and (2) this effect depends on whether modeling reduce bone loss in part through direct actions on osteoclasts. Their effects on osteoblasts and bone treatments (+108 to +175%, P effect on MAR at either the en- docortical

  8. Completion of the Operational Closure of Tank 18F and Tank 19F at the Savannah River Site by Grouting - 13236

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tisler, Andrew J. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive waste is stored in underground waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The low-level fraction of the waste is immobilized in a grout waste form, and the high level fraction is disposed of in a glass waste form. Once the waste is removed, the tanks are prepared for closure. Operational closure of the tanks consists of filling with grout for the purpose of chemically stabilizing residual material, filling the tank void space for long-term structural stability, and discouraging future intrusion. Two of the old-style single-shell tanks at the SRS have received regulatory approval confirming waste removal had been completed, and have been stabilized with grout as part of completing operational closure and removal from service. Consistent with the regulatory framework, two types of grout were used for the filling of Tanks 18F and 19F. Reducing grout was used to fill the entire volume of Tanks 18F and 19F (bulk fill grout) and a more flowable grout was used to fill equipment that was left in the tank (equipment fill grout). The reducing grout was added to the tanks using portable grout pumps filled from concrete trucks, and delivered the grout through slick lines to the center riser of each tank. Filling of the two tanks has been completed, and all equipment has been filled. The final capping of riser penetrations brings the operation closure of Tanks 18F and 19F to completion. (authors)

  9. Clarification of Institutional Controls at the Rocky Flats Site Central Operable Unit and Implementation of the Soil Disturbance Review Plan - 13053

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSalvo, Rick [Stoller LMS Team, 11025 Dover St, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States)] [Stoller LMS Team, 11025 Dover St, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States); Surovchak, Scott [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, 11025 Dover St, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, 11025 Dover St, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 (United States); Spreng, Carl [Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S, Denver, CO 80246-1530 (United States)] [Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S, Denver, CO 80246-1530 (United States); Moritz, Vera [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8, 1595 Wynkoop St., Denver, CO 80202-1129 (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8, 1595 Wynkoop St., Denver, CO 80202-1129 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleanup and closure of DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado, which was placed on the CERCLA National Priority List in 1989, was accomplished under CERCLA, RCRA, and the Colorado Hazardous Waste Act (CHWA). The physical cleanup work was completed in late 2005 and all buildings and other structures that composed the Rocky Flats industrial complex were removed from the surface, but remnants remain in the subsurface. Other remaining features include two landfills closed in place with covers, four groundwater treatment systems, and surface water and groundwater monitoring systems. Under the 2006 Corrective Action Decision/Record of Decision for Rocky Flats Plant (US DOE) Peripheral Operable Unit and the Central Operable Unit (CAD/ROD), the response actions selected for the Central Operable Unit (OU) are institutional controls (ICs), physical controls, and continued monitoring and maintenance. The objectives of these ICs were to prevent unacceptable exposure to remaining subsurface contamination and to prevent contaminants from mobilizing to surface water and to prevent interfering with the proper functioning of the engineered components of the remedy. An amendment in 2011 of the 2006 CAD/ROD clarified the ICs to prevent misinterpretation that would prohibit work to manage and maintain the Central OU property. The 2011 amendment incorporated a protocol for a Soil Disturbance Review Plan for work subject to ICs that requires approval from the State and public notification by DOE prior to conducting approved soil-disturbing work. (authors)

  10. DEVELOPMENT QUALIFICATION AND DISPOSAL OF AN ALTERNATIVE IMMOBILIZED LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE FORM AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAMS TL; EDGE JA; SWANBERG DJ; ROBBINS RA

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Demonstrating that a waste form produced by a given immobilization process is chemically and physically durable as well as compliant with disposal facility acceptance criteria is critical to the success of a waste treatment program, and must be pursued in conjunction with the maturation of the waste processing technology. Testing of waste forms produced using differing scales of processing units and classes of feeds (simulants versus actual waste) is the crux of the waste form qualification process. Testing is typically focused on leachability of constituents of concern (COCs), as well as chemical and physical durability of the waste form. A principal challenge regarding testing immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) forms is the absence of a standard test suite or set of mandatory parameters against which waste forms may be tested, compared, and qualified for acceptance in existing and proposed nuclear waste disposal sites at Hanford and across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. A coherent and widely applicable compliance strategy to support characterization and disposal of new waste forms is essential to enhance and accelerate the remediation of DOE tank waste. This paper provides a background summary of important entities, regulations, and considerations for nuclear waste form qualification and disposal. Against this backdrop, this paper describes a strategy for meeting and demonstrating compliance with disposal requirements emphasizing the River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site and the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) mineralized low-activity waste (LAW) product stream.

  11. Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

  12. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, G.O.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

  13. The Effects of Site Characterization Activities on the Abundance of Ravens (Corvus corax) in the Yucca Mountain Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.E. Lederle

    1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed and is implementing the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Raven abundance was measured from August 1991 through August 1995 along treatment and control routes to evaluate whether site characterization activities resulted in increased raven abundance at Yucca Mountain. This study fulfills the requirement set forth in the incidental take provisions of the Biological Opinion that DOE monitor the abundance of ravens at Yucca Mountain. Ravens were more abundant at Yucca Mountain than in the control area, and raven abundance in both areas increased over time. However, the magnitude of differences between Yucca Mountain and control surveys did not change over time, indicating that the increase in raven abundance observed during this study was not related to site characterization activities. Increases over time on both Yucca Mountain and control routes are consistent with increases in raven abundance in the Mojave Desert reported by the annual Breeding Bird Survey of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service. Evidence from the Desert Tortoise Monitoring Program at Yucca Mountain suggests that ravens are not a significant predator of small tortoises in this locale. Carcasses of small tortoises (less than 110 mm in length) collected during the study showed little evidence of raven predation, and 59 radiomarked hatchlings that were monitored on a regular basis were not preyed upon by ravens. Overall, no direct evidence of raven predation on tortoises was observed during this study. Small tortoises are probably encountered so infrequently by ravens that they are rarely exploited as a food source. This is likely due to the relatively low abundance of both desert tortoises and ravens in the Yucca Mountain area.

  14. First Dark Matter Search Results from a 4-kg CF$_3$I Bubble Chamber Operated in a Deep Underground Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behnke, E.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Behnke, J.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Brice, S.J.; /Fermilab; Broemmelsiek, D.; /Fermilab; Collar, J.I.; /Chicago U., EFI; Conner, A.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Cooper, P.S.; /Fermilab; Crisler, M.; /Fermilab; Dahl, C.E.; /Chicago U., EFI; Fustin, D.; /Chicago U., EFI; Grace, E.; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New data are reported from the operation of a 4.0 kg CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber in the 6800 foot deep SNOLAB underground laboratory. The effectiveness of ultrasound analysis in discriminating alpha decay background events from single nuclear recoils has been confirmed, with a lower bound of >99.3% rejection of alpha decay events. Twenty single nuclear recoil event candidates and three multiple bubble events were observed during a total exposure of 553 kg-days distributed over three different bubble nucleation thresholds. The effective exposure for single bubble recoil-like events was 437.4 kg-days. A neutron background internal to the apparatus, of known origin, is estimated to account for five single nuclear recoil events and is consistent with the observed rate of multiple bubble events. This observation provides world best direct detection constraints on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering for WIMP masses >20 GeV/c{sup 2} and demonstrates significant sensitivity for spin-independent interactions.

  15. Site clearance working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana continue to be areas with a high level of facility removal, and the pace of removal is projected to increase. Regulations were promulgated for the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana requiring that abandoned sites be cleared of debris that could interfere with fishing and shrimping activities. The site clearance regulations also required verification that the sites were clear. Additionally, government programs were established to compensate fishermen for losses associated with snagging their equipment on oil and gas related objects that remained on the water bottoms in areas other than active producing sites and sites that had been verified as clear of obstructions and snags. The oil and gas industry funds the compensation programs. This paper reviews the regulations and evolving operating practices in the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana where site clearance and fisherman`s gear compensation regulations have been in place for a number of years. Although regulations and guidelines may be in place elsewhere in the world, this paper focuses on the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana. Workshop participants are encouraged to bring up international issues during the course of the workshop. Additionally, this paper raises questions and focuses on issues that are of concern to the various Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana water surface and water bottom stakeholders. This paper does not have answers to the questions or issues. During the workshop participants will debate the questions and issues in an attempt to develop consensus opinions and/or make suggestions that can be provided to the appropriate organizations, both private and government, for possible future research or policy adjustments. Site clearance and facility removal are different activities. Facility removal deals with removal of the structures used to produce oil and gas including platforms, wells, casing, piles, pipelines, well protection structures, etc.

  16. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  17. Identification of the amino acid residues at the active site of beef liver argininosuccinate synthetase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulmer, Dorothy Ann

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of NMTS with 5, 5- dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTMB) was performed by adding 4, 62 mN DTNB to 20 mN MNTS in a 3-mL cuvette and monitoring the appearance of 2-nitro-5-mercaptobenzoic acid at 410 nm (Ae = 13, 600 M cm ). -1 -1 13 Inactivation b 5... binding. Results also show 5'fluorosulfonylbenzoyl adenosine to be a very effective affinity label for the enzyme. The pK values of the amino acid groups of argininosuccinate synthetase that are essential for catalytic activity and/or substrate...

  18. Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on In2O3(110): A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Jingyun; Liu, Changjun; Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on the defective In2O3(110) surface with surface oxygen vacancies has been investigated using periodic density functional theory calculations. The relative stabilities of six possible surface oxygen vacancies numbered from Ov1 to Ov6 on the perfect In2O3(110) surface were examined. The calculated oxygen vacancy formation energies show that the D1 surface with the Ov1 defective site is the most thermodynamically favorable while the D4 surface with the Ov4 defective site is the least stable. Two different methanol synthesis routes from CO2 hydrogenation over both D1 and D4 surfaces were studied and the D4 surface was found to be more favorable for CO2 activation and hydrogenation. On the D4 surface, one of the O atoms of the CO2 molecule fills in the Ov4 site upon adsorption. Hydrogenation of CO2 to HCOO on the D4 surface is both thermodynamically and kinetically favorable. Further hydrogenation of HCOO involves both forming the C-H bond and breaking the C-O bond, resulting in H2CO and hydroxyl. The HCOO hydrogenation is slightly endothermic with an activation barrier of 0.57 eV. A high barrier of 1.14 eV for the hydrogenation of H2CO to H3CO indicates that this step is the rate-limiting step in the methanol synthesis on the defective In2O3(110) surface. We gratefully acknowledge the supports from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (#20990223) and from US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Science program (DE-FG02-05ER46231). D. Mei was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. The computations were performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), which is a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  19. Droplet Activation Properties of Organic Aerosols Observed at an Urban Site during CalNex-LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Fan; Hayes, Patrick L.; Ortega, Amber; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Allan, James D.; Gilman, Jessica; Kuster, W. C.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Wang, Jian

    2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were characterized at an urban supersite in Pasadena, California from 15 May to 4 June, 2010, during the CalNex campaign. The derived hygroscopicity (?CCN) of CCN-active particles with diameter between 97 and 165 nm ranged from 0.05 to 0.4. Diurnal variation showed a slight decrease of ?CCN from 8:00 to 16:00 (from 0.24 to 0.20), which is attributed to increasing organics volume fraction resulted from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. The derived hygroscopicity distribution and maximum activated fraction of the size selected particles were examined as functions of photochemical age. The result indicates that condensation of secondary species (e.g., SOA and sulfate) quickly converted hydrophobic particles to hydrophilic ones, and during daytime, nearly every particle became a CCN at ~0.4% in just a few hours. Based on ?CCN and aerosol chemical composition, the organic hygroscopicity (?org) was derived, and ranged from 0.05 to 0.23 with an average value of 0.13, consistent with the results from earlier studies. The derived ?org generally increased with the organic oxidation level, and most of the variation in ?org could be explained by the variation of the organic O:C atomic ratio alone. The least squares fit of the data yielded ?org =(0.83±0.06) ? (O:C) +(-0.19±0.02). Compared to previous results based on CCN measurements of laboratory generated aerosols, ?org derived from measurements during the CalNex campaign exhibited stronger increase with O:C atomic ratio, and therefore substantially higher values for organics with average O:C greater than 0.5.

  20. Operation and Maintenance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations and Maintenance Operations OASIS: WALC-DSW (Note: this site is not hosted by Western and requires a digital certificate and login for full access.) Contact Information...

  1. 1992 Fernald Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the Fernald site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. This report covers the reporting period from January 1, 1992, through December 31, 1992, with the exception of Chapter Three, which provides information from the first quarter of 1993 as well as calendar year 1992 information. This 1992 report provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Use included in this report are summary data of the sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. Finally, this report provides general information on the major waste management and environmental restoration activities during 1992.

  2. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)] over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the “fines” fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  3. Site Environmental Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California's Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment. Chapter 3, ''Compliance Summary,'' reviews the site's various environmental protection activities and compliance status with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1998 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public.

  4. SWPF Crane Lift Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple vview shot of the SWPF crane lift operation at the Savannah River Site. Funded by the Recovery Act.

  5. Remedial site evaluation report for the waste area grouping 10 wells associated with the new hydrofracture facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Field activities and well summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four hydrofracture sites at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were used for development, demonstration, and disposal from 1959 to 1984. More than 10 million gal of waste grout mix was disposed of via hydrofracture. Various types of wells were installed to monitor the hydrofracture operations. The primary goal of this remedial investigation was to gather information about the wells in order to recommend the type and best method of final disposition for the wells. Evaluations were performed to determine the integrity of well castings, confirm construction details for each well, evaluate the extent of contamination, assist in planning for future activities, and determine the suitability of the wells for future temporary site monitoring.

  6. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  7. Empirical Analysis of the Effects of Bus Stop Consolidation on Passenger Activity and Transit Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    project at TriMet, the regional transit provider for the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. The study of the transit service planning process. Both the budgetary resources of the transit provider and the travel operating budget; #12;3 2. The variation in bus running time will decline, saving the transit provider

  8. Hanford site operator changes management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is a brief discussion of management changes at the Westinghouse Hanford Corporation. A. LeMar Trego has relieved Thomas Anderson as president of WHC. This was in response to recent shortcomings in Westinghouse`s management of the environmental restoration and their failure to receive a $10M performance bonus.

  9. Planning and scheduling of concurrent high-level activities for UUV mission operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Larry, S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a mission planning and scheduling algorithm that enables a single Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (UUV) to concurrently perform high level activities, while managing various resources in a dynamic ocean ...

  10. The Mochovce final treatment center for liquid radioactive waste introduced to active trial operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krajc, T.; Stubna, M.; Kravarik, K.; Zatkulak, M. [VUJE Trnava, Inc. (Slovakia); Slezak, M.; Remias, V. [Javys - Jadrova a vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s. - Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, plc., Tomasikova 22, 821 02 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Final Treatment Centre (FTC) for Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) have been designed for treatment and final conditioning of radioactive liquid and wet waste produced by named NPP equipped with Russian VVER-440 type of reactors. Treated wastes comprise radioactive concentrates, spent resin and sludge. VUJE Inc. as an experienced company in field of treatment of radioactive waste in Slovakia has been chosen as main contractor for technological part of FTC. During the realisation of project the future operator of Centre required the contractor to solve the treatment of wastes produced in the process of NPP A-1 decommissioning. On the basis of this requirement the project was modified in order to enable manipulations with waste products from A-1 NPP transported to Centre in steel drums. The initial project was prepared in 2003. The design and manufacture of main components were performed in 2004 and 2005. FTC civil works started in August 2004. Initial nonradioactive testing of the system parts were carried out from April to September 2006, then the tests of systems started with model concentrates and non-radioactive resins. After the processes evaluation the radioactive test performed from February 2007. A one-year trial operation of facility is planned for completion during 2007 and 2008. The company JAVYS, Inc. is responsible for radioactive waste and spent fuel treatment in the Slovak republic and will operate the FTC during trial operation and after its completion. This Company has also significant experience with operation of Jaslovske Bohunice Treatment Centre. The overall capacity of the FTC is 820 m{sup 3}/year of concentrates and 40 m{sup 3}/year of spent resin and sludge. Bituminization and cementation were provided as main technologies for treatment of these wastes. Treatment of concentrate is performed by bituminization on Thin Film Evaporator with rotating wiping blades. Spent resin and sludge are decanted, dried and mixed with bitumen in blade homogeniser. The bitumen product is discharged into 200 dm{sup 3} steel drums. Drums with bitumen product or drums originated from A-1 NPP are loaded into Fibre Reinforced Concrete containers (FRC) and grouted with cement. Cement grout is prepared from the mixture of cement, additive and radioactive over-concentrate. By formulating the cement grout with evaporator concentrates the maximum radioactivity is fixed in cement matrix and volume of final waste product is minimized. A batch mixer with rotating blades is used to produce the cement grout. The grouted FRC containers are stored in the expedition hall and after 28 days of curing are transported to final disposal. After the start of routine operation, the FTC provides treatment for all liquid and wet LLW produced from the operation of the Mochovce NPP. The final product of the FTC is a FRC loaded with bitumen product in drums and filled with radioactive cement product. This container meets all limits for final disposal in the National Radioactive Waste Repository at Mochovce. This paper introducing the main parts of FTC and describes the technological procedures including the basic technological parameters for both used technologies, their working capacity and the overall waste flow. The evaluation of experience gained in the phases of Centre construction and commissioning and partially trial operation as well is a part of this paper (Evaluation of completion works process and time schedule, the process of individual system parts testing, testing of systems using model media, radioactive testing and trial operation). (authors)

  11. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2013 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2013). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  12. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, Cathy A

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2013). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  13. Planning a site investigation using analogous groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, P.M. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States); Galgoul, M.J.; Wittreich, C.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A limited field investigation (LFI) has been designed for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit within the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington state using the concept of analogous groups. The LFI is part of a RCRA facility investigation (RFI) corrective measures study (CMS) being conducted in this operable unit. The concept emphasizes that characterization activities can be reduced by identifying select sites (analogous sites) for characterization that represents a group of sites (analogous groups). This concept is particularly applicable to operable units that contain several waste management units that are similar in design, disposal history, and geology. Application of this concept reduced the number of waste management units initially undergoing characterization by more than two-thirds. The work plan is presently in the approval cycle with the field characterization phase expected to begin August 1993.

  14. Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites for October 1995--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. The inactive uranium mill tailings sites in Colorado are at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of understanding (PMOU). This PMOU requires the DOE to fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report provides the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. Due to the completion of surface activities at the UMTRA Project sites, this will be the last annual report to the state of Colorado. Cultural resources activities subsequent to this report will be reported to the state through site-specific correspondence.

  15. EIS-0387: Y-12 National Security Complex Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Final Y-12 Site-wide EIS analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the reasonable alternatives for ongoing and foreseeable future operations and activities at Y-12, including alternatives for changes to site infrastructure and levels of operation (using production capacity as the key metric for comparison).

  16. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008" (PNNL-18427), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

  17. Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Recovery and Storage of Strontium-90 Fueled Radioisotope Thermal Electric Generators at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of recovery and storage for disposal of six strontium-90 (Sr-90) fueled radioisotope thermal electric generators (RTGs) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA)-54, Area G, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) proposed to recover and store six Sr-90 RTGs from the commercial sector as part of its Offsite-Source Recovery Project (OSRP). The OSRP focuses on the proactive recovery and storage of unwanted radioactive sealed sources exceeding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits for Class C low-level waste (also known as Greater than Class C waste, or GTCC). In response to the events of September 11, 2001, NRC conducted a risk-based evaluation of potential vulnerabilities to terrorist threats involving NRC-licensed nuclear facilities and materials. NRC's evaluation concluded that possession of unwanted radioactive sealed sources with no disposal outlet presents a potential vulnerability (NRC 2002). In a November 25, 2003 letter to the manager of the NNSA's Los Alamos Site Office, the NRC Office of Nuclear Security and Incident Response identified recovery of several Sr-90 RTGs as the highest priority and requested that DOE take whatever actions necessary to recovery these sources as soon as possible. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of this proposal to the offsite source recovery program evaluated in the SWEIS and a subsequent SA that evaluated a change to the approach of a portion of the recovery program. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the Proposed Action and activities described in the previous SWEIS and SA analyses.

  18. Site environmental report for 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status, with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1996 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. 37 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Site environmental report for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brekke, D.D.; Holland, R.C.; Gordon, K.W. [ed.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally-produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1994 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. A summary of the findings is provided below.

  20. AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar takes an in-depth look at the latest siting challenges and identify opportunities to reduce risks associated with the siting and operation of wind farms to...

  1. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part A, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 1 and 2, A summary of historical activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation with emphasis on information concerning off-site emissions of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, G.M.; Buddenbaum, J.E.; Lamb, J.K.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase I feasibility study has focused on determining the availability of information for estimating exposures of the public to chemicals and radionuclides released as a result of historical operation of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The estimation of such past exposures is frequently called dose reconstruction. The initial project tasks, Tasks 1 and 2 were designed to identify and collect information that documents the history of activities at the ORR that resulted in the release of contamination and to characterize the availability of data that could be used to estimate the magnitude of the contaminant releases or public exposures. A history of operations that are likely to have generated off-site releases has been documented as a result of Task 1 activities. The activities required to perform this task involved the extensive review of historical operation records and interviews with present and past employees as well as other knowledgeable individuals. The investigation process is documented in this report. The Task 1 investigations have led to the documentation of an overview of the activities that have taken place at each of the major complexes, including routine operations, waste management practices, special projects, and accidents and incidents. Historical activities that appear to warrant the highest priority in any further investigations were identified based on their likely association with off-site emissions of hazardous materials as indicated by the documentation reviewed or information obtained in interviews.

  2. PROGRAMMATIC ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND WASTE PROGRAMS. Operational Planning and Development (Activity No. AR OS 10 05 K; ONL-WN06)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) has performed an assessment of the waste management operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to review radioactive waste management as practiced at ORNL and to recommend improvements or alternatives for further study. The study involved: 1) an on-site survey of ORNL radioactive waste management operations; 2) a review of radioactive waste source data, records, and regulatory requirements; 3) an assessment of existing and planned treatment, storage, and control facilities; and 4) identification of alternatives for improving waste management operations. Information for this study was obtained from both personal interviews and written reports. The G/C suggestions for improving ORNL waste management operations are summarized. Regulatory requirements governing ORNL waste management operations are discussed. Descriptions and discussions of the radioactive liquid, solid, and gaseous waste systems are presented. The waste operations control complex is discussed.

  3. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010, Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Wills, ed.

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010. Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  4. Audience/Panel Discussion: Sites Lesson Learned about Activity-level Work Planning and Control Using EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guideline

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Donna J. Governor, Deputy Dept Mgr for Planning & Integration, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory work planning and control lessons learned and audience/panel discussion on site's lessons learned about Activity-level Work Planning and Control using EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guideline Document.

  5. Single-Site Vanadyl Activation, Functionalization, and Reoxidation Reaction Mechanism for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on the Cubic V4O10 Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Single-Site Vanadyl Activation, Functionalization, and Reoxidation Reaction Mechanism for Propane of density functional theory) to examine the detailed mechanism for propane reacting with a V4O10 cluster to model the catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane on the V2O5(001) surface. We here report

  6. Mechanism and Site Requirements for Activation and Chemical Conversion of Methane on Supported Pt Clusters and Turnover Rate Comparisons among Noble Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Mechanism and Site Requirements for Activation and Chemical Conversion of Methane on Supported Pt smaller than the rate of methane chemical conversion in CO2 and H2O reforming reactions; thus, C-H bond and Pt2,3,8-32 lead to H2/CO mixtures useful as precursors to fuels and petrochemicals. Pt appears

  7. Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Nuclear Materials Contained in High-Activity Waste Arising from the Operations at the 'SHELTER' Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherkas, Dmytro

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986, the explosion dispeesed nuclear materials contained in the nuclear fuel of the reactor core over the destroyed facilities at Unit No. 4 and over the territory immediately adjacent to the destroyed unit. The debris was buried under the Cascade Wall. Nuclear materials at the SHELTER can be characterized as spent nuclear fuel, fresh fuel assemblies (including fuel assemblies with damaged geometry and integrity, and individual fuel elements), core fragments of the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4, finely-dispersed fuel (powder/dust), uranium and plutonium compounds in water solutions, and lava-like nuclear fuel-containing masses. The new safe confinement (NSC) is a facility designed to enclose the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4 destroyed by the accident. Construction of the NSC involves excavating operations, which are continuously monitored including for the level of radiation. The findings of such monitoring at the SHELTER site will allow us to characterize the recovered radioactive waste. When a process material categorized as high activity waste (HAW) is detected the following HLW management operations should be involved: HLW collection; HLW fragmentation (if appropriate); loading HAW into the primary package KT-0.2; loading the primary package filled with HAW into the transportation cask KTZV-0.2; and storing the cask in temporary storage facilities for high-level solid waste. The CDAS system is a system of 3He tubes for neutron coincidence counting, and is designed to measure the percentage ratio of specific nuclear materials in a 200-liter drum containing nuclear material intermixed with a matrix. The CDAS consists of panels with helium counter tubes and a polyethylene moderator. The panels are configured to allow one to position a waste-containing drum and a drum manipulator. The system operates on the ‘add a source’ basis using a small Cf-252 source to identify irregularities in the matrix during an assay. The platform with the source is placed under the measurement chamber. The platform with the source material is moved under the measurement chamber. The design allows one to move the platform with the source in and out, thus moving the drum. The CDAS system and radioactive waste containers have been built. For each drum filled with waste two individual measurements (passive/active) will be made. This paper briefly describes the work carried out to assess qualitatively and quantitatively the nuclear materials contained in high-level waste at the SHELTER facility. These efforts substantially increased nuclear safety and security at the facility.

  8. Site environmental report for 2009 : Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2009 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2009. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2009. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2009. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

  9. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 98-02: DOE Enforcement Activities where Off-site Transportation Issues are also Present.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recently several questions have arisen regarding the scope of Price-Anderson enforcement when transportation issues are directly or indirectly involved in an incident. These questions can be separated into two areas, (1) transportation issues that involve on-site transportation typically not regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT), and (2) transportation issues that involve off-site transportation. This guidance addresses off-site transportation that is regulated by DOT and other state and federal agencies.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on inspection of Westinghouse Savannah River Company fees for managing and operating the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first five years of its contract with the Department of Energy, Westinghouse Savannah River Company was paid over $130 million in fees to manage and operate the Savannah River Site. Fees paid to Westinghouse steadily increased over the five year period. For example, fees paid for the last six months of this five year period were over three times as large as fees paid for the first six months. The purpose of this inspection was to review the Department`s annual negotiation of total available fees with Westinghouse, and to examine the reasons for the growth in fees over this five year period. The review disclosed that, after Fiscal Year 1989, the Department used an increasing number of fee bases in calculating Westinghouse Savannah River Company`s fixed-fee-equivalents from the maximum fee schedules within the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation. The authors found that the Department had significantly increased the percentage of the dollar value of subcontracts being placed in Westinghouse`s fee bases for fee calculation purposes. They found that the Department had effectively increased Westinghouse`s fixed-fee-equivalents by approximately $3 million in both Fiscal Year 1993 and 1994 to, in large part, fund an unallowable employee incentive compensation program. They found that Westinghouse`s total paid fees for the five year period increased significantly over what they would have been had the terms resulting from the original competitive negotiations been maintained. The authors recommended that the Deputy Assist Secretary for Procurement and Assistance Management require that changes in either the number or composition of fee bases used in calculating fees from the maximum fee schedules be submitted to the Department`s Procurement Executive for approval.

  11. Hanford Site environmental management specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grygiel, M.L.

    1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

  12. Data communications for a collective operation in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraj, Daniel A

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Algorithm selection for data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including associating in the PAMI data communications algorithms and bit masks; receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a collective instruction, the instruction specifying transmission of a data communications message from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint; constructing a bit mask for the received collective instruction; selecting, from among the associated algorithms and bit masks, a data communications algorithm in dependence upon the constructed bit mask; and executing the collective instruction, transmitting, according to the selected data communications algorithm from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint, the data communications message.

  13. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from

  14. Experience in Remote Demolition of the Activated Biological Shielding of the Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) on the German Karlsruhe Site - 12208

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenmann, Beata; Fleisch, Joachim; Prechtl, Erwin; Suessdorf, Werner; Urban, Manfred [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, WAK Decommissioning and Waste Management GmbH (WAK) became owner and operator of the waste treatment facilities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as well as of the prototype reactors, the Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (KNK) and Multi-Purpose Reactor (MZFR), both being in an advanced stage of dismantling. Together with the dismantling and decontamination activities of the former WAK reprocessing facility since 1990, the envisaged demolishing of the R and D reactor FR2 and a hot cell facility, all governmentally funded nuclear decommissioning projects on the Karlsruhe site are concentrated under the WAK management. The small space typical of prototype research reactors represented a challenge also during the last phase of activated dismantling, dismantling of the activated biological shield of the MZFR. Successful demolition of the biological shield required detailed planning and extensive testing in the years before. In view of the limited space and the ambient dose rate that was too high for manual work, it was required to find a tool carrier system to take up and control various demolition and dismantling tools in a remote manner. The strategy formulated in the concept of dismantling the biological shield by means of a modified electro-hydraulic demolition excavator in an adaptable working scaffolding turned out to be feasible. The following boundary conditions were essential: - Remote exchange of the dismantling and removal tools in smallest space. - Positioning of various supply facilities on the working platform. - Avoiding of interfering edges. - Optimization of mass flow (removal of the dismantled mass from the working area). - Maintenance in the surroundings of the dismantling area (in the controlled area). - Testing and qualification of the facilities and training of the staff. Both the dismantling technique chosen and the proceeding selected proved to be successful. Using various designs of universal cutters developed on the basis of wall saws, both the activated steel liner and the inner reinforcing layer were cut remotely in one process. This allowed for the efficient execution of the following remote concrete removal steps using mining techniques. The electro-hydraulic demolition excavator that was purchased and then modified turned out to be an ideal tool carrier system with rapid-exchange coupling. Due to the high availability, no major delays occurred. This also was a result of the consistently implemented maintenance and repair concept. With the excavator installed in a modifiable scaffolding suspended from a rotating carrier ring, all dismantling areas could be reached and treated in spite of the small space. Thanks to an optimum organization of work-flows, routine change of dismantling work, and maintenance or repair, the iterative radiological measurement campaigns could be integrated in the whole activity without the dismantling work being disturbed significantly. The ventilation system with pressure grading and pre-filtration units ensured a low contamination level in the dismantling area. It was also possible to manage the dust formed by the milling of concrete surfaces. As it was possible to further cut metal parts and crushed concrete later on, residue flows were optimized. The planned overall period for testing, dismantling the bio-shield and removing the equipment was 36 months. The final duration was 39 months. (authors)

  15. An evaluation of the single turnover (STO) procedure as a method for the determination of the active site densities on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, R.L.; Baum, D.R.; High, K.G.; Szivos, L.S.; O'Leary, S.T. (Seton Hall Univ., South Orange, NJ (USA))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extent of 2-butene formation during the STO reactions over Pd and Rh indicates that the alkene isomerization is nonstoichiometric. With Pt the extent of isomerization is also influenced by flow rate and reactant pulse size but to a lesser extent. Thus, the STO reaction procedure cannot be used for the determination of isomerization site densities on any of these catalysts. This procedure has been used to determine the saturation site densities on the EuroPt-I Pt/SiO{sub 2} and some northwestern Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalysts. The STO reaction sequence has also been run over Pt, Pd, and Rh catalysts using each of the isomeric butenes as the reactant alkene. Over all three catalysts the same amounts of direct and two-step saturation were observed regardless of the starting alkene showing that these saturation sites are not sensitive to the geometry of the reactant olefin. With Rh a near equilibrium mixture of all three double bond isomers is formed from each of the three starting alkenes. With Pt the extent of isomerization is characteristically low regardless of the starting olefin, so the low isomerization observed during the STO reaction of 1-butene on Pt is not the result of the formation of a primary metalalkyl on a large number of isomerization sites. The STO determined reactive site densities have been correlated with transition electron microscopy (TEM) measured metal particle sizes and turnover frequency (TOF) data for a number of reactions. From these results the sites on which specific reactions take place have been determined as has the site TOF for each of the active sites involved.

  16. Site maps and facilities listings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

  17. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011. Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  18. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

  19. Site Environmental Report for 2010 Sandia National Laboratories, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, manages and operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This Site Environmental Report for 2010 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2010. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2010. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2010. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

  20. Lessons Learned at the Nevada National Security Site Implementing the EFCOG Activity-level Work Planning and Control Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Steele Coddington, Work Planning Manager, National Security Technologies, Nevada National Security Site. Lessons Learned Implementing Work Planning & Control. 6 Step Process for improving WP&C.

  1. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin (NWU); (Penn)

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  2. Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

  3. Nevada Test Site Environmental Summary Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  4. Nevada Test Site Summary 2006 (Volume 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security-related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  5. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2007 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  6. Supplement Analysis for Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Modification of Management Methods for Transuranic Waste Characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a waste management proposal for installing and operating modular units for the characterization of transuranic (TRU) waste1 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA)-54, Area G, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9 (c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an EIS when an agency makes substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns or there are circumstances or information relevant to concerns and bearing on the proposed action or its impacts. This SA is prepared in accordance with Section 10 CFR 1021.314(c) of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) regulations for NEPA implementation stating that ''When it is unclear whether or not an EIS supplement is required, DOE shall prepare a Supplement Analysis.'' This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of the waste management program evaluated in the SWEIS with those of a proposal that would change the approach of a portion of this management program. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in the previous SWEIS analysis. DOE proposes to expedite the shipment of legacy TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The Cerro Grande Fire in 2000 and events of September 11, 2001, have focused attention on the potential risk to the public and the credible security hazard posed by the amount of plutonium stored above ground at LANL and the increased necessity to safeguard our nation's nuclear waste. The safest place for defense-generated TRU waste has been determined to be DOE's permitted repository for TRU waste 2100 feet underground at WIPP. The proposed accelerated plan to dispose of TRU waste at WIPP would result in the complete disposition of LANL legacy TRU waste by 2010; this accelerated disposition would be 20 years ahead of schedule, at a savings of $500 million in life-cycle costs and result in 3,000 fewer shipments to WIPP. However, the current individual small facilities at LANL lack the buildings, equipment, and trained personnel to conduct efficient characterization activities on an increased scale. Installing new modular structures and equipment close to the drum storage location at TA-54 in housings designed for a large inventory and high throughput would support DOE's expedited shipment program by increasing the repackaging rate, and it would also decrease on-site transportation vulnerabilities.

  7. Photovoltaic solar system connected to the electric power grid operating as active power generator and reactive power compensator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albuquerque, Fabio L.; Moraes, Adelio J.; Guimaraes, Geraldo C.; Sanhueza, Sergio M.R.; Vaz, Alexandre R. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Uberlandia-MG, CEP 38400-902 (Brazil)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the case of photovoltaic (PV) systems acting as distributed generation (DG) systems, the DC energy that is produced is fed to the grid through the power-conditioning unit (inverter). The majority of contemporary inverters used in DG systems are current source inverters (CSI) operating at unity power factor. If, however, we assume that voltage source inverters (VSI) can replace CSIs, we can generate reactive power proportionally to the remaining unused capacity at any given time. According to the theory of instantaneous power, the inverter reactive power can be regulated by changing the amplitude of its output voltage. In addition, the inverter active power can be adjusted by modifying the phase angle of its output voltage. Based on such theory, both the active power supply and the reactive power compensation (RPC) can be carried out simultaneously. When the insolation is weak or the PV modules are inoperative at night, the RPC feature of a PV system can still be used to improve the inverter utilisation factor. Some MATLAB simulation results are included here to show the feasibility of the method. (author)

  8. Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Savannah River Operations Office and Savannah River Site, January 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), inspected environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Savannah River Site.

  9. FRMAC Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frandsen, K.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the event of a major radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) will coordinate the federal agencies that have various statutory responsibilities. The FRMAC is responsible for coordinating all environmental radiological monitoring, sampling, and assessment activities for the response. This manual describes the FRMAC’s response activities in a radiological incident. It also outlines how FRMAC fits in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) under the National Response Framework (NRF) and describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the affected areas. In the event of a potential or existing major radiological incident, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is responsible for establishing and managing the FRMAC during the initial phases.

  10. Flammable gas/slurry growth unreviewed safety question:justification for continued operation for the tank farms at the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, C.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) provides a basis for continued operation in 176 high level waste tanks, double contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, 244-AR Vault, 242-S and 242-T Evaporators and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUSTs) relative to flammable gas hazards. Required controls are specified.

  11. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Site (SRS) conducts effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance to ensure the safety of the public and the well-being of the environment. DOE Order 5400,1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` requires the submission of an environmental report that documents the impact of facility operations on the environment and on public health. SRS has had an extensive environmental surveillance program in place since 1951 (before site startup). At that time, data generated by the on-site surveillance program were reported in site documents. Beginning in 1959, data from off-site environmental monitoring activities were presented in reports issued for public dissemination. Separate reporting of SRS`s on- and off-site environmental monitoring activities continued until 1985, when data from both surveillance programs were merged into a single public document. The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1993 is an overview of effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance activities conducted on and in the vicinity of SRS from January 1 through December 31, 1993. For complete program descriptions, consult the ``SRS Environmental Monitoring Plan`` (WSRC-3Ql-2-1000). It documents the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, the frequency of monitoring and analysis, the specific analytical and sampling procedures, and the quality assurance requirements.

  12. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 98-02: DOE Enforcement Activities where Off-site Transportation Issues are also Present

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity to the Office of Enforcement and Investigation to issue clarifying guidance from time to...

  13. Hanford Site ground-water surveillance for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Bates, D.J.; Kemner, M.L.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report of ground-water surveillance activities provides discussions and listings of results for ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site during 1989. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) assesses the impacts of Hanford operations on the environment for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The impact Hanford operations has on ground water is evaluated through the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance program. Five hundred and sixty-seven wells were sampled during 1989 for Hanford ground-water monitoring activities. This report contains a listing of analytical results for calendar year (CY) 1989 for species of importance as potential contaminants. 30 refs., 29 figs,. 4 tabs.

  14. 1996 Site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FEMP is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the FEMP in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the FEMP. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1996 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the FEMP progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  15. Site environmental report - CY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental compliance activities are described for the NPR-3 site from January 1997 through December 1997. Hazardous waste storage activities and storage tank testing are included.

  16. 2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978.1 These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE operates 18 UMTRCA Title I sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.27 (10 CFR 40.27). As required under the general license, a long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for each site was prepared by DOE and accepted by NRC. The Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site, one of the 19 Title I sites, will not be included under the general license until the open, operating portion of the cell is closed. The open portion will be closed either when it is filled or in 2023. This site is inspected in accordance with an interim LTSP. Long-term surveillance and maintenance services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective actions; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder relations, and other regulatory stewardship functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific LTSPs and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up or contingency inspections, or corrective action in accordance with the LTSP. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available on the Internet at http://www.lm.doe.gov/.

  17. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  18. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Waste Disposition Activities at the Paducah Site Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1339), which is incorporated herein by reference, for proposed disposition of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes, low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site (Paducah Site) in Paducah, Kentucky. All of the wastes would be transported for disposal at various locations in the United States. Based on the results of the impact analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment with in the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations August 28, 2014 - 12:00pm...

  20. Waste reduction at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, W.E.; Lee, R.A.; Reynolds, R.W.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation for the production and research of nuclear materials for national defense and peace time applications and has been operating a full nuclear fuel cycle since the early 1950s. Wastes generated include high level radioactive, transuranic, low level radioactive, hazardous, mixed, sanitary, and aqueous wastes. Much progress has been made during the last several years to reduce these wastes including management systems, characterization, and technology programs. The reduction of wastes generated and the proper handling of the wastes have always been a part of the Site`s operation. This paper summarizes the current status and future plans with respect to waste reduction to waste reduction and reviews some specific examples of successful activities.

  1. Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

    Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

  2. EA-0881: Tank 241-c-103 Organic Vapor and Liquid Characterization and Supporting Activities, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to sample the vapor space and liquid waste and perform other supporting activities in Tank 241-C-103 located in the 241-C Tank Farm on the...

  3. Sitewide risk perspectives for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, S.J. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Field Office; Foppe, T.L. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recently finalized a closure plan (originally called the Ten Year Plan) for closure and environmental cleanup of previous nuclear weapons facilities. The DOE Rocky Flats Field Office has established priorities for risk reduction work to Support closure activities, as well as addressing those hazards associated with storage and management of radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. To provide information for future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) or other regulatory assessments of specific risk reduction projects identified in the Closure Plan, a risk assessment of normal operations and potential accidents was recently prepared to provide an updated baseline of the cumulative impacts to the worker, public and environment due to the Site`s operations, activities, and environmental conditions in light of the Site`s change in mission, and of future closure projects. This paper summarizes the risk assessment approach, results, and conclusions.

  4. U.S. DOE Geopressured/Geothermal Program: Final report on well plug and abandonment operations and well site restoration, Louisiana and Texas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the critical operations conducted during the plugging and abandonment of the three producing wells of the U.S. DOE GEOPRESSURED/GEOTHERL PROGRAM were witnessed by D-O-R Engineering personnel. All operations witnessed by D-O-R personnel were in compliance with the respective state regulations and were conducted as per D-O-R's recommendations to the Department of Energy and their prime contractor, EG&G Idaho. It is our belief that competent cement plugs were left in all three wells. The following describes the work actually witnessed by D-O-R personnel.

  5. Tyrosine hydroxylase is activated and phosphorylated at different sites in rat pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells treated with phorbol ester and forskolin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tachikawa, E.; Tank, A.W.; Weiner, D.H.; Mosimann, W.F.; Yanagihara, N.; Weiner, N.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of phorbol ester (4..beta..-phorbol, 12..beta..-myristate, 13..cap alpha..-acetate; TPA), an activator of Ca/sup + +//phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PK-C), and forskolin, which stimulates adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), on the activation and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells were examined. Incubation of the cells with TPA (0.01-1 ..mu..M) or forskolin (0.01-0.1 ..mu..M) produces increases in activation and phosphorylation of TH in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of TPA are dependent on extracellular Ca/sup + +/ and are inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with trifluoperazine (TFP). The effects of forskolin are independent of Ca/sup + +/ and are not inhibited by TFP. In cells treated with forskolin, the time course of the increase in cAMP correlates with the increases in TH activity and phosphorylation. cAMP levels do not increase in cells treated with TPA. There is an increase in the phosphorylation of only one tryptic phosphopeptide derived from TH in cells treated with either forskolin or TPA. The peptide phosphorylated in TPA-treated cells exhibits different elution characteristics on HPLC from that in forskolin-treated cells. The authors conclude that TH in PC 12 cells is phosphorylated on different sites by cAMP-PK and PK-C. Phosphorylation of either of these sites is associated with enzyme activation.

  6. Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Proposed Horizontal Expansion of the Restricted Airspace up to 5,000 feet at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of modifying the horizontal restricted airspace boundaries at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to include LANL's Technical Areas (TA)-33 and TA-54, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9(c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an EIS when an agency makes substantial changes in the Proposed Action that are relevant to Environmental concerns or when there are new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the Proposed Action or its impacts. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of this proposal to the SWEIS impact analysis, and considers LANL operational accident analyses. The Sa concludes with a finding of fact regarding whether the environmental effects of the Proposed Action are adequately bounded by the analyses of impacts projected by the 1999 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, or whether a Supplemental EIS is required.

  7. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    sabba, d

    2007-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2005 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. SLAC effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system (ISEMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that: (1) Worker safety and health are protected; (2) The environment is protected; and (3) Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2005, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2005. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2005, in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and implementing a chemical management system (CMS) to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details are discussed.

  8. K:\\COO (clinical operations orientation)\\Active COO Documents Revised 4/17/2014 THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    K:\\COO (clinical operations orientation)\\Active COO Documents Revised 4/17/2014 THE UNIVERSITY Content Speaker AIDET Clinical Nurse Education Specialist Overview of JDH/UMG Services Clinical Nurse Education Specialist JDH/UMG Mission/Vision/Overall Strategy Clinical Nurse Education Specialist Overview

  9. Top Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Efficiency Opportunities at DoD/Army Sites - A Guide for O&M/Energy Managers and Practitioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Gregory P.; Dean, Jesse D.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, sponsored the Army's Energy Engineering Analysis Program, provides the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Energy manager and practitioner with useful information about the top O&M opportunities consistently found across the DoD/Army sector. The target is to help the DoD/Army sector develop a well-structured and organized O&M program.

  10. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

  11. SITE ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.P. McCann

    1999-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Electrical Power System receives and distributes utility power to all North Portal site users. The major North Portal users are the Protected Area including the subsurface facility and Balance of Plant areas. The system is remotely monitored and controlled from the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System. The system monitors power quality and provides the capability to transfer between Off-Site Utility and standby power (including dedicated safeguards and security power). Standby power is only distributed to selected loads for personnel safety and essential operations. Security power is only distributed to essential security operations. The standby safeguards and security power is independent from all other site power. The system also provides surface lighting, grounding grid, and lightning protection for the North Portal. The system distributes power during construction, operation, caretaker, and closure phases of the repository. The system consists of substation equipment (disconnect switches, breakers, transformers and grounding equipment) and power distribution cabling from substation to the north portal switch gear building. Additionally, the system includes subsurface facility substation (located on surface), switch-gear, standby diesel generators, underground duct banks, power cables and conduits, switch-gear building and associated distribution equipment for power distribution. Each area substation distributes power to the electrical loads and includes the site grounding, site lighting and lightning protection equipment. The site electrical power system distributes power of sufficient quantity and quality to meet users demands. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the North Portal surface systems requiring electrical power. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System which will supply power to the underground facilities from the North Portal. Power required for the South Portal and development side activities of the subsurface facility will be provided at the South Portal by the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the Off-Site Utility System for the receipt of power. The System interfaces with the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control. The System interfaces with MGR Site Layout System for the physical location of equipment and power distribution.

  12. Managing Legacy Records for Formerly Utilized Sites. Remedial Action Program Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, C. [DOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Gueretta, J. [Lead DOE Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, CO (United States); Tack, J. [Source One Management, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Widdop, M. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracted for support work through private and academic parties through the early 1960's. The work often involved radioactive materials. Residual radioactive contamination was left at some of more than 600 potentially contaminated (candidate) sites, and worker health and safety concerns remain from the site operations and subsequent remediation activities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program to identify and protect records of MED/AEC activities and of remediation work conducted under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) to aid in resolving questions about site conditions, liability, and worker health and safety and to ensure ongoing protectiveness of human health and the environment. This paper discusses DOE activities undertaken to locate records collections, confirm retention schedules and access requirements, and document information about the collections for use by future stewards. In conclusion: DOE-LM recognizes that records and information management is a critical component of effective LTS and M. Records are needed to answer questions about site conditions and demonstrate to the public in the future that the sites are safe. DOE-LM is working to satisfy present needs and anticipate future uses for FUSRAP records, and compile a collection of site and program information from which future stewards can readily locate and retrieve needed information. (authors)

  13. Remote site survey and characterization for the National ER WM Program using the SRIP (Solider Robot Interface Project) vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, B.S.; Killough, S.M.; Emery, M.D.; Herndon, J.N.; Hamel, W.R.; Burks, B.L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant number of Department of Energy (DOE) production and research sites will require remediation of buried waste sites during the coming years. An important first step in cleanup, restoration, and decontamination activities is burial site characterization. An early field demonstration of buried waste site survey and characterization will be conducted using a remotely operated vehicle equipped with sensors, a manipulator system, and a vision system. This demonstration will be conducted in July 1990. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

  15. M & O Contract Recompete Site -- Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    web site for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Pantex Plant, and Savannah River Tritium Operations Management and Operating (M&O) Contract Competition. The purpose of this...

  16. Environmental Assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), for the proposed granting of DOE permission of offloading activities to support the movement Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies (SGSAs) across the Savannah River Site (SRS). Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. On the basis of the floodplain/wetlands assessment in the EA, DOE has determined that there is no practicable alternative to the proposed activities and that the proposed action has been designed to minimize potential harm to or within the floodplain of the SRS boat ramp. No wetlands on SRS would be affected by the proposed action.

  17. Work Plan: Work Plan for the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study - Environmental Assessment (RI/FS-EA) for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at the Weldon Spring Site.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj:'I,\ W C -hSinceSite

  18. Nuclear Archeology in a Bottle: Evidence of Pre-Trinity U.S. Weapons Activities from a Waste Burial Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Douglas, Matthew; Bonde, Steven E.; Briggs, David; Farmer, Orville T.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Orton, Christopher R.; Wacker, John F.; Luksic, Andrzej T.

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During World War II, the Hanford Site in Washington was chosen for plutonium production. In 2004, a bottle containing a sample of plutonium was recovered from a Hanford waste trench. Isotopic age dating indicated the sample was separated from the fuel pellet 64 ±2.8 years earlier. Detectable products of secondary nuclear reactions, such as 22Na, proved useful as 1) a detectable analog for alpha emitting actinides, 2) an indicator of sample splitting, and 3) a measure of the time since sample splitting. The sample origin was identified as the X-10 reactor, Oak Ridge, TN. Corroborated by historical documents, we concluded this sample was part of the first batch of Pu separated at T-Plant, Hanford, the world’s first industrial-scale reprocessing facility, on December 9, 1944.

  19. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  20. Effects of a potential drop of a shipping cask, a waste container, and a bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.L.; Lee, J.; Lu, D.L.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the effects of potential drops of a typical shipping cask, waste container, and bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations at the prospective Yucca Mountain Repository. The waste-handling process (one stage, no consolidation configuration) is examined to estimate the maximum loads imposed on typical casks and containers as they are handled by various pieces of equipment during waste-handling operations. Maximum potential drop heights for casks and containers are also evaluated for different operations. A nonlinear finite-element model is employed to represent a hybrid spent fuel container subject to drop heights of up to 30 ft onto a reinforced concrete floor. The impact stress, strain, and deformation are calculated, and compared to the failure criteria to estimate the limiting (maximum permissible) drop height for the waste container. A typical Westinghouse 17 {times} 17 PWR fuel assembly is analyzed by a simplified model to estimate the energy absorption by various parts of the fuel assembly during a 30 ft drop, and to determine the amount of kinetic energy in a fuel pin at impact. A nonlinear finite-element analysis of an individual fuel pin is also performed to estimate the amount of fuel pellet fracture due to impact. This work was completed on May 1990.

  1. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): New Bedford Site, Upper and Lower Harbor Operable Units, New Bedford, MA, September 25, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Record of Decision sets forth the selected remedial action for the Upper and Lower Harbors of the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The major components of the selected remedy include: Approximately 450,000 cubic yards of sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be removed; In certain shoreline areas prone to beach combing, sediments between the high and low tide levels will be removed if above 25 ppm PCBs; Four shoreline CDFs will be constructed to contain and isolate the dredged sediments; Once the dredged sediments are placed in the CDFs, the large volumes of water brought in by the dredging process will be decanted and treated to low levels before discharge back to the Harbor; Once full, first an interim and then a final cap will be constructed at each CDF; The capped CDFs will be monitored and maintained over the long term to ensure their integrity; Institutional controls, including seafood advisories, no-fishing signs and educational campaigns will be implemented to minimize ingestion of local PCB-contaminated seafood until PCBs in seafood reach safe levels; Once completed, the CDFs will be available for beneficial reuse as shoreline open space, parks or, in the case of the lower harbor CDF, a commercial marine facility; and A review of the Site will take place every five years after the initiation of the remedial action to assure that the remedy continues to protect human health and the environment.

  2. Structure of the 2-Aminopurine-Cytosine Base Pair Formed in the Polymerase Active Site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reha-Krantz, Linda J.; Hariharan, Chithra; Subuddhi, Usharani; Xia, Shuangluo; Zhao, Chao; Beckman, Jeff; Christian, Thomas; Konigsberg, William (Yale); (Alberta)

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The adenine base analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) is a potent base substitution mutagen in prokaryotes because of its enhanceed ability to form a mutagenic base pair with an incoming dCTP. Despite more than 50 years of research, the structure of the 2AP-C base pair remains unclear. We report the structure of the 2AP-dCTP base pair formed within the polymerase active site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA polymerase. A modified wobble 2AP-C base pair was detected with one H-bond between N1 of 2AP and a proton from the C4 amino group of cytosine and an apparent bifurcated H-bond between a proton on the 2-amino group of 2-aminopurine and the ring N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine. Interestingly, a primer-terminal region rich in AT base pairs, compared to GC base pairs, facilitated dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. We propose that the increased flexibility of the nucleotide binding pocket formed in the Y567A-DNA polymerase and increased 'breathing' at the primer-terminal junction of A+T-rich DNA facilitate dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. Thus, interactions between DNA polymerase residues with a dynamic primer-terminal junction play a role in determining base selectivity within the polymerase active site of RB69 DNA polymerase.

  3. Environmental assessment of Oklahoma abandoned drilling and production sites and associated public education outreach activities. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, M.

    1996-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Oklahoma oil producers and royalty owners are taking part in the nation`s first oil industry funded environmental cleanup and education program. The program is administered by the Oklahoma Energy Resources Board (OERB), a state agency which was created by the Oklahoma Independent Energy Education and Marketing Act. The purpose of this project will be accomplished through two primary objectives: (1) Conduct environmental assessment of abandoned oil and gas drilling and production sites where no responsible owner can be found and transfer environmental technology to oil and gas operators; and (2) Provide a comprehensive public education/outreach program to increase public awareness of the importance of the Oklahoma oil (and gas) industry. Technical progress is reported for these tasks.

  4. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, California Chapter 3 Site Environmental Report for 2008 Berkeley Lab continued operating

  5. CSMRI SITE PROJECT SUMMARY September 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the EPA action a tailings pond had been operated in that portion of the Site. The new well detected

  6. St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet WHAT IS FUSRAP?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    remediation program. It addresses radiological contamination generated by activities of the Manhattan Engineer operated as a uranium extrusion and rod-straightening facility. Contamination is now in dust located (USACE), St. Louis District, is conducting a radiological cleanup program for four Missouri sites (SLDS

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Site, Operable Unit 4, Jasper County, MO, July 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has prepared this decision document to present the selected remedial action for ground water at the Oronogo/Duenweg Mining Belt Site located in Jasper County, Missouri. This selected remedy deals with providing safe drinking water supplies to residents currently consuming ground water contaminated with metals. The major components of selected remedy are: Support to Public Water Supply District No. 3 in the Oronogo/Duenweg Designated Area (DA); Extension of existing public water lines in the Oronogo/Duenweg DA; Extension of existing public water lines in the Irons Gates Extension DA; Installation of point-of-use treatment units to homes not accessible to public water; A maintenance program for the point-of-use treatment units; A monitoring program for threatened homes and the point-of-use treatment units; and Institutional controls to regulate future uses of the contaminated shallow aquifer.

  8. Hanford Site Raptor Nest Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, John J.; Lindsey, Cole T.; Wilde, Justin W.

    2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.

  9. Hanford Site Anuran Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilde, Justin W.; Johnson, Scott J.; Lindsey, Cole T.

    2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.

  10. Sulfur K-Edge XAS and DFT Calculations on NitrileHydratase: Geometric and Electronic Structure of the Non-heme Iron Active Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Taniguchi, Kayoko; /Wako, RIKEN; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; /Washington U., Seattle; Maeda, Mizuo; /SLAC,; Kovacs, Julie A.; /Washington U., Seattle; Odaka, Masafumi; /Wako, RIKEN; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS{sup -})-, sulfenate (RSO{sup -})-, and sulfinate (RSO{sub 2}{sup -})-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO- species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by {approx}0.1 {angstrom}). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe{sup III} in the active site of NHase as CysS{sup -}, CysSOH, and CysSO{sub 2}{sup -} both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z{sub eff} of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO]{sup 6} NHase species has a Z{sub eff} very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe{sup III} counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong {pi} back-bonding into the {pi}* antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t{sub 2}{sup 6} low-spin metal to the coordinated NO.

  11. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  12. Investigation of the mechanism of phosphotriesterase: characterization of the binuclear metal active site by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samples, Cynthia Renee

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    between the two divalent cations and the loss of catalytic activity. The reversible protonation of the bridging hydroxide has an apparent pK a of 7.3 based upon changes in the EPR spectrum of Mn/Mn-PTE with alterations in pH. The pH-rate profile... for the hydrolysis of paraoxon by Mn/Mn-PTE shows the requirement of a single function group that must be unprotonated with a pK a of 7.1. The comparable pK a values are proposed to result from the protonation of the same ionizable species. The effects...

  13. Operational, aesthetic, and construction process performance for innovative passive and active solar building components for residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settlemyre, Kevin (Kevin Franklin), 1971-

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system-based framework creates the ability to integrate operational, aesthetic, and construction process performance. The framework can be used to evaluate innovations within residential construction. By reducing the ...

  14. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummins, C.L.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to meet three of the primary objectives of the Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental monitoring program. These objectives are to assess actual or potential exposures to populations form the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from normal operations or nonroutine occurrences; to demonstrate compliance with applicable authorized limits and legal requirements; and to communicate results of the monitoring program to the public. This 1989 report contains descriptions of radiological and nonradiological monitoring programs, it provides data obtained from these programs, and it describes various environmental research activities ongoing at the site. Also included are summaries of environmental management and compliance activities, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act activities, and a listing of environmental permits issued by regulatory agencies.

  15. Site Index - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-OrganicPulseSimulation,Site Index

  16. Test Plan for Field Experiments to Support the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Performance Assessment at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bacon, Diana H.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the data collected to support the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) simulations have been obtained in the laboratory on a relatively small scale (less than 10 cm). In addition, the PA simulations themselves are currently the only means available to integrate the chemical and hydrologic processes involved in the transport of contaminants from the disposal facility into the environment. This report describes the test plan for field experiments to provide data on the hydraulic, transport, and geochemical characteristics of the near-field materials on a more representative (i.e., larger) scale than the laboratory data currently available. The experiments will also provide results that encompass a variety of transport processes likely to occur within the actual disposal facility. These experiments will thus provide the first integrated data on the ILAW facility performance and will provide a crucial dataset to evaluate the simulation-based estimates of overall facility performance used in the PA.

  17. Managing contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asante-Duah, D.K.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This book summarizes the generic principles of contaminated site management. The book walks the reader through contaminated site identification, risk assessment and the evaluation of remediation alternatives. The book is divided into two major sections, problem diagnosis and development of site restoration. In problem diagnosis, the general principles of site investigation are discussed, including the objectives and differences between tier 1,2, and 3 investigations. The principles of data collection and analysis are presented. A small quantitative discussion of statistical analysis is presented but in keeping with the objectives of the text is not sufficient comprehensive or detailed to provide much of a guide for the practitioner. Chapters on contaminant fate and transport processes and risk assessment help the reader understand the role of these issues in site investigation and remedial planning. A chapter is also included on elements of a site characterization activity, which summarizes some of the key considerations in conducting a site investigation.

  18. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Request

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Davison

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

  19. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Davison

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

  20. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MikeFishoperator 0911.JPG Gallery: Groundwater Treatment Resin Title: Groundwater Treatment Facility Operations Groundwater Treatment Facility Operations Name: Groundwater...

  1. Fiscal years 1993 and 1994 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This photobriefing book describes the ongoing decontamination and decommissioning projects at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)-East Site near Lemont, Illinois. The book is broken down into three sections: introduction, project descriptions, and summary. The introduction elates the history and mission of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Projects Department at ANL-East. The second section describes the active ANL-East D and D projects, giving a project history and detailing fiscal year (FY) 1993 and FY 1994 accomplishments and FY 1995 goals. The final section summarizes the goals of the D and D Projects Department and the current program status. The D/D projects include the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor, Chicago Pile-5 Reactor, that cells, and plutonium gloveboxes. 73 figs.

  2. Annual Site Environmental Report, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2004 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2004, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2004. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2004, in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with its established permit conditions: 2004 was the seventh consecutive year the air quality management program operated without receiving any notices of violation (NOVs) from regulators. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible for overseeing hazardous materials and waste management at SLAC. The CUPA made no facility inspections of SLAC during 2004. (3) Stormwater and Industrial Wastewater--SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions: 2004 was the eighth consecutive year the program operated without receiving any NOVs from program regulators. During 2004 the last 32 unauthorized discharge connections to the stormwater system were eliminated. (4) Hazardous Materials Program--Although SLAC has been successful in meeting the regulatory requirements for managing hazardous materials, it has decided to pursue a more active strategy in reducing its use of such materials. The cornerstone of this effort is the implementation of a chemical management system (CMS). (5) Environmental Radiological Program--In 2004, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. As detailed in Chapter 5, SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. (6) Groundwater Protection and Environmental Restoration--In general, environmental concerns at SLAC are limited in number, small in scale and are actively being managed or eliminated. The Environmental Restoration Program continued work on site characterization and evaluation of remedial alternatives at four sites with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater and several areas with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lead in soil.

  3. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2003 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the DOE for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management to meet the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2003, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were utilized by SLAC to implement such ''greening of the government'' initiatives like Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2003. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2003 in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a system to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the sixth consecutive year the air quality management program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. Nevertheless, SLAC has an active program to improve its environmental performance in air quality. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible for overseeing hazardous materials and waste management at SLAC. The CUPA made facility enforcement inspections of SLAC in August and September of 2003. These inspections covered SLAC's hazardous materials and waste management, business plan, California Accidental Release Prevention Program (CalARP), and tiered permitting/permit-by-rule programs. No notices of violation were issued as a result of either inspection. (3) Stormwater and Industrial Wastewater--SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the seventh consecutive year the program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. SLAC actively pursues projects to reduce flow to the wastewater system, and through a variety of measures, has managed to keep its facility-wide wastewater discharge constant during a period in which many new connections were made to the system. SLAC continues to make the transition to a new facility-wide sanitary sewer flow-monitoring scheme, and made substantial progress towards completing the project during 2003. SLAC discharges stormwater with the potential to come into contact with industrial activities. SLAC has an extensive monitoring program in place at the eight discharge locations where the greatest potential for contact exists. During the 2002-2003 wet season, SLAC met all the requirements of its monitoring plan, with the exception of consistent sample collection within the first hour of discharge. For the eleventh consecutive year, the surface water program operated in 2003 without receiving any NOVs from program regulators. After expenditures of more than $1 million, SLAC was nearly complete with its Unauthorized Stormwater Connection Project at year-end; only 32 connections (less than 10 percent of the original total) remained to be replumed. SLAC actively pursued several other BMP-related performance improvements during the year. (4) Hazardous Materials Program--Although SLAC has been successful in meeting regulatory requirements for managing hazardous materials, it has decided to pursue a more activ

  4. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2006 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year; i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2006/2007 (October 2006 through May 2007), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. SLAC continued to follow the path to self-declare an environmental management system under DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program' and effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2006, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing 'greening of the government' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. The SLAC Office of Assurance was created during 2006 in response to DOE Order 226.1. During 2006, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations, and there were no Notice of Violations issued to SLAC from any of the regulatory agencies that oversee SLAC. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during 2006 to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details are discussed below. SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with its established permit conditions. The Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) did not conduct a facility inspection of SLAC during 2006, though it did visit the site on four different occasions. The BAAQMD did compliment SLAC for the overall configuration of SLAC's gasoline dispensing facility and of SLAC's asbestos/demolition notification program during two of the visits. DOE awarded SLAC the 2006 Best in Class for Pollution Prevention and Environmental Stewardship Accomplishment in recognition of SLAC's CMS program which manages the procurement and use of chemicals. As an example of the efficiency of the CMS, SLAC reviewed its use of gases and associated tanks and phased out numerous gas tanks that were no longer needed or were not acceptable for long-term storage, in turn, reducing SLAC's on-site chemical inventory. As part of SLAC's waste minimization and management efforts, more than one thousand tons of municipal solid waste was recycled by SLAC during 2006. SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions. During 2006, SLAC obtained a new facility-wide wastewater discharge permit which replaced four separate permits that were previously issued to SLAC. In 2006, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. The Environmental Restoration Program continued work on site characterization and evaluation of remedial alternatives at four sites with volatile organic compounds in groundwater and several areas with polychlorinated biphenyls and low concentrations of lead in soil. SLAC is regulated under a site cleanup requirements order (board or

  5. Supplemental feasibility study for remedial action for the Groundwater Operable Unit at the Chemical Plant Area of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Site data evaluated indicate that after source removal, dilution and dispersion appear to be the primary processes that would further attenuate groundwater contaminant concentrations. On the basis of these attenuation processes, the calculations presented in Chapter 2 indicate that it would take several years to decades (approximately 60 to 150 and 14 years, respectively, for Zones 1 and 2) for TCE concentrations in Zones 1 and 2 to attenuate to the MCL (or ARAR) of 5 pg/L. The estimates for Zones 1 through 3, where the higher nitrate concentrations are clustered, indicate that it would likely take at least 80 years for nitrate concentrations to attenuate to the MCL (or ARAR) of 10 mg/L. Costs for implementing NINA for groundwater at the chemical plant area are primarily associated with those incurred for monitoring contaminant concentrations and the replacement costs for monitoring wells. Cost estimates are relatively high because a rather lengthy period of monitoring would be involved. Calculations performed to evaluate the feasibility of groundwater removal and subsequent treatment of the extracted water included determinations for the number of extraction wells needed, required number of pore volumes, and the number of years of implementation required to attain bench marks. The calculations were performed per zone of contamination, as discussed in Chapter 1. Several observations can be made about the results presented in Chapter 3 regarding Alternative 4. The first is that by looking at the results for Zones 1 and 2 evaluated under Alternative 4, one can also assess the feasibility of Alternative 7, because Alternative 7 addresses this particular subset of Alternative 4 (i.e., Zones 1 and 2). TCE contamination has been observed in Zones 1 and 2, but has not been reported in any of the remaining five zones. Nitrate, nitroaromatic compounds, and uranium have also been reported in Zones 1 and 2. The present-worth costs for implementing the pump and treat alternative in Zones 1 and 2 constitute the major component of the overall present-worth cost for Alternative 4, which indicates that the cost for Alternative 7 would be similarly high. Another observation is that although estimated times are shorter for the pump and treat approach than those for MNA, pump and treat for Zones 1 and 2 likely would take several decades (at least 30 years) to attain ARARs or bench marks. The cost estimates (in present-worth costs) for Alternatives 4 and 7 are much higher (approximately an order of magnitude higher) than those for Alternative 3.

  6. Site Environmental Report for 2011, Volumes 1& 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskin, David; Bauters, Tim; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Horst, Blair; Jelinski, John; Lackner, Ginny; Philliber, Jeff; Rothermich, Nancy; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Xu, Suying

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Environmental Report for 2011 summarizes Berkeley Lab’s environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year (CY) 2011. Throughout this report, “Berkeley Lab” or “LBNL” refers both to (1) the multiprogram scientific facility the UC manages and operates on the 202-acre university-owned site located in the hills above the UC Berkeley campus, and the site itself, and (2) the UC as managing and operating contractor for Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that include an overview of LBNL, a discussion of its Environmental Management System (EMS), the status of environmental programs, summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities, and quality assurance (QA) measures. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  7. Operational Excellence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeedingthis site » OpenOperational

  8. Optogenetic Mimicry of the Transient Activation of Dopamine Neurons by Natural Reward Is Sufficient for Operant Reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kyung Man

    Activation of dopamine receptors in forebrain regions, for minutes or longer, is known to be sufficient for positive reinforcement of stimuli and actions. However, the firing rate of dopamine neurons is increased for only ...

  9. Annual Site Environmental Report: 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides information about environmental programs during 2002 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2002, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC did not receive any notices of violation during 2002. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2002, in decreasing air emission rates, the storm drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better.

  10. Tank waste remediation system operational scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.E.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium and cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner (DOE 1993). This operational scenario is a description of the facilities that are necessary to remediate the Hanford Site tank wastes. The TWRS Program is developing technologies, conducting engineering analyses, and preparing for design and construction of facilities necessary to remediate the Hanford Site tank wastes. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared to evaluate proposed actions of the TWRS. This operational scenario is only one of many plausible scenarios that would result from the completion of TWRS technology development, engineering analyses, design and construction activities and the TWRS EIS. This operational scenario will be updated as the development of the TWRS proceeds and will be used as a benchmark by which to evaluate alternative scenarios.

  11. Waste reduction at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, W.E.; Lee, R.A.; Reynolds, R.W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation for the production and research of nuclear materials for national defense and peace time applications and has been operating a full nuclear fuel cycle since the early 1950s. Wastes generated include high level radioactive, transuranic, low level radioactive, hazardous, mixed, sanitary, and aqueous wastes. Much progress has been made during the last several years to reduce these wastes including management systems, characterization, and technology programs. The reduction of wastes generated and the proper handling of the wastes have always been a part of the Site's operation. This paper summarizes the current status and future plans with respect to waste reduction to waste reduction and reviews some specific examples of successful activities.

  12. Calendar year 2007 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agogino, Karen [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (US), NNSA; Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia Corp., Albuquerque, NM (US)

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Offi ce (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Washington Group International subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2007. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Site Offi ce (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual (DOE 2007).

  13. Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  14. Programmatic agreement among the USDOE/RL Operations Office, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the WA State Historic Preservation Office for the maintenance, deactivation, alteration and demolition of the built environment on the Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, D.W.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Programmatic Agreement (PA) addresses the built environment (i.e., buildings and structures) constructed during the Manhattan Project and Cold War Era periods of Hanford`s operational history. As such it encompasses the years 1943 through 1990. The identification, evaluation, and treatment of buildings and historic archeological remains on the Hanford Site predating 1943 will be accomplished through Sections 800.4 through 800.6 of the Council`s regulations. This PA will be in effect from the date of signature until September 30, 2000. Completion of the Sitewide Treatment Plan established under this PA satisfies all Section 106 requirements for identification, evaluation, and treatment necessary for all undertakings, up to and including demolition which may affect Manhattan Project and Cold War Era properties. This PA may be extended if the Sitewide Treatment Plan has not been completed by the end of FY 2000. Identification, evaluation, and treatment of properties constructed on the Hanford Site after 1990 will be handled pursuant to the regulations in effect at the time such properties are eligible for review.

  15. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  16. Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilmer, J.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

  17. TRACKING SITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site.  https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack 

  18. DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order institutes a DOE wide program for the management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and facilitate the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Cancels DOE O 210.2.

  19. Independent Oversight Activity Report for the Operational Awareness Oversight Visit of the Nevada National Security Site, May 5-7, 2014

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions for DOEthe RankingReform atSolar Energy Report Number:IEA Independent

  20. HANFORD SITE WELDING PROGRAM SUCCESSFULLY PROVIDING A SINGLE SITE FUNCTION FOR USE BY MULTIPLE CONTRACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CANNELL GR

    2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) recently restructured its Hanford work scope, awarding two new contracts over the past several months for a total of three contracts to manage the sites cleanup efforts. DOE-RL met with key contractor personnel prior to and during contract transition to ensure site welding activities had appropriate oversight and maintained code compliance. The transition also provided an opportunity to establish a single site-wide function that would provide welding and materials engineering services to the Hanford site contractors: CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC); Mission Support Alliance (MSA); Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS); and Washington Closure Hanford (WCH). Over the years, multiple and separate welding programs (amongst the several contractors) existed at the Hanford site leading to inefficiencies resulting from duplication of administrative efforts, maintenance of welding procedures, welder performance certifications, etc. The new, single program eliminates these inefficiencies. The new program, co-managed by two of the sites' new contractors, the CHPRC ('owner' of the program and responsible for construction welding services) and the MSA (provides maintenance welding services), provides more than just the traditional construction and maintenance welding services. Also provided, are welding engineering, specialty welding development/qualification for the closure of radioactive materials containers and materials evaluation/failure analysis. The following describes the new Hanford site welding program.

  1. Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site in calendar year 2010. The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. The Salmon, MS, Site is a federally owned site located in Lamar County, MS, approximately 12 miles west of Purvis, MS, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, MS (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), is responsible for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the 1,470-acre site. DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the operating agent for the surface and subsurface real estate.

  2. Financial services FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.10.4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vodney, E.P.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the signed Financial Service fiscal year 1995 Site Support Program Plan, Work Breakdown Structure 6.10.4, for the Hanford site. This plan is intended to enable the contractor to accomplish the following: ensure financial integrity in all Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) operation while supporting the programmatic activities of WHC, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, and other Hanford contractors; provide efficient and effective financial services, and value added audits and review that enable management to enhance future operational results.

  3. Hanford Site environmental surveillance data report for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site collects data that provides a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford operations. Data are also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water and sediment. In addition, Hanford Site wildlife samples were also collected for metals analysis. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory publishes an annual environmental report for the Hanford Site each calendar year. The Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1996 describes the site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, and environmental monitoring activities and results. The report includes a summary of offsite and onsite environmental monitoring data collected during 1996 by PNNL`s Environmental Monitoring Program. Appendix A of that report contains data summaries created from river monitoring and sediment data. This volume contains the actual raw data used to create the summaries. The data volume also includes Hanford Site drinking water radiological data.

  4. Theoretic Insight into CO2 Reduction at Active Sites of Molybdenum and Tungsten Enzymes: a {\\pi} Interaction between CO2 and Tungsten Bis-Dithiolene Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Yong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active sites of molybdenum and tungsten enzymes, particularly mononuclear tungsten formate dehydrogenase (FDH) have been theoretically investigated towards their interaction with CO2. Obvious {\\pi} interaction has been found between the 2e reduced metallodithiole moiety and the molecular CO2. This weak {\\pi} bonding is predicated both at gas phase, noted as -6.0 kcal/mol and aqueous solvation level, -3.6 kcal/mol. Such interaction is not only limited to CO2, but also to the CO2 reduced product, i.e. formate, in the form of anion- {\\pi} interaction, noted as -6.8 kcal/mol and -4.1 kcal/mol respectively in gas and aqueous solvation model. The Bailar twisted angles from 60o to 0o, governing structure preference of tungsten dithiolene from octahedron to triangle prism in their restricted structures, has been explored to evaluate such {\\pi} in-terrelations with CO2 and formate. An octahedral structure with 3 kcal/mol energy lower is preferred over the triangle prismatic when such interactions are concerned.

  5. Expression of a soluble form of iodotyrosine deiodinase for active site characterization by engineering the native membrane protein from Mus musculus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, Jennifer M.; McTamney, Patrick M.; Rokita, Steven E. (Maryland)

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Reductive deiodination is critical for thyroid function and represents an unusual exception to the more common oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms of dehalogenation in mammals. Studies on the reductive processes have been limited by a lack of convenient methods for heterologous expression of the appropriate proteins in large scale. The enzyme responsible for iodide salvage in the thyroid, iodotyrosine deodinase, is now readily generated after engineering its gene from Mus musculus. High expression of a truncated derivative lacking the membrane domain at its N-terminal was observed in Sf9 cells, whereas expression in Pichia pastoris remained low despite codon optimization. Ultimately, the desired expression in Escherichia coli was achieved after replacing the two conserved Cys residues of the deiodinase with Ala and fusing the resulting protein to thioredoxin. This final construct provided abundant enzyme for crystallography and mutagenesis. Utility of the E. coli system was demonstrated by examining a set of active site residues critical for binding to the zwitterionic portion of substrate.

  6. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). NNSA/NSO prepares the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report (NNSSER) to provide the public an understanding of the environmental monitoring and compliance activities that are conducted on the NNSS to protect the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. The NNSSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NNSS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. This summary provides an abbreviated and more readable version of the NNSSER. It does not contain detailed descriptions or presentations of monitoring designs, data collection methods, data tables, the NNSS environment, or all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The NNSS is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national security-related missions and high-risk operations. The NNSS is located about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The approximately 1,360-square-mile site is one of the largest restricted access areas in the United States. It is surrounded by federal installations with strictly controlled access, as well as by lands that are open to public entry.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Test Site Operations & Maintenance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Personnel Water Power in the News Geothermal Advanced Bit Development Geothermal Energy & Drilling Technology Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Materials & Components...

  8. Off-site Intensive Operational Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctober 1996 - September 2001 The rates BPA2Odds and2

  9. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

  10. NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

  11. anciens sites miniers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detailed procedures for site assessment, remedial system design, and optimization of the remedial action operation (RAO) for the petroleum-hydrocarbons contaminated sites. In...

  12. ancien site minier: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    detailed procedures for site assessment, remedial system design, and optimization of the remedial action operation (RAO) for the petroleum-hydrocarbons contaminated sites. In...

  13. United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environment, Safety & Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada.

  14. Site decommissioning management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  15. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup Document Date: 10162009 Keywords: recovery, waste site, BC Control, soil, contamination Area: BC Control Area Description: Using Recovery Act funding, contractors are...

  16. Site Characterization Work Plan for the Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico (Rev. 1, January 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

    2002-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Gnome was the first nuclear experiment conducted under the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Plowshare Program. The Plowshare Program focused on developing nuclear devices exclusively for peaceful purposes. The intent of the Gnome experiment was to evaluate the effects of a nuclear detonation in a salt medium. Historically, Project Gnome consisted of a single detonation of a nuclear device on December 10, 1961 with the Salado Formation. Since the Gnome detonation, the AEC/DOE has conducted surface restoration, site reconnaissance, and decontamination and decommissioning activities at the site. In addition, annual groundwater sampling is performed under a long-term hydrological monitoring program begun in 1972. Coach, an experiment to be located near the Gnome project, was initially scheduled for 1963. Although construction and rehabilitation were completed for Coach, the experiment was canceled and never executed. Known collectively as Project Gnome-Coach, the site is located approximately 25 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, in Eddy County, and is comprised of nearly 680 acres, of which approximately 60 acres are disturbed from the combined AEC/DOE operations. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the project. The subsurface at the Gnome-Coach site has two contaminant sources that are fundamentally different in terms of both their stratigraphic location and release mechanism. The goal of this characterization is to collect data of sufficient quantity and quality to establish current site conditions and to use the data to identify and evaluate if further action is required to protect human health and the environment and achieve permanent closure of the site. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

  17. Management of Decommissioning on a Multi-Facility Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laraia, Michele; McIntyre, Peter; Visagie, Abrie [IAEA, Vienna and NECSA (South Africa)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The management of the decommissioning of multi-facility sites may be inadequate or inappropriate if based on approaches and strategies developed for sites consisting of only a single facility. The varied nature of activities undertaken, their interfaces and their interdependencies are likely to complicate the management of decommissioning. These issues can be exacerbated where some facilities are entering the decommissioning phase while others are still operational or even new facilities are being built. Multi-facility sites are not uncommon worldwide but perhaps insufficient attention has been paid to optimizing the overall site decommissioning in the context of the entire life cycle of facilities. Decommissioning management arrangements need to be established taking a view across the whole site. A site-wide decommissioning management system is required. This should include a project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage identified interfaces and interdependencies. A group should be created to manage decommissioning across the site, ensuring adequate and consistent practices in accordance with the management system. Decommissioning management should be aimed at the entire life cycle of facilities. In the case of multi facility sites, the process becomes more complex and decommissioning management arrangements need to be established with a view to the whole site. A site decommissioning management system, a group that is responsible for decommissioning on site, a site project evaluation and approval process and specific arrangements to manage the identified interfaces are key areas of a site decommissioning management structure that need to be addressed to ensure adequate and consistent decommissioning practices. A decommissioning strategy based on single facilities in a sequential manner is deemed inadequate.

  18. Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers’ Council

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level radioactive waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures.

  19. Chicago Operations Office: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) activities funded through the Chicago Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US Industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. The information has been assembled from recently produced OTD documents which highlight technology development activities within each of the OTD program elements. OTD technologies addresses three specific problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention. These problems are not unique to DOE, but are associated with other Federal agency and industry sites as well. Thus, technical solutions developed within OTD programs will benefit DOE, and should have direct applications in outside markets.

  20. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the initial document for developing site-specific activities to achieve regulatory compliance in the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The regulatory framework used to select the proposed ground water compliance strategies is presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. The Shiprock site consists of two, interconnected hydrogeologic systems: the terrace system and the floodplain system. Separate compliance strategies are proposed for these two systems. The compliance strategy for the terrace aquifer is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards based on classification of the terrace aquifer as having Class III (limited-use) ground water. The compliance strategy for the floodplain aquifer is active remediation using a subsurface biological barrier. These strategies were selected by applying site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) (DOE, 1994a). The site conceptual model indicates that milling-related contamination has impacted the ground water in the terrace and floodplain aquifers. Ground water occurs in both aquifers in alluvium and in fractures in the underlying Cretaceous age Mancos Shale. A mound of ground water related to fluids from the milling operations is thought to exist in the terrace aquifer below the area where settling ponds were in use during the mill operations. Most of the water occurring in the floodplain aquifer is from recharge from the San Juan River.

  1. Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, CY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; McKinney, S.M.; Perkins, C.J.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1992 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State in 1992. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sediments, soil, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and to control the impacts of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the workers and the local environment. Additionally, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although impacts from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and are slightly elevated when compared to offsite, these impacts are less than in previous years.

  2. 2010 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2010. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2010 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

  3. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12189

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Christopher [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Kothari, Vijendra [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States); Starr, Ken [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado (United States); Gillespie, Joey; Widdop, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to address residual radiological contamination at sites where work was performed for the Manhattan Engineer District and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Initially, FUSRAP activities began with a records search for sites that had the potential to contain residual radiological contamination; 46 sites were identified that were eligible for and required remediation. Remedial action began in 1979. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for the remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE retains responsibility for determining if sites are eligible for FUSRAP remediation and for providing long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) of remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE LTS and M activities are designed to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment and to preserve knowledge regarding FUSRAP sites. Additional elements include eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS and M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close coordination with USACE and regulators to ensure there is no loss of protectiveness when sites transition to DOE for LTS and M. Over the life of the FUSRAP program from 1974 to the present, DOE's primary mission and responsibility has been to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment. In fulfilling this mission, the DOE program includes the following key elements: eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS and M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close communication stakeholders as well as state and federal regulators. DOE programs are designed to preserve and present the information that future stewards and stakeholders will need to maintain site remedies and knowledge. (authors)

  4. MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories/California site environmental report for 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condouris, R.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. The Site Environmental Report describes the results of SNL/California`s environmental protection activities during the calendar year. It also summarizes environmental monitoring data and highlights major environmental programs. Overall, it evaluates SNL/California`s environmental management performance and documents the site`s regulatory compliance status.

  6. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the sediment transport modeling task

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This site-specific Work Plan/Health and Safety Checklist (WP/HSC) is a supplement to the general health and safety plan (HASP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 remedial investigation and site investigation (WAG 2 RI&SI) activities [Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169)] and provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 RI&SI Sediment Transport Modeling Task. This WP/HSC identifies specific site operations, site hazards, and any recommendations by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) health and safety organizations [i.e., Industrial Hygiene (IH), Health Physics (HP), and/or Industrial Safety] that would contribute to the safe completion of the WAG 2 RI&SI. Together, the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI&SI (ORNL/ER-169) and the completed site-specific WP/HSC meet the health and safety planning requirements specified by 29 CFR 1910.120 and the ORNL Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) Program Manual. In addition to the health and safety information provided in the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI&SI, details concerning the site-specific task are elaborated in this site-specific WP/HSC, and both documents, as well as all pertinent procedures referenced therein, will be reviewed by all field personnel prior to beginning operations.

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) documents the activities performed to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996, and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SA4FER) Plan for CAU 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 2001). CAU 398 consists of the following thirteen Corrective Action Sites (CASs) all located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1): CAS 25-25-02, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-03, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-04, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-05, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-06, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-07, Hydraulic Oil Spill(s), CAS 25-25-08, Hydraulic Oil Spill(s), CAS 25-25-16, Diesel Spill (from CAS 25-01-02), CAS 25-25-17, Subsurface Hydraulic Oil Spill, CAS 25-44-0 1, Fuel Spill, CAS 25-44-04, Acid Spill (from CAS 25-01-01), CAS 25-44-02, Spill, and CAS 25-44-03, Spill. Copies of the analytical results for the site verification samples are included in Appendix B. Copies of the CAU Use Restriction Information forms are included in Appendix C.

  8. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). NNSA/NSO prepares the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) to provide the public an understanding of the environmental monitoring and compliance activities that are conducted on the NTS to protect the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. This summary provides an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER. It does not contain detailed descriptions or presentations of monitoring designs, data collection methods, data tables, the NTS environment, or all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  9. Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12189

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Christopher [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Gillespie, Joey [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado; Widdop, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado; none,

    2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to address residual radiological contamination at sites where work was performed for the Manhattan Engineer District and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Initially, FUSRAP activities began with a records search for sites that had the potential to contain residual radiological contamination; 46 sites were identified that were eligible for and required remediation. Remedial action began in 1979. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for the remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE retains responsibility for determining if sites are eligible for FUSRAP remediation and for providing long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) of remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE LTS&M activities are designed to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment and to preserve knowledge regarding FUSRAP sites. Additional elements include eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS&M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close coordination with USACE and regulators to ensure there is no loss of protectiveness when sites transition to DOE for LTS&M.

  10. Darwin : The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, William E.; Jones, L. A. (Larry A.); Baldwin, T. (Tony); Nitschke, K. (Kim)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998, a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. The Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites are operated through collaborative agreements with the PNG National Weather Service, The Nauru Department of Industry and Economic Development (IED), and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Special Services Unit (SSU) respectively. All ARM TWP activities in the region are coordinated with the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) based in Apia, Samoa. The Darwin ARM site and its role in the ARM TWP Program are discussed.

  11. IBRD Operational Decision Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, R; Hibbard, W; Raber, E; Carlsen, T; Folks, K; MacQueen, D; Mancieri, S; Bunt, T; Richards, J; Hirabayashi-Dethier, J

    2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The IBRD Operational Decision Framework in this document is an expansion of an emerging general risk management framework under development by an interagency working group. It provides the level of detail necessary to develop a general Consequence Management Guidance Document for biological contamination remediation and restoration. It is the intent of this document to support both wide area and individual site remediation and restoration activities. This product was initiated as a portion of the IBRD Task 1 Systems Analysis to aid in identification of wide area remediation and restoration shortcomings and gaps. The draft interagency general risk management framework was used as the basis for the analysis. The initial Task 1 analysis document expanded the draft interagency framework to a higher level of resolution, building on both the logic structure and the accompanying text explanations. It was then employed in a qualitative manner to identify responsible agencies, data requirements, tool requirements, and current capabilities for each decision and task. This resulted in identifying shortcomings and gaps needing resolution. Several meetings of a joint LLNL/SNL working group reviewed and approved the initial content of this analysis. At the conclusion of Task 1, work continued on the expanded framework to generate this Operational Decision Framework which is consistent with the existing interagency general risk management framework. A large LLNL task group met repeatedly over a three-month period to develop the expanded framework, coordinate the framework with the biological remediation checklist, and synchronize the logic with the Consequence Management Plan table of contents. The expanded framework was briefed at a large table top exercise reviewing the interagency risk management framework. This exercise had representation from major US metropolitan areas as well as national agencies. This product received positive comments from the participants. Upon completion of the Operational Decision Framework, another joint LLNL/SNL working group conducted a day-long review. Identified modifications were made to the document, resulting in the included product.

  12. Progress on Footprint Reduction at the Hanford Site - 12406

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenney, Dale E. [CH2M HILL, Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Seeley, Paul [Cenibark International, Inc., Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Farabee, Al [U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) continues to reduce the footprint of legacy sites throughout the EM complex. Footprint reduction is being accomplished by focusing cleanup activities on decontamination and demolition of excess contaminated facilities, soil and groundwater remediation, and solid waste disposition. All of these initiatives are being accomplished with established technologies in proven regulatory frameworks. Ultimately, completion of these environmental cleanup activities will reduce the monitoring and maintenance costs associated with managing large federal facilities, allowing EM to place more focus on other high priority cleanup efforts and facilitate a successful transition to land-term stewardship of these sites. Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) investment, the Department's cleanup footprint has been reduced by 45 percent to date, from 2411 km{sup 2} (931 mi{sup 2}) to 1336 km{sup 2} (516 mi{sup 2}s). With this significant progress on footprint reduction, the Department is on track towards their goal to reduce its overall footprint by approximately 90 percent by 2015. In addition, some areas cleaned up may become available for alternate uses (i.e. recreation, conservation, preservation, industrialization or development). Much of the work to reduce the complex's footprint occurred at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina and the Hanford Site in Washington, but cleanup continues across the complex. Footprint reduction is progressing well at the Hanford Site, supported predominantly through ARRA investment. To date, 994 km{sup 2} (384 mi{sup 2}) (65%) of footprint reduction have been achieved at Hanford, with a goal to achieve a 90% reduction by Fiscal Year 2015. The DOE EM and DOE Richland Operations Office, continue to make great progress to reduce the legacy footprint of the Hanford Site. Footprint reduction is being accomplished by focusing cleanup activities on decontamination and demolition of excess facilities, both contaminated and uncontaminated, waste site cleanup activities, and debris pile removal. All of these activities can be accomplished with proven technologies and within established regulatory frameworks. Footprint reduction goals for Fiscal Year 2011 were exceeded, largely with the help of ARRA funding. As cleanup projects are completed and the total area requiring cleanup shrinks, overall costs for surveillance and maintenance operations and infrastructure services decrease. This work completion and decrease in funding requirements to maintain waste sites and antiquated facilities allows more focus on high priority site missions (i.e. groundwater remediation, tank waste disposition, etc.) and moves Site areas closer to transition from EM to the Legacy Management program. The progress in the Hanford footprint reduction effort will help achieve success in these other important mission areas. (authors)

  13. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Berry, M.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

  15. Identification of radionuclides of concern in Hanford Site environmental cleanup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, R.W.; Jenquin, U.P.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to consider which radionuclides should be included in conducting environmental surveys relative to site remediation at Hanford. During the operation of the Hanford site, the fission product radionuclides and a large number of activation products including the transuranic radionuclides were formed. The reactor operations and subsequent chemical processing and metallurgical operations resulted in the environmental release of gaseous and liquid effluents containing some radionuclides; however, the majority of the radionuclides were stored in waste tanks or disposed to trenches and cribs. Since some contamination of both soils and subsurface waters occurred, one must decide which radionuclides still remain in sufficient amounts to be of concern at the time when site remediation is to be complete. Many of the radionuclides which have constituted the principal hazard during site operation have half-lives on the order of a year or less; therefore, they will have decayed to insignificant amounts by the year 2030, a possible date for completion of the remediation process.

  16. Implementation of a DOD ELAP Conforming Quality System at a FUSRAP Site Field Temporary Radiological Screening Laboratory - 13500

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winters, M.S.; McElheny, G. [Cabrera Services Inc. 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT (United States)] [Cabrera Services Inc. 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT (United States); Houston, L.M.; Masset, M.R.; Spector, H.L. [United States Army Corps of Engineers -1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers -1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case study is presented on specific program elements that supported the transition of a temporary field radiological screening lab to an accredited operation capable of meeting client quality objectives for definitive results data. The temporary field lab is located at the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Linde Site in Tonawanda, NY. The site is undergoing remediation under the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, with Cabrera Services Inc. as the remediation contractor and operator of the on-site lab. Analysis methods employed in the on-site lab include gross counting of alpha and beta particle activity on swipes and air filters and gamma spectroscopy of soils and other solid samples. A discussion of key program elements and lessons learned may help other organizations considering pursuit of accreditation for on-site screening laboratories. (authors)

  17. Nevada National Security Site Radiation Protection Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, “Occupational Radiation Protection,” establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This RPP section consists of general statements that are applicable to the NNSS as a whole. The RPP also includes a series of appendices which provide supporting detail for the associated NNSS Tennant Organizations (TOs). Appendix H, “Compliance Demonstration Table,” contains a cross-walk for the implementation of 10 CFR 835 requirements. This RPP does not contain any exemptions from the established 10 CFR 835 requirements. The RSPC and TOs are fully compliant with 10 CFR 835 and no additional funding is required in order to meet RPP commitments. No new programs or activities are needed to meet 10 CFR 835 requirements and there are no anticipated impacts to programs or activities that are not included in the RPP. There are no known constraints to implementing the RPP. No guides or technical standards are adopted in this RPP as a means to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  18. Site Safety Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bainer, R.; Duarte, J.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety policy of LLNL is to take every reasonable precaution in the performance of work to protect the environment and the health and safety of employees and the public, and to prevent property damage. With respect to hazardous agents, this protection is provided by limiting human exposures, releases to the environment, and contamination of property to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). It is the intent of this Plan to supply the broad outline for completing environmental investigations within ALARA guidelines. It may not be possible to determine actual working conditions in advance of the work; therefore, planning must allow the opportunity to provide a range of protection based upon actual working conditions. Requirements will be the least restrictive possible for a given set of circumstances, such that work can be completed in an efficient and timely fashion. Due to the relatively large size of the LLNL Site and the different types of activities underway, site-specific Operational Safety Procedures (OSPs) will be prepared to supplement activities not covered by this Plan. These site-specific OSPs provide the detailed information for each specific activity and act as an addendum to this Plan, which provides the general plan for LLNL Main Site operation.

  19. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operations7-22-14 184 Mike Fish.JPG Gallery: Reducing Chromium in Groundwater Title: Reducing chromium contamination in groundwater Reducing chromium contamination in groundwater...

  20. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    48.jpg Gallery: ERDF Reaches 14 million Title: Keywords: ERDF, landfill, disposal Description: The Waste Operations organization uses trucks carrying 25-ton-capacity containers to...

  1. Moab Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HISTORYUranium Reduction Company constructed the Moab mill in 1956 and operated it until 1962 when the assets were sold to Atlas Minerals Corporation (Atlas). Uranium concentrate (called yellowcake...

  2. Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring - Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure - 13060

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilborn, Bill; Knapp, Kathryn [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Intera (United States)] [Navarro-Intera (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs. (authors)

  3. Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilborn, Bill [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Knapp, Kathryn [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States)

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

  4. Site environmental report for 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, K.W. [ed.; Brekke, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program, conducted in conjunction with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the general environment in the area. This monitoring effort ensures that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of the Environmental Monitoring Program, an ambient environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally-produced food stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions.

  5. Site Management Guide (Blue Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Department’s postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOE’s postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site cleanup is complete, LM accepts title to these sites on behalf of the United States and assumes long-term management.

  6. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherry, T. D.; Kohlhorst, D. P.; Little, S. K.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy efficiency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifically, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Table ES.2 gives a comprehensive overview of Y-12's performance status and planned actions. B&W Y-12's Energy Management mission is to incorporate renewable energy and energy efficient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. During FY 2011, the site formed a sustainability team (Fig. ES.1). The sustainability team provides a coordinated approach to meeting the various sustainability requirements and serves as a forum for increased communication and consistent implementation of sustainability activities at Y-12. The sustainability team serves as an information exchange mechanism to promote general awareness of sustainability information, while providing a system to document progress and to identify resources. These resources are necessary to implement activities that support the overall goals of sustainability, including reducing the use of resources and conserving energy. Additionally, the team's objectives include: (1) Foster a Y-12-wide philosophy to conserve resources; (2) Reduce the impacts of production operations in a cost-effective manner; (3) Increase materials recycling; (4) Use a minimum amount of energy and fuel; (5) Create a minimum of waste and pollution in achieving Y-12-strategic objectives; (6) Develop and implement techniques, technologies, process modifications, and programs that support sustainable acquisition; (7) Minimize the impacts to resources, including energy/fuel, water, waste, pesticides, and pollution generation; (8) Incorporate sustainable design principles into the design and construction of facility upgrades, new facilities, and infrastructure; and (9) Comply with federal and state regulations, executive orders, and DOE requirements. Y-12 is working to communicate its sustainment vision through procedural, engineering, operational, and management practices. The site will make informed decisions based on the application of the five Guiding Principles for HPSBs to the maximum extent possible.

  7. Hanford Site Black-Tailed Jackrabbit Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.; Wilde, Justin W.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan provides a high-level summary of environmental monitoring performed by various organizations within and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, Guide DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, and in accordance with 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The purpose of these orders is to 1) implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations, and 2) to establish standards and requirements for the operations of DOE and DOE contractors with respect to protection of the environment and members of the public against undue risk from radiation. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL Site, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. Detailed monitoring procedures, program plans, or other governing documents used by contractors or agencies to implement requirements are referenced in this plan. This plan covers all planned monitoring and environmental surveillance. Nonroutine activities such as special research studies and characterization of individual sites for environmental restoration are outside the scope of this plan.

  9. FFTF A History of Safety & Operational Excellence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIELSEN, D L

    2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400-megawatt, sodium-cooled, fast neutron flux reactor owned by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford Site. The reactor was designed and built in the late 1970s and brought on line in 1982 during a period when world interest in development of a liquid metal breeder reactor was high. For approximately 10 years, FFTF operated successfully as a national research facility testing advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, active and passive reactor safety technologies, and gaining operating experience for the next generation of nuclear reactors. FFTF also produced a wide variety of high purity medical isotopes, made tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and provided international testing support. The reactor was last operated in 1992 and is proceeding with deactivation.

  10. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  11. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  12. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  13. Interim Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for Fiscal Years 2012 and 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A J

    2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 in fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management Site-Specific

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operating a Local Site-Specific Advisory Board ... 8 A. Public Participation and Record Keeping ......

  15. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2018 are projected based on assumption as of July 1999. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement.

  16. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  17. Operational waste volume projection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koreski, G.M.

    1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June 1996.

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Denver Radium, Operable Unit 9, Denver, CO. (Eighth remedial action), December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Denver Radium site is a former radioactive mining site located in Denver, Denver County, Colorado. Industrial activities commenced at the site in 1886 with the construction of the Bailey Smelter. By 1903, the Colorado Zinc Company had constructed a mill on the site of the Bailey Smelter, and zinc milling operations continued until 1910. From 1914 to 1917, the U.S. Bureau of Mines operated a radium processing facility onsite, known as the National Radium Institute (NRI). Other onsite industrial activities included minerals recovery, manufacturing and servicing of storage batteries, treating and sacking of metallic ore insulation, oil reclamation, and landfilling. The ROD addresses approximately 16,500 cubic yards of metal-contaminated soil as OU9, the 9th of 11 OUs planned for the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are metals, including arsenic, lead, and zinc.

  19. Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan McCorkleSingin' in theCleanup SiteSite

  20. allosteric sites implications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the active site. The propeller consists of seven Flp, Vilmos 18 Radionuclide Contamination at Kazakhstans Semipalatinsk Test Site: Implications on Human and...