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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site -...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Activity Report, Savannah River Site - February 2014 February 2014 Operational Awareness Visit of the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2014-02-25 This Independent Activity...

2

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Site Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 126 Site Selection Date Last Modified Modified by: 09 References none #12;SOP 126: Site Selection 3 1.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY This standard operating procedure field conditions, and for ease of operation and maintenance. IMPROVE aerosol samplers are generally

Fischer, Emily V.

3

Federal environmental standards of potential importance to operations and activities at US Department of Energy sites. Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is now engaged in a program of environmental restoration nationwide across its 45 sites. It is also bringing its facilities into compliance with environmental regulations, decontaminating and decommissioning unwanted facilities, and constructing new waste management facilities. One of the most difficult questions that DOE must face in successfully remediating its inactive waste sites, decontaminating and decommissioning its inactive facilities, and operating its waste management facilities is: ``What criteria and standards should be met?`` Acceptable standards or procedures for determining standards will assist DOE in its conduct of ongoing waste management and pending cleanup activities by helping to ensure that those activities are conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations and are accepted by the regulatory community and the public. This document reports on the second of three baseline activities that are being conducted as prerequisites to either the development of quantitative standards that could be used by DOE, or consistent procedures for developing such standards. The first and third baseline activities are also briefly discussed in conjunction with the second of the three activities.

Fowler, K.M.; Bilyard, G.R.; Davidson, S.A.; Jonas, R.J.; Joseph, J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation is this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort stationwagons.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Protein active sites, interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for active site identification ! Manual MSA and structure analysis ! Catalytic Site Atlas (homology-based) ! Evolutionary Trace (MSA subfamily- and family-wide conservation; phylogenetic tree and structure analysis) ! 3D", Bartlett et al. J Mol Biol. 2002 Nov 15;324(1):105-21. · "An evolutionary trace method defines binding

Sjölander, Kimmen

6

Hanford Site air operating permit application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Sampler Maintenance by Site Operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 201 Sampler Maintenance by Site Operators Date Last.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY This standard operating procedure (SOP) describes the procedures and schedules. The procedural steps for weekly maintenance and repairs performed by the site operator are included in TI 201A

Fischer, Emily V.

8

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES Annual Site Maintenance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPROVE STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES SOP 226 Annual Site Maintenance Date Last Modified Modified This standard operating procedure (SOP) describes the procedures for annual maintenance of equipment Sampler Operation Manual #12;SOP 226: Annual Site Maintenance 3 1.0 PURPOSE AND APPLICABILITY

Fischer, Emily V.

9

Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

June 20-22, 2011, at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The activity consisted of observing an operational assessment of the facility's...

10

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

Roberts, R.S.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Operating Ground Rules - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships, ScholarshipsSpeedingOilOnlineOperating

13

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview Setting The Oak Ridge Reservation Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and Environmental Monitoring on the Oak Ridge

Pennycook, Steve

14

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program; Site Operator Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities during the first quarter centered around integrating the new participants into the program. A meeting of the Site Operators, in conjunction with the first meeting of the Electric Vehicle Users Task Force, was held in October. A second meeting of the Task Force was held in December. During these meetings the new contractual requirements were explained to the participants. The Site Operator Data Base was distributed and explained. The Site Operators will begin using the data base in December 1991 and will supply the operating and maintenance data to the INEL on a monthly basis. The Operators requested that they be able to have access to the data of the other Operators and it was agreed that they would be provided this on floppy disk monthly from the INEL. Presentations were made to the DOE sponsored Automotive Technology Development-Contractors Coordination Meeting in October. An overview of the program was given by EG G. Representatives from Arizona Public Service, Texas A M University, and York Technical College provided details of their programs and the results and future goals. Work was begun on commercializing the Versatile Data Acquisition System (VDAS). A Scope of Work has been written for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to be submitted to the USABC. If implemented, the CRADA will provide funds for the development and commercialization of the VDAS. Participants in the Site Operator Program will test prototypes of the system within their fleets, making the data available to the USABC and other interested organizations. The USABC will provide recommendations on the data to be collected. Major activities by the majority of the Operators were involved with the continued operation and demonstration of existing vehicles. In addition, several of the operators were involved in identifying and locating vehicles to be added to their fleets. A list of the vehicles in each Site Operator fleet is included as Appendix A to this report.

Warren, J.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Salt site performance assessment activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site -...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

at the Nevada National Security Site. The purpose of the activity was to observe Subcritical Experiment activities at the U1a Complex, discuss ongoing activities at the...

17

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

September 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - September 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Effectiveness Review The U.S. Department of...

18

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

undertaking that produced the materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation's role has evolved over restoration remedial investigation reports and waste manage- ment characterization sampling, are presented Reservation 1-2 Site and Operations Overview surement of contaminants in air, water, groundwa- water skiing

Pennycook, Steve

19

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operation - June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Operation - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Self-Assessment of the Technical Qualification...

20

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration remedial investigation reports, waste management the site and its environs; these activities provide direct measurement of contaminants in air, water

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Pro- ject, a secret undertaking that produced data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as environmental restoration remedial; these activities provide direct measurement of contaminant concentrations in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods

Pennycook, Steve

22

Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The statute establishes a procedure for the review, approval, monitoring, and enforcement of compliance in the planning, siting, construction, and operation of energy facilities, including...

23

Field Operations Program Activities Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program's goals are to evaluate electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments, support electric vehicle technology advancement, develop infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use, support increased use of electric vehicles in federal fleets, and increase overall awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from fiscal year 1997 through mid-fiscal year 1999. The Field Operations Program succeeded the Site Operator Program, which ended in September 1996. Electric vehicle testing conducted by the Program includes baseline performance testing (EV America testing), accelerated reliability (life-cycle) testing, and fleet testing. The baseline performance parameters include accelerations, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collects accelerated reliability and fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program's Qualified Vehicle Testing (QVT) partners. The Program's QVT partners have over 3 million miles of electric vehicle operating experience.

J. E. Francfort; D. V. O'Hara; L. A. Slezak

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

assessment included evaluation of work control, fall protection, quality assurance, and conduct of operations. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Operations Office - July 2010...

25

Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, 625 Indiana Ave., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20004-2901 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site -...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- July 2011 July 2011 NNSS Operational Readiness Review of the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility HIAR-NNSS-2011-07-28 This Independent Activity...

27

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - May 2010 May 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Walkthrough The U.S. Department...

28

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - June 2010 June 2010 Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Site Orientation Visit The U.S....

29

Remotely operated excavator needs assessment/site visit summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration requested an assessment of soil excavation needs relative to soil remediation. The following list identifies the DOE sites assessed: Mound Laboratory, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Nevada Test Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, and Fernald Site. The reviewed sites fall into one or more of the following three categories: production, EPA National Priorities List, or CERCLA (superfund) designation. Only three of the sites appear to have the need for a remotely operated excavator rope. Hanford and Idaho Falls have areas of high-level radioactive contamination either buried or in/under buildings. The Fernald site has a need for remote operated equipment of different types. It is their feeling that remote equipment can be used to remove the health dangers to humans by removing them from the area. Most interviewees stated that characterization technologies needs are more immediate concern over excavation. In addition, the sites do not have similar geographic conditions which would aid in the development of a generic precision excavator. The sites visited were not ready to utilize or provide the required design information necessary to draft a performance specification. This creates a strong case against the development of one type of ROPE for use at these sites. Assuming soil characterization technology/methodology is improved sufficiently to allow accurate and real time field characterization then development of a precision excavator might be pursued based on FEMP needs, since the FEMP`s sole scope of work is remediation. The excavator could then be used/tested and then later modified for other sites as warranted.

Straub, J.; Haller, S.; Worsley, R. [Westinghouse Environmental Management Co. of Ohio, Cincinnati, OH (United States); King, M. [THETA Technology Inc. (United States)

1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

30

Studies of the Active Sites for Methane Dehydroaromatization...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Active Sites for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using Ultrahigh-Field Solid-State Mo95 NMR Spectroscopy. Studies of the Active Sites for Methane Dehydroaromatization Using...

31

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was established in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced materials data collected for other site and regulatory purposes, such as envi- ronmental restoration remedial concentrations in air, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media. Environmental surveillance data

Pennycook, Steve

32

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the early 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project, a secret undertaking that produced the materials. Additional data collected for other site purposes, such as environmental restoration Remedial Investigation, water, groundwater, soil, foods, biota, and other media subsequent to effluent release

Pennycook, Steve

33

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program; Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities during the first quarter centered around integrating the new participants into the program. A meeting of the Site Operators, in conjunction with the first meeting of the Electric Vehicle Users Task Force, was held in October. A second meeting of the Task Force was held in December. During these meetings the new contractual requirements were explained to the participants. The Site Operator Data Base was distributed and explained. The Site Operators will begin using the data base in December 1991 and will supply the operating and maintenance data to the INEL on a monthly basis. The Operators requested that they be able to have access to the data of the other Operators and it was agreed that they would be provided this on floppy disk monthly from the INEL. Presentations were made to the DOE sponsored Automotive Technology Development-Contractors Coordination Meeting in October. An overview of the program was given by EG&G. Representatives from Arizona Public Service, Texas A&M University, and York Technical College provided details of their programs and the results and future goals. Work was begun on commercializing the Versatile Data Acquisition System (VDAS). A Scope of Work has been written for a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to be submitted to the USABC. If implemented, the CRADA will provide funds for the development and commercialization of the VDAS. Participants in the Site Operator Program will test prototypes of the system within their fleets, making the data available to the USABC and other interested organizations. The USABC will provide recommendations on the data to be collected. Major activities by the majority of the Operators were involved with the continued operation and demonstration of existing vehicles. In addition, several of the operators were involved in identifying and locating vehicles to be added to their fleets. A list of the vehicles in each Site Operator fleet is included as Appendix A to this report.

Warren, J.F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment.

None

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ridge area. The majority lies within the corporate limits of the city of Oak Ridge; 608 acres, west, L. W. McMahon, and L. G. Shipe Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy currently oversees activities. The reservation's role has evolved over the years, and it continues to adapt to meet the changing defense, energy

Pennycook, Steve

36

active site zn: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 30 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

37

active site confers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fee Lodging Giles, C. Lee 29 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

38

active site mutant: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 39 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

39

active site mutations: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In contrast van Aalten, Daan 57 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

40

active site mutants: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 39 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

active site tryptic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 18 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

42

active site serine: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

John Copeland Ellingson, Steven W. 33 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

43

Shaft Siting and Configuration for Flexible Operating Mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document as stated in the ''Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities'' (CRWMS M&O 2001a, pg. 14) is to review and evaluate the most current concepts for shaft siting and configuration. The locations of the shaft sites will be evaluated in reference to the overall subsurface ventilation layout shown in Figure 1. The scope will include discussions on pad size requirements, shaft construction components such as collars, shaft stations, sumps, ground support and linings, head frames, fan ducting and facility equipping. In addition to these, shaft excavation methodologies and integration with the overall subsurface construction schedule will be described. The Technical Work Plan (TWP), (CRWMS M&O 2001a), for this document has been prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering and Regulatory Compliance Activities''. This document will be prepared in accordance with AP-3.10Q, ''Analysis and Models''. This document contributes to Site Recommendation (SR). The intended use of this document is to provide an analysis for shaft siting and configuration criteria for subsequent construction. This document identifies preliminary design concepts that should not be used for procurement, fabrication, or construction.

Robert Boutin

2001-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

44

Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1998, DOE operations at Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1998 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D and D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 1998 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, and direct radiation. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

Rutherford, P.D. [ed.] [ed.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

45

Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goals of the site operator program include field evaluation of electric vehicles (EVs) in real-world applications and environments, advancement of electric vehicle technologies, development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant EV use, and increasing the awareness and acceptance of EVs by the public. The site operator program currently consists of 11 participants under contract and two other organizations with data-sharing agreements with the program. The participants (electric utilities, academic institutions, Federal agencies) are geographically dispersed within US and their vehicles see a broad spectrum of service conditions. Current EV inventories of the site operators exceeds 250 vehicles. Several national organizations have joined DOE to further the introduction and awareness of EVs, including: (1) EVAmerica (a utility program) and DOE conduct performance and evaluation tests to support market development for EVs; (2) DOE, DOT, the Electric Transportation Coalition, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas are conducting a series of workshops to encourage urban groups in Clean Cities (a DOE program) to initiate the policies and infrastructure development necessary to support large-scale demonstrations, and ultimately the mass market use, of EVs. Current focus of the program is collection and dissemination of EV operations and performance data to aid in the evaluation of real- world EV use. This report contains several sections with vehicle evaluation as a focus: EV testing results, energy economics of EVs, and site operators activities.

Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Briasco, S. [Los Angeles City Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Site operator program final report for fiscal years 1992 through 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Site Operator Program was an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program`s goals included the field evaluation of electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments; the support of electric vehicle technology advancement; the development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from 1992 to 1996. The Site Operator Program ended in September 1996, when it was superseded by the Field Operations Program. Electric vehicle testing included baseline performance testing, which was performed in conjunction with EV America. The baseline performance parameters included acceleration, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collected fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program`s thirteen partners, comprising electric utilities, universities, and federal agencies. The Program`s partners had over 250 electric vehicles, from vehicle converters and original equipment manufacturers, in their operating fleets. Test results are available via the World Wide Web site at http://ev.inel.gov/sop.

Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Bassett, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Birasco, S. [Los Angeles Dept. of Water and Power, CA (United States)] [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Operating Water Cherenkov Detectors in high altitude sites for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) are efficient detectors for detecting GRBs in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV energy range using the single particle technique, given their sensitivity to low energy secondary photons produced by high energy photons when cascading in the atmosphere. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) operates arrays of WCD in high altitude sites (above 4500 m a.s.l.) in Bolivia, Mexico and Venezuela, with planned extension to Peru. Details on the operation and stability of these WCD in remote sites with high background rates of particles will be detailed, and compared to simulations. Specific issues due to operation at high altitude, atmospheric effects and solar activity, as well as possible hardware enhancements will also be presented.

Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; Gonzlez, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; Lpez, J A; Martnez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Nez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Prez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site- July 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of Nevada National Security Site Device Assembly Facility Justification for Continued Operations for Inoperable HEPA-Filtered Ventilation System [HIAR-NNSS-2011-07-08

49

EIS-0466: Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Ongoing Operations at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the continued operation of the DOE/NNSA activities at Sandia National Laboratories. The SWEIS will consider a No Action Alternative, which is to continue current operations through implementation of the 1999 Record of Decision and subsequent NEPA decisions, and three action alternatives proposed for consideration.

50

Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE Operations annual site environmental report 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power of Boeing North American, Inc. These are identified as Area 4 of the SSFL and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for research and development (R and D), engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields primarily in energy research and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site had research and development laboratories involved with nuclear research. This work was terminated in 1995 and only D and D activities will have potential for impact on the environment. Since 1956, Area 4 has been used for work with nuclear materials, including fabricating nuclear reactor fuels, testing nuclear reactors, and dissembling used fuel elements. This work ended in 1988 and subsequent efforts have been directed toward decommissioning and decontamination of the former nuclear facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies responsible for oversight. Information presented here concentrates on Area 4 at SSFL, which is the only area at SSFL where DOE operations were performed.

Robinson, K.S. [ed.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

51

active site mismatches: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ayman U. (Ayman Umar) 2001-01-01 38 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

52

active site conformational: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D 2005 Elsevier B Hong, Mei 56 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

53

active site conformation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D 2005 Elsevier B Hong, Mei 56 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

54

active site probe: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 61 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

55

active site constrained: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 41 Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE Engineering Websites Summary: Coldwater Creek, make up the North County Site. On...

56

active site insights: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

disassembly of C-site. Our current results Lee, Keun Woo 2 Theoretic Insight into CO2 Reduction at Active Sites of Molybdenum and Tungsten Enzymes: a pi Interaction between CO2...

57

Sustainable Sites SS Prerequisite 1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the environmental impact from the location of a building on a site. Requirements Do not develop buildings, hardscapeSustainable Sites SS Prerequisite 1: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention Required Intent Reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

58

Summary of operations and performance of the Murdock site restoration project in 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater and surface water restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Murdock, Nebraska, during the third full year of system operation, from January 1 through December 31, 2008. Performance in June 2005 through December 2007 was reported previously (Argonne 2007, 2008). In the Murdock project, several innovative technologies are being used to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town, as well as from water naturally discharged to the surface at the headwaters of a small creek (a tributary to Pawnee Creek) north of the town (Figure 1.1). The restoration activities at Murdock are being conducted by the CCC/USDA as a non-time-critical removal action under the regulatory authority and supervision of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VII. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the restoration effort and facilities during this review period. Included in this report are the results of all sampling and monitoring activities performed in accord with the EPA-approved Monitoring Plan for this site (Argonne 2006), as well as additional investigative activities conducted during the review period. The annual performance reports for the Murdock project assemble information that will become part of the five-year review and evaluation of the remediation effort. This review will occur in 2010. This document presents overviews of the treatment facilities (Section 2) and site operations and activities (Section 3), then describes the groundwater, surface water, vegetation, and atmospheric monitoring results (Section 4) and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 5). Section 6 summarizes the current period of operation. A gallery of photographs of the Murdock project is in Appendix A.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

59

US Department of Energy DOE Nevada Operations Office, Nevada Test Site: Underground safety and health standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site Underground Safety and Health Standards Working Group was formed at the direction of John D. Stewart, Director, Nevada Test Site Office in April, 1990. The objective of the Working Group was to compile a safety and health standard from the California Tunnel Safety Orders and OSHA for the underground operations at the NTS, (excluding Yucca Mountain). These standards are called the NTS U/G Safety and Health Standards. The Working Group submits these standards as a RECOMMENDATION to the Director, NTSO. Although the Working Group considers these standards to be the most integrated and comprehensive standards that could be developed for NTS Underground Operations, the intent is not to supersede or replace any relevant DOE orders. Rather the intent is to collate the multiple safety and health references contained in DOE Order 5480.4 that have applicability to NTS Underground Operations into a single safety and heath standard to be used in the underground operations at the NTS. Each portion of the standard was included only after careful consideration by the Working Group and is judged to be both effective and appropriate. The specific methods and rationale used by the Working Group are outlined as follows: The letter from DOE/HQ, dated September 28, 1990 cited OSHA and the CTSO as the safety and health codes applicable to underground operations at the NTS. These mandated codes were each originally developed to be comprehensive, i.e., all underground operations of a particular type (e.g., tunnels in the case of the CTSO) were intended to be adequately regulated by the appropriate code. However, this is not true; the Working Group found extensive and confusing overlap in the codes in numerous areas. Other subjects and activities were addressed by the various codes in cursory fashion or not at all.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations Adds Multi-Functional...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

now been filled. The SDUs play an essential role in the closure of the 45 liquid waste tanks on the site. About 90 percent of the waste in these tanks is salt waste that must be...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has prepared an environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of the Health Physics Site Support Facility on the Savannah River Site. This (new) facility would meet requirements of the site radiological protection program and would ensure site compliance with regulations. It was determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and no environmental impact statement is needed.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Oak Ridge Operations Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawandaUniversity21 theB29.1y /I/

63

Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model Antonio Araujo, Simone sensitivity analysis of optimal operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test.[7] applied a systematic procedure for control structure design of an activated sludge process

Skogestad, Sigurd

64

Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos Site Office - August...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of actions being taken to support upgrading and future management of the TA-55 wet-pipe sprinkler system as a safety-class system. Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos Site...

65

Active Sites Additional Information | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEF HISTORY OF THE|PhysicalGuideAcquisition,forActive

66

The Hanford Site Richland Operations Office Office of River Protection Office of Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hanford Site Richland Operations Office Office of River Protection Office of Science Plateau Remediation Contractor Tank Operations Contractor Analytical Services Contractor Waste Treatment Plant (WTP;HANFORDSMALLBUSINESSCOUNCIL Richland Operations Office Sally A. Sieracki Small Business Program Manager E-mail: sally

67

Nuclear Operations Application to Environmental Restoration at Corrective Action Unit 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, at the Nevada National Security Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office has responsibility for environmental restoration at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly the Nevada Test Site). This includes remediation at locations where past testing activities have resulted in the release of plutonium to the environment. One of the current remediation efforts involves a site where an underground subcritical nuclear safety test was conducted in 1964. The underground test was vented through a steel pipe to the surface in a closed system where gas samples were obtained. The piping downstream of the gas-sampling apparatus was routed belowground to a location where it was allowed to vent into an existing radioactively contaminated borehole. The length of the pipe above the ground surface is approximately 200 meters. This pipe remained in place until remediation efforts began in 2007, at which time internal plutonium contamination was discovered. Following this discovery, an assessment was conducted to determine the quantity of plutonium present in the pipe. This site has been identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites. The quantity of plutonium identified at CAU 547 exceeded the Hazard Category 3 threshold but was below the Hazard Category 2 threshold specified in DOE Standard DOE-STD-1027-92. This CAU, therefore, was initially categorized as a Hazard Category 3 environmental restoration site. A contaminated facility or site that is initially categorized as Hazard Category 3, however, may be downgraded to below Hazard Category 3 if it can be demonstrated through further analysis that the form of the material and the energy available for release support reducing the hazard category. This is an important consideration when performing hazard categorization of environmental restoration sites because energy sources available for release of material are generally fewer at an environmental restoration site than at an operating facility and environmental restoration activities may result in the complete removal of source material.

Kevin Cabble (NSO), Mark Krauss and Patrick Matthews (N-I)

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

68

Environmental restoration and waste management site-specific plan for Richland Operations Office. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was prepared to implement and support the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) national plan. The national plan, entitled Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (DOE 1990b) (hereinafter referred to as the DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan) is the cornerstone of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term strategy in environmental restoration and waste management. The DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan addresses overall philosophy and environmental and waste-related activities under the responsibilities of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The plan also reaffirms DOE-HQ goals to bring its nuclear sites into environmental compliance in cooperation with its regulators and the public, and to clean up and restore the environment by 2019 (the commitment for the Hanford Site is for one year sooner, or 2018). This document is part of the site-specific plan for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is the first revision of the original plan, which was dated December 1989 (DOE-RL 1989a). This document is a companion document to the Overview of the Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989d) and The Hanford Site Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan Activity Data Sheets (DOE-RL 1991). Although there are three documents that make up the complete DOE-RL plan, this detailed information volume was prepared so it could be used as a standalone document. 71 refs., 40 figs., 28 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores Tubay Long-TermGWSHP3Site

70

FTCP Site Specific Information - Savannah River Operations Office |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionof Energy Field Office FTCP Site

71

EIS-0380: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the continued operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NNSA identified and assessed three alternatives for continued operation of LANL: (1) No Action, (2) Reduced Operations, and (3) Expanded Operations.

72

Environmental analysis of the operation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10 site)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmental analysis of the operation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facilities in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley was conducted to present to the public information concerning the extent to which recognizable effects, or potential effects, on the environment may occur. The analysis addresses current operations of the ORNL X-10 site and completed operations that may continue to have residual effects. Solid wastes from ORNL operations at the Y-12 site which are transported to the X-10 site for burial (e.g., Biology Division animal wastes) are included as part of X-10 site operation. Socioeconomic effects are associated primarily with the communities where employees live and with the Knoxville Bureau of Economic Analysis economic area as a whole. Therefore, ORNL employees at both Y-12 and X-10 sites are included in the ORNL socioeconomic impact analysis. An extensive base of environmental data was accumulated for this report. Over 80 reports related to ORNL facilities and/or operations are cited as well as many open-literature citations. Environmental effects of the operation of ORNL result from operational discharges from the onsite facilities; construction and/or modification of facilities, transportation to and from the site of persons, goods and services; socioeconomic impacts to the local, regional, and general population; and accidental discharges if they should occur. Operational discharges to the environnment are constrained by federal, state, and local regulations and by criteria established by the US Department of Energy to minimize adverse impacts. It is the purpose of this document to evaluate the operation of the ORNL insofar as impacts beyond the site boundary may occur or have the potential for occurrence.

Boyle, J.W.; Blumberg, R.; Cotter, S.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States)] [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Overview of Low-Level Waste Disposal Operations at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is charged with the responsibility to carry out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site. Core elements of this mission are ensuring that disposal take place in a manner that is safe and cost-effective while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on giving an overview of the Nevada Test Site facilities regarding currant design of disposal. In addition, technical attributes of the facilities established through the site characterization process will be further described. An update on current waste disposal volumes and capabilities will also be provided. This discussion leads to anticipated volume projections and disposal site requirements as the Nevada Test Site disposal operations look towards the future.

DOE /Navarro

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) for the 2004 Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report briefly describes each of the key data fields, including the source(s) of data, and provides the resulting inputs to be used for the 2004 Composite Analysis. A master spreadsheet termed the Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) was assembled to facilitate the generation of keyword input files containing general information on each waste site, its operational/disposal history, and its environmental settings (past, current, and future).

Last, George V.; Nichols, William E.; Kincaid, Charles T.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Anaconda Smelter site, (Operable Unit 11 - Flue Dust), Deer Lodge County, Anaconda, MT. (Second remedial action), September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 6,000-acre Anaconda Smelter site is a former copper and ore processing facility in Deer Lodge County, Montana. Land use in the area is predominantly residential. The site is bounded on the north and east, respectively, by the Warm Springs Creek and Mill Creek, both of which are potential sources of drinking water. From 1884 until 1980 when activities ceased, the site was used for ore processing and smelting operations. In 1988, EPA conducted an investigation to determine the nature and extent of the flue dust contamination. A 1988 ROD addressed the Mill Creek Operable Unit (OU15) and documented the relocation of residents from the community surrounding the smelter site as the selected remedial action. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the Flue Dust Operable Unit (OU11). The primary contaminants of concern affecting this site from the flue dust materials are metals including arsenic, cadmium, and lead. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

Not Available

1991-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater

Martin, Thomas E.

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - active site characterization Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transuranic (TRU) waste generator sites operating... sites (Condition 2) and ... Source: Yucca Mountain Project, US EPA Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 3...

80

Non-Operational Property Evaluation for the Hanford Site River Corridor - 12409  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site River Corridor consists of the former reactor areas of the 100 Areas and the former industrial (fuel processing) area in the 300 Area. Most of the waste sites are located close to the decommissioned reactors or former industrial facilities along the Columbia River. Most of the surface area of the River Corridor consists of land with little or no subsurface infrastructure or indication of past or present releases of hazardous constituents, and is referred to as non-operational property or non-operational area. Multiple lines of evidence have been developed to assess identified fate and transport mechanisms and to evaluate the potential magnitude and significance of waste site-related contaminants in the non-operational area. Predictive modeling was used for determining the likelihood of locating waste sites and evaluating the distribution of radionuclides in soil based on available soil concentration data and aerial radiological surveys. The results of this evaluation indicated: 1) With the exception of stack emissions, transport pathways associated with waste site contaminants are unlikely to result in dispersion of contaminants in soil away from operational areas, 2) Stack emissions that may have been associated with Hanford Site operations generally emitted short-lived and/or gaseous radionuclides, and (3) the likelihood of detecting elevated radionuclide concentrations or other waste sites in non-operational area soils is very small. The overall conclusions from the NPE evaluation of the River Corridor are: - With the exception of stack emissions to the air, transport pathways associated with waste site contaminants are unlikely to result in dispersion of contaminants in soil away from operational areas. While pathways such as windblown dust, overland transport and biointrusion have the potential for dispersing waste site contaminants, the resulting transport is unlikely to result in substantial contamination in non-operational areas. - Stack emissions that may have been associated with Hanford Site operations generally emitted short-lived and/or gaseous radionuclides; these radionuclides either would have decayed and would be undetectable in soil, or likely would not have deposited onto Hanford Site soils. A small fraction of the total historical emissions consisted of long-lived particulate radionuclides, which could have deposited onto the soil. Soil monitoring studies conducted as part of surveillance and monitoring programs do not indicate a build-up of radionuclide concentrations in soil, which might indicate potential deposition impacts from stack emissions. Aerial radiological surveys of the Hanford Site, while effective in detecting gamma-emitting nuclides, also do not indicate deposition patterns in soil from stack emissions. - The surveillance and monitoring programs also have verified that the limited occurrence of biointrusion observed in the River Corridor has not resulted in a spread of contamination into the non-operational areas. - Monitoring of radionuclides in ambient air conducted as part of the surveillance and monitoring programs generally show a low and declining trend of detected concentrations in air. Monitoring of radionuclides in soil and vegetation correspondingly show declining trends in concentrations, particularly for nuclides with short half lives (Cs-137, Co-60 and Sr-90). - Statistical analysis of the geographical distribution of waste sites based on man -made features and topography describes the likely locations of waste sites in the River Corridor. The results from this analysis reinforce the findings from the Orphan Site Evaluation program, which has systematically identified any remaining waste sites within the River Corridor. - Statistical analysis of the distribution of radionuclide concentrations observable from aerial surveys has confirmed that the likelihood of detecting elevated radionuclide concentrations in non-operational area soils is very small; the occurrences and locations where potentially elevated concentrations may be found are discussed below. In

Lowe, John [CH2M HILL, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Aly, Alaa [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and INTERA Incorporated, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Characterization ReportOperational Closure Covers for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The Area 3 RWMS is located in south-central Yucca Flat and the Area 5 RWMS is located about 15 miles south, in north-central Frenchman Flat. Though located in two separate topographically closed basins, they are similar in climate and hydrogeologic setting. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste, while the Area 3 RWMS uses subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons for the disposal of packaged and unpackaged bulk waste. Over the next several decades, most waste disposal units at both the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are anticipated to be closed. Closure of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs will proceed through three phases: operational closure, final closure, and institutional control. Many waste disposal units at the Area 5RWMS are operationally closed and final closure has been placed on one unit at the Area 3 RWMS (U-3ax/bl). Because of the similarities between the two sites (e.g., type of wastes, environmental factors, operational closure cover designs, etc.), many characterization studies and data collected at the Area 3 RWMS are relevant and applicable to the Area 5 RWMS. For this reason, data and closure strategies from the Area 3 RWMS are referred to as applicable. This document is an interim Characterization Report Operational Closure Covers, for the Area 5 RWMS. The report briefly describes the Area 5 RWMS and the physical environment where it is located, identifies the regulatory requirements, reviews the approach and schedule for closing, summarizes the monitoring programs, summarizes characterization studies and results, and then presents conclusions and recommendations.

Bechtel Nevada Geotechnical Sciences

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Superfund Docket Operations Manual for rule-making activities. Directive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The directive discusses the purpose of the SDIC Operations Manual for Rulemaking Activities which is to serve as a procedural guide for SDIC staff when a rulemaking docket is prepared. These procedures are evaluated on a regular basis, and are revised as needed to keep the SDIC operationally efficient and responsive to its users.

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

EIS-0018: Continued Operation of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Site, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this statement to assesses the potential cumulative environmental impacts associated with current, known future, and continuing activities at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory site.

84

Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities at the Seperations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Overview of Nevada Test Site Radioactive and Mixed Waste Disposal Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is responsible for carrying out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and low-level radioactive mixed waste (MW) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Core elements of this mission are ensuring safe and cost-effective disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the NTS related to LLW and MW. Covered topics include: the first year of direct funding for NTS waste disposal operations; zero tolerance policy for non-compliant packages; the suspension of mixed waste disposal; waste acceptance changes; DOE Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) auditing; the 92-Acre Area closure plan; new eligibility requirements for generators; and operational successes with unusual waste streams.

J.T. Carilli; S.K. Krenzien; R.G. Geisinger; S.J. Gordon; B. Quinn

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Progress report on decommissioning activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), is located about 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. Between 1953 and 1989, the facility, then called the Feed Material Production Center or FMPC, produced uranium metal products used in the eventual production of weapons grade material for use by other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In 1989, FMPC`s production was suspended by the federal government in order to focus resources on environmental restoration versus defense production. In 1992, Fluor Daniel Fernald assumed responsibility for managing all cleanup activities at the FEMP under contract to the DOE. In 1990, as part of the remediation effort, the site was divided into five operable units based on physical proximity of contaminated areas, similar amounts of types of contamination, or the potential for a similar technology to be used in cleanup activities. This report continues the outline of the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities at the FEMP site Operable Unit 3 (OU3) and provides an update on the status of the decommissioning activities. OU3, the Facilities Closure and Demolition Project, involves the remediation of more than 200 uranium processing facilities. The mission of the project is to remove nuclear materials stored in these buildings, then perform the clean out of the buildings and equipment, and decontaminate and dismantle the facilities.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Savannah River Sites H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions- Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nations only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AIKEN, S.C. The Savannah River Site (SRS) is breathing new life into the H Canyon, the only active nuclear chemical separations facility still operating in the U.S.

88

Session: Development and application of guidelines for siting, constructing, operating and monitoring wind turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The two papers were: 'Development and Application of USFWS Guidance for Site Evaluation, Siting, Construction, Operation and Monitoring of Wind Turbines' by Albert Manville and 'Wind Power in Washington State' by Greg Hueckel. The session provided a comparison of wind project guidelines developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in May 2003 and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife in August 2003. Questions addressed included: is there a need or desire for uniform national or state criteria; can other states learn from Washington State's example, or from the USFWS voluntary guidelines; should there be uniform requirements/guidelines/check-lists for the siting, operation, monitoring, and mitigation to prevent or minimize avian, bat, and other wildlife impacts.

Manville, Albert; Hueckel, Greg

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NTS solid waste disposal sites must be permitted by the state of Nevada Solid Waste Management Authority (SWMA). The SWMA for the NTS is the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as land manager (owner), and National Security Technologies (NSTec), as operator, will store, collect, process, and dispose all solid waste by means that do not create a health hazard, a public nuisance, or cause impairment of the environment. NTS disposal sites will not be included in the Nye County Solid Waste Management Plan. The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The Area 5 RWMS is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NTS (Figure 2), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. A Notice of Intent to operate the disposal site as a Class III site was submitted to the state of Nevada on January 28, 1994, and was acknowledged as being received in a letter to the NNSA/NSO on August 30, 1994. Interim approval to operate a Class III SWDS for regulated asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) was authorized on August 12, 1996 (in letter from Paul Liebendorfer to Runore Wycoff), with operations to be conducted in accordance with the ''Management Plan for the Disposal of Low-Level Waste with Regulated Asbestos Waste.'' A requirement of the authorization was that on or before October 9, 1999, a permit was required to be issued. Because of NDEP and NNSA/NSO review cycles, the final permit was issued on April 5, 2000, for the operation of the Area 5 Low-Level Waste Disposal Site, utilizing Pit 7 (P07) as the designated disposal cell. The original permit applied only to Pit 7, with a total design capacity of 5,831 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (157,437 cubic feet [ft{sup 3}]). NNSA/NSO is expanding the SWDS to include the adjacent Upper Cell of Pit 6 (P06), with an additional capacity of 28,037 yd{sup 3} (756,999 ft{sup 3}) (Figure 3). The proposed total capacity of ALLW in Pit 7 and P06 will be approximately 33,870 yd{sup 3} (0.9 million ft{sup 3}). The site will be used for the disposal of regulated ALLW, small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The only waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM). The term asbestiform is used throughout this document to describe this waste. Other TSCA waste (i.e., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]) will not be accepted for disposal at the SWDS. The disposal site will be used as a depository of permissible waste generated both on site and off site. All generators designated by NNSA/NSO will be eligible to dispose regulated ALLW at the Asbestiform Low-Level Waste Disposal Site in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) 325

NSTec Environmental Programs

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

90

Operational Strategies for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site in Egypt - 13513  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate aims of treatment and conditioning is to prepare waste for disposal by ensuring that the waste will meet the waste acceptance criteria of a disposal facility. Hence the purpose of low-level waste disposal is to isolate the waste from both people and the environment. The radioactive particles in low-level waste emit the same types of radiation that everyone receives from nature. Most low-level waste fades away to natural background levels of radioactivity in months or years. Virtually all of it diminishes to natural levels in less than 300 years. In Egypt, The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center has been established since 1983, as a waste management facility for LLW and ILW and the disposal site licensed for preoperational in 2005. The site accepts the low level waste generated on site and off site and unwanted radioactive sealed sources with half-life less than 30 years for disposal and all types of sources for interim storage prior to the final disposal. Operational requirements at the low-level (LLRW) disposal site are listed in the National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control NCNSRC guidelines. Additional procedures are listed in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Standards Manual. The following describes the current operations at the LLRW disposal site. (authors)

Mohamed, Yasser T. [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 3 Ahmed El-Zomor St., El-Zohour District, Naser City, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

none,

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

EIS-0302: Transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) operations at the Mound Site near Miamisburg, Ohio, to an alternative DOE site.

93

An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert (UMASS, MED)

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

94

EIS-0426: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of proposed alternatives for continued management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site) and other U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)-managed sites in Nevada.

95

The role of historical operations information for supporting remedial investigation work at the former Harshaw Chemical Site - 8279.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early stages of hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste (HTRW) site investigations, basic record searches are performed to help direct the agencies investigating contaminated sites to areas of concern and to identify contaminants of interest (COI). Plans developed on the basis of this preliminary research alone are often incomplete and result in unexpected discoveries either while in the field investigating the site or after the reports have been written. Many of the sites investigated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action program (FUSRAP) have complex histories that are slowly uncovered over the life of the project. Because of programmatic constraints, nuances of these sites are often discovered late in their programs and result in increased expenditures in order to fully characterize the site, perform a robust feasibility study, and recommend appropriate alternatives for remediation. By identifying resources for public records, classified records, historic aerial photographs, and other sources of site-specific historical information, a process can be established to optimize the collection of information and to develop efficient and complete project plans. In many cases, interviews with past site employees are very useful tools. In combining what is found in the records, observed on historic aerial photographs, and heard from former employees and family members, teams investigating these sites can begin to compile sound and more complete conceptual site models (CSMs). The former Harshaw Chemical Site (HCS) illustrates this discovery process. HCS is part of FUSRAP. Preliminary investigations by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in the 1970s provided an initial CSM of activities that had taken place that may have resulted in contamination. The remedial investigation (RI) conducted by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was designed around this CSM. The RI work, however, identified a number of site conditions that were unexpected, including new potential COI associated with recycled uranium and contaminant locations that were inconsistent with the original CSM. As part of an RI Addendum effort, the USACE reconsidered its understanding of HCS historical activities. This effort included an intensive review of available historical aerial photography, an in-depth Potentially Responsible Parties (PRP) investigation, additional analysis of the production processes in place at HCS, and targeted supplemental data collection. The result of this effort was a revised CSM that included a number of previously unidentified potential COI and a much clearer understanding of the processes and resulting waste streams potentially associated with environmental contamination. Because of their complex and often poorly documented operational histories, unexpected discoveries will always be a part of investigating sites such as HCS. Taking advantage of available resources and expending funds for thorough historical research early in the life of a project will help to reduce the chances for expensive field remobilizations and significant schedule delays. A complete and accurate site history also allows for more efficient long-term technical and budgetary planning, thus eliminating many obstacles associated with the ultimate disposition of HTRW sites.

Johnson, R.; Peterson, J.; Picel, K.; Kolhoff, A.; Devaughn, J.; Environmental Science Division; U. S.Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District; Science Applications International Corp.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Role of Historical Operations Information for Supporting Remedial Investigation Work at the Former Harshaw Chemical Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early stages of hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste (HTRW) site investigations, basic record searches are performed to help direct the agencies investigating contaminated sites to areas of concern and to identify contaminants of interest (COI). Plans developed on the basis of this preliminary research alone are often incomplete and result in unexpected discoveries either while in the field investigating the site or after the reports have been written. Many of the sites investigated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) have complex histories that are slowly uncovered over the life of the project. Because of programmatic constraints, nuances of these sites are often discovered late in their programs and result in increased expenditures in order to fully characterize the site, perform a robust feasibility study, and recommend appropriate alternatives for remediation. By identifying resources for public records, classified records, historic aerial photographs, and other sources of site-specific historical information, a process can be established to optimize the collection of information and to develop efficient and complete project plans. In many cases, interviews with past site employees are very useful tools. In combining what is found in the records, observed on historic aerial photographs, and heard from former employees and family members, teams investigating these sites can begin to compile sound and more complete conceptual site models (CSM(s). The former Harshaw Chemical Site (HCS) illustrates this discovery process. HCS is part of FUSRAP. Preliminary investigations by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the 1970's provided an initial CSM of activities that had taken place that may have resulted in contamination. The remedial investigation (RI) conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was designed around this CSM. The RI work, however, identified a number of site conditions that were unexpected, including new potential COI associated with recycled uranium and contaminant locations that were inconsistent with the original CSM. As part of an RI Addendum effort, the USACE reconsidered its understanding of HCS historical activities. This effort included an intensive review of available historical aerial photography, an in-depth Potentially Responsible Parties (PRP) investigation, additional analysis of the production processes in place at HCS, and targeted supplemental data collection. The result of this effort was a revised CSM that included a number of previously unidentified potential COI and a much clearer understanding of the processes and resulting waste streams potentially associated with environmental contamination. Because of their complex and often poorly documented operational histories, unexpected discoveries will always be a part of investigating sites such as HCS. Taking advantage of available resources and expending funds for thorough historical research early in the life of a project will help to reduce the chances for expensive field re-mobilizations and significant schedule delays. A complete and accurate site history also allows for more efficient long-term technical and budgetary planning, thus eliminating many obstacles associated with the ultimate disposition of HTRW sites. (authors)

Kolhoff, A. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY (United States); Johnson, R.; Peterson, J.; Picel, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); DeVaughn, J. [Science Applications International Corporation, Twinsburg, OH (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Process centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures in canyon reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) maintains a compilation of operating problems and equipment failures that have occurred in the fuel reprocessing areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). At present, the data bank contains more than 230,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with the potential for injury or contamination of personnel, or for economic loss. The data bank has been used extensively for a wide variety of purposes, such as failure analyses, trend analyses, and preparation of safety analyses. Typical of the data are problems associated with the canyon process centrifuges. This report contains a compilation of the centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures primarily as an aid to organizations with related equipment. Publication of these data was prompted by a number of requests for this information by other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 11 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Durant, W.S.; Baughman, D.F.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H CANYON FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H Canyon Facility is the only large scale, heavily shielded, nuclear chemical separations plant still in operation in the U.S. The facility's operations historically recovered uranium-235 (U-235) and neptunium-237 (Np-237) from aluminum-clad, enriched-uranium fuel tubes from Site nuclear reactors and other domestic and foreign research reactors. Today the facility, in conjunction with HB Line, is working to provide the initial feed material to the Mixed Oxide Facility also located on SRS. Many additional campaigns are also in the planning process. Furthermore, the facility has started to integrate collaborative research and development (R&D) projects into its schedule. H Canyon can serve as the appropriate testing location for many technologies focused on monitoring the back end of the fuel cycle, due to the nature of the facility and continued operation. H Canyon, in collaboration with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), has been working with several groups in the DOE complex to conduct testing demonstrations of novel technologies at the facility. The purpose of conducting these demonstrations at H Canyon will be to demonstrate the capabilities of the emerging technologies in an operational environment. This paper will summarize R&D testing activities currently taking place in H Canyon and discuss the possibilities for future collaborations.

Sexton, L.; Fuller, Kenneth

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

100

Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

K. B. Campbell

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Sampling and analysis plan for the site characterization of the waste area Grouping 1 groundwater operable unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes all of the former ORNL radioisotope research, production, and maintenance facilities; former waste management areas; and some former administrative buildings. Site operations have contaminated groundwater, principally with radiological contamination. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to a known extent. In addition, karst geology, numerous spills, and pipeline leaks, together with the long and varied history of activities at specific facilities at ORNL, complicate contaminant migration-pathway analysis and source identification. To evaluate the extent of contamination, site characterization activity will include semiannual and annual groundwater sampling, as well as monthly water level measurements (both manual and continuous) at WAG 1. This sampling and analysis plan provides the methods and procedures to conduct site characterization for the Phase 1 Remedial Investigation of the WAG 1 Groundwater Operable Unit.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Waste minimization plan construction and operation of the replacement cross-site transfer system, project W-058  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the research and development of a waste minimization plan for the construction and operation of Project W-058, Replacement of the Cross-Site Transfer System, on the Hanford Site. The plan is based on Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-307, Plans. The waste minimization plan identifies areas where pollution prevention/waste minimization principles can be incorporated into the construction and operation of the cross-site transfer system.

Boucher, T.D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

FAQs about the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities Site Visit Program What is the purpose of the site visit program?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FAQs about the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities Site Visit Program General What at enhancing compliance with the NIH Guidelinesfor Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines). The aim of the site visits is to enhance institutional awareness of the requirements of the NIH Guidelines

Oliver, Douglas L.

105

Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning site is located in the southeast portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site (Figure 1). This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 23, 2001. Because of questionable representativeness and precision of the results, the site was resampled on June 12, 2001. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the December 1997 Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1997). If after six years the rate of degradation appears to be so slow that the greatest concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) present at the site would not decay within 30 years of the site closure, the site will be reevaluated with consideration to enriching the impacted soil at the site to enhance the degradation process. A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report, samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in TPH concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, the data results from 2000 were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2001 consisted of the following: Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2); Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]); Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs; and Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

A. T. Urbon

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program year 5 first quarter report, July 1-- September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy` s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU now has two electric cars. Both are electric conversion vehicles from Soleq Corporation out of Chicago. KSU in conjunction with KEURP also initiated procurement for the purchase of four (4) Chevy S-10 pickup trucks. Since the supplier, GE-Spartan, canceled its effort concerning the production of vehicles other appropriate sources were sought. Today, K-State and the Kansas Utilities are working with Troy Design and Manufacturing (TDM), Redford, Michigan. TDM is working with Ford Motor Company and expects to become the first certified electric vehicle Quality Vehicle Modifier (QVM). Kansas State has entered into an agreement to assist TDM in supporting the infrastructure and technical manual development for these vehicles. The Soleq EVcorts have not been signed to illustrate to the public that it is an electric vehicle. Magnetic signs have been made for special functions to ensure sponsor support is recognized and acknowledged. As soon as TDM`s Ford Ranger electric vehicles are delivered they will be used throughout the state by utility companies that are participating with K-State`s Site Operator Program.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Department of Energy Site Operator Program. Final report, October 1, 1991--September 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

York Technical College is a two-year public institution accredited by the Commission of Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. York Technical College has been involved with electric vehicles since the late 1980`s. The four major objectives of the Site Operator Program were (1) field test and evaluate electric and hybrid vehicles and related components; (2) define and develop a national infrastructure system including electric charging systems, service/training education programs, utility system impacts and safety standards; (3) increase public awareness regarding environmental benefits, reduced dependency on foreign oil, technology development, and economic impacts; (4) assist local, state and federal agencies and fleet operators in developing electric and hybrid vehicle programs. The primary thrusts of the electric vehicle program at York Technical College, supporting the objectives of the Site Operator program were: (1) public awareness, (2) public education, (3) EV maintenance curriculum development and maintenance training, (4) field data collection, (5) vehicle modification and upgrade, (6) establish electric vehicle partnerships.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Regulatory impact analysis of environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title I of the Act pertains to tailings at inactive sites for which the Agency has developed standards as part of a separate rulemaking. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards developed under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the operations standards is very limited.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Development and operation of a photovoltaic power system for use at remote Antarctic sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A photovoltaic power system, designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center, has successfully operated over the past two summer seasons at a remote site in Antarctica, providing utility-type power for a six-person field team. The system was installed at the Lake Hoare site for approximately five weeks during late 1992, put into storage for the Antarctic winter, and then used again during the 1993 season. The photovoltaic power system consists of three silicon photovoltaic sub-arrays delivering a total of 1.5 kWe peak power, three lead-acid gel battery modules supplying 2.4 kWh, and an electrical distribution system which delivers 120 Vac and 12 Vdc to the user. The system worked extremely well in providing quiet, reliable power. The experience gained from early system demonstrations such as this should be beneficial in accelerating the transition toward future PV systems in Antarctica and other similar areas.

Piszczor, M.F.; Kohout, L.L.; Manzo, M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Colozza, A.J. [NYMA, Brook Park, OH (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Analysis of 2011 Meteorological Data from the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory and Kesselring Site Operations Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) in Schenectady, NY and the Kesselring Site Operations (KSO) facility near Ballston Spa, NY are required to estimate the effects of hypothetical emissions of radiological material from their respective facilities by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which regulates these facilities. An atmospheric dispersion model known as CAP88, which was developed and approved by the EPA for such purposes, is used by KAPL and KSO to meet this requirement. CAP88 calculations over a given time period are based on statistical data on the meteorological conditions for that period. Both KAPL and KSO have on-site meteorological towers which take atmospheric measurements at a frequency ideal for EPA regulatory model input. However, an independent analysis and processing of the meteorological data from each tower is required to derive a data set appropriate for use in the CAP88 model. The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) was contracted by KAPL to process the on-site data for the calendar year 2011. The purpose of this document is to: (1) summarize the procedures used in the preparation/analysis of the 2011 meteorological data; and (2) document adherence of these procedures to the guidance set forth in 'Meteorological Monitoring Guidance for Regulatory Modeling Applications', EPA document - EPA-454/R-99-005 (EPA-454). This document outlines the steps in analyzing and processing meteorological data from the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory and Kesselring Site Operations facilities into a format that is compatible with the steady state dispersion model CAP88. This process is based on guidance from the EPA regarding the preparation of meteorological data for use in regulatory dispersion models. The analysis steps outlined in this document can be easily adapted to process data sets covering time period other than one year. The procedures will need to be modified should the guidance in EPA-454 be updated or revised.

Aluzzi, F J

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

111

Low-Level Waste Overview of the Nevada Test Site Waste Disposal Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview and the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Operational changes have been implemented, such as larger trench sizes and more efficient soil management as have administrative processes to address U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Code of Federal Regulation analyses. Some adverse conditions have prompted changes in transportation and mixed low-level waste polices, and a new funding mechanism was developed. This year has seen many changes to the NTS disposal family. (authors)

Carilli, J.T.; Skougard, M.G. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Krenzien, S.K. [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Wrapp, J.K.; Ramirez, C.; Yucel, V.; Shott, G.J.; Gordon, S.J.; Enockson, K.C.; Desotell, L.T. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

File:Large Construction Site Notice for Primary Operators.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf JumpApschem.pdf Jumptight-gas.pdfFutInformation Operators.pdf Jump

113

File:Large Construction Site Notice for Secondary Operators.pdf | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf JumpApschem.pdf Jumptight-gas.pdfFutInformation Operators.pdf

114

Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the SLAPS wastes were purchased, moved, and stored at a property on Latty Avenue. The eastern part the materials along haul routes and to adjacent properties forming the SLAPS and Latty Avenue Vicinity Site. The North County Site is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP

US Army Corps of Engineers

115

Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Year 1 third quarter report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation is this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort stationwagons.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final (EPA 1988). The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers) identified in the groundwater sampling and analysis plan for the operable unit (DOE/RL-2001-49, Rev. 1) with additions.

Truex, Michael J.; Dresel, P. EVAN; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenati...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on In2O3(110): A DFT Study. Active Oxygen Vacancy Site for Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation on...

119

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF SOIL REMEDIATION ALTERNATIVES AT THE BUILDING 812 OPERABLE UNIT, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE 300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Livermore Site Office requested a technical review of remedial alternatives proposed for the Building 812 Operable Unit, Site 300 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team visited the site and reviewed the alternatives proposed for soil remediation in the draft RI/FS and made the following observations and recommendations. Based on the current information available for the site, the team did not identify a single technology that would be cost effective and/or ecologically sound to remediate DU contamination at Building 812 to current remedial goals. Soil washing is not a viable alternative and should not be considered at the site unless final remediation levels can be negotiated to significantly higher levels. This recommendation is based on the results of soil washing treatability studies at Fernald and Ashtabula that suggest that the technology would only be effective to address final remediation levels higher than 50 pCi/g. The technical review team identified four areas of technical uncertainty that should be resolved before the final selection of a preferred remedial strategy is made. Areas of significant technical uncertainty that should be addressed include: (1) Better delineation of the spatial distribution of surface contamination and the vertical distribution of subsurface contamination in the area of the firing table and associated alluvial deposits; (2) Chemical and physical characterization of residual depleted uranium (DU) at the site; (3) Determination of actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates to support risk modeling; and (4) More realistic estimation of cost for remedial alternatives, including soil washing, that were derived primarily from vendor estimates. Instead of conducting the planned soil washing treatability study, the team recommends that the site consider a new phased approach that combines additional characterization approaches and technologies to address the technical uncertainty in the remedial decision making. The site should redo the risk calculations as the future use scenario has changed for the site. As a result, the existing model is based on very conservative assumptions that result in calculation of unreasonably low cleanup goals. Specifically, the review team proposes that LLNL consider: (1) Revising the industrial worker scenario to a reasonable maximum exposure (RME) for a site worker that performs a weekly walk down of the area for two hours for 25 years (or an alternative RME if the exposure scenario changes); (2) Revising the ESSI of 2 mg U per kg soil for the deer mouse to account for less than 0.05 of the total ingested uranium being adsorbed by the gut; (3) Revising bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for vegetation and invertebrates that are based on 100 mg of soluble uranium per kg of soil, as the uranium concentration in the slope soil does not average 100 mg/kg and it is not all in a soluble form; and (4) Measuring actual contaminant concentrations in air particulates at the site and using the actual values to support risk calculations. The team recommends that the site continue a phased approach during remediation. The activities should focus on elimination of the principal threats to groundwater by excavating (1) source material from the firing table and alluvial deposits, and (2) soil hotspots from the surrounding slopes with concentrations of U-235 and U-238 that pose unacceptable risk. This phased approach allows the remediation path to be driven by the results of each phase. This reduces the possibility of costly 'surprises', such as failure of soil treatment, and reduces the impact of remediation on endangered habitat. Treatment of the excavated material with physical separation equipment may result in a decreased volume of soil for disposal if the DU is concentrated in the fine-grained fraction, which can then be disposed of in an offsite facility at a considerable cost savings. Based on existing data and a decision to implement the recommended phased approach, the cost of characterization, excavation and physical

Eddy-Dilek, C.; Miles, D.; Abitz, R.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

120

active site structure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

matrix 76 Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Plant species...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos Site Office - December...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 2010 Los Alamos Site Office, Office of Quality Assurance Assessment of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project Quality Assurance Plan The U.S....

122

active sites independently: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

emphasis on an assessment of the erosion potential of the site, and the potential impacts on any surfacewaters in thecatchment,hydrogeology, meteorological conditions, land...

123

Environmental assessment of ground water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming. Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is an environmental assessment of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. It analyzes the impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action for ground water compliance. The proposed action is to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the UMTRA Project sites (40 CFR Part 192) by meeting supplemental standards based on the limited use ground water at the Spook site. This proposed action would not require site activities, including ground water monitoring, characterization, or institutional controls. Ground water in the uppermost aquifer was contaminated by uranium processing activities at the Spook site, which is in Converse County, approximately 48 miles (mi) (77 kilometers [km]) northeast of Casper, Wyoming. Constituents from the site infiltrated and migrated into the uppermost aquifer, forming a plume that extends approximately 2500 feet (ft) (800 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The principal site-related hazardous constituents in this plume are uranium, selenium, and nitrate. Background ground water in the uppermost aquifer at the site is considered limited use. It is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e)). Background ground water quality also is poor due to first, naturally occurring conditions (natural uranium mineralization associated with an alteration front), and second, the effects of widespread human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). There are no known exposure pathways to humans, animals, or plants from the contaminated ground water in the uppermost aquifer because it does not discharge to lower aquifers, to the surface, or to surface water.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - active edge sites Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

active, and those... that carbon radical sites ... Source: Popov, Branko N. - Center for Electrochemical Engineering & Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South...

125

Sandia Site Office Assessment of Activity-Levell Work Planning...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Activity-Level Work Planning and Control at Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNL) Dates of Activity : 02142011 - 02182011 Report Preparer: Patricia Williams...

126

Analytical Electron Microscopy examination of uranium contamination at the DOE Fernald operation site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) has been used to identify uranium-bearing phases present in contaminated soils from the DOE Fernald operation site. A combination of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron detection (SEM/BSE), and AEM was used in isolating and characterizing uranium-rich regions of the contaminated soils. Soil samples were prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) by ultramicrotomy using an embedding resin previously employed for aquatic colloids and biological samples. This preparation method allowed direct comparison between SEM and TEM images. At the macroscopic level much of the uranium appears to be associated with clays in the soils; however, electron beam analysis revealed that the uranium is present as discrete phases, including iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite. Only low levels of uranium were actually within the clay minerals. The distribution of uranium phases was inhomogeneous at the submicron level.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been observed in any of the pour stream glass samples. Spinel was observed at the bottom of DWPF Melter 1 as a result of K-3 refractory corrosion. Issues have occurred with accumulation of spinel in the pour spout during periods of operation at higher waste loadings. Given that both DWPF melters were or have been in operation for greater than 8 years, the service life of the melters has far exceeded design expectations. It is possible that the DWPF liquidus temperature approach is conservative, in that it may be possible to successfully operate the melter with a small degree of allowable crystallization in the glass. This could be a viable approach to increasing waste loading in the glass assuming that the crystals are suspended in the melt and swept out through the riser and pour spout. Additional study is needed, and development work for WTP might be leveraged to support a different operating limit for the DWPF. Several recommendations are made regarding considerations that need to be included as part of the WTP crystal tolerant strategy based on the DWPF development work and operational data reviewed here. These include: Identify and consider the impacts of potential heat sinks in the WTP melter and glass pouring system; Consider the contributions of refractory corrosion products, which may serve to nucleate additional crystals leading to further accumulation; Consider volatilization of components from the melt (e.g., boron, alkali, halides, etc.) and determine their impacts on glass crystallization behavior; Evaluate the impacts of glass REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) conditions and the distribution of temperature within the WTP melt pool and melter pour chamber on crystal accumulation rate; Consider the impact of precipitated crystals on glass viscosity; Consider the impact of an accumulated crystalline layer on thermal convection currents and bubbler effectiveness within the melt pool; Evaluate the impact of spinel accumulation on Joule heating of the WTP melt pool; and Include noble metals in glass melt experiments because of their potential to act as nucleation site

Fox, K. M.

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-KR-4 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the CERCLA remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The 100-K Area consists of the 100-KR-4 groundwater operable unit and three source operable units. The 100-KR-4 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water beneath the 100-K Area. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Spent Fuel Storage Operational Experience With Increased Crud Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant part of the electricity production in Hungary is provided by 4 units of VVER 440 nuclear reactors at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant. Interim dry storage of the spent fuel assemblies that are generated during the operation of the reactors is provided in a Modular Vault Dry Storage (MVDS) facility that is located in the immediate vicinity of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant. The storage capacity of the MVDS is being continuously extended in accordance with spent the fuel production rate from the four reactors. An accident occurred at unit 2 of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant in 2003, when thirty irradiated fuel assemblies were damaged during a cleaning process. The fuel assemblies were not inside the reactor at the time of the accident, but in a separate tank within the adjacent fuel decay pool. As a result of this accident, contamination from the badly damaged fuel assemblies spread to the decay pool water and also became deposited onto the surface of (hermetic) spent fuel assemblies within the decay pool. Therefore, it was necessary to review the design basis of the MVDS and assess the effects of taking the surface contaminated spent fuel assemblies into dry storage. The contaminated hermetic assemblies were transferred from the unit 2 pool to the interim storage facility in the period between 2005 and 2007. Continuous inspection and measurement was carried out during the transfer of these fuel assemblies. On the basis of the design assessments and measurement of the results during the fuel transfer, it was shown that radiological activity values increased due to the consequences of the accident but that these levels did not compromise the release and radiation dose limits for the storage facility. The aim of this paper is to show the effect on the operation of the MVDS interim storage facility as a result of the increased activity values due to the accident that occurred in 2003, as well as to describe the measurements that were taken, and their results and experience gained. In summary: On the basis of the design assessments and measurement of the results during the fuel transfer operations, it was shown that radiological activity values increased due to the consequences of the 2003 accident but that these levels did not compromise the release and dose limits for the fuel storage facility. In the environment there was no measurable radioactivity as a result of the operation of the Paks ISFSI. The exposure of the surrounding population was calculated on measured releases and meteorological data. The calculations show negligible doses until 2004. Due to the increased surface contamination on the spent fuel assemblies the dose rate increased almost 5 times compared to the least annual value, but still less then 0.01 percent of the allowed dose restriction. (authors)

Barnabas, I. [Public Agency for Radioactive Waste, Management (PURAM) (Hungary); Eigner, T. [Paks NPP (Hungary); Gresits, I. [Technical University of Budapest (Hungary); Ordagh, M. [SOM System Llc, (Hungary)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

GROUDWATER REMEDIATION AT THE 100-HR-3 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA - 11507  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site underlies three former plutonium production reactors and the associated infrastructure at the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminant of concern at the site is hexavalent chromium; the secondary contaminants are strontium-90, technetium-99, tritium, uranium, and nitrate. The hexavalent chromium plume is the largest plume of its type in the state of Washington, covering an area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} (2.7 mi{sup 2}) with concentrations greater than 20 {micro}g/L. Concentrations range from 60,000 {micro}g/L near the former dichromate transfer station in the 100-D Area to large areas of 20 to 100 {micro}g/L across much of the plume area. Pump-and-treat operations began in 1997 and continued into 2010 at a limited scale of approximately 200 gal/min. Remediation of groundwater has been fairly successful in reaching remedial action objectives (RAOs) of 20 {micro}g/L over a limited region at the 100-H, but less effective at 100-D. In 2000, an in situ, permeable reactive barrier was installed downgradient of the hotspot in 100-D as a second remedy. The RAOs are still being exceeded over a large portion of the area. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company was awarded the remediation contract for groundwater in 2008 and initiated a remedial process optimization study consisting of modeling and technical studies intended to enhance the remediation. As a result of the study, 1,400 gal/min of expanded treatment capacity are being implemented. These new systems are designed to meet 2012 and 2020 target milestones for protection of the Columbia River and cleanup of the groundwater plumes.

SMOOT JL; BIEBESHEIMER FH; ELUSKIE JA; SPILIOTOPOULOS A; TONKIN MJ; SIMPKIN T

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

131

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report, 1992. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site for 1992. Monitoring and surveillance on and around the NTS by DOE contractors and Site user organizations during 1992 indicated that underground nuclear testing operations were conducted in compliance with regulations, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.15 percent of the guideline for air exposure. All 1992 nuclear events took place during the first three quarters of the calendar year prior to the Congressional testing moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from test operations was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated maximum effective dose equivalent offsite would have been 0.012 mrem. Any person receiving this dose was also exposed to 78 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped to EPA-approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Non-NTS support facilities complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

Black, S.C.; Latham, A.R.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

BIOTIC INTEGRITY OF STREAMS IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNITS, 1996 TO 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been divided into six Integrator Operable Units (IOUs) that correspond to the watersheds of the five major streams on the SRS (Upper Three Runs, Fourmile Branch, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs) and the portions of the Savannah River and Savannah River Swamp associated with the SRS. The streams are the primary integrators within each IOU because they potentially receive, through surface or subsurface drainage, soluble contaminants from all waste sites within their watersheds. If these contaminants reach biologically significant levels, they would be expected to effect the numbers, types, and health of stream organisms. In this study, biological sampling was conducted within each IOU as a measure of the cumulative ecological effects of the waste sites within the IOUs. The use of information from biological sampling to assess environmental quality is often termed bioassessment. The IOU bioassessment program included 38 sites in SRS streams and nine sites in the Savannah River. Sampling was conducted in 1996 to 1998, 2000, and 2003. Four bioassessment methods were used to evaluate ecological conditions in the IOU streams: the Index of Biotic Integrity, the Fish Health Assessment Index, measurement of fish tissue contaminant levels, and two benthic macroinvertebrate indices. The Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) is an EPA supported method based on comparison of ecologically important and sensitive fish assemblage variables between potentially disturbed and reference (i.e., undisturbed) sites. It is designed to assess the ability of a stream to support a self-sustaining biological community and ecological processes typical of undisturbed, natural conditions. Since many types of contaminants can bioaccumulate, fish tissue contaminant data were used to determine the types of chemicals fish were exposed to and their relative magnitudes among IOUs. The Fish Health Assessment Index (HAI) is an EPA supported method for assessing the health and condition of individual fish based on dissection and internal examination. It helped to determine whether contaminant concentrations were high enough to adversely affect the health of individual fish. The benthic macroinvertebrate multimetric index (HDMI), used in 1997 to 2000, is a method for assessing stream health based on macroinvertebrate data collected with Hester-Dendy artificial substrates. In 2003 it was replaced with the Multiple Habitat Sampling protocol, a SCDHEC method for collecting and analyzing benthic macroinvertebrate data from natural substrate. These two macroinvertebrate based methods were used in conjunction with the fish based IBI to provide a more comprehensive assessment of ecological conditions. Lastly, habitat data were collected from each stream to assist in determining whether ecological integrity was compromised by physical factors (e.g., erosion) or chemical factors (e.g., discharge of toxic materials). Fish from many SRS streams exhibited evidence of contamination as a result of current or former SRS operations. The most prevalent radiological contaminants were cesium-137 (highest in fish from Lower Three Runs followed by Steel Creek and Fourmile Branch), tritium (highest in fish from Fourmile Branch followed by Pen Branch, and the Savannah River swamp), and strontium (highest in fish from Fourmile Branch followed by Pen Branch). Radiological contaminants were also found in fish collected from the Savannah River near the mouths of contaminated SRS streams; however, contaminant levels were substantially lower than in fish from the streams themselves. Mercury levels were moderately elevated in fish from some streams, particularly Lower Three Runs, and in fish from the Savannah River. Despite the occurrence of contaminants, most SRS streams exhibited comparatively high biotic integrity (based on IBI, HDMI, and MHSP scores) and minimal levels of pathology among individual fish (e.g., presence of tumors or extreme thinness), indicating that contaminant levels were generally insufficient to cause significant ecological de

Paller, M; Susan Dyer, S

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

133

Current Challenges for Modeling Enzyme Active Sites by Biomimetic Synthetic Diiron Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This tutorial review describes recent progress in modeling the active sites of carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron enzymes that activate dioxygen to carry out several key reactions in Nature. The chemistry of soluble methane ...

Friedle, Simone

134

Splice site strengthdependent activity and genetic buffering by poly-G runs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pre-mRNA splicing is regulated through the combinatorial activity of RNA motifs, including splice sites and splicing regulatory elements. Here we show that the activity of the G-run (polyguanine sequence) class of splicing ...

Xiao, Xinshu

135

active sites environmental: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: ER 200-1-4 29 August 2014 ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM.C. 20314-1000 CECC-E Regulation No. 200-1-4 29 August 2014...

136

ALTERNATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY STUDY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT AT 200-PO-1 OPERABLE UNIT AT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on the remediation methods and technologies applicable for use at 200-PO-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site. The 200-PO-I Groundwater au requires groundwater remediation because of the existence of contaminants of potential concern (COPC). A screening was conducted on alternative technologies and methods of remediation to determine which show the most potential for remediation of groundwater contaminants. The possible technologies were screened to determine which would be suggested for further study and which were not applicable for groundwater remediation. COPCs determined by the Hanford Site groundwater monitoring were grouped into categories based on properties linking them by remediation methods applicable to each COPC group. The screening considered the following criteria. (1) Determine if the suggested method or technology can be used for the specific contaminants found in groundwater and if the technology can be applied at the 200-PO-I Groundwater au, based on physical characteristics such as geology and depth to groundwater. (2) Evaluate screened technologies based on testing and development stages, effectiveness, implementability, cost, and time. This report documents the results of an intern research project conducted by Mathew Dado for Central Plateau Remediation in the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project. The study was conducted under the technical supervision of Gloria Cummins and management supervision of Theresa Bergman and Becky Austin.

DADO MA

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Improving Reactivity Against Target Organothiophosphates via Active-Site Directed Mutagenisis of a Bacterial Phosphotriesterase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the initial screen and were targets for steady state kinetic characterization of active site mutants. Site directed mutagenesis of binding sites was conducted and the most reactive point mutants, F132G, F132V and S308G, were used as backgrounds for subsequent...

Githens, Tyler 1986-

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

Third-party/shared savings initiatives at DOE's government-owned/contractor-operated sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To promote energy conservation at its government owned/contractor operated (GOCO) facilities, DOE implemented the In-house Energy Management (IHEM) Program. In early FY 1984, the IHEM program became interested in the concept of third-party financing as a potential supplement for its appropriated budget. The basic approach to this activity is discussed, including some of the initial concerns of third-party/shared savings financing at DOE facilities. The legal and procurement issues involved are discussed in detail. Planned initiatives are also discussed.

Petrolati, V.P.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

[Electric and hybrid vehicle site operators program]: Thinking of the future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid vans and two (2) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1993 Ford EVcort station wagons. The G-Van has been signed in order for the public to be aware that this is an electric drive vehicle. Financial participants' names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. This vehicle is available for short term loan to interested utilities and companies. When other vehicles are obtained, the G-Van will be maintained on K-State's campus.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Screening of Potential Remediation Methods for the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A screening-level evaluation of potential remediation methods for application to the contaminants of concern (COC) in the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit at the Hanford Site was conducted based on the methods outlined in the Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies under CERCLA Interim Final. The scope of this screening was to identify the most promising remediation methods for use in the more detailed analysis of remediation alternatives that will be conducted as part of the full feasibility study. The screening evaluation was conducted for the primary COC (potential major risk drivers). COC with similar properties were grouped for the screening evaluation. The screening evaluation was conducted in two primary steps. The initial screening step evaluated potential remediation methods based on whether they can be effectively applied within the environmental setting of the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit for the specified contaminants. In the second step, potential remediation methods were screened using scoping calculations to estimate the scale of infrastructure, overall quantities of reagents, and conceptual approach for applying the method for each defined grouping of COC. Based on these estimates, each method was screened with respect to effectiveness, implementability, and relative cost categories of the CERCLA feasibility study screening process defined in EPA guidance.

Truex, Michael J.; Nimmons, Michael J.; Johnson, Christian D.; Dresel, P EVAN.; Murray, Christopher J.

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Superconducting Super Collider site environmental report for calendar year 1991. Pre-operational  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first annual SER prepared for the SSC project. It is a pre-operational report, intended primarily to describe the baseline characterization of the Ellis County, Texas site that has been developed subsequent to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Supplemental Environmental impact Statement (SEIS). As such, the emphasis will be on environmental compliance efforts, including monitoring and mitigation programs. The SER also reports on the measures taken to meet the commitments made in the EIS and SEIS. These measures are detailed in the Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) (Department of Energy (DOE), 1991), which was prepared following the signing of the Record of Decision (ROD) to construct the SSC in Texas. The SER will continue to be preoperational until the first high-energy (20 trillion electron volt or TeV) protons collisions are observed, at which point the SSC will become operational. At that time, the SER will place more emphasis on the radiological monitoring program. This SER will report on actions taken in 1991 or earlier and briefly mention some of those planned for calendar year 1992. AU actions completed in 1992 will be addressed in the SER for calendar year 1992.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Organometallic Complexes that Model the Active Sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-Hydrogenases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

My research primarily focuses on biomimetics of the active sites of the [FeFe]- and [Fe]-hydrogenases (H2ase) and is classified into three parts. Part A: The one-electron oxidation of asymmetrically disubstituted FeIFeI models of the active site...

Liu, Tianbiao

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electric and hybrid vehicle program: Site operator program. Quarterly progress report, April--June, 1994 (3rd quarter of FY-1994)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Site Operator Program was initially established to meet the requirements of the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976. The Program has since evolved in response to new legislation and interests. Its mission now includes three major activity categories; advancement of Electric Vehicle (EV) technologies, development of infrastructure elements needed to support significant EV use, and increasing public awareness and acceptance of EVs. The 13 Program participants, their geographic locations, and the principal thrusts of their efforts are identified. The EV inventories of each participant are summarized. This third quarter report (FY-94) will include a summary of activities from the previous three quarters. The report section sequence has been revised to provide a more easily seen program overview, and specific operator activities are now included.

Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Operations of the LR56 radioactive liquid cask transport system at U.S. Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LR56 cask system is licensed for use in France under Certificate of Compliance F/309/B(U)F for transport of 4,000-liter volumes of radioactive liquids. Three LR56 cask systems (with modifications for use at Department of Energy (DOE) sites) have been purchased for delivery at the Hanford Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The LR56 cask systems will be used for on-site transfers of Type B quantities of radioactive liquid waste. The ORNL unit will also be used as a Type A packaging for transfers of radioactive liquids between DOE sites. This paper discusses LR56 operating features and the use of the cask system at the three DOE sites.

Davidson, J.S. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hornstra, D.J. [Performance Development Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sazawal, V.K. [NUMATEC, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States); Clement, G. [SGN, St. Quentin en Yvelines (France)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

active site suffices: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

site suffices First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Convergence from below suffices J. F....

148

Summary of Activities at the ST. LOUIS DOWNTOWN SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, USACE FUSRAP Project Office 8945 Latty Avenue Berkeley, Missouri 63134 And St. Louis Public Library 1301/CentersofExpertise/ FormerlyUtilizedSitesRemedialAc- tionProgram.aspx Or write St. Louis District, USACE FUSRAP Project Office 8945 Latty Avenue Berkeley, Missouri 63134 Background From 1942 to 1957, the Mallinckrodt Chemical

US Army Corps of Engineers

149

Summary of Activities at the ST LOUIS NORTH COUNTY SITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the SLAPS and Latty Avenue Vicinity Properties (VPs). Today these sites, including impacted areas along) 260-3905 Or write St. Louis District, Corps of Engineers FUSRAP Project Office 8945 Latty Avenue were purchased, moved, and stored at a property on Latty Avenue, which became known as the Hazelwood

US Army Corps of Engineers

150

Active Fault Controls At High-Temperature Geothermal Sites- Prospectin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the level of unrecognized active faults present in these areas. Analysis of low-sun-angle aerial photography acquired over the Needle Rocks, Astor Pass, Empire, and Lee...

151

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Savannah River Site Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Activity...

152

Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit at the Weldon Spring Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The Weldon Spring site consists of two noncontiguous areas -- the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits, and the quarry. Cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, incorporating the values of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The contents of the documents prepared for the project are not intended to represent a statement regarding the legal applicability of NEPA to remedial actions conducted under CERCLA. In accordance with the integrated CERCLA/NEPA approach, a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment (RI/FS-EA) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU). This operable unit consists of the following areas and/or media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and bulk waste; underlying groundwater; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough. This work plan identifies the activities within the RI/FS-EA process that are being proposed to address contamination remaining at the quarry area.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES TO OPERATING AN ON-SITE LABORATORY AT THE SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES CHEMICAL WASTE LANDFILL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the excavation of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), operations were realized by the presence of URS' (formerly known as United Research Services) On-site Mobile Laboratory (OSML) and the close proximity of the SNL/NM Environmental Restoration Chemical Laboratory (ERCL). The laboratory was located adjacent to the landfill in order to provide soil characterization, health and safety support, and waste management data. Although the cost of maintaining and operating an analytical laboratory can be higher than off-site analysis, there are many benefits to providing on site analytical services. This paper describes the synergies between the laboratory, as well as the advantages and disadvantages to having a laboratory on-site during the excavation of SNL/NM CWL.

Young, S.G.; Creech, M.N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, environmental data report for the Nevada Test Site -- 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` establishes environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for DOE operations. These mandates require compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection regulations. During calendar year (CY) 1995 environmental protection and monitoring programs were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) managed sites in Nevada and across the United States. A detailed discussion of these environmental protection and monitoring programs, and summary data and assessments for environmental monitoring results at these sites in CY 1995 are provided in the DOE/NV, Annual Site Environmental Report--1995, (ASER) DOE/NV/11718-037. A brief description of the scope of this environmental monitoring is provided below, categorized by ``on-NTS`` and ``off-NTS`` monitoring.

Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.; Kinnison, R.R.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic Controlled Variable Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test-bed benchmark simulation model no structure that leads to optimal economic operation, while promptly rejecting disturbances at lower layers

Skogestad, Sigurd

156

Oversight Reports - Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 22, 2013 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Site - March 2013 Oversight Scheduling an Operational Awareness at the Savannah River Site HIAR-SRS-2013-03-25...

157

EIS-0147: Continued Operation of the K-,L-, and P- Reactors, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental impact statement (EIS) analyzes the environmental impacts of the proposed action, which is to continue operation of K-, L-, and P-Reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to ensure the capability to produce nuclear materials, and to produce nuclear materials as necessary for United States defense and nondefense programs.

158

EIS-0063: Waste Management Operations, Double-Shell Tanks for Defense High Level Radioactive Waste Storage, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to evaluate the existing tank design and consider additional specific design and safety feature alternatives for the thirteen tanks being constructed for storage of defense high-level radioactive liquid waste at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This statement supplements ERDA-1538, "Final Environmental Statement on Waste Management Operation."

159

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by DOE contractors and NTS user organizations during 1993 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable federal and DOE guidelines, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.04 percent of the 10 mrem per year guide for air exposure. No nuclear tests were conducted due to the moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of effluents, or resuspension was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.004 mrem. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 97 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Support facilities at off-NTS locations compiled with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Activity-level Work Planning and Control in the Hanford Site Worker Evaluation Tool  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Ted Giltz, Volpentest HAMMER Federal Training Center. Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool, Verifying Activity-Level Worker Medical Clearance and Training. The Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool (HSWET) provides line management an easy to use tool to determine if workers are medically cleared and trained to perform work safely.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Explorations of iron-iron hydrogenase active site models by experiment and theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation describes computational and experimental studies of synthetic complexes that model the active site of the iron-iron hydrogenase [FeFe]H2ase enzyme. Simple dinuclear iron dithiolate complexes act as functional models of the ironiron...

Tye, Jesse Wayne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Lessons learned from an installation perspective for chemical demilitarization plant start-up at four operating incineration sites.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents the lessons learned by chemical storage installations as they prepared for the start of chemical demilitarization plant operations at the four current chemical incinerator sites in Alabama, Arkansas, Oregon, and Utah. The study included interviews with persons associated with the process and collection of available documents prepared at each site. The goal was to provide useful information for the chemical weapons storage sites in Colorado and Kentucky that will be going through plant start-up in the next few years. The study is not a compendium of what to do and what not to do. The information has been categorized into ten lessons learned; each is discussed individually. Documents that may be useful to the Colorado and Kentucky sites are included in the appendices. This study should be used as a basis for planning and training.

Motz, L.; Decision and Information Sciences

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

163

Density Functional Calculations of ATP Systems. 2. ATP Hydrolysis at the Active Site of J. Akola and R. O. Jones*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density Functional Calculations of ATP Systems. 2. ATP Hydrolysis at the Active Site of Actin J-triphosphate (ATP) at the active site of actin has been studied using density functional calculations. The active site is modeled by the triphosphate tail of ATP, an Mg cation, surrounding water molecules

164

Site-Dependent Activity of Atomic Ti Catalysts in Al-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site-Dependent Activity of Atomic Ti Catalysts in Al-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials Abdullah Al storage processes. Here we analyze the role of atomic Ti catalysts in the hydrogenation of Al-based hydrogen storage materials. We show that Ti atoms near the Al surface activate gas-phase H2, a key step

Ciobanu, Cristian

165

Equilibrium polymerization of cyclic carbonate oligomers. II. Role of multiple active sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equilibrium polymerization of cyclic carbonate oligomers. II. Role of multiple active sites P 30 November 2001; accepted 8 February 2002 Ring opening polymerization of bisphenol A polycarbonate 0.36%) of chemically active particles lead to equilibrium polymerization. There is a continuous

166

Chapter 3 Project Components and Construction, Operation and Maintenance Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStanding FriedelIron-Sulfur3-1 November 2012Chapter 26 -3-1

167

Application for Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS, and NSTec is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS has signs posted along its entire perimeter.

NSTec Environmental Management

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Pajarito Site operating procedures for the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating procedures consistent with DOE Order 5480.6, and the American National Standard Safety Guide for the Performance of Critical Experiments are defined for the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These operating procedures supersede and update those previously published in 1983 and apply to any criticality experiment performed at the facility. 11 refs.

Malenfant, R.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

List of currently classified documents relative to Hanford Production Facilities Operations originated on the Hanford Site between 1961 and 1972  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has declared that all Hanford plutonium production- and operations-related information generated between 1944 and 1972 is declassified. Any documents found and deemed useful for meeting Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) objectives may be declassified with or without deletions in accordance with DOE guidance by Authorized Derivative Declassifiers. The September 1992, letter report, Declassifications Requested by the Technical Steering Panel of Hanford Documents Produced 1944--1960, (PNWD-2024 HEDR UC-707), provides an important milestone toward achieving a complete listing of documents that may be useful to the HEDR Project. The attached listing of approximately 7,000 currently classified Hanford-originated documents relative to Hanford Production Facilities Operations between 1961 and 1972 fulfills TSP Directive 89-3. This list does not include such titles as the Irradiation Processing Department, Chemical Processing Department, and Hanford Laboratory Operations monthly reports generated after 1960 which have been previously declassified with minor deletions and made publicly available. Also Kaiser Engineers Hanford (KEH) Document Control determined that no KEH documents generated between January 1, 1961 and December 31, 1972 are currently classified. Titles which address work for others have not been included because Hanford Site contractors currently having custodial responsibility for these documents do not have the authority to determine whether other than their own staff have on file an appropriate need-to-know. Furthermore, these documents do not normally contain information relative to Hanford Site operations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF{sub 6} from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (United States Code, Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a Federal Register Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; from the transportation of all ETTP cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF6 [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) to Portsmouth; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). An option of shipping the ETTP cylinders to Paducah is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Portsmouth and ETTP sites. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0359) evaluates potential environmental impacts for the proposed Paducah conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

171

Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - October 2011 | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Plant Operational Awareness Site Visit HIAR PTX-2011-10-28 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness activity conducted by Office of Health, Safety and...

172

Oversight Scheduling and Operational Awareness at the Savannah...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report on Oversight Scheduling and Operational Awareness at the Savannah River Site Dates of Activity : 0325...

173

Decommissioning an Active Historical Reactor Facility at the Savannah River Site - 13453  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, where Management and Operations are performed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS). In 2004, DOE recognized SRS as structure within the Cold War Historic District of national, state and local significance composed of the first generation of facilities constructed and operated from 1950 through 1989 to produce plutonium and tritium for our nation's defense. DOE agreed to manage the SRS 105-C Reactor Facility as a potentially historic property due to its significance in supporting the U.S. Cold War Mission and for potential for future interpretation. This reactor has five primary areas within it, including a Disassembly Basin (DB) that received irradiated materials from the reactor, cooled them and prepared the components for loading and transport to a Separation Canyon for processing. The 6,317 square meter area was divided into numerous work/storage areas. The walls between the individual basin compartments have narrow vertical openings called 'slots' that permit the transfer of material from one section to another. Data indicated there was over 830 curies of radioactivity associated with the basin sediments and approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated water, not including a large quantity of activated reactor equipment, scrap metal, and debris on the basin floor. The need for an action was identified in 2010 to reduce risks to personnel in the facility and to eliminate the possible release of contaminants into the environment. The release of DB water could potentially migrate to the aquifer and contaminate groundwater. DOE, its regulators [U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)-Region 4 and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)] and the SC Historical Preservation Office (SHPO) agreed/concurred to perform a non-time critical removal action for the In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) of the 105-C Disassembly Basin. ISD consisted of stabilization/isolation of remaining contaminated water, sediment, activated reactor equipment, and scrap metal by filling the DB with underwater non-structural grout to the appropriate (-4.877 meter) grade-level, thence with dry area non-structural grout to the final -10 centimeter level. The roof over the DB was preserved due to its potential historical significance and to prevent the infiltration of precipitation. Forced evaporation was the form of treatment implemented to remove the approximately 9.1 M liters of contaminated basin water. Using specially formulated grouts, irradiated materials and sediment were treated by solidification/isolation thus reducing their mobility, reducing radiation exposure and creating an engineered barrier thereby preventing access to the contaminants. Grouting provided a low permeability barrier to minimize any potential transport of contaminants to the aquifer. Efforts were made to preserve the historical significance of the Reactor in accordance with the National Historic Preservation Act. ISD provides a cost effective means to isolate and contain residual radioactivity from past nuclear operations allowing natural radioactive decay to reduce hazards to manageable levels. This method limits release of radiological contamination to the environment, minimizes radiation exposure to workers, prevents human/animal access to the hazardous substances, and allows for ongoing monitoring of the decommissioned facility. Field construction was initiated in August 2011; evaporator operations commenced January 2012 and ended July 2012 with over 9 M liters of water treated/removed. Over 8,525 cubic meters of grout were placed, completing in August 2012. The project completed with an excellent safety record, on schedule and under budget. (authors)

Bergren, Christopher L.; Long, J. Tony; Blankenship, John K. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy, Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Magnetic properties of a diferrous-water complex and ligands for modeling the active site of MMOH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1: The Importance of Modeling Diiron Sites in Nature.There are a variety of metalloenzymes that have nearly identical carboxylate-bridged diiron active sites. An example is sMMOH, an enzyme that catalyzes the ...

Kelly, Amy E. (Amy Elizabeth), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products (hydrogen fluoride [HF] or calcium fluoride [CaF{sub 2}]). Although not part of the proposed action, an option of shipping all cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF{sub 6} [LEU-UF{sub 6}], and empty) stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Paducah rather than to Portsmouth is also considered. In addition, this EIS evaluates a no action alternative, which assumes continued storage of DUF{sub 6} in cylinders at the Paducah site. A separate EIS (DOE/EIS-0360) evaluates the potential environmental impacts for the proposed Portsmouth conversion facility.

N /A

2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Summary of field operations Tijeras Arroyo Well TJA-2. Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a basic data report for field operations associated with the drilling, logging, completion, and development of Tijeras Arroyo well TJA-2. This test/monitoring well was installed as part of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Environmental Restoration Project.

Foutz, W.L. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCord, J.P. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

EIS-0157: Site-wide for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore/Sandia National Laboratory, Livermore  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory - Livermore, including programmatic enhancements and facility modifications to occur over the subsequent 10-year term that are pursuant to research and development missions established for the Laboratories by Congress and the President.

178

EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluate the potential environmental impacts of expansion or continued use of existing sand and gravel pits located on the Hanford Site (Pits F, H, N, 6, 9, 18, 21, 23, 24, 30, and 34) and establishing one new borrow area source in the 100 Area for ongoing construction activities and fill material following remediation activities. The scope of this EA does not include borrow sources for silt-loam material.

179

Drart environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Testing Geometrical Discrimination within an Enzyme Active Site: Constrained Hydrogen Bonding in the Ketosteroid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing Geometrical Discrimination within an Enzyme Active Site: Constrained Hydrogen Bonding, Stanford UniVersity, Stanford, California 94305, and Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry-chain reorientation and prevent hydrogen bond shortening by 0.1 ? or less. Further, this constraint has substantial

Herschlag, Dan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparison of Protein Active Site Structures for Functional Annotation of Proteins and Drug Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of various genomics efforts has been a vast growth in putative protein sequences that lack any experimental there are numerous examples of proteins with similar folds that lack any significant sequence homology.8Comparison of Protein Active Site Structures for Functional Annotation of Proteins and Drug Design

Powers, Robert

182

Structural Analyses of a Malate Dehydrogenase with a Variable Active Site*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in eukaryotes, the malate/aspartate shuttle. MDH is highly selective for its 4-carbon dicarboxylic acid substrate, distinguishing malate from the readily avail- able 3-carbon (pyruvate) and 5-carbon on a loop that bends into the active site and form hydrogen bond inter- actions with the 4-carboxyl and 2

Viola, Ronald

183

Critical Role of Magnesium Ions in DNA Polymerase 's Closing and Active Site Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical Role of Magnesium Ions in DNA Polymerase 's Closing and Active Site Assembly Linjing Yang nucleotide with conserved catalytic residues (Asp190, Asp192, Asp256) and the two functional magnesium ions adjustments of the nucleotide-binding and catalytic magnesium ions help guide polymerase selection

Schlick, Tamar

184

Oxygen Activation by the Noncoupled Binuclear Copper Site in Peptidylglycine r-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sites in hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase, in O2 activation. 1. Introduction Cu proteinsII centers.4 Coupled binuclear Cu proteins include hemocyanin, tyrosinase, and catechol oxidase.2 The two Cu)), which is acti- vated for electrophilic attack on substrates (in tyrosinase).4 Noncoupled binuclear Cu

Chen, Peng

185

Hydrogen bond dynamics in the active site of photoactive yellow protein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen bond dynamics in the active site of photoactive yellow protein Paul A. Sigala, Mark A for review February 5, 2009) Hydrogen bonds play major roles in biological structure and function. Nonetheless, hydrogen-bonded protons are not typically observed by X-ray crystallography, and most structural

Herschlag, Dan

186

Paducah and Portsmouth Sites Advance Operations at DUF6 Plants | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652 Srivastava,Pacific NorthwestFebruarySite Hostsof

187

U. S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office - Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled SystemReleases SavannahPermit ReportsSite Map

188

Transient Inverse Calibration of Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts - 1943 to 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of predictions made with the Hanford site-wide groundwater flow and transport model. The focus is on characterizing major uncertainties in the current model. PNNL will develop and implement a calibration approach and methodology that can be used to evaluate alternative conceptual models of the Hanford aquifer system. The calibration process will involve a three-dimensional transient inverse calibration of each numerical model to historical observations of hydraulic and water quality impacts to the unconfined aquifer system from Hanford operations since the mid-1940s.

Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Thorne, Paul D.; Orr, Samuel; Mckinley, Mathew I.

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Fiscal year 1996 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Site summary baseline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical baseline is a hierarchical description of the Hanford Site cleanup mission. This technical baseline does not address the science, technology, or economic transition missions. It begins with a definition of the existing conditions at the Hanford Site, provides a description of the end product or mission accomplishments at completion, presents a statement of the major requirements and constraints that must be observed during the performance of the mission, and provides a statement of the top-level strategic approach to accomplish the mission. Mission-level interfaces are also described. This information is further defined hierarchically in increasing levels of detail. This definition is composed of the following major elements: functions that are key task descriptions; requirements that are the measurable standards to which the functions must be performed; architectures which are specific engineering solutions or systems that perform the functions described earlier; and verification ensuring the system satisfies the requirements and fulfills the functions. The above information is supplemented with the following: interface data; risk analyses and watch lists; assumptions; and required analyses.

Johndro-Collins, A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Application for a Permit to Operate a Class III Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada National Security Site Area 5 Asbestiform Low-Level Solid Waste Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NNSS and National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NNSS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NNSS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NNSS. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) is the location of the permitted facility for the Solid Waste Disposal Site (SWDS). The Area 5 RWMS is located near the eastern edge of the NNSS (Figure 1), approximately 26 km (16 mi) north of Mercury, Nevada. The Area 5 RWMS is used for the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste. Many areas surrounding the RWMS have been used in conducting nuclear tests. The site will be used for the disposal of regulated Asbestiform Low-Level Waste (ALLW), small quantities of low-level radioactive hydrocarbon-burdened (LLHB) media and debris, LLW, LLW that contains Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, and small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids, or waste that is regulated as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or state-of-generation hazardous waste regulations, will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that will be accepted at the disposal site is regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM) and PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water. The term asbestiform is used throughout this document to describe RACM. The disposal site will be used as a depository of permissible waste generated both on site and off site. All generators designated by NNSA/NSO will be eligible to dispose regulated ALLW at the Asbestiform Low-Level Waste Disposal Site in accordance with the DOE/NV-325, Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC, current revision). Approval will be given by NNSA/NSO to generators that have successfully demonstrated through process knowledge (PK) and/or sampling and analysis that the waste is low-level, contains asbestiform material, or contains PCB Bulk Product Waste greater than 50 ppm that leaches at a rate of less than 10 micrograms of PCB per liter of water, or small quantities of LLHB demolition and construction waste and does not contain prohibited waste materials. Each waste stream will be approved through the Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP), which ensures that the waste meets acceptance requirements outlined in the NNSSWAC.

NSTec Environmental Programs

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

191

Safety analysis--200 Area Savannah River Site: Separations Area operations Building 211-H Outside Facilities. Supplement 11, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The H-Area Outside Facilities are located in the 200-H Separations Area and are comprised of a number of processes, utilities, and services that support the separations function. Included are enriched uranium loadout, bulk chemical storage, water handling, acid recovery, general purpose evaporation, and segregated solvent facilities. In addition, services for water, electricity, and steam are provided. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Area Outside Facilities and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the SR Implementation Plan for DOE order 5481.1A. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the facility can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations, to the environment, and to operating personnel. In this report, risks are defined as the expected frequencies of accidents, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequences in person-rem. Following the summary description of facility and operations is the site evaluation including the unique features of the H-Area Outside Facilities. The facility and process design are described in Chapter 3.0 and a description of operations and their impact is given in Chapter 4.0. The accident analysis in Chapter 5.0 is followed by a list of safety related structures and systems (Chapter 6.0) and a description of the Quality Assurance program (Chapter 7.0). The accident analysis in this report focuses on estimating the risk from accidents as a result of operation of the facilities. The operations were evaluated on the basis of three considerations: potential radiological hazards, potential chemical toxicity hazards, and potential conditions uniquely different from normal industrial practice.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is comprised of appendices which support monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during 1993. Appendix A contains onsite Pu-238, gross beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides in air. Appendix B contains onsite tritium in air. Appendix C contains onsite Pu-238, Sr-90, gross alpha and beta, gamma-emitting radionuclides, Ra-226, Ra-228 and tritium in water. A summary of 1993 results of offsite radiological monitoring is included in Appendix D. Appendix E contains radioactive noble gases in air onsite. Appendix F contains onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data. Historical trends in onsite thermoluminescent dosimeter data are contained in Appendix G. Appendix H summarizes 1993 compliance at the DOE/NV NTS and non-NTS facilities. Appendix I summarizes the 1993 results of non radiological monitoring.

Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Particle Size Distribution Data From Existing Boreholes at the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides particle size distribution data for samples near the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Site that were archived in the Hanford Geotechnical Sample Library. Seventy-nine sediment samples were analyzed from four boreholes. Samples were collected from every ten feet in the boreholes. Eightly percent of the samples were classified as slightly gravelly sand. Fifteen percent were classified as gravelly sand, gravelly silty sand, or sandy gravels. These data indicate that the particle size of the sediment is consistent across the ILAW site and is dominated by sand in the upper part of the Hanford formation with more gravel rich units in the lower part.

Valenta, Michelle M.; Martin, Maria B.; Moreno, Jorge R.; Ferri, Rosalie M.; Horton, Duane G.; Reidel, Stephen P.

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

194

Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level waste, for disposal is a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

Petersen, C.A.

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

195

Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level wastes, for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

Petersen, C.A., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

REVISED FINAL REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT SITES, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK DCN 0496-SR-06-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modeling the active sites of non-heme diiron metalloproteins with sterically hindered carboxylates and syn N-Donor ligands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Different Synthetic Approaches to Modeling the Active Sites of Carboxylate-Bridged Non-Heme Diiron Enzymes Carboxylate-bridged non-heme diiron enzymes activate dioxygen to perform a variety of biological functions. ...

Friedle, Simone, 1976-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Measurement of Tc-99 in Savannah River Site High Activity Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste cleanup efforts currently underway at the Savannah River Site have created a need to characterize Tc-99 in the various high activity waste matrices currently in Site inventories. The traditional method our laboratory used for analyzing Tc-99 in higher activity matrices was a solvent-solvent extraction method using Aliquat-336 in xylene, which resulted in the problematic generation of mixed waste. In an effort to eliminate the generation of mixed wastes resulting from the Aliquat 336/xylene process, a variety of different separation methodologies have been studied. Eichrom TEVA solid phase extractions using column technology have been employed in a case by case basis over the last several years. More recently, applications using Eichrom TEVA extraction discs and 3M Empore Tc extraction discs have also been explored.

DiPrete, D.P.

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

Disposal Activities and the Unique Waste Streams at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide show documents waste disposal at the Nevada National Security Site. Topics covered include: radionuclide requirements for waste disposal; approved performance assessment (PA) for depleted uranium disposal; requirements; program approval; the Waste Acceptance Review Panel (WARP); description of the Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP); facility evaluation; recent program accomplishments, nuclear facility safety changes; higher-activity waste stream disposal; and, large volume bulk waste streams.

Arnold, P.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Supplement Analysis to the 1999 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Proposed Disposition of Certain Large Containment Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) (DOE 1999a) adequately addresses the environmental effects of introducing a proposed project for the clean-out and decontamination (DECON) of certain large containment vessels into the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA) 3, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. After undergoing the clean-out and DECON steps, the subject containment vessels would be disposed of at LANL's TA-54 low-level waste (LLW) disposal site or, as appropriate, at a DOE or commercial offsite permitted LLW-regulated landfill; after actinides were recovered from the DECON solution within the CMR Building, they would be moved to LANL's TA-55 Plutonium Facility and undergo subsequent processing at that facility for reuse. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9(c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an environmental impact statement (EIS) when an agency makes substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns, or there are changed circumstances or new or changed information relevant to concerns and bearing on the proposed action or its impacts. This SA is prepared in accordance with Section 10 CFR 10211.314(c) of the DOE's regulations for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementation that states: ''When it is unclear whether or not an EIS supplement is required, DOE shall prepare a Supplement Analysis''. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of the proposed project action with the LANL operations capabilities evaluated in the 1999 SWEIS in support DOE's long-term hydrodynamic testing program at LANL, as well as the waste disposal capabilities evaluated in the SWEIS in support of LANL operations. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in the SWEIS analysis. The SWEIS analyzed the impacts of performing plutonium (Pu) and actinide activities, including hydrodynamic testing support activity, at the Plutonium Facility and at the CMR Building.

N /A

2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

202

Three-dimensional representations of salt-dome margins at four active strategic petroleum reserve sites.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing paper-based site characterization models of salt domes at the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been converted to digital format and visualized using modern computer software. The four sites are the Bayou Choctaw dome in Iberville Parish, Louisiana; the Big Hill dome in Jefferson County, Texas; the Bryan Mound dome in Brazoria County, Texas; and the West Hackberry dome in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A new modeling algorithm has been developed to overcome limitations of many standard geological modeling software packages in order to deal with structurally overhanging salt margins that are typical of many salt domes. This algorithm, and the implementing computer program, make use of the existing interpretive modeling conducted manually using professional geological judgement and presented in two dimensions in the original site characterization reports as structure contour maps on the top of salt. The algorithm makes use of concepts of finite-element meshes of general engineering usage. Although the specific implementation of the algorithm described in this report and the resulting output files are tailored to the modeling and visualization software used to construct the figures contained herein, the algorithm itself is generic and other implementations and output formats are possible. The graphical visualizations of the salt domes at the four Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites are believed to be major improvements over the previously available two-dimensional representations of the domes via conventional geologic drawings (cross sections and contour maps). Additionally, the numerical mesh files produced by this modeling activity are available for import into and display by other software routines. The mesh data are not explicitly tabulated in this report; however an electronic version in simple ASCII format is included on a PC-based compact disk.

Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Stein, Joshua S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

204

Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (Final)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE proposes to continue operating the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos County, in north-central New Mexico. DOE has identified and assessed four alternatives for the operation of LANL: (1) No Action, (2) Expanded Operations, (3) Reduced Operations, and (4) Greener. Expanded Operations is DOE's Preferred Alternative, with the exception that DOE would only implement pit manufacturing at a level of 20 pits per year. In the No Action Alternative, DOE would continue the historical mission support activities LANL has conducted at planned operational levels. In the Expanded Operations Alternative, DOE would operate LANL at the highest levels of activity currently foreseeable, including full implementation of the mission assignments from recent programmatic documents. Under the Reduced Operations Alternative, DOE would operate LANL at the minimum levels of activity necessary to maintain the capabilities to support the DOE mission in the near term. Under the Greener Alternative, DOE would operate LANL to maximize operations in support of nonproliferation, basic science, materials science, and other nonweapons areas, while minimizing weapons activities. Under all of the alternatives, the affected environment is primarily within 50 miles (80 kilometers) of LANL. Analyses indicate little difference in the environmental impacts among alternatives. The primary discriminators are: collective worker risk due to radiation exposure, socioeconomic effects due to LANL employment changes, and electrical power demand.

N /A

1999-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - active site determination Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Geophysics, Center for Rock Abuse Collection: Fossil Fuels ; Geosciences 7 SITE MAINTENANCE PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION Summary: CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION 1.0 HISTORY ...

206

Draft Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ''Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement'' (LLNL SW/SPEIS) describes the purpose and need for agency action for the continued operation of LLNL and analyzes the environmental impacts of these operations. The primary purpose of continuing operation of LLNL is to provide support for the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship missions. LLNL, located about 40 miles east of San Francisco, California, is also needed to support other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs and Federal agencies such as the U.S. Department of Defense, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the newly established U.S. Department of Homeland Security. This LLNL SW/SPEIS analyzes the environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for ongoing and foreseeable future operations, facilities, and activities at LLNL. The reasonable alternatives include the No Action Alternative, Proposed Action, and the Reduced Operation Alternative. The major decision to be made by DOE/NNSA is to select one of the alternatives for the continued operation of the LLNL. As part of the Proposed Action, DOE/NNSA is considering: using additional materials including plutonium on the National Ignition Facility (NIF); increasing the administrative limit for plutonium in the Superblock, which includes the Plutonium Facility, the Tritium Facility, and the Hardened Engineering Test Building; conducting the Integrated Technology Project, using laser isotope separation to provide material for Stockpile Stewardship experiments, in the Plutonium Facility; increasing the material-at-risk limit for the Plutonium Facility; and increasing the Tritium Facility material-at-risk. A discussion of these issues is presented in Section S.5.2, Proposed Action. The ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) establishes environmental policy, sets goals, and provides means for implementing the policy. NEPA contains provisions to ensure that Federal agencies adhere to the letter and spirit of the Act. The key provision requires preparation of an environmental impact statement on ''major Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment'' (40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' [CFR] {section}1502.3). NEPA ensures that environmental information is available to public officials and citizens before decisions are made and actions are taken (40 CFR {section}1500.1[b]). DOE has a policy to prepare sitewide environmental impact statements documents for certain large, multiple-facility sites such as LLNL (10 CFR {section}1021.330). In August 1992, DOE released the ''Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operations of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore'' (LLNL EIS/EIR). A Record of Decision (ROD) (58 ''Federal Register'' [FR] 6268) was issued in January 1993. With the passage of more than 10 years since the publication of the 1992 LLNL EIS/EIR (DOE/EIS-0157) and because of proposed modifications to existing projects and new programs, NNSA determined that it was appropriate to prepare a new LLNL SW/SPEIS.

N /A

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

activity-dependent polyadenylation site: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 37 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

208

Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority regional waste management center at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a landfill and technology center for regionally-generated municipal solid waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The facility would serve the municipal solid waste disposal needs for SRS and at least nine of the surrounding counties who currently comprise the Three Rivers Solid Waste Authority (TRSWA). Additional counties could become included in the proposed action at some future date. Current Federal and state requirements do not afford individual counties and municipalities within the region encompassing SRS the ability to efficiently or economically operate modern waste management facilities. In addition, consolidation of regional municipal solid waste at one location would have the benefit of reducing the duplicity of environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of county-level facilities. The option to seek a combined disposal and technology development facility based on a regionally-cooperative effort was selected as a viable alternative to the existing individual SRS or county disposal activities. This document was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CFR Part 1021). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. Based on the potential for impacts described for impacts described herein, DOE will either publish a Finding of No Significant Impact or prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS).

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Third Quarter Calendar Year 2013  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawandaUniversity21PreparedRffi Prepared3

210

Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Third Quarter Calendar Year 2013  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawandaUniversity21PreparedRffi

211

Design and Synthesis of a Novel Triptycene-Based Ligand for Modeling Carboxylate-Bridged Diiron Enzyme Active Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel triptycene-based ligand with a preorganized framework was designed to model carboxylate-bridged diiron active sites in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) hydroxylase enzymes. The synthesis of the ...

Li, Yang

212

Investigation of Reaction Networks and Active Sites In Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming Over Co-Based Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Paper by Umit S. Ozkan, Hua Song, and Lingzhi Zhang (Ohio State University) on the fundamental understanding of reaction networks, active sites of deactivation mechanisms of potential bio-ethanol steam reforming catalysts.

213

Oxidation of substrates tethered to N-donor ligands for modeling non-heme diiron enzyme active sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Modeling Carboxylate-Rich Diiron Sites of Dioxygen-Dependent Non-Heme Enzymes Carboxylate-bridged diiron centers are employed in a variety of biological systems to activate dioxygen for substrate oxidation, and ...

Carson, Emily Carrig, 1978-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

[Aluminum coordination and active sites on aluminas, Y-zeolites and pillared layered silicates]. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is organized in four sections. In the first the authors will outline structural features which are common to all fine grained alumina, as well as to non-framework alumina in zeolites. This section will be followed by a study of the surface vs. bulk coordination of aluminum. The third section will deal with measurement of the number of acid sites and the scaling of their strength. The fourth and last section will describe three model reactions: the isomerization of 1-butene and of 2 cis-butene; the isomerization and disproportionation of oxtho-xylene; and the transformation of trichloroethane into vinyl chloride followed by the polymerization of the vinyl chloride. The relationship between chemical activity and selectivity and what is known of the local structure of the active catalytic sites will be underlined. Other kinds of zeolites besides Y zeolite have been studied. Instead of the aluminum pillared silicates they found it more interesting to study the substitution of silicon by aluminum in a layered structure containing a permanent porosity (aluminated sepiolite).

Fripiat, J.J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Regulatory impact analysis of final environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards promulgated under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public health and environment after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the standards during mill operations is very limited.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Proposal for the award of an industrial service contract for stores operations and relatedlogistics, in-house mail distribution and transport services on the CERN site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This document concerns the award of an industrial support contract for stores operations and related logistics, in-house mail distribution and transport services on the CERN site. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium ISS (CH) - ISS (ES), for stores operations and related logistics, in-house mail distribution and transport services on the CERN site for a period of three years for a total amount not exceeding 10 312 028 Swiss francs not subject to revision. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

EIS-0238-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE), Albuquerque Operations Office, has prepared a Supplemental Analysis (SA) to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a proposal for modifying current methods utilized to receive and manage certain offsite unwanted radioactive sealed sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory or if additional documentation under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is needed.

218

Design criteria applicable to the environmental restoration of sites affected by uranium mining activities in the past  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the authors discuss the basic aspects to be considered while evaluating different alternatives to perform environmental restoration of sites affected by naturally occurring radionuclides, enhanced by human actions, as is the case in some old uranium mining activities. The discussion is confined to sites where radiation hazards had existed forever (sites with uranium deposits) and where the mining activities have introduced several factors modifying the initial situation, leading to the now existing one, requiring intervention as decided by the relevant authorities, in accordance with recommendations of ICRP60.

Carboneras, P. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, M. [INITEC, Madrid (Spain)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - active site metal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: collected from a reference site and a site with a long-term history of heavy-metal pollution. Direct... the metal-polluted site were more tolerant of metals but less...

220

Natural resource management activities at the Savannah River Site. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This environmental assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences of ongoing natural resource management activities on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Appendix A contains the Natural Resources Management Plant (NRMP). While several SRS organizations have primary responsibilities for different elements of the plan, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Savannah River Forest Station (SRFS) is responsible for most elements. Of the river scenarios defined in 1985, the High-Intensity Management alternative established the upper bound of environmental consequences; it represents a more intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative established compliance mechanisms for several natural resource-related requirements and maximum practical timber harvesting. Similarly, the Low-Intensity Management alternative established the lower bound of environmental consequences and represents a less intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative also established compliance mechanisms, but defined a passively managed natural area. The Proposed Action of this EA describes the current level of multiple-natural resource management. This EA reviews the proposed action, and the high and low intensity alternative scenarios.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

RECERTIFICATION OVERVIEW The WIPP Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's only permanent disposal site for transuranic (TRU) radio- active waste created during the research and production of nuclear weapons. The WIPP site is located outside of Carlsbad, New Mexico, where TRU waste Facts Recertification requires DOE to submit documentation of WIPP began waste disposal operations

223

Comparison of POLDER Cloud Phase Retrievals to Active Remote Sensors Measurements at the ARM SGP Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our present study, cloud boundaries derived from a combination of active remote sensors at the ARM SGP site are compared to POLDER cloud top phase index which is derived from polarimetric measurements using an innovative method. This approach shows the viability of the POLDER phase retrieval algorithm, and also leads to interesting results. In particular, the analysis demonstrates the sensitivity of polarization measurements to ice crystal shape and indicates that occurrence of polycrystalline ice clouds has to be taken into account in order to improve the POLDER phase retrieval algorithm accuracy. Secondly, the results show that a temperature threshold of 240 K could serve for cloud top particle phase classification. Considering the limitations of the analysis, the temperature threshold could be biased high, but not by more than about 5 degrees.

Riedi, J.; Goloub, P.; Marchand, Roger T.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

History of the 185-/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory and its effects on reactor operations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 185-D deaeration building and the 189-D refrigeration building were constructed at Hanford during 1943 and 1944. Both buildings were constructed as part of the influent water cooling system for D reactor. The CMS studies eliminated the need for 185-D function. Early gains in knowledge ended the original function of the 189-D building mission. In 1951, 185-D and 189-D were converted to a thermal-hydraulic laboratory. The experiments held in the thermal-hydraulic lab lead to historic changes in Hanford reactor operations. In late 1951, the exponential physics experiments were moved to the 189-D building. In 1958, new production reactor experiments were begun in 185/189-D. In 1959, Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor experiments were added to the 185/189-D facility. By 1960, the 185/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory was one of the few full service facilities of its type in the nation. During the years 1961--1963 tests continued in the facility in support of existing reactors, new production reactors, and the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor. In 1969, Fast Flux Test Facility developmental testings began in the facility. Simulations in 185/189-D building aided in the N Reactor repairs in the 1980`s. In 1994 the facility was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, because of its pioneering role over many years in thermal hydraulics, flow studies, heat transfer, and other reactor coolant support work. During 1994 and 1995 it was demolished in the largest decontamination and decommissioning project thus far in Hanford Site history.

Gerber, M.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

U.S. Department of Energy electric and hybrid vehicle Site Operator Program at Platte River Power Authority. Final report, July 3, 1991--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Platte River Power Authority (Platte River) is a political subdivision of the state of Colorado, owned by the four municipalities of Fort Collins, Loveland, Longmont and Estes Park, Colorado. Platte River is a non-profit, publicly owned, joint-action agency formed to construct, operate and maintain generating plants, transmission systems and related facilities for the purpose of delivering to the four municipalities electric energy for distribution and resale. Platte River, as a participant in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Site Operator Program, worked to accomplish the Site Operator Program goals and objectives to field test and evaluate electric and electric-hybrid vehicles and electric vehicle systems in a real world application/environment. This report presents results of Platte River`s program (Program) during the five-years Platte River participated in the DOE Site Operator Program. Platte River participated in DOE Site Operator Program from July 3, 1991 through August 31, 1996. During its Program, Platte River conducted vehicle tests and evaluations, and electric vehicle demonstrations in the Front Range region of Northern Colorado. Platte River also investigated electric vehicle infrastructure issues and tested infrastructure components. Platte River`s Program objectives were as follows: evaluate the year round performance, operational costs, reliability, and life cycle costs of electric vehicles in the Front Range region of Northern Colorado; evaluate an electric vehicle`s usability and acceptability as a pool vehicle; test any design improvements or technological improvements on a component level that may be made available to PRPA and which can be retrofit into vehicles; and develop, test and evaluate, and demonstrate components to be used in charging electric vehicles.

Emmert, R.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Alternate particle removal technologies for the Airborne Activity Confinement System at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressed in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.

Brockmann, J.E.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Gelbard, F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effect of Secondary Interactions on the Fundamental Properties of Small Molecule Models of the Diiron Hydrogenase Active Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mixed-valent FeIFeII complexes. An X-ray crystal structure of one of these complexes, (?-SCH2C(CH3)2CH2S-)[Fe(CO)2PMe3]2PF6 shows both a semi-bridging carbonyl and an open site similar to the 2-Fe subsite in the Hox state of the enzyme active site...

Singleton, Michael Lee

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

SUPPLEMENTAL COLUMBIA RIVER PROTECTION ACTIVITIES AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 2008 TECHNICAL REVIEW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in 2006, the US Department of Energy (DOE) supported nine applied research projects to improve the protection of the Columbia River and mitigate the impacts of Hanford Site groundwater. These projects were funded through a supplemental Congressional budget allocation, and are now in various stages of completion in accordance with the research plans. The DOE Office of Environmental Management Groundwater and Soil Cleanup Technologies (EM-22) sponsored a technical peer review meeting for these projects in Richland WA, July 28-31, 2008. The overall objective of the peer review is to provide information to support DOE decisions about the status and potential future application of the various technologies. The charge for the peer review panel was to develop recommendations for each of the nine 'technologies'. Team members for the July 2008 review were Brian Looney, Gene LeBoeuf, Dawn Kaback, Karen Skubal, Joe Rossabi, Paul Deutsch, and David Cocke. Previous project reviews were held in May 2007 and March-May of 2006. The team used the following four rating categories for projects: (a) Incorporate the technology/strategy in ongoing and future EM activities; (b) Finish existing scope of applied research and determine potential for EM activities when research program is finished; (c) Discontinue current development activities and do not incorporate technology/strategy into ongoing and future EM activities unless a significant and compelling change in potential viability is documented; and (d) Supplement original funded work to obtain the data needed to support a DOE decision to incorporate the technology into ongoing and future EM activities. The supplemental funding portfolio included two projects that addressed strontium, five projects that addressed chromium, one project that addressed uranium and one project that addressed carbon tetrachloride. The projects ranged from in situ treatment methods for immobilizing contaminants using chemical-based methods such as phosphate addition, to innovative surface treatment technologies such as electrocoagulation. Total funding for the nine projects was $9,900,000 in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and $2,000,000 in FY 2007. At the Richland meeting, the peer reviewers provided a generally neutral assessment of the projects and overall progress, and a generally positive assessment with regard to the principal investigators meeting their stated research objectives and performing the planned laboratory research and limited field work. Only one project, the Electrocoagulation Treatability Test, received a rating of 'discontinue' from the team because the project goals had not been met. Because this particular project has already ended, no action with respect to funding withdrawal is necessary. All other projects were recommended to be finished and/or incorporated into field efforts at Hanford. Specific technical comments and recommendations were provided by the team for each project.

Looney, B; Dawn S. Kaback, D; Eugene L. LeBoeuf, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Karen L. Skubal, K; David L. Cocke, D; Paul C. Deutsch, P

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Operating Experience and Lessons Learned in the Use of Soft-Sided Packaging for Transportation and Disposal of Low Activity Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the operating experience and lessons learned at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites as a result of an evaluation of potential trailer contamination and soft-sided packaging integrity issues related to the disposal of low-level and mixed low-level (LLW/MLLW) radioactive waste shipments. Nearly 4.3 million cubic meters of LLW/MLLW will have been generated and disposed of during fiscal year (FY) 2010 to FY 2015either at commercial disposal sites or disposal sites owned by DOE. The LLW/MLLW is packaged in several different types of regulatory compliant packaging and transported via highway or rail to disposal sites safely and efficiently in accordance with federal, state, and local regulations and DOE orders. In 1999, DOE supported the development of LLW containers that are more volumetrically efficient, more cost effective, and easier to use as compared to metal or wooden containers that existed at that time. The DOE Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), working in conjunction with the plastic industry, tested several types of soft-sided waste packaging systems that meet U.S. Department of Transportation requirements for transport of low specific activity and surface contaminated objects. Since then, soft-sided packaging of various capacities have been used successfully by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects to package, transport, and dispose D&D wastes throughout the DOE complex. The joint team of experts assembled by the Energy Facility Contractors Group from DOE waste generating sites, DOE and commercial waste disposal facilities, and soft-sided packaging suppliers conducted the review of soft-sided packaging operations and transportation of these packages to the disposal sites. As a result of this evaluation, the team developed several recommendations and best practices to prevent or minimize the recurrences of equipment contamination issues and proper use of soft-sided packaging for transport and disposal of waste.

Kapoor, A. [DOE; Gordon, S. [NSTec; Goldston, W. [Energy Solutions

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

230

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF OKLAHOMA ABANDONED DRILLING AND PRODUCTION SITES AND ASSOCIATED PUBLIC EDUCATION/OUTREACH ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has participated with the Oklahoma Energy Resource Board (OERB) since 1995 by providing grant funding for on-going work in both environmental assessment of abandoned oilfield exploration and production sites and associated public education/outreach activities. The OERB, a state agency created in 1993 by the Oklahoma legislature, administers programs funded by an assessment of one tenth of one percent on all oil and natural gas produced and sold in the state of Oklahoma. Approximately one half of the funds are used to assess and remediate abandoned oilfield sites and the other half are being used to educate about the importance of the oil and natural gas industry and OERB's environmental efforts. Financial participation through grant funding by the U.S. D.O.E. has been $200,000 annually which represents approximately 3 percent of OERB's private funding. Most of OERB's revenues come from an assessment of 1/10th of 1% on the sale of crude and natural gas in Oklahoma. The assessment is considered voluntary in that any interest owner may ask for a refund annually of their contributions to the fund. On average, 95% of the assessment dollars have remained with OERB, which shows tremendous support by the industry. This Final Report summarizes the progress of the three year grant. The purpose of this three-year project was to continue the progress of the OERB to accomplish its environmental and educational objectives and transfer information learned to other organizations and producing states in the industry.

Mike Terry

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Remote Handled TRU Waste Status and Activities and Challenges at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of the Department of Energy's forecast volume of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste will originate from the Hanford Site. The forecasted Hanford RH-TRU waste volume of over 2000 cubic meters may constitute over one-third of the forecast inventory of RH-TRU destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To date, the Hanford TRU waste program has focused on the retrieval, treatment and certification of the contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes. This near-term focus on CH-TRU is consistent with the National TRU Program plans and capabilities. The first shipment of CH-TRU waste from Hanford to the WIPP is scheduled early in Calendar Year 2000. Shipments of RH-TRU from Hanford to the WIPP are scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 2006 per the National TRU Waste Management Plan. This schedule has been incorporated into milestones within the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). These Tri-Party milestones (designated the ''M-91'' series of milestones) relate to development of project management plans, completion of design efforts, construction and contracting schedules, and initiation of process operations. The milestone allows for modification of an existing facility, construction of a new facility, and/or commercial contracting to provide the capabilities for processing and certification of RH-TRU wastes for disposal at the WIPP. The development of a Project Management Plan (PMP) for TRU waste is the first significant step in the development of a program for disposal of Hanford's RH-TRU waste. This PMP will address the path forward for disposition of waste streams that cannot be prepared for disposal in the Hanford Waste Receiving and Processing facility (a contact-handled, small container facility) or other Site facilities. The PMP development effort has been initiated, and the PMP will be provided to the regulators for their approval by June 30, 2000. This plan will detail the path forward for the Hanford RH-TRU program.

MCKENNEY, D.E.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Computation Of The Residual Radionuclide Activity Within Three Natural Waterways At The Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2010 a Composite Analysis (CA) of the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Savannah River Site (SRS) was completed. This investigation evaluated the dose impact of the anticipated SRS End State residual sources of radionuclides to offsite members of the public. Doses were assessed at the locations where SRS site streams discharge into the Savannah River at the perimeter of the SRS. Although the model developed to perform this computation indicated that the dose constraint of 0.3 mSv/yr (30 mrem/yr), associated with CA, was not approached at the Points of Assessment (POAs), a significant contribution to the total computed dose was derived from the radionuclides (primarily Cs-137) bound-up in the soil and sediment of the drainage corridors of several SRS streams. DOEs Low Level Waste Federal Review Group (LFRG) reviewed the 2010 CA and identified several items to be addressed in the SRS Maintenance Program. One of the items recognized Cs-137 in the Lower Three Runs (LTR) Integrator Operable Unit (IOU), as a significant CA dose driver. The item made the recommendation that SRS update the estimated radionuclide inventory, including Cs-137, in the LTR IOU. That initial work has been completed and its radionuclide inventory refined. There are five additional streams at SRS and the next phase of the response to the LFRG concern was to obtain a more accurate inventory and distribution of radionuclides in three of those streams, Fourmile Branch (FMB), Pen Branch (PB) and Steel Creek (SC). Each of these streams is designated as an IOU, which are defined for the purpose of this investigation as the surface water bodies and associated wetlands, including the channel sediment, floodplain sed/soil, and related biota. If present, radionuclides associated with IOUs are adsorbed to the streambed sediment and soils of the shallow floodplains that lie immediately adjacent to stream channels. The scope of this effort included the evaluation of any previous sampling and analysis data that had been collected for various SRS investigations, as well as the additional streambed and floodplain sampling and analysis data acquired more recently as part of the ongoing SRS IOU program, and associated specifically with the FMB, PB, and SC IOUs. Samples have been acquired along the waterways, within the stream channels themselves and in the adjacent floodplain zones. While Cs-137 is the most significant and abundant radionuclide associated with the SRS waterways, it is not the only radionuclide, hence work was conducted to evaluate all radionuclides present.

Hiergesell, R. A.; Phifer, M. A.

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

An Overview Comparison of Tank Closure Activities at Certain DOE Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a summary-level comparison of the similarities and differences of tank closure programs at the four primary radioactive waste tank sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The sites are Hanford, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The depth of our understanding of the closure programs varies with the amount of detailed information each of the four sites has provided to date. This paper was prepared using the best available information, including direct communications with key tank closure personnel at each of the sites. Many of the current schedules are under review for possible acceleration.

LUKE, J.J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Miamisburg, Ohio, Site (Mound Site)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores" _August 4,Operations and

235

Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

236

A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

Lentsch, J.W.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats Site, operable unit 4, Ruston/North Tacoma Study Area, WA, June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Ruston/North Tacoma Study Area, in Ruston and Tacoma, Washington. The EPA has divided the Commencement Bay/Nearshore Tideflats Superfund site into seven operable units (OU's) in order to facilitate the investigation, analysis, and cleanup of this very large site. Four of these OU's are associated with the Asarco smelter: OU 02 - Asarco Tacoma Smelter; OU 04 - Asarco Off-Property (Ruston/North Tacoma Study Area); OU 06 - Asarco Sediments; and OU 07 - Asarco Demolition. The remedy described in this ROD addresses OU 04 and involves the cleanup of arsenic and lead contaminated soils and slag in the Study Area, the residential community surrounding the smelter. This remedy will address the principal threat posed by conditions at the site, which is the ingestion of contaminated soil and dust.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A review of market monitoring activities at U.S. independent system operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policymakers have increasingly recognized the structural impediments to effective competition in electricity markets, which has resulted in a renewed emphasis on the need for careful market design and market monitoring in wholesale and retail electricity markets. In this study, we review the market monitoring activities of four Independent System Operators in the United States, focusing on such topics as the organization of an independent market monitoring unit (MMU), the role and value of external market monitors, performance metrics and indices to aid in market analysis, issues associated with access to confidential market data, and market mitigation and investigation authority. There is consensus across the four ISOs that market monitoring must be organizationally independent from market participants and that ISOs should have authority to apply some degree of corrective actions on the market, though scope and implementation differ across the ISOs. Likewise, current practices regarding access to confidential market data by state energy regulators varies somewhat by ISO. Drawing on our interviews and research, we present five examples that illustrate the impact and potential contribution of ISO market monitoring activities to enhance functioning of wholesale electricity markets. We also discuss several key policy and implementation issues that Western state policymakers and regulators should consider as market monitoring activities evolve in the West.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Goldman, Charles; Bartholomew, Emily

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Colocalization of ATP release sites and ecto-ATPase activity at the extracellular surface of human astrocytes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colocalization of ATP release sites and ecto-ATPase activity at the extracellular surface of human ATP Release from Astrocytes Key Words: Extracellular nucleotides, ATP release, astrocytes, P2302680200 #12;2 SUMMARY Extracellular ATP and other nucleotides function as autocrine and paracrine

Newman, Eric A.

240

Fragment Based Protein Active Site Analysis Using Markov Random Field Combinations of Stereochemical Feature-Based Classifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these methods have been able to account successfully for the diversity in the sequence and structural conformations observed in proteins that have the same function. An additional complication is the flexibility in both the protein active site and the ligand...

Pai Karkala, Reetal

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Activity-level Work Planning and Control in the Hanford Site...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Worker Evaluation Tool Addthis Description Slide Presentation by Ted Giltz, Volpentest HAMMER Federal Training Center. Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool, Verifying...

243

Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, single particle composition and size distributions at a high-elevation research site from March 2011 are presented.

Friedman, B.

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - active site plasticity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy 5 In my view, there are three fundamental questions that serve to motivate and guide future plasticity stud- Summary: , sites or habitats. Mechanisms of plastic response...

245

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the sites geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the sites environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

DOE/EIS-0238, Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (1999)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE proposes to continue operating the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos County, in north-central New Mexico. DOE has identified and assessed four alternatives for the...

247

The effect of the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid on the activity in catalyzing aldol condensation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts containing carboxylic and amine groups, which were immobilized at defined distance from one another on the mesoporous solid were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), elemental analysis, and back titration. Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance was more active than maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. It appears that the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid should be an essential factor for catalysis optimization. -- Graphical abstract: Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance and maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance. {yields} Maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance. {yields} Compared to maximum-C-A-SBA-15, proximal-C-A-SBA-15 was more active toward aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

Yu Xiaofang [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Yu Xiaobo [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wu Shujie; Liu Bo; Liu Heng [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.c [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China); Kan Qiubin, E-mail: catalysischina@yahoo.com.c [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Jiefang Road 2519, Changchun 130023 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Corrosion Control during Closure Activities at the Savannah River Site - 13514  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Site (SRS) separation process are stored in large underground carbon steel tanks. Until the waste is removed from storage, transferred, and processed, the materials and structures of the tanks must maintain a confinement function by providing a barrier to the environment and by maintaining acceptable structural stability during normal service and design basis events (e.g., earthquake conditions). A corrosion control program is in place to ensure that degradation of the steel does not impact the structural and leak integrity functions of these waste tanks. The SRS is currently retrieving waste from older waste tanks and processing the waste through the vitrification for long term stabilization. The retrieval processes prepare the tanks for ultimate closure (i.e., grouting) by removing sludge by mechanical and/or sluicing methods, dissolving salt cake by adding water, and chemical cleaning of the residual sludge with oxalic acid. Each of these retrieval methods will result in waste chemistry that does not meet the requirements of the current corrosion control program. Given the short-term exposure and limited remaining service life for the tanks in which retrievals are being performed, an assessment of the need for corrosion controls in these tanks was performed. The assessment reviewed the corrosion rates in the more aggressive environments and the postulated loads on the structure during the closure activities. The assessment concluded that the current corrosion control program may be suspended for a short period of time while final retrieval of the waste is performed. (authors)

Wiersma, Bruce J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Subramanian, Karthik H.; Martin, Keisha B. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

Installation and Operation of Sorbathene Solvent Vapor Recovery Units to Recover and Recycle Volatile Organic Compounds at Operating Sites within the Dow Chemical Company  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because of the history of fires caused by exothermic heat of adsorption and high flammability when adsorption occurs during a long cycle time'. Three SORBATHENE units utilizing activated carbon with a short cycle time to limit temperature rise have... to the potential presence of oxygen in the vapor phase and the increased reactivity of the chemicals on the catalytic surface of the adsorbent. The extent of temperature rises and pressure swings are critical parameters. The adsorption phenomena is exothermic...

Hall, T. L.; Larrinaga, L.

251

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

L:\\Projects - Active\\2003\\2003  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of fume hood and benchtop radiological work identified numerous radiological conduct of operations deficiencies for these types of activities in RPL. As a result, site...

253

SWEIS annual review - CY2002 : a comparison of CY2002 operations to projections included in the site-wide environmental impact statement for continued operation of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SNL/NM CY2002 SWEIS Annual Review discusses changes in facilities and facility operations that have occurred in selected and notable facilities since source data were collected for the SNL/NM SWEIS (DOE/EIS-0281). The following information is presented: {sm_bullet} An updated overview of SNL/NM selected and notable facilities and infrastructure capabilities. {sm_bullet} An overview of SNL/NM environment, safety, and health programs, including summaries of the purpose, operations, activities, hazards, and hazard controls at relevant facilities and risk management methods for SNL/NM. {sm_bullet} Updated base year activities data, together with related inventories, material consumption, emissions, waste, and resource consumption. {sm_bullet} Appendices summarizing activities and related hazards at SNL/NM individual special, general, and highbay laboratories, and chemical purchases.

Bayliss, Linda Sue (Outrider Environmental Planning & Technical Services, Cedar Crest, NM); White, Brenda Bailey (The Plus Group, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Guerrero, Joseph Vincent; Catechis, Christopher Spyros (Outrider Environmental Planning & Technical Services, Cedar Crest, NM)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application Supplemental Information [Sec 1 Thru 5] Vol 1 Thru 3 Appendices A Thru C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61), Subpart H: ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities,'' and with the Washington Administrative Code Chapter 246247, Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. The federal regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from Department of Energy facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1998 from Hanford Site point sources was 1.3 E-02 mrem (1.3 E-04 mSv). which is 0.13 percent of the federal standard. Chapter 246-247 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Department of Energy Hanford Site sources. The state has adopted into these regulations the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE. The EDE to the MEI attributable to diffuse and fugitive radionuclide air emissions from the Hanford Site in 1998 was 2.5 E-02 mrem (2.S E-04 mSv). This dose added to the dose from point sources gives a total for all sources of 3.8 E-02 mrem/yr (3.8 E-04 mSv) EDE. which is 0.38 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard. An unplanned release on August 26, 1998, in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site resulted in a potential dose of 4.1 E-02 mrem to a hypothetical individual at the nearest point of public access to that area. This hypothetical individual was not the MEI since the wind direction on the day of the release was away from the MEI residence. The potential dose from the unplanned event was similar in magnitude to that from routine releases during 1998. Were the release from this unplanned event combined with routine releases, the total dose would be less than 1 percent of the 10 mrem/yr standard.

CURN, B.L.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Role of the Sellafield Ltd Centres of Expertise in Engaging with the Science, Environment and Technology Supply Chain and University Sector to Support Site Operations and Decommissioning in the UK Nuclear Industry - 13018  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and maintenance of the broad range of the highly technical skills required for safe and successful management of nuclear sites is of vital importance during routine operations, decommissioning and waste treatment activities.. In order to maintain a core team of technical experts, across all of the disciplines required for these tasks, the approach which has been taken by the Sellafield Ltd has been the formation of twenty five Centres of Expertise (CoE), each covering key aspects of the technical skills required for nuclear site operations. Links with the Specialist University Departments: The CoE leads are also responsible for establishing formal links with university departments with specialist skills and facilities relevant to their CoE areas. The objective of these links is to allow these very specialist capabilities within the university sector to be more effectively utilized by the nuclear industry, which benefits both sectors. In addition to the utilization of specialist skills, the university links are providing an important introduction to the nuclear industry for students and researchers. This is designed to develop the pipeline of potential staff, who will be required in the future by both the academic and industrial sectors. (authors)

Butcher, Ed [Uranium and Reactive Metals Centre of Expertise Lead, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [Uranium and Reactive Metals Centre of Expertise Lead, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Connor, Donna [Technical Capability Manager, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [Technical Capability Manager, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Keighley, Debbie [Head of Profession, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [Head of Profession, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Kansas State University: DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program. Year 4, fourth quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kansas State University, in support of a DOE and Kansas Electric Utilities Research Program subject contract, continues to test, evaluate, demonstrate, and develop electric vehicle and infrastructure technology. K-State is operating two Soleq EVcort vehicles. During this reporting period both vehicles were brought back to full operational status after warranty service was completed by Soleq. Vehicle failures occurred due to three unrelated battery cable failures in addition to the replacement of one battery. Both vehicles are being operated on a routine basis. K-State, along with York Technical College, has established a relationship with Troy Design and Manufacturing (TDM) Redford, Michigan. K-State has ordered no less than four Ford Ranger electric trucks from TDM. K-State is involved in the steering committee that is monitoring and refining information to direct the design and testing of these new technology vehicles. TDM should become the first automotive manufacturer certified by one of the Big Three under their Quality Vehicle Manufacturer program. Kansas State University and the Kansas Electric Utility Research Program look forward to working with TDM on their new EV program.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

260

Methanol Synthesis over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3: The Active Site in Industrial Catalysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unlike homogeneous catalysts, heterogeneous catalysts that have been optimized through decades are typically so complex and hard to characterize that the nature of the catalytically active site is not known. This is one of the main stumbling blocks in developing rational catalyst design strategies in heterogeneous catalysis. We show here how to identify the crucial atomic structure motif for the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} methanol synthesis catalyst. Using a combination of experimental evidence from bulk-, surface-sensitive and imaging methods collected on real high-performance catalytic systems in combination with DFT calculations. We show that the active site consists of Cu steps peppered with Zn atoms, all stabilized by a series of well defined bulk defects and surface species that need jointly to be present for the system to work.

Behrens, Malte

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The Savannah River Site is a 803 km2 (310 square mile) industrial complex operated by the Department of Energy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and waste handling facilities were completed in only five years (1951-1956). Such a flurry of intensive or Stream Features Recorded · Flow obstructions such as active and abandoned levees, dams, and crossings · Reaches of severe entrenchment, instability, or sedimentation · Severe head cuts or erosion · Abandoned

Georgia, University of

264

Preliminary Site Characterization Report, Rulsion Site, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of environmental information gathered during a review of the documents pertaining to Project Rulison and interviews with personnel who worked on the project. Project Rulison was part of Operation Plowshare (a program designed to explore peaceful uses for nuclear devices). The project consisted of detonating a 43-kiloton nuclear device on September 10, 1969, in western Colorado to stimulate natural gas production. Following the detonation, a reentry well was drilled and several gas production tests were conducted. The reentry well was shut-in after the last gas production test and was held in standby condition until the general cleanup was undertaken in 1972. A final cleanup was conducted after the emplacement and testing wells were plugged in 1976. However, some surface radiologic contamination resulted from decontamination of the drilling equipment and fallout from the gas flaring during drilling operations. With the exception of the drilling effluent pond, all surface contamination at the Rulison Site was removed during the cleanup operations. All mudpits and other excavations were backfilled, and both upper and lower drilling pads were leveled and dressed. This report provides information regarding known or suspected areas of contamination, previous cleanup activities, analytical results, a review of the regulatory status, the site`s physical environment, and future recommendations for Project Ruhson. Based on this research, several potential areas of contamination have been identified. These include the drilling effluent pond and mudpits used during drilling operations. In addition, contamination could migrate in the gas horizon.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Site environmental report for 2004 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2004 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2004. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Site environmental report for 2006 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2006 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2006. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Site environmental report for 2005 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Site Office (SSO) oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2005 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2005. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Site environmental report for 2003 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2003 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2003. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

SI}M!1ARY REPORT ON SITE nnTESTIGATION AND REMOVAL ACTIVITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED POR: u~s~ Environmental Protection Agency Region V1:I1 Waste Management Division E·uilding.s~. ~ ~ '" .. ~ ~ '" 10 Site Utilit.ies ~ '" 10 Dx'a·in Syst.em 10 Water Sampling , 10 Soil S'a.mpling ~ '" ., 11 Drl1l1l Protection Agency - Emergency Response Branch (EPA) tasked the Ecology & Environment, Inc" f 'Tec

270

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2008). Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy Wills

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Scenarios constructed for basaltic igneous activity at Yucca Mountain and vicinity; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basaltic volcanism has been identified as a possible future event initiating a release of radionuclides from a potential repository at the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository site. The performance assessment method set forth in the Site Characterization Plan (DOE, 1988) requires that a set of scenarios encompassing all significant radionuclide release paths to the accessible environment be described. This report attempts to catalogue the details of the interactions between the features and processes produced by basaltic volcanism in the presence of the presumed groundwater flow system and a repository structure, the engineered barrier system (EBS), and waste. This catalogue is developed in the form of scenarios. We define a scenario as a well-posed problem, starting from an initiating event or process and proceeding through a logically connected and physically possible combination or sequence of features, events, and processes (FEPs) to the release of contaminants.

Barr, G.E.; Dunn, E.; Dockery, H.; Barnard, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Valentine, G.; Crowe, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Characterization of the geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils on the Savannah River Site: Field sampling activities. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are 36,000 acres of wetlands on the Savannah River Site (SRS) and an additional 5,000 acres of floodplain. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste sites at SRS have shown that some wetlands have been contaminated with pollutants resulting from SRS operations. In general, releases of contaminants to wetland areas have been indirect. These releases may have originated at disposal lagoons or waste facilities located in the vicinity of the wetland areas. Transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, soil erosion, sediment transport, and groundwater seepage into downgradient wetland areas are responsible for the indirect discharges to the wetland areas. The SRS determined that a database of background geochemical and physical properties for wetland soils on the SRS was needed to facilitate future remedial investigations, human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, and feasibility studies for the wetland areas. These data are needed for comparison to contaminant data collected from wetland soils that have been affected by contamination from SRS operations. This report describes the efforts associated with the collection of soil cores, preparation of a lithologic log for each core, and the processing and packaging of individual soil samples for shipment to analytical laboratory facilities.

Dixon, K.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Kansas State University DOE/KEURP Site Operator Program. Year 3, Third quarter report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formed on July 15, 1981, the goal of this program is to undertake applied research and development projects that may enhance reliability and minimize the cost of electric service in Kansas. The Kansas Electric Utilities Research Program (KEURP) is a contractual joint venture between six major electric utilities that serve the residents of the State of Kansas. The establishment of KEURP was made possible by the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC). The KCC allowed Kansas electric utilities to include research and development (R & D) costs in their operating expenses, including dues to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Kansas universities play a unique role in KEURP with representation on the executive, technical and advisory committees of the program. The universities receive significant direct and indirect support from KEURP through direct funded projects as well as KEURP/EPRI co-funded projects. KEURP is working with EPRI researchers on projects to develop or expand Kansans knowledge and expertise in the fields of high technology and economic development. KEURP is a major source of funding in the electric/hybrid vehicle demonstration program.

Hague, J.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

First Dark Matter Search Results from a 4-kg CF$_3$I Bubble Chamber Operated in a Deep Underground Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New data are reported from the operation of a 4.0 kg CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber in the 6800 foot deep SNOLAB underground laboratory. The effectiveness of ultrasound analysis in discriminating alpha decay background events from single nuclear recoils has been confirmed, with a lower bound of >99.3% rejection of alpha decay events. Twenty single nuclear recoil event candidates and three multiple bubble events were observed during a total exposure of 553 kg-days distributed over three different bubble nucleation thresholds. The effective exposure for single bubble recoil-like events was 437.4 kg-days. A neutron background internal to the apparatus, of known origin, is estimated to account for five single nuclear recoil events and is consistent with the observed rate of multiple bubble events. This observation provides world best direct detection constraints on WIMP-proton spin-dependent scattering for WIMP masses >20 GeV/c{sup 2} and demonstrates significant sensitivity for spin-independent interactions.

Behnke, E.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Behnke, J.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Brice, S.J.; /Fermilab; Broemmelsiek, D.; /Fermilab; Collar, J.I.; /Chicago U., EFI; Conner, A.; /Indiana U., South Bend; Cooper, P.S.; /Fermilab; Crisler, M.; /Fermilab; Dahl, C.E.; /Chicago U., EFI; Fustin, D.; /Chicago U., EFI; Grace, E.; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Completion of the Operational Closure of Tank 18F and Tank 19F at the Savannah River Site by Grouting - 13236  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste is stored in underground waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The low-level fraction of the waste is immobilized in a grout waste form, and the high level fraction is disposed of in a glass waste form. Once the waste is removed, the tanks are prepared for closure. Operational closure of the tanks consists of filling with grout for the purpose of chemically stabilizing residual material, filling the tank void space for long-term structural stability, and discouraging future intrusion. Two of the old-style single-shell tanks at the SRS have received regulatory approval confirming waste removal had been completed, and have been stabilized with grout as part of completing operational closure and removal from service. Consistent with the regulatory framework, two types of grout were used for the filling of Tanks 18F and 19F. Reducing grout was used to fill the entire volume of Tanks 18F and 19F (bulk fill grout) and a more flowable grout was used to fill equipment that was left in the tank (equipment fill grout). The reducing grout was added to the tanks using portable grout pumps filled from concrete trucks, and delivered the grout through slick lines to the center riser of each tank. Filling of the two tanks has been completed, and all equipment has been filled. The final capping of riser penetrations brings the operation closure of Tanks 18F and 19F to completion. (authors)

Tisler, Andrew J. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

278

Biological activities of binding site specific monoclonal antibodies to prolactin receptors of rabbit mammary gland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biological activity of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the rabbit mammary prolactin (PRL) receptor (M110, A82, and A917) were investigated using explants of rabbit mammary gland. The three mAbs which were all able to inhibit the binding of SVI-ovine prolactin to its receptor had different biological activities. Two mAbs (M110 and A82) were able to prevent the stimulating effect of PRL on casein synthesis when the molar ratio between the mAb and PRL was 100. One mAb (A917) was able to mimic the action of PRL on both casein and DNA ((TH)thymidine incorporation) synthesis, whereas the other two mAbs were without any stimulatory effect. For this stimulatory effect to be observed, bivalency of the antibody was essential, since monovalent fragments, which were able to inhibit PRL binding, had no agonistic activity. The ability of the mAbs to induce a down-regulation of receptors was also studied. These studies suggest that the binding domain of the receptor might be relatively complex, since only a part of this domain recognized by the antibody with PRL-like activity was able to induce hormonal action. Alternatively, only those antibodies able to microaggregate the receptors may possess PRL-like activity.

Djiane, J.; Dusanter-Fourt, I.; Katoh, M.; Kelly, P.A.

1985-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

279

Identification of items and activities important to waste form acceptance by Westinghouse GoCo sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has established specifications (Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms, or WAPS) for canistered waste forms produced at Hanford, Savannah River, and West Valley. Compliance with these specifications requires that each waste form producer identify the items and activities which must be controlled to ensure compliance. As part of quality assurance oversight activities, reviewers have tried to compare the methodologies used by the waste form producers to identify items and activities important to waste form acceptance. Due to the lack of a documented comparison of the methods used by each producer, confusion has resulted over whether the methods being used are consistent. This confusion has been exacerbated by different systems of nomenclature used by each producer, and the different stages of development of each project. The waste form producers have met three times in the last two years, most recently on June 28, 1993, to exchange information on each producer`s program. These meetings have been sponsored by the Westinghouse GoCo HLW Vitrification Committee. This document is the result of this most recent exchange. It fills the need for a documented comparison of the methodologies used to identify items and activities important to waste form acceptance. In this document, the methodology being used by each waste form producer is summarized, and the degree of consistency among the waste form producers is determined.

Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Dempster, J. [West Valley Demonstration Project, NY (United States); Randklev, E.H. [Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (United States)

1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

Antiremodeling Agents Influence Osteoblast Activity Differently in Modeling and Remodeling Sites of Canine Rib  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effects on osteo- blast activity in the canine rib and (2) this effect depends on whether modeling reduce bone loss in part through direct actions on osteoclasts. Their effects on osteoblasts and bone treatments (+108 to +175%, P effect on MAR at either the en- docortical

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996--Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty. These results, however, indicate that additional improvements are required to the conceptual model framework. An investigation was initiated at the end of this basalt inverse modeling effort to determine whether facies-based zonation would improve specific yield parameter estimation results (ACM-2). A description of the justification and methodology to develop this zonation is discussed.

Vermeul, Vincent R.; Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2001-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - active trial operation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences 4 COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE Role of the basal ganglia in switching a planned response Summary: from frontal eye fields, an area shown to be more active for antisaccade...

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - activate store-operated calcium Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synaptic Summary: by Calcium Ions; is Activated by Ras-GTP All PLC Isoforms Perform the Same Reaction... Calcium Ions Play a Role in Muscle...

284

Environmental Controls on the Activity of Aquifer Microbial Communities in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aquifer microbes in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA are periodically exposed to U(VI) concentrations that can range up to 10 ?M in small sediment fractures. Assays of 35 H-leucine incorporation indicated that both sediment-associated and planktonic microbes were metabolically active, and that organic C was growth-limiting in the sediments. Although bacteria suspended in native groundwater retained high activity when exposed to 100 ?M U(VI), they were inhibited by U(VI) < 1 ?M in synthetic groundwater that lacked added bicarbonate. Chemical speciation modeling suggested that positively-charged species and particularly (UO2)3(OH)5+ rose in concentration as more U(VI) was added to synthetic groundwater, but that carbonate complexes dominated U(VI) speciation in natural groundwater. U toxicity was relieved when increasing amounts of bicarbonate were added to synthetic groundwater containing 4.5 ?M U(VI). Pertechnetate, an oxyanion that is another contaminant of concern at the Hanford Site, was not toxic to groundwater microbes at concentrations up to 125 ?M.

Konopka, Allan; Plymale, Andrew E.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lin, Xueju; McKinley, James P.

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

DEVELOPMENT QUALIFICATION AND DISPOSAL OF AN ALTERNATIVE IMMOBILIZED LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE FORM AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstrating that a waste form produced by a given immobilization process is chemically and physically durable as well as compliant with disposal facility acceptance criteria is critical to the success of a waste treatment program, and must be pursued in conjunction with the maturation of the waste processing technology. Testing of waste forms produced using differing scales of processing units and classes of feeds (simulants versus actual waste) is the crux of the waste form qualification process. Testing is typically focused on leachability of constituents of concern (COCs), as well as chemical and physical durability of the waste form. A principal challenge regarding testing immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) forms is the absence of a standard test suite or set of mandatory parameters against which waste forms may be tested, compared, and qualified for acceptance in existing and proposed nuclear waste disposal sites at Hanford and across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. A coherent and widely applicable compliance strategy to support characterization and disposal of new waste forms is essential to enhance and accelerate the remediation of DOE tank waste. This paper provides a background summary of important entities, regulations, and considerations for nuclear waste form qualification and disposal. Against this backdrop, this paper describes a strategy for meeting and demonstrating compliance with disposal requirements emphasizing the River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site and the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) mineralized low-activity waste (LAW) product stream.

SAMS TL; EDGE JA; SWANBERG DJ; ROBBINS RA

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

286

X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

Tan, G.O.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Cultural Resource Activities at Colorado UMTRA Project Sites for October 1993 through September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The UMTRA Project is a cooperative (state and federal) program mandated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, Public Law 95-604 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.). This law requires the timely cleanup of 24 inactive uranium mill tailings sites throughout the United States. Nine of these inactive uranium mill tailings sites are in Colorado at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of agreement (PMOA) (DOE, 1984). This PMOA specifies requirements for the DOE`s fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report fulfills the requirement for the DOE to provide the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all of the UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. This report is organized by UMTRA Project site. For each site, the general remedial action activities and cultural resource activities performed during the period of record are summarized. When known, the DOE`s plans for future cultural resource activities at the site are summarized.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

[Electric and hybrid vehicle site operators program]: Thinking of the future. Second year third quarter report, January 1--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid vans and two (2) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1993 Ford EVcort station wagons. The G-Van has been signed in order for the public to be aware that this is an electric drive vehicle. Financial participants` names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. This vehicle is available for short term loan to interested utilities and companies. When other vehicles are obtained, the G-Van will be maintained on K-State`s campus.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Effects of Site Characterization Activities on the Abundance of Ravens (Corvus corax) in the Yucca Mountain Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed and is implementing the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Raven abundance was measured from August 1991 through August 1995 along treatment and control routes to evaluate whether site characterization activities resulted in increased raven abundance at Yucca Mountain. This study fulfills the requirement set forth in the incidental take provisions of the Biological Opinion that DOE monitor the abundance of ravens at Yucca Mountain. Ravens were more abundant at Yucca Mountain than in the control area, and raven abundance in both areas increased over time. However, the magnitude of differences between Yucca Mountain and control surveys did not change over time, indicating that the increase in raven abundance observed during this study was not related to site characterization activities. Increases over time on both Yucca Mountain and control routes are consistent with increases in raven abundance in the Mojave Desert reported by the annual Breeding Bird Survey of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service. Evidence from the Desert Tortoise Monitoring Program at Yucca Mountain suggests that ravens are not a significant predator of small tortoises in this locale. Carcasses of small tortoises (less than 110 mm in length) collected during the study showed little evidence of raven predation, and 59 radiomarked hatchlings that were monitored on a regular basis were not preyed upon by ravens. Overall, no direct evidence of raven predation on tortoises was observed during this study. Small tortoises are probably encountered so infrequently by ravens that they are rarely exploited as a food source. This is likely due to the relatively low abundance of both desert tortoises and ravens in the Yucca Mountain area.

P.E. Lederle

1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

290

Fernald Environmental Management Project 1995 site environmental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fernald site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. This 1995 Site Environmental Report provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

SWPF Crane Lift Operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multiple vview shot of the SWPF crane lift operation at the Savannah River Site. Funded by the Recovery Act.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen (GSKPA)

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

Planning and scheduling of concurrent high-level activities for UUV mission operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a mission planning and scheduling algorithm that enables a single Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (UUV) to concurrently perform high level activities, while managing various resources in a dynamic ocean ...

Chang, Larry, S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Optimal handling of Highly Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients during milling and blending operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates best practices for Highly Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (HAPI) milling and blending. We utilize a qualitative analysis centering on a benchmarking study and quantitative analyses using a ...

Setty, Prashant (Prashant Neelappanavara)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Mochovce final treatment center for liquid radioactive waste introduced to active trial operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Treatment Centre (FTC) for Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) have been designed for treatment and final conditioning of radioactive liquid and wet waste produced by named NPP equipped with Russian VVER-440 type of reactors. Treated wastes comprise radioactive concentrates, spent resin and sludge. VUJE Inc. as an experienced company in field of treatment of radioactive waste in Slovakia has been chosen as main contractor for technological part of FTC. During the realisation of project the future operator of Centre required the contractor to solve the treatment of wastes produced in the process of NPP A-1 decommissioning. On the basis of this requirement the project was modified in order to enable manipulations with waste products from A-1 NPP transported to Centre in steel drums. The initial project was prepared in 2003. The design and manufacture of main components were performed in 2004 and 2005. FTC civil works started in August 2004. Initial nonradioactive testing of the system parts were carried out from April to September 2006, then the tests of systems started with model concentrates and non-radioactive resins. After the processes evaluation the radioactive test performed from February 2007. A one-year trial operation of facility is planned for completion during 2007 and 2008. The company JAVYS, Inc. is responsible for radioactive waste and spent fuel treatment in the Slovak republic and will operate the FTC during trial operation and after its completion. This Company has also significant experience with operation of Jaslovske Bohunice Treatment Centre. The overall capacity of the FTC is 820 m{sup 3}/year of concentrates and 40 m{sup 3}/year of spent resin and sludge. Bituminization and cementation were provided as main technologies for treatment of these wastes. Treatment of concentrate is performed by bituminization on Thin Film Evaporator with rotating wiping blades. Spent resin and sludge are decanted, dried and mixed with bitumen in blade homogeniser. The bitumen product is discharged into 200 dm{sup 3} steel drums. Drums with bitumen product or drums originated from A-1 NPP are loaded into Fibre Reinforced Concrete containers (FRC) and grouted with cement. Cement grout is prepared from the mixture of cement, additive and radioactive over-concentrate. By formulating the cement grout with evaporator concentrates the maximum radioactivity is fixed in cement matrix and volume of final waste product is minimized. A batch mixer with rotating blades is used to produce the cement grout. The grouted FRC containers are stored in the expedition hall and after 28 days of curing are transported to final disposal. After the start of routine operation, the FTC provides treatment for all liquid and wet LLW produced from the operation of the Mochovce NPP. The final product of the FTC is a FRC loaded with bitumen product in drums and filled with radioactive cement product. This container meets all limits for final disposal in the National Radioactive Waste Repository at Mochovce. This paper introducing the main parts of FTC and describes the technological procedures including the basic technological parameters for both used technologies, their working capacity and the overall waste flow. The evaluation of experience gained in the phases of Centre construction and commissioning and partially trial operation as well is a part of this paper (Evaluation of completion works process and time schedule, the process of individual system parts testing, testing of systems using model media, radioactive testing and trial operation). (authors)

Krajc, T.; Stubna, M.; Kravarik, K.; Zatkulak, M. [VUJE Trnava, Inc. (Slovakia); Slezak, M.; Remias, V. [Javys - Jadrova a vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s. - Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, plc., Tomasikova 22, 821 02 Bratislava (Slovakia)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

In Situ XAS Studies on the Structure of the Active Site of Supported Gold Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gold clusters supported on Al2O3 and TiO2 have been exposed to different mixtures of CO and O2. Their structure has been probed in situ using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Au L3-edge. In all materials, the dominant phase during catalysis is Au0. Both samples show variations of the electronic structure of the gold clusters with changing reaction conditions as evidenced by changes in the X-ray absorption near-edge (XANES) region. These variations are caused by interaction between the gold clusters and the carbon monoxide present in the gas phase. The gold atoms remain zerovalent throughout all experiments confirming the importance of Au0 for catalytic activity.

Weiher, Norbert; Beesley, Angela M.; Tsapatsaris, Nikolaos [Molecular Materials Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, Sackville Street, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Louis, Catherine; Delannoy, Laurent [Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, UMR 7609 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 place Jussieu, 75252, Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Schroeder, Sven L. M. [Molecular Materials Centre, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, Sackville Street, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Molecular Materials Centre, School of Chemistry, Sackville Street, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

297

Droplet Activation Properties of Organic Aerosols Observed at an Urban Site during CalNex-LA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were characterized at an urban supersite in Pasadena, California from 15 May to 4 June, 2010, during the CalNex campaign. The derived hygroscopicity (?CCN) of CCN-active particles with diameter between 97 and 165 nm ranged from 0.05 to 0.4. Diurnal variation showed a slight decrease of ?CCN from 8:00 to 16:00 (from 0.24 to 0.20), which is attributed to increasing organics volume fraction resulted from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. The derived hygroscopicity distribution and maximum activated fraction of the size selected particles were examined as functions of photochemical age. The result indicates that condensation of secondary species (e.g., SOA and sulfate) quickly converted hydrophobic particles to hydrophilic ones, and during daytime, nearly every particle became a CCN at ~0.4% in just a few hours. Based on ?CCN and aerosol chemical composition, the organic hygroscopicity (?org) was derived, and ranged from 0.05 to 0.23 with an average value of 0.13, consistent with the results from earlier studies. The derived ?org generally increased with the organic oxidation level, and most of the variation in ?org could be explained by the variation of the organic O:C atomic ratio alone. The least squares fit of the data yielded ?org =(0.830.06) ? (O:C) +(-0.190.02). Compared to previous results based on CCN measurements of laboratory generated aerosols, ?org derived from measurements during the CalNex campaign exhibited stronger increase with O:C atomic ratio, and therefore substantially higher values for organics with average O:C greater than 0.5.

Mei, Fan; Hayes, Patrick L.; Ortega, Amber; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Allan, James D.; Gilman, Jessica; Kuster, W. C.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Wang, Jian

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

Site Scientific Mission Plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January--June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1994, and also looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM Functional Teams (Management Team, Experiment Support Team, Operations Team, Data Management Team, Instrument Team, and Campaign Team), and it serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the Science Team. This document includes a description of the site`s operational status and the primary envisaged site activities, together with information concerning approved and proposed Intensive Observation Periods. Amendments will be prepared and distributed whenever the content changes by more than 30% within a six-month period. The primary users of this document are the site operator, the site scientist, the Science Team through the ARM Program Science Director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program Functional Teams. This plan is a living document that will be updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

Schneider, J.M.; Lamb, P.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies; Sisterson, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Div.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

ROLE OF C AND P SITES ON THE CHEMICAL ACTIVITY OF METAL CARBIDE AND PHOSPHIDES: FROM CLUSTERS TO SINGLE-CRYSTAL SURFACES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal carbides and phosphides have shown tremendous potential as highly active catalysts. At a microscopic level, it is not well understood how these new catalysts work. Their high activity is usually attributed to ligand or/and ensemble effects. Here, we review recent studies that examine the chemical activity of metal carbide and phosphides as a function of size, from clusters to extended surfaces, and metal/carbon or metal/phosphorous ratio. These studies reveal that the C and P sites in these compounds cannot be considered as simple spectators. They moderate the reactivity of the metal centers and provide bonding sites for adsorbates.

RODRIGUEZ,J.A.; VINES, F.; LIU, P.; ILLAS, F.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)] over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the fines fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Site Environmental Report for 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site external radiation monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California's Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of hazardous materials in groundwater, stormwater, and sewage. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment. Chapter 3, ''Compliance Summary,'' reviews the site's various environmental protection activities and compliance status with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1998 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public.

Holland, R.C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Site scientific mission plan for the southern Great Plain CART site July-December 1997.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on July 1, 1997, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, Instrument Team [IT], and Campaign Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the site operator, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

Lamb, P.J.; Peppler, R.A.; Sisterson, D.L.

1997-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Planning a site investigation using analogous groups  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A limited field investigation (LFI) has been designed for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit within the 200 Areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington state using the concept of analogous groups. The LFI is part of a RCRA facility investigation (RFI) corrective measures study (CMS) being conducted in this operable unit. The concept emphasizes that characterization activities can be reduced by identifying select sites (analogous sites) for characterization that represents a group of sites (analogous groups). This concept is particularly applicable to operable units that contain several waste management units that are similar in design, disposal history, and geology. Application of this concept reduced the number of waste management units initially undergoing characterization by more than two-thirds. The work plan is presently in the approval cycle with the field characterization phase expected to begin August 1993.

Pak, P.M. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States); Galgoul, M.J.; Wittreich, C.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Data communications for a collective operation in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Algorithm selection for data communications in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including associating in the PAMI data communications algorithms and bit masks; receiving in an origin endpoint of the PAMI a collective instruction, the instruction specifying transmission of a data communications message from the origin endpoint to a target endpoint; constructing a bit mask for the received collective instruction; selecting, from among the associated algorithms and bit masks, a data communications algorithm in dependence upon the constructed bit mask; and executing the collective instruction, transmitting, according to the selected data communications algorithm from the origin endpoint to the target endpoint, the data communications message.

Faraj, Daniel A

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

306

Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites for October 1995--September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. The inactive uranium mill tailings sites in Colorado are at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of understanding (PMOU). This PMOU requires the DOE to fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report provides the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. Due to the completion of surface activities at the UMTRA Project sites, this will be the last annual report to the state of Colorado. Cultural resources activities subsequent to this report will be reported to the state through site-specific correspondence.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2013 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2013). Included are subsections that summarize the sites geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the sites environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Wills, C.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2013). Included are subsections that summarize the sites geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the sites environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Wills, Cathy A

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Nuclear Materials Contained in High-Activity Waste Arising from the Operations at the 'SHELTER' Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986, the explosion dispeesed nuclear materials contained in the nuclear fuel of the reactor core over the destroyed facilities at Unit No. 4 and over the territory immediately adjacent to the destroyed unit. The debris was buried under the Cascade Wall. Nuclear materials at the SHELTER can be characterized as spent nuclear fuel, fresh fuel assemblies (including fuel assemblies with damaged geometry and integrity, and individual fuel elements), core fragments of the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4, finely-dispersed fuel (powder/dust), uranium and plutonium compounds in water solutions, and lava-like nuclear fuel-containing masses. The new safe confinement (NSC) is a facility designed to enclose the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4 destroyed by the accident. Construction of the NSC involves excavating operations, which are continuously monitored including for the level of radiation. The findings of such monitoring at the SHELTER site will allow us to characterize the recovered radioactive waste. When a process material categorized as high activity waste (HAW) is detected the following HLW management operations should be involved: HLW collection; HLW fragmentation (if appropriate); loading HAW into the primary package KT-0.2; loading the primary package filled with HAW into the transportation cask KTZV-0.2; and storing the cask in temporary storage facilities for high-level solid waste. The CDAS system is a system of 3He tubes for neutron coincidence counting, and is designed to measure the percentage ratio of specific nuclear materials in a 200-liter drum containing nuclear material intermixed with a matrix. The CDAS consists of panels with helium counter tubes and a polyethylene moderator. The panels are configured to allow one to position a waste-containing drum and a drum manipulator. The system operates on the add a source basis using a small Cf-252 source to identify irregularities in the matrix during an assay. The platform with the source is placed under the measurement chamber. The platform with the source material is moved under the measurement chamber. The design allows one to move the platform with the source in and out, thus moving the drum. The CDAS system and radioactive waste containers have been built. For each drum filled with waste two individual measurements (passive/active) will be made. This paper briefly describes the work carried out to assess qualitatively and quantitatively the nuclear materials contained in high-level waste at the SHELTER facility. These efforts substantially increased nuclear safety and security at the facility.

Cherkas, Dmytro

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on inspection of Westinghouse Savannah River Company fees for managing and operating the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first five years of its contract with the Department of Energy, Westinghouse Savannah River Company was paid over $130 million in fees to manage and operate the Savannah River Site. Fees paid to Westinghouse steadily increased over the five year period. For example, fees paid for the last six months of this five year period were over three times as large as fees paid for the first six months. The purpose of this inspection was to review the Department`s annual negotiation of total available fees with Westinghouse, and to examine the reasons for the growth in fees over this five year period. The review disclosed that, after Fiscal Year 1989, the Department used an increasing number of fee bases in calculating Westinghouse Savannah River Company`s fixed-fee-equivalents from the maximum fee schedules within the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation. The authors found that the Department had significantly increased the percentage of the dollar value of subcontracts being placed in Westinghouse`s fee bases for fee calculation purposes. They found that the Department had effectively increased Westinghouse`s fixed-fee-equivalents by approximately $3 million in both Fiscal Year 1993 and 1994 to, in large part, fund an unallowable employee incentive compensation program. They found that Westinghouse`s total paid fees for the five year period increased significantly over what they would have been had the terms resulting from the original competitive negotiations been maintained. The authors recommended that the Deputy Assist Secretary for Procurement and Assistance Management require that changes in either the number or composition of fee bases used in calculating fees from the maximum fee schedules be submitted to the Department`s Procurement Executive for approval.

NONE

1995-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

EIS-0387: Y-12 National Security Complex Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Final Y-12 Site-wide EIS analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the reasonable alternatives for ongoing and foreseeable future operations and activities at Y-12, including alternatives for changes to site infrastructure and levels of operation (using production capacity as the key metric for comparison).

312

Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008" (PNNL-18427), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

Bisping, Lynn E.

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007" (PNNL-17603), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

Bisping, Lynn E.

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

314

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from

315

Site environmental report for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally-produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1994 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. A summary of the findings is provided below.

Brekke, D.D.; Holland, R.C.; Gordon, K.W. [ed.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Site environmental report for 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status, with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1996 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. 37 figs., 12 tabs.

Holland, R.C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar takes an in-depth look at the latest siting challenges and identify opportunities to reduce risks associated with the siting and operation of wind farms to...

318

Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part A, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 1 and 2, A summary of historical activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation with emphasis on information concerning off-site emissions of hazardous materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase I feasibility study has focused on determining the availability of information for estimating exposures of the public to chemicals and radionuclides released as a result of historical operation of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The estimation of such past exposures is frequently called dose reconstruction. The initial project tasks, Tasks 1 and 2 were designed to identify and collect information that documents the history of activities at the ORR that resulted in the release of contamination and to characterize the availability of data that could be used to estimate the magnitude of the contaminant releases or public exposures. A history of operations that are likely to have generated off-site releases has been documented as a result of Task 1 activities. The activities required to perform this task involved the extensive review of historical operation records and interviews with present and past employees as well as other knowledgeable individuals. The investigation process is documented in this report. The Task 1 investigations have led to the documentation of an overview of the activities that have taken place at each of the major complexes, including routine operations, waste management practices, special projects, and accidents and incidents. Historical activities that appear to warrant the highest priority in any further investigations were identified based on their likely association with off-site emissions of hazardous materials as indicated by the documentation reviewed or information obtained in interviews.

Bruce, G.M.; Buddenbaum, J.E.; Lamb, J.K.; Widner, T.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1993 summary pamphlet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This pamphlet summarizes the impact of 1993 Savannah River Site operations on the environment and the off-site public. It includes an overview of site operations; the basis for radiological and nonradiological monitoring; 1993 radiological releases and the resulting dose to the off-site population; and results of the 1993 nonradiological program. The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1993 describes the findings of the environmental monitoring program for 1993. The report contains detailed information about site operations,the environmental monitoring and surveillance programs, monitoring and surveillance results, environmental compliance activities, and special programs. The report is distributed to government officials, members of the US Congress, universities, government facilities, environmental and civic groups, the news media, and interested individuals.

Karapatakis, L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Audience/Panel Discussion: Sites Lesson Learned about Activity-level Work Planning and Control Using EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guideline  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Donna J. Governor, Deputy Dept Mgr for Planning & Integration, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory work planning and control lessons learned and audience/panel discussion on site's lessons learned about Activity-level Work Planning and Control using EFCOG Work Planning and Control Guideline Document.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 98-02: DOE Enforcement Activities where Off-site Transportation Issues are also Present.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recently several questions have arisen regarding the scope of Price-Anderson enforcement when transportation issues are directly or indirectly involved in an incident. These questions can be separated into two areas, (1) transportation issues that involve on-site transportation typically not regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT), and (2) transportation issues that involve off-site transportation. This guidance addresses off-site transportation that is regulated by DOT and other state and federal agencies.

322

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010, Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010. Included are subsections that summarize the sites geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the sites environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

C. Wills, ed.

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

Site environmental report for 2009 : Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2009 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2009. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2009. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2009. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Site disturbance from intensive forestry practices in East Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental Design, Treatments Harvest Site Preparation and Planting Measurement and Analysis Vegetation. Surface Cover and Condition Soil Properties Photographs Infiltration and Sediment Production. 19 19 19 19 21 22 22 22 23 24 25... operations Post-logging bulk densities and soil moisture samples Pace transect Infiltration of skid trails Aerial photographs Ground photo points photographed Site preparation activities Post-site preparation bulk densities and soil moisture samples...

Crawley, Walter Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hanford Site environmental management specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

Grygiel, M.L.

1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

Photovoltaic solar system connected to the electric power grid operating as active power generator and reactive power compensator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the case of photovoltaic (PV) systems acting as distributed generation (DG) systems, the DC energy that is produced is fed to the grid through the power-conditioning unit (inverter). The majority of contemporary inverters used in DG systems are current source inverters (CSI) operating at unity power factor. If, however, we assume that voltage source inverters (VSI) can replace CSIs, we can generate reactive power proportionally to the remaining unused capacity at any given time. According to the theory of instantaneous power, the inverter reactive power can be regulated by changing the amplitude of its output voltage. In addition, the inverter active power can be adjusted by modifying the phase angle of its output voltage. Based on such theory, both the active power supply and the reactive power compensation (RPC) can be carried out simultaneously. When the insolation is weak or the PV modules are inoperative at night, the RPC feature of a PV system can still be used to improve the inverter utilisation factor. Some MATLAB simulation results are included here to show the feasibility of the method. (author)

Albuquerque, Fabio L.; Moraes, Adelio J.; Guimaraes, Geraldo C.; Sanhueza, Sergio M.R.; Vaz, Alexandre R. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Uberlandia-MG, CEP 38400-902 (Brazil)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Site specific plan. [Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) covers the period for FY 1989 through FY 1995. The plan establishes a Department of Energy -- Headquarters (DOE-HQ) agenda for cleanup and compliance against which overall progress can be measured. The FYP covers three areas: Corrective Activities, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Operations. Corrective Activities are those activities necessary to bring active or standby facilities into compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Environmental restoration activities include the assessment and cleanup of surplus facilities and inactive waste sites. Waste management operations includes the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes which are generated as a result of ongoing operations. This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show how environmental restoration and waste management activities that were identified during the preparation of the FYP will be implemented, tracked, and reported. The SSP describes DOE Savannah River (DOE-SR) and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), organizations that are responsible, for undertaking the activities identified in this plan. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. 8 refs., 46 figs., 23 tabs.

Hutchison, J.; Jernigan, G.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

TWRS phase I privatization site environmental baseline and characterization plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a plan to characterize and develop an environmental baseline for the TWRS Phase I Privatization Site before construction begins. A site evaluation study selected the former Grout Disposal Area of the Grout Treatment Facility in the 200 East Area as the TWRS Phase I Demonstration Site. The site is generally clean and has not been used for previous activities other than the GTF. A DQO process was used to develop a Sampling and Analysis Plan that would allow comparison of site conditions during operations and after Phase I ends to the presently existing conditions and provide data for the development of a preoperational monitoring plan.

Shade, J.W.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Savannah River Operations Office and Savannah River Site, January 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), inspected environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Savannah River Site.

331

Supplement Analysis for Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Modification of Management Methods for Transuranic Waste Characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a waste management proposal for installing and operating modular units for the characterization of transuranic (TRU) waste1 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA)-54, Area G, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9 (c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an EIS when an agency makes substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns or there are circumstances or information relevant to concerns and bearing on the proposed action or its impacts. This SA is prepared in accordance with Section 10 CFR 1021.314(c) of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) regulations for NEPA implementation stating that ''When it is unclear whether or not an EIS supplement is required, DOE shall prepare a Supplement Analysis.'' This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of the waste management program evaluated in the SWEIS with those of a proposal that would change the approach of a portion of this management program. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in the previous SWEIS analysis. DOE proposes to expedite the shipment of legacy TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The Cerro Grande Fire in 2000 and events of September 11, 2001, have focused attention on the potential risk to the public and the credible security hazard posed by the amount of plutonium stored above ground at LANL and the increased necessity to safeguard our nation's nuclear waste. The safest place for defense-generated TRU waste has been determined to be DOE's permitted repository for TRU waste 2100 feet underground at WIPP. The proposed accelerated plan to dispose of TRU waste at WIPP would result in the complete disposition of LANL legacy TRU waste by 2010; this accelerated disposition would be 20 years ahead of schedule, at a savings of $500 million in life-cycle costs and result in 3,000 fewer shipments to WIPP. However, the current individual small facilities at LANL lack the buildings, equipment, and trained personnel to conduct efficient characterization activities on an increased scale. Installing new modular structures and equipment close to the drum storage location at TA-54 in housings designed for a large inventory and high throughput would support DOE's expedited shipment program by increasing the repackaging rate, and it would also decrease on-site transportation vulnerabilities.

N /A

2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

332

FRMAC Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the event of a major radiological incident, the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) will coordinate the federal agencies that have various statutory responsibilities. The FRMAC is responsible for coordinating all environmental radiological monitoring, sampling, and assessment activities for the response. This manual describes the FRMACs response activities in a radiological incident. It also outlines how FRMAC fits in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) under the National Response Framework (NRF) and describes the federal assets and subsequent operational activities which provide federal radiological monitoring and assessment of the affected areas. In the event of a potential or existing major radiological incident, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is responsible for establishing and managing the FRMAC during the initial phases.

Frandsen, K.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Experience in Remote Demolition of the Activated Biological Shielding of the Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) on the German Karlsruhe Site - 12208  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, WAK Decommissioning and Waste Management GmbH (WAK) became owner and operator of the waste treatment facilities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as well as of the prototype reactors, the Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (KNK) and Multi-Purpose Reactor (MZFR), both being in an advanced stage of dismantling. Together with the dismantling and decontamination activities of the former WAK reprocessing facility since 1990, the envisaged demolishing of the R and D reactor FR2 and a hot cell facility, all governmentally funded nuclear decommissioning projects on the Karlsruhe site are concentrated under the WAK management. The small space typical of prototype research reactors represented a challenge also during the last phase of activated dismantling, dismantling of the activated biological shield of the MZFR. Successful demolition of the biological shield required detailed planning and extensive testing in the years before. In view of the limited space and the ambient dose rate that was too high for manual work, it was required to find a tool carrier system to take up and control various demolition and dismantling tools in a remote manner. The strategy formulated in the concept of dismantling the biological shield by means of a modified electro-hydraulic demolition excavator in an adaptable working scaffolding turned out to be feasible. The following boundary conditions were essential: - Remote exchange of the dismantling and removal tools in smallest space. - Positioning of various supply facilities on the working platform. - Avoiding of interfering edges. - Optimization of mass flow (removal of the dismantled mass from the working area). - Maintenance in the surroundings of the dismantling area (in the controlled area). - Testing and qualification of the facilities and training of the staff. Both the dismantling technique chosen and the proceeding selected proved to be successful. Using various designs of universal cutters developed on the basis of wall saws, both the activated steel liner and the inner reinforcing layer were cut remotely in one process. This allowed for the efficient execution of the following remote concrete removal steps using mining techniques. The electro-hydraulic demolition excavator that was purchased and then modified turned out to be an ideal tool carrier system with rapid-exchange coupling. Due to the high availability, no major delays occurred. This also was a result of the consistently implemented maintenance and repair concept. With the excavator installed in a modifiable scaffolding suspended from a rotating carrier ring, all dismantling areas could be reached and treated in spite of the small space. Thanks to an optimum organization of work-flows, routine change of dismantling work, and maintenance or repair, the iterative radiological measurement campaigns could be integrated in the whole activity without the dismantling work being disturbed significantly. The ventilation system with pressure grading and pre-filtration units ensured a low contamination level in the dismantling area. It was also possible to manage the dust formed by the milling of concrete surfaces. As it was possible to further cut metal parts and crushed concrete later on, residue flows were optimized. The planned overall period for testing, dismantling the bio-shield and removing the equipment was 36 months. The final duration was 39 months. (authors)

Eisenmann, Beata; Fleisch, Joachim; Prechtl, Erwin; Suessdorf, Werner; Urban, Manfred [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Flammable gas/slurry growth unreviewed safety question:justification for continued operation for the tank farms at the Hanford site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) provides a basis for continued operation in 176 high level waste tanks, double contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, 244-AR Vault, 242-S and 242-T Evaporators and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUSTs) relative to flammable gas hazards. Required controls are specified.

Leach, C.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Site maps and facilities listings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Lessons Learned at the Nevada National Security Site Implementing the EFCOG Activity-level Work Planning and Control Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Slide Presentation by Steele Coddington, Work Planning Manager, National Security Technologies, Nevada National Security Site. Lessons Learned Implementing Work Planning & Control. 6 Step Process for improving WP&C.

337

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011. Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy Wills, ed.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

339

Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin (NWU); (Penn)

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Site Environmental Report for 2010 Sandia National Laboratories, California.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, manages and operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The NNSA Sandia Site Office administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This Site Environmental Report for 2010 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A (DOE 2004a). The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2010. General site and environmental program information is also included. The Site Environmental Report is divided into ten chapters. Chapter 1, the Executive Summary, highlights compliance and monitoring results obtained in 2010. Chapter 2 provides a brief introduction to SNL/CA and the existing environment found on site. Chapter 3 summarizes SNL/CA's compliance activities with the major environmental requirements applicable to site operations. Chapter 4 presents information on environmental management, performance measures, and environmental programs. Chapter 5 presents the results of monitoring and surveillance activities in 2010. Chapter 6 discusses quality assurance. Chapters 7 through 9 provide supporting information for the report and Chapter 10 is the report distribution list.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Site scientific mission plan for the southern Great Plains CART site, January--June 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. The primary purpose of this site scientific mission plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team, Operations Team, and Instrument Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the Site operator, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies; Sisterson, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Div.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nevada Test Site Environmental Summary Report 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

Cathy Wills

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nevada Test Site Summary 2006 (Volume 2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security-related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

Cathy Wills

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2007 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

Cathy Wills

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nevada National Security Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

HISTORYIn 1950, President Truman established what is now known as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) to perform nuclear weapons testing activities. In support of national defense initiatives...

346

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 98-02: DOE Enforcement Activities where Off-site Transportation Issues are also Present  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity to the Office of Enforcement and Investigation to issue clarifying guidance from time to...

347

Top Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Efficiency Opportunities at DoD/Army Sites - A Guide for O&M/Energy Managers and Practitioners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, sponsored the Army's Energy Engineering Analysis Program, provides the Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Energy manager and practitioner with useful information about the top O&M opportunities consistently found across the DoD/Army sector. The target is to help the DoD/Army sector develop a well-structured and organized O&M program.

Sullivan, Gregory P.; Dean, Jesse D.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

348

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Site (SRS) conducts effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance to ensure the safety of the public and the well-being of the environment. DOE Order 5400,1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` requires the submission of an environmental report that documents the impact of facility operations on the environment and on public health. SRS has had an extensive environmental surveillance program in place since 1951 (before site startup). At that time, data generated by the on-site surveillance program were reported in site documents. Beginning in 1959, data from off-site environmental monitoring activities were presented in reports issued for public dissemination. Separate reporting of SRS`s on- and off-site environmental monitoring activities continued until 1985, when data from both surveillance programs were merged into a single public document. The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1993 is an overview of effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance activities conducted on and in the vicinity of SRS from January 1 through December 31, 1993. For complete program descriptions, consult the ``SRS Environmental Monitoring Plan`` (WSRC-3Ql-2-1000). It documents the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, the frequency of monitoring and analysis, the specific analytical and sampling procedures, and the quality assurance requirements.

Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

1996 Site environmental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FEMP is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the FEMP in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the FEMP. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1996 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the FEMP progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Proposed Horizontal Expansion of the Restricted Airspace up to 5,000 feet at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of modifying the horizontal restricted airspace boundaries at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to include LANL's Technical Areas (TA)-33 and TA-54, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9(c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an EIS when an agency makes substantial changes in the Proposed Action that are relevant to Environmental concerns or when there are new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the Proposed Action or its impacts. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of this proposal to the SWEIS impact analysis, and considers LANL operational accident analyses. The Sa concludes with a finding of fact regarding whether the environmental effects of the Proposed Action are adequately bounded by the analyses of impacts projected by the 1999 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, or whether a Supplemental EIS is required.

N /A

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Feasibility Study: Feasibility Study for Remedial Action for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri. DOE/OR/21548-595.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATION REPORTFairfield, Ohio, Site.

352

Sampling Plan: Sampling Plan for the Feasibility Study for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri. DOE/OR/21548-699.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28Sacandaga Site CertificationSalmon,

353

Effects of a potential drop of a shipping cask, a waste container, and a bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the effects of potential drops of a typical shipping cask, waste container, and bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations at the prospective Yucca Mountain Repository. The waste-handling process (one stage, no consolidation configuration) is examined to estimate the maximum loads imposed on typical casks and containers as they are handled by various pieces of equipment during waste-handling operations. Maximum potential drop heights for casks and containers are also evaluated for different operations. A nonlinear finite-element model is employed to represent a hybrid spent fuel container subject to drop heights of up to 30 ft onto a reinforced concrete floor. The impact stress, strain, and deformation are calculated, and compared to the failure criteria to estimate the limiting (maximum permissible) drop height for the waste container. A typical Westinghouse 17 {times} 17 PWR fuel assembly is analyzed by a simplified model to estimate the energy absorption by various parts of the fuel assembly during a 30 ft drop, and to determine the amount of kinetic energy in a fuel pin at impact. A nonlinear finite-element analysis of an individual fuel pin is also performed to estimate the amount of fuel pellet fracture due to impact. This work was completed on May 1990.

Wu, C.L.; Lee, J.; Lu, D.L.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Site environmental report - CY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental compliance activities are described for the NPR-3 site from January 1997 through December 1997. Hazardous waste storage activities and storage tank testing are included.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Infrared studies of CO and CO/sub 2/ adsorption on Pt/CeO/sub 2/: the characterization of active sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The active sites of a ceria-supported platinum catalysts have been identified by the adsorption/desorption behavior of gases. On the fresh catalyst CO adsorption occurred on both cationic Pt and fully reduced metal. Two CO bands associated with adsorption on reduced Pt have been assigned to open- and close-packed sites. Both CO and CO/sub 2/ dissociation have been observed. Residual C(a) resulting from the dissociation of CO is removed following oxidation by the support at elevated temperature. The decrease in CO absorption which follows a 973 K reduction is reversed by a reoxidation and rereduction at 673 K. Sintering and encapsulation have not been supported by XPS and XRD and an electronic SMSI is proposed.

Daniel, D.W.

1988-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

EA-0881: Tank 241-c-103 Organic Vapor and Liquid Characterization and Supporting Activities, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to sample the vapor space and liquid waste and perform other supporting activities in Tank 241-C-103 located in the 241-C Tank Farm on the...

357

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

Radiological Control Managers' Council

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

359

Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

2013 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978.1 These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements. DOE operates 18 UMTRCA Title I sites under a general license granted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 40.27 (10 CFR 40.27). As required under the general license, a long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for each site was prepared by DOE and accepted by NRC. The Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site, one of the 19 Title I sites, will not be included under the general license until the open, operating portion of the cell is closed. The open portion will be closed either when it is filled or in 2023. This site is inspected in accordance with an interim LTSP. Long-term surveillance and maintenance services for these disposal sites include inspecting and maintaining the sites; monitoring environmental media and institutional controls; conducting any necessary corrective actions; and performing administrative, records, stakeholder relations, and other regulatory stewardship functions. Annual site inspections and monitoring are conducted in accordance with site-specific LTSPs and procedures established by DOE to comply with license requirements. Each site inspection is performed to verify the integrity of visible features at the site; to identify changes or new conditions that may affect the long-term performance of the site; and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, follow-up or contingency inspections, or corrective action in accordance with the LTSP. LTSPs and site compliance reports are available on the Internet at http://www.lm.doe.gov/.

none,

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Tyrosine hydroxylase is activated and phosphorylated at different sites in rat pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells treated with phorbol ester and forskolin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of phorbol ester (4..beta..-phorbol, 12..beta..-myristate, 13..cap alpha..-acetate; TPA), an activator of Ca/sup + +//phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PK-C), and forskolin, which stimulates adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), on the activation and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells were examined. Incubation of the cells with TPA (0.01-1 ..mu..M) or forskolin (0.01-0.1 ..mu..M) produces increases in activation and phosphorylation of TH in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of TPA are dependent on extracellular Ca/sup + +/ and are inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with trifluoperazine (TFP). The effects of forskolin are independent of Ca/sup + +/ and are not inhibited by TFP. In cells treated with forskolin, the time course of the increase in cAMP correlates with the increases in TH activity and phosphorylation. cAMP levels do not increase in cells treated with TPA. There is an increase in the phosphorylation of only one tryptic phosphopeptide derived from TH in cells treated with either forskolin or TPA. The peptide phosphorylated in TPA-treated cells exhibits different elution characteristics on HPLC from that in forskolin-treated cells. The authors conclude that TH in PC 12 cells is phosphorylated on different sites by cAMP-PK and PK-C. Phosphorylation of either of these sites is associated with enzyme activation.

Tachikawa, E.; Tank, A.W.; Weiner, D.H.; Mosimann, W.F.; Yanagihara, N.; Weiner, N.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

EIS-0426: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site...

363

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Site, Operable Unit 4, Jasper County, MO, July 29, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has prepared this decision document to present the selected remedial action for ground water at the Oronogo/Duenweg Mining Belt Site located in Jasper County, Missouri. This selected remedy deals with providing safe drinking water supplies to residents currently consuming ground water contaminated with metals. The major components of selected remedy are: Support to Public Water Supply District No. 3 in the Oronogo/Duenweg Designated Area (DA); Extension of existing public water lines in the Oronogo/Duenweg DA; Extension of existing public water lines in the Irons Gates Extension DA; Installation of point-of-use treatment units to homes not accessible to public water; A maintenance program for the point-of-use treatment units; A monitoring program for threatened homes and the point-of-use treatment units; and Institutional controls to regulate future uses of the contaminated shallow aquifer.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Operational, aesthetic, and construction process performance for innovative passive and active solar building components for residential buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A system-based framework creates the ability to integrate operational, aesthetic, and construction process performance. The framework can be used to evaluate innovations within residential construction. By reducing the ...

Settlemyre, Kevin (Kevin Franklin), 1971-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Compilation of data to estimate groundwater migration potential for constituents in active liquid discharges at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary characterization of the constituents present in the 33 liquid waste streams at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site has been completed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. In addition, Westinghouse Hanford has summarized the soil characteristics based on drill logs collected at each site that receives these liquid wastes. Literature searches were conducted and available Hanford-specific data were tabulated and reviewed. General literature on organic chemicals present in the liquid waste streams was also reviewed. Using all of this information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a best estimate of the transport characteristics (water solubility and soil adsorption properties) for those radionuclides and inorganic and organic chemicals identified in the various waste streams. We assume that the potential for transport is qualified through the four geochemical parameters: solubility, distribution coefficient, persistence (radiogenic or biochemical half-life), and volatility. Summary tables of these parameters are presented for more than 50 inorganic and radioactive species and more than 50 organic compounds identified in the liquid waste streams. Brief descriptions of the chemical characteristics of Hanford sediments, solubility, and adsorption processes, and of how geochemical parameters are used to estimate migration in groundwater-sediment environments are also presented. Groundwater monitoring data are tabulated for wells neighboring the facilities that receive the liquid wastes. 91 refs., 16 figs., 23 tabs.

Ames, L.L.; Serne, R.J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

M & O Contract Recompete Site -- Home Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

web site for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Pantex Plant, and Savannah River Tritium Operations Management and Operating (M&O) Contract Competition. The purpose of this...

367

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

368

Reaction Pathways and Site Requirements for the Activation and Chemical Conversion of Methane on Ru-Based Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-reactant activation steps. These conclusions suggest that water-gas shift reactions are also equilibrated at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 ReceiVed: June 24, 2003; In Final Form: September 29, 2003 Kinetic mechanistic picture and a unifying kinetic treatment for CH4/CO2 and CH4/H2O reforming reactions and CH4

Iglesia, Enrique

369

Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Co-operativity among defect sites in AnO2+ and An4O9 (An = U, Np or Pu)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Actinide dioxides derived from the AnO{sub 2} fluorite lattice are of high technological relevance due to their application in nuclear reactor fuels. Oxidation of AnO{sub 2} compounds emerges as a central theme in fuel fabrication, reactor operation, long-term storage forms for both spent fuels and surplus weapons materials, and environmental actinide migration. In this paper, we use density functional theory calculations to study the oxidation of uranium, neptunium and plutonium dioxides, AnO{sub 2} (An = U, Np or Pu), in O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O environments. We pay particular attention to the formation of oxygen clusters (co-operativity) in AnO{sub 2+x} and how this phenomenon govern oxidation thermodynamics and the development of ordered An{sub 4}O{sub 9} compounds. The so-called split di-interstitial, which is composed of two nearest neighbor octahedral oxygen interstitials that are distorted in such a way that they dislocate one regular fluorite lattice oxygen ion to form a cluster of triangular geometry, is predicted to be the fundamental building block of the most stable cluster configurations. We also identify how the formation of oxygen defect clusters and the degree of oxidation in AnO{sub 2+x} are both governed by the characer of the An-5f to excess O-2p charger transfer, i.e. the charge transfer to the O-2p orbitals of the interstitial-like (+x) ions, and the ability of the excess O-2p orbitals to hybridize with regular fluorite lattice ions.

Andersson, Anders David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lezama Pacheco, Juan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Structure of the 2-Aminopurine-Cytosine Base Pair Formed in the Polymerase Active Site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA Polymerase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adenine base analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) is a potent base substitution mutagen in prokaryotes because of its enhanceed ability to form a mutagenic base pair with an incoming dCTP. Despite more than 50 years of research, the structure of the 2AP-C base pair remains unclear. We report the structure of the 2AP-dCTP base pair formed within the polymerase active site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA polymerase. A modified wobble 2AP-C base pair was detected with one H-bond between N1 of 2AP and a proton from the C4 amino group of cytosine and an apparent bifurcated H-bond between a proton on the 2-amino group of 2-aminopurine and the ring N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine. Interestingly, a primer-terminal region rich in AT base pairs, compared to GC base pairs, facilitated dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. We propose that the increased flexibility of the nucleotide binding pocket formed in the Y567A-DNA polymerase and increased 'breathing' at the primer-terminal junction of A+T-rich DNA facilitate dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. Thus, interactions between DNA polymerase residues with a dynamic primer-terminal junction play a role in determining base selectivity within the polymerase active site of RB69 DNA polymerase.

Reha-Krantz, Linda J.; Hariharan, Chithra; Subuddhi, Usharani; Xia, Shuangluo; Zhao, Chao; Beckman, Jeff; Christian, Thomas; Konigsberg, William (Yale); (Alberta)

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, California Chapter 3 Site Environmental Report for 2008 Berkeley Lab continued operating

Lackner, Regina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Cell, Vol. 98, 475485, August 20, 1999, Copyright 1999 by Cell Press Activation of Store-Operated Ca2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Operated Ca2 Current in Xenopus Oocytes Requires SNAP-25 but Not a Diffusible Messenger and Blatter, 1997 (1996) showed that the GTP S inhibition of Ca2 influx into oocytes could be prevented by staurosporine reinterpreted as direct inhibition of the Ca2 influxLa Jolla, California 92093-0647 channels (Gregory

Tsien, Roger Y.

374

Optogenetic Mimicry of the Transient Activation of Dopamine Neurons by Natural Reward Is Sufficient for Operant Reinforcement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activation of dopamine receptors in forebrain regions, for minutes or longer, is known to be sufficient for positive reinforcement of stimuli and actions. However, the firing rate of dopamine neurons is increased for only ...

Kim, Kyung Man

375

Sulfur K-Edge XAS and DFT Calculations on NitrileHydratase: Geometric and Electronic Structure of the Non-heme Iron Active Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geometric and electronic structure of the active site of the non-heme iron enzyme nitrile hydratase (NHase) is studied using sulfur K-edge XAS and DFT calculations. Using thiolate (RS{sup -})-, sulfenate (RSO{sup -})-, and sulfinate (RSO{sub 2}{sup -})-ligated model complexes to provide benchmark spectral parameters, the results show that the S K-edge XAS is sensitive to the oxidation state of S-containing ligands and that the spectrum of the RSO- species changes upon protonation as the S-O bond is elongated (by {approx}0.1 {angstrom}). These signature features are used to identify the three cysteine residues coordinated to the low-spin Fe{sup III} in the active site of NHase as CysS{sup -}, CysSOH, and CysSO{sub 2}{sup -} both in the NO-bound inactive form and in the photolyzed active form. These results are correlated to geometry-optimized DFT calculations. The pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum is sensitive to the Z{sub eff} of the Fe and reveals that the Fe in [FeNO]{sup 6} NHase species has a Z{sub eff} very similar to that of its photolyzed Fe{sup III} counterpart. DFT calculations reveal that this results from the strong {pi} back-bonding into the {pi}* antibonding orbital of NO, which shifts significant charge from the formally t{sub 2}{sup 6} low-spin metal to the coordinated NO.

Dey, Abhishek; Chow, Marina; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Taniguchi, Kayoko; /Wako, RIKEN; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Davin, Steven; /Washington U., Seattle; Maeda, Mizuo; /SLAC,; Kovacs, Julie A.; /Washington U., Seattle; Odaka, Masafumi; /Wako, RIKEN; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

Site Feeds - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System OutagesNewsMaterialsX-rayOur‹Simulation,Site

377

Site Screening, Site Selection,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smartversatileplatform chemical.OfficeScreening, Site

378

Hanford Site Raptor Nest Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.

Nugent, John J.; Lindsey, Cole T.; Wilde, Justin W.

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hanford Site Anuran Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) conducts ecological monitoring on the Hanford Site to collect and track data needed to ensure compliance with an array of environmental laws, regulations, and policies governing DOE activities. Ecological monitoring data provide baseline information about the plants, animals, and habitat under DOE-RL stewardship at Hanford required for decision-making under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The Hanford Site Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP, DOE/EIS-0222-F) which is the Environmental Impact Statement for Hanford Site activities, helps ensure that DOE-RL, its contractors, and other entities conducting activities on the Hanford Site are in compliance with NEPA.

Wilde, Justin W.; Johnson, Scott J.; Lindsey, Cole T.

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to meet three of the primary objectives of the Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental monitoring program. These objectives are to assess actual or potential exposures to populations form the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from normal operations or nonroutine occurrences; to demonstrate compliance with applicable authorized limits and legal requirements; and to communicate results of the monitoring program to the public. This 1989 report contains descriptions of radiological and nonradiological monitoring programs, it provides data obtained from these programs, and it describes various environmental research activities ongoing at the site. Also included are summaries of environmental management and compliance activities, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act activities, and a listing of environmental permits issued by regulatory agencies.

Cummins, C.L.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Request  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

L. Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

Lee Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

Liquid and gaseous waste operations section. Annual operating report CY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents information on the liquid and gaseous wastes operations section for calendar year 1997. Operating activities, upgrade activities, and maintenance activities are described.

Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Office of Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Facility Waste Handling Systems Hazard Analysis Activities Observations - December 2014  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLC OrderEfficiencyOceanOctober XX,/2012noteOperational(EA)

386

Programmatic agreement among the USDOE/RL Operations Office, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the WA State Historic Preservation Office for the maintenance, deactivation, alteration and demolition of the built environment on the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Programmatic Agreement (PA) addresses the built environment (i.e., buildings and structures) constructed during the Manhattan Project and Cold War Era periods of Hanford`s operational history. As such it encompasses the years 1943 through 1990. The identification, evaluation, and treatment of buildings and historic archeological remains on the Hanford Site predating 1943 will be accomplished through Sections 800.4 through 800.6 of the Council`s regulations. This PA will be in effect from the date of signature until September 30, 2000. Completion of the Sitewide Treatment Plan established under this PA satisfies all Section 106 requirements for identification, evaluation, and treatment necessary for all undertakings, up to and including demolition which may affect Manhattan Project and Cold War Era properties. This PA may be extended if the Sitewide Treatment Plan has not been completed by the end of FY 2000. Identification, evaluation, and treatment of properties constructed on the Hanford Site after 1990 will be handled pursuant to the regulations in effect at the time such properties are eligible for review.

Lloyd, D.W.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

1228 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID, VOL. 5, NO. 3, MAY 2014 Optimal Operation of Active Distribution Grids: A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Wholesale market price. Price of power exchange between DISCO and MG. Retail energy price by the DISCO contracts. Real power demand of load . , Active and reactive power provided by distributed energy resource. Retail energy price by the MG. Vector of response and target variables. , Minimum and maximum value

Fu, Yong

388

Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase in complex with the feedback inhibitor CoA reveals only one active-site conformation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine to form dephosphocoenzyme A (dPCoA). To complement recent biochemical and structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) and to provide further insight into the feedback regulation of MtPPAT by CoA, the X-ray crystal structure of the MtPPAT enzyme in complex with CoA was determined to 2.11 {angstrom} resolution. Unlike previous X-ray crystal structures of PPAT-CoA complexes from other bacteria, which showed two distinct CoA conformations bound to the active site, only one conformation of CoA is observed in the MtPPAT-CoA complex.

Wubben, T.; Mesecar, A.D. (Purdue); (UIC)

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

389

Annual Site Environmental Report, 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during 2004 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2004, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2004. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2004, in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with its established permit conditions: 2004 was the seventh consecutive year the air quality management program operated without receiving any notices of violation (NOVs) from regulators. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible for overseeing hazardous materials and waste management at SLAC. The CUPA made no facility inspections of SLAC during 2004. (3) Stormwater and Industrial Wastewater--SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions: 2004 was the eighth consecutive year the program operated without receiving any NOVs from program regulators. During 2004 the last 32 unauthorized discharge connections to the stormwater system were eliminated. (4) Hazardous Materials Program--Although SLAC has been successful in meeting the regulatory requirements for managing hazardous materials, it has decided to pursue a more active strategy in reducing its use of such materials. The cornerstone of this effort is the implementation of a chemical management system (CMS). (5) Environmental Radiological Program--In 2004, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. As detailed in Chapter 5, SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. (6) Groundwater Protection and Environmental Restoration--In general, environmental concerns at SLAC are limited in number, small in scale and are actively being managed or eliminated. The Environmental Restoration Program continued work on site characterization and evaluation of remedial alternatives at four sites with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater and several areas with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lead in soil.

Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order institutes a DOE wide program for the management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and facilitate the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Cancels DOE O 210.2.

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

391

Managing contaminated sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book summarizes the generic principles of contaminated site management. The book walks the reader through contaminated site identification, risk assessment and the evaluation of remediation alternatives. The book is divided into two major sections, problem diagnosis and development of site restoration. In problem diagnosis, the general principles of site investigation are discussed, including the objectives and differences between tier 1,2, and 3 investigations. The principles of data collection and analysis are presented. A small quantitative discussion of statistical analysis is presented but in keeping with the objectives of the text is not sufficient comprehensive or detailed to provide much of a guide for the practitioner. Chapters on contaminant fate and transport processes and risk assessment help the reader understand the role of these issues in site investigation and remedial planning. A chapter is also included on elements of a site characterization activity, which summarizes some of the key considerations in conducting a site investigation.

Asante-Duah, D.K.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Annual Site Environmental Report: 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during 2003 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the DOE for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management to meet the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2003, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were utilized by SLAC to implement such ''greening of the government'' initiatives like Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. There were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations during 2003. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2003 in waste minimization, recycling, decreasing air emission rates, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a system to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details discussed are: (1) Air Quality--SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the sixth consecutive year the air quality management program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. Nevertheless, SLAC has an active program to improve its environmental performance in air quality. (2) Hazardous Waste--The Environmental Health Division of the San Mateo County Health Services Agency is the California certified unified permitting agency (CUPA) responsible for overseeing hazardous materials and waste management at SLAC. The CUPA made facility enforcement inspections of SLAC in August and September of 2003. These inspections covered SLAC's hazardous materials and waste management, business plan, California Accidental Release Prevention Program (CalARP), and tiered permitting/permit-by-rule programs. No notices of violation were issued as a result of either inspection. (3) Stormwater and Industrial Wastewater--SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions; 2003 was the seventh consecutive year the program operated without any NOVs issued by regulators. SLAC actively pursues projects to reduce flow to the wastewater system, and through a variety of measures, has managed to keep its facility-wide wastewater discharge constant during a period in which many new connections were made to the system. SLAC continues to make the transition to a new facility-wide sanitary sewer flow-monitoring scheme, and made substantial progress towards completing the project during 2003. SLAC discharges stormwater with the potential to come into contact with industrial activities. SLAC has an extensive monitoring program in place at the eight discharge locations where the greatest potential for contact exists. During the 2002-2003 wet season, SLAC met all the requirements of its monitoring plan, with the exception of consistent sample collection within the first hour of discharge. For the eleventh consecutive year, the surface water program operated in 2003 without receiving any NOVs from program regulators. After expenditures of more than $1 million, SLAC was nearly complete with its Unauthorized Stormwater Connection Project at year-end; only 32 connections (less than 10 percent of the original total) remained to be replumed. SLAC actively pursued several other BMP-related performance improvements during the year. (4) Hazardous Materials Program--Although SLAC has been successful in meeting regulatory requirements for managing hazardous materials, it has decided to pursue a more activ

Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Disposal Process for High Activity Sources by a University through the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Off-Site Source Recovery Project - 12076  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sealed radioactive sources are used in a wide variety of applications by a large number of license holders in the Unites States. Applications range from low-activity calibration sources to high-activity irradiators for engineering, research, or medical purposes. This paper describes and evaluates the safety and security measures in place for disused sealed sources, in particular of high activity sealed sources at the end of their operational life-time. The technical, radiation protection, and financial challenges for licensees and the Competent Authorities are reviewed from the point of view of the license holder. As an example, the waste management processes and the chain of custody for disused research irradiator sources are followed from extraction from the irradiator facility to the source disposal or recycling contractor. Possible safety and security concern in the waste disposal process are investigated in order to identify improvement potential for radiation protection or source security. Two shipments of disused sealed sources from Colorado State University (CSU) have been conducted through the CSU Radiation Control Office (RCO) in the last two years, with a third shipment expected to be completed by the end of November 2011. Two of the sources shipped are considered 'high' activity and exceed the U.S. NRC limits requiring increased controls for security purposes. Three sources were shipped in 2009 and ten more are expected in 2011. A total activity of 117.3 GBq was shipped in 2009. Nine sources were recently shipped in October 2011 through a third party waste broker where the total activity was 96.34 GBq. The last source is scheduled for shipment no later than 30 November 2011 and contains an activity of 399.96 GBq. Radiation waste disposal of high activity sources in large shields with unknown manufacturers, serial numbers, or model numbers is an arduous process requiring multiple contacts with various state and federal agencies. DOE's OSRP has made it possible for CSU to dispose of older unused sources in an economically viable way. Disposal of multiple sources all at once was not an option prior to the establishment of the SCATR program. While CSU was able to dispose of sealed sources when funds were available, the cost to the University would have been prohibitive for this type of mass removal and disposal of radiation sources initiated within this initiative. Where we estimate a cost of about $130 k to ship these sources otherwise, CSU's contribution of $21 k realized a significant savings in what would have been an impossible disposal cost. Removing unused radiation sources from CSU has realized a cost savings while removing a potential security threat. (authors)

Abraham, James P. [Colorado State University Radiation Control Office, Department of Environmental Health Services, Fort Collins, CO. 80523-6021 (United States); Brandl, Alexander [Colorado State University, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Fort Collins CO. 80523-1618 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Annual Site Environmental Report: 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during the calendar year (CY) of 2006 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. Activities that span the calendar year; i.e., stormwater monitoring covering the winter season of 2006/2007 (October 2006 through May 2007), are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. SLAC continued to follow the path to self-declare an environmental management system under DOE Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program' and effectively applied environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety and environmental management system goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that Worker safety and health are protected; The environment is protected; and Compliance is ensured. Throughout 2006, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems. These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing 'greening of the government' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. The SLAC Office of Assurance was created during 2006 in response to DOE Order 226.1. During 2006, there were no reportable releases to the environment from SLAC operations, and there were no Notice of Violations issued to SLAC from any of the regulatory agencies that oversee SLAC. In addition, many improvements in waste minimization, recycling, stormwater drain system, groundwater restoration, and SLAC's chemical management system (CMS) were continued during 2006 to better manage chemical use. Program-specific details are discussed below. SLAC operates its air quality management program in compliance with its established permit conditions. The Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) did not conduct a facility inspection of SLAC during 2006, though it did visit the site on four different occasions. The BAAQMD did compliment SLAC for the overall configuration of SLAC's gasoline dispensing facility and of SLAC's asbestos/demolition notification program during two of the visits. DOE awarded SLAC the 2006 Best in Class for Pollution Prevention and Environmental Stewardship Accomplishment in recognition of SLAC's CMS program which manages the procurement and use of chemicals. As an example of the efficiency of the CMS, SLAC reviewed its use of gases and associated tanks and phased out numerous gas tanks that were no longer needed or were not acceptable for long-term storage, in turn, reducing SLAC's on-site chemical inventory. As part of SLAC's waste minimization and management efforts, more than one thousand tons of municipal solid waste was recycled by SLAC during 2006. SLAC operates its industrial and sanitary wastewater management program in compliance with established permit conditions. During 2006, SLAC obtained a new facility-wide wastewater discharge permit which replaced four separate permits that were previously issued to SLAC. In 2006, no radiological incidents occurred that increased radiation levels or released radioactivity to the environment. In addition to managing its radioactive wastes safely and responsibly, SLAC worked to reduce the amount of waste generated. SLAC has implemented programs and systems to ensure compliance with all radiological requirements related to the environment. The Environmental Restoration Program continued work on site characterization and evaluation of remedial alternatives at four sites with volatile organic compounds in groundwater and several areas with polychlorinated biphenyls and low concentrations of lead in soil. SLAC is regulated under a site cleanup requirements order (board or

Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

395

Site Environmental Report for 2011, Volumes 1& 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Site Environmental Report for 2011 summarizes Berkeley Labs environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year (CY) 2011. Throughout this report, Berkeley Lab or LBNL refers both to (1) the multiprogram scientific facility the UC manages and operates on the 202-acre university-owned site located in the hills above the UC Berkeley campus, and the site itself, and (2) the UC as managing and operating contractor for Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that include an overview of LBNL, a discussion of its Environmental Management System (EMS), the status of environmental programs, summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities, and quality assurance (QA) measures. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

Baskin, David; Bauters, Tim; Borglin, Ned; Fox, Robert; Horst, Blair; Jelinski, John; Lackner, Ginny; Philliber, Jeff; Rothermich, Nancy; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Xu, Suying

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

396

Annual Site Environmental Report: 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about environmental programs during 2002 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Seasonal activities that span calendar years are also included. Production of an annual site environmental report (ASER) is a requirement established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for all management and operating (M&O) contractors throughout the DOE complex. SLAC is a federally-funded, research and development center with Stanford University as the M&O contractor. The most noteworthy information in this report is summarized in this section. This summary demonstrates the effective application of SLAC environmental management in meeting the site's integrated safety management system (ISMS) goals. For normal daily activities, all SLAC managers and supervisors are responsible for ensuring that proper procedures are followed so that worker safety and health are protected; the environment is protected; and compliance is ensured. Throughout 2002, SLAC focused on these activities through the SLAC management systems (described in Chapter 3). These systems were also the way SLAC approached implementing ''greening of the government'' initiatives such as Executive Order 13148. The management systems at SLAC are effective, supporting compliance with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements. SLAC did not receive any notices of violation during 2002. In addition, many improvements were continued during 2002, in decreasing air emission rates, the storm drain system, groundwater restoration, and planning for a chemical management system to manage chemical use better.

Nuckolls, H.; /SLAC

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

397

Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- To ensure effective implementation and control of operation activities. * Conduct of Operations - To ensure efficient, safe, and reliable process operations. *...

398

Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Sandia National Laboratories: Test Site Operations & Maintenance...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generator Modeling Radar Friendly Blades Special Programs Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014...

400

Off-site Intensive Operational Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) forOdds2 ARM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Guide to good practices for shift routines and operating practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, ``Shift Routines and Operating Practices,`` Chapter 2 of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing shift routines and operating practices. ``Shift Routines and Operating Practices`` is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a high standard of professional conduct and sound operating practices to promote safe and efficient operations. Recently, guidance pertaining to this element has been strengthened for nuclear power reactors. This additional guidance is given in Appendix C for information purposes. Though this guidance and good practices pertain to nuclear power reactors, DOE sites may choose to use a graded approach for implementing these in nuclear facilities.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

TRACKING SITE  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site. https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack

403

Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

Kilmer, J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Chicago Operations Office: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) activities funded through the Chicago Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US Industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. The information has been assembled from recently produced OTD documents which highlight technology development activities within each of the OTD program elements. OTD technologies addresses three specific problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention. These problems are not unique to DOE, but are associated with other Federal agency and industry sites as well. Thus, technical solutions developed within OTD programs will benefit DOE, and should have direct applications in outside markets.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environment, Safety & Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

HANFORD SITE WELDING PROGRAM SUCCESSFULLY PROVIDING A SINGLE SITE FUNCTION FOR USE BY MULTIPLE CONTRACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Richland Operations (DOE-RL) recently restructured its Hanford work scope, awarding two new contracts over the past several months for a total of three contracts to manage the sites cleanup efforts. DOE-RL met with key contractor personnel prior to and during contract transition to ensure site welding activities had appropriate oversight and maintained code compliance. The transition also provided an opportunity to establish a single site-wide function that would provide welding and materials engineering services to the Hanford site contractors: CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC); Mission Support Alliance (MSA); Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS); and Washington Closure Hanford (WCH). Over the years, multiple and separate welding programs (amongst the several contractors) existed at the Hanford site leading to inefficiencies resulting from duplication of administrative efforts, maintenance of welding procedures, welder performance certifications, etc. The new, single program eliminates these inefficiencies. The new program, co-managed by two of the sites' new contractors, the CHPRC ('owner' of the program and responsible for construction welding services) and the MSA (provides maintenance welding services), provides more than just the traditional construction and maintenance welding services. Also provided, are welding engineering, specialty welding development/qualification for the closure of radioactive materials containers and materials evaluation/failure analysis. The following describes the new Hanford site welding program.

CANNELL GR

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

407

Theoretic Insight into CO2 Reduction at Active Sites of Molybdenum and Tungsten Enzymes: a {\\pi} Interaction between CO2 and Tungsten Bis-Dithiolene Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active sites of molybdenum and tungsten enzymes, particularly mononuclear tungsten formate dehydrogenase (FDH) have been theoretically investigated towards their interaction with CO2. Obvious {\\pi} interaction has been found between the 2e reduced metallodithiole moiety and the molecular CO2. This weak {\\pi} bonding is predicated both at gas phase, noted as -6.0 kcal/mol and aqueous solvation level, -3.6 kcal/mol. Such interaction is not only limited to CO2, but also to the CO2 reduced product, i.e. formate, in the form of anion- {\\pi} interaction, noted as -6.8 kcal/mol and -4.1 kcal/mol respectively in gas and aqueous solvation model. The Bailar twisted angles from 60o to 0o, governing structure preference of tungsten dithiolene from octahedron to triangle prism in their restricted structures, has been explored to evaluate such {\\pi} in-terrelations with CO2 and formate. An octahedral structure with 3 kcal/mol energy lower is preferred over the triangle prismatic when such interactions are concerned.

Yan, Yong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Financial services FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.10.4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the signed Financial Service fiscal year 1995 Site Support Program Plan, Work Breakdown Structure 6.10.4, for the Hanford site. This plan is intended to enable the contractor to accomplish the following: ensure financial integrity in all Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) operation while supporting the programmatic activities of WHC, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, and other Hanford contractors; provide efficient and effective financial services, and value added audits and review that enable management to enhance future operational results.

Vodney, E.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

IBRD Operational Decision Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IBRD Operational Decision Framework in this document is an expansion of an emerging general risk management framework under development by an interagency working group. It provides the level of detail necessary to develop a general Consequence Management Guidance Document for biological contamination remediation and restoration. It is the intent of this document to support both wide area and individual site remediation and restoration activities. This product was initiated as a portion of the IBRD Task 1 Systems Analysis to aid in identification of wide area remediation and restoration shortcomings and gaps. The draft interagency general risk management framework was used as the basis for the analysis. The initial Task 1 analysis document expanded the draft interagency framework to a higher level of resolution, building on both the logic structure and the accompanying text explanations. It was then employed in a qualitative manner to identify responsible agencies, data requirements, tool requirements, and current capabilities for each decision and task. This resulted in identifying shortcomings and gaps needing resolution. Several meetings of a joint LLNL/SNL working group reviewed and approved the initial content of this analysis. At the conclusion of Task 1, work continued on the expanded framework to generate this Operational Decision Framework which is consistent with the existing interagency general risk management framework. A large LLNL task group met repeatedly over a three-month period to develop the expanded framework, coordinate the framework with the biological remediation checklist, and synchronize the logic with the Consequence Management Plan table of contents. The expanded framework was briefed at a large table top exercise reviewing the interagency risk management framework. This exercise had representation from major US metropolitan areas as well as national agencies. This product received positive comments from the participants. Upon completion of the Operational Decision Framework, another joint LLNL/SNL working group conducted a day-long review. Identified modifications were made to the document, resulting in the included product.

Greenwalt, R; Hibbard, W; Raber, E; Carlsen, T; Folks, K; MacQueen, D; Mancieri, S; Bunt, T; Richards, J; Hirabayashi-Dethier, J

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hanford Site environmental surveillance data report for calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site collects data that provides a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford operations. Data are also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water and sediment. In addition, Hanford Site wildlife samples were also collected for metals analysis. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory publishes an annual environmental report for the Hanford Site each calendar year. The Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1996 describes the site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, and environmental monitoring activities and results. The report includes a summary of offsite and onsite environmental monitoring data collected during 1996 by PNNL`s Environmental Monitoring Program. Appendix A of that report contains data summaries created from river monitoring and sediment data. This volume contains the actual raw data used to create the summaries. The data volume also includes Hanford Site drinking water radiological data.

Bisping, L.E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011 Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). NNSA/NSO prepares the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report (NNSSER) to provide the public an understanding of the environmental monitoring and compliance activities that are conducted on the NNSS to protect the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. The NNSSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NNSS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. This summary provides an abbreviated and more readable version of the NNSSER. It does not contain detailed descriptions or presentations of monitoring designs, data collection methods, data tables, the NNSS environment, or all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The NNSS is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national security-related missions and high-risk operations. The NNSS is located about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The approximately 1,360-square-mile site is one of the largest restricted access areas in the United States. It is surrounded by federal installations with strictly controlled access, as well as by lands that are open to public entry.

Cathy Wills, ed

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

412

Post-Closure Inspection, Sampling, and Maintenance Report for the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the annual inspection, sampling, measurement, and maintenance activities performed at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site in calendar year 2010. The draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Salmon Site, Lamar County Mississippi (DOE 2007) specifies the submittal of an annual report of site activities with the results of sample analyses. The Salmon, MS, Site is a federally owned site located in Lamar County, MS, approximately 12 miles west of Purvis, MS, and about 21 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, MS (Figure 1). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a successor agency to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), is responsible for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the 1,470-acre site. DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the operating agent for the surface and subsurface real estate.

None

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

Wayne Moe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Overview of Science and Technology Improvements at Office of Legacy Management Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) supports science and technology (S and T) initiatives to more effectively manage LM sites, help protect human health and the environment, and reduce long-term costs of site maintenance and remediation by ensuring that sound engineering and scientific principles are used. Through the use of telemetry, LM's SOARS (System Operation and Analysis of Remote Sites) project provides project scientists and engineers with timely information needed to evaluate, maintain, and optimize remediation systems, while limiting the amount of required travel. This paper presents three recent S and T activities focused on enhancing remediation of ground water at LM sites. (authors)

Morrison, S.; Bartlett, T.; Boylan, J.; Carpenter, C.; Miller, D. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado (United States); Kothari, V. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, West Virginia (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

anciens sites miniers: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

detailed procedures for site assessment, remedial system design, and optimization of the remedial action operation (RAO) for the petroleum-hydrocarbons contaminated sites. In...

417

ancien site minier: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

detailed procedures for site assessment, remedial system design, and optimization of the remedial action operation (RAO) for the petroleum-hydrocarbons contaminated sites. In...

418

EIS-0426: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

6: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada National Security Site and...

419

UNIT NAME C-611 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

79 UNIT NAME C-611 PCB Spill Site REGULATORY STATUS CERCLA LOCATION C-611 Transformer area (Map location 79) APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS FUNCTION Spill Site OPERATIONAL STATUS NA DATES...

420

In Situ Studies of the Active Sites for the Water Gas Shift Reaction over Cu-CeO2 Catalysts: Complex Interaction Between Metallic Copper and Oxygen Vacancies of Ceria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New information about the active sites for the water gas shift (WGS) reaction over Cu-CeO{sub 2} systems was obtained using in-situ, time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TR-XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS, Cu K and Ce L3 edges), and infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Cu-CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by a novel reversed microemulsion method (doped Ce1-xCuxO2 sample) and an impregnation method (impregnated CuO{sub x}/CeO{sub 2} sample) were studied. The results from all of the samples indicate that both metallic copper and oxygen vacancies in ceria were involved in the generation of active sites for the WGS reaction. Evidence was found for a synergistic Cu-O vacancy interaction. This interaction enhances the chemical activity of Cu, and the presence of Cu facilitates the formation of O vacancies in ceria under reaction conditions. Water dissociation occurred on the O vacancy sites or the Cu-O vacancy interface. No significant amounts of formate were formed on the catalysts during the WGS reaction. The presence of strongly bound carbonates is an important factor for the deactivation of the catalysts at high temperatures. This work identifies for the first time the active sites for the WGS reaction on Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts and illustrates the importance of in situ structural studies for heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

Wang,X.; Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J.; Gamarra, D.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "activities site operators" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Site decommissioning management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities